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A networked learning perspective on teacher professional development

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Eapril Keynote Maarten De Laat 2009

Eapril Keynote Maarten De Laat 2009

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  • Learning is a social network connection whether it is through working together, being a member of a community, by networking
  • Learning is a social network connection whether it is through working together, being a member of a community, by networking
  • Learning is a social network connection whether it is through working together, being a member of a community, by networking
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6a_KF7TYKVc
  • Spanning structural boundaries, establish broad networks across existing hierarchy and work them directly, making opportunistic use of meetings. Making transitions , use transitions as opportunities to learn new skills, look for alternatives/ role models, tend to dive in and enter quickly, stay focussed on needs being served, facilitate major change through lots of communication, set new expectations, and build trust. Communication skills , engage in building shared meaning, focus on the need of others and anticipate questions, the real communication tends to go on outside meetings, Problem solving, look at the whole situation (out of boundary or lateral thinking) or the big picture, and coaching others. Power relationships, treat bosses as coaches or mentors, as supporters or as people who could add value to an idea. Play leaderships roles without authority
  • Obama aproach Friends 8 messages Groups – facilitating online learning conversations Share video, ppt, pictures, twitter feeds Hot seats forums – regular focused discussion with a online keynote or a member of this site.

A networked learning perspective on teacher professional development A networked learning perspective on teacher professional development Presentation Transcript

  • A networked learning perspective on teacher professional development Maarten de Laat [email_address] Keynote presentation EAPRIL, 18-20 November, Trier, Germany
  •  
    • Learning is a social network relation
    • (Haythornthwaite, 2008)
    • Learning is a social network relation
    • Learning is social interaction
    exchange community working together feedback questioning reflection transfer networking sharing experiences
  • What is social networking?
  • Network characteristics
    • Have a shared purpose and focus
    • Match between demand and supply
    • Are interactive and adapt to changes (internal and external sources)
    • Are self-governing and have their own rules and goals
    • Come and go
    • A culture of trust, openness and safety are essential
    • Productive networks are small
    • Electronic tools can support them but they are based on social interactions
  • Network competencies
    • Spanning structural boundaries
    • Making transitions
    • Communication skills
    • Problem solving
    • Power relationships
    • (Walton, 1999)
  • How can social networking support learning?
    • Networked learning is about something!
    • A central theme or object that connects
    • networked relationships
    • Social networking can bring people together
    • Identify shared interests
    • Developing learning friendships
    • Share experiences and build new knowledge
  • http://www.networkedlearningconference.org.uk/ hotseats social networking site
  • What is networked learning?
  • What is networked learning?
    • Early definition of networked learning
      • The use of ICT to promote collaborative or cooperative connections between learners, their tutors and learning resources (Steeple and Jones, 2002)
  • What is networked learning ? Around the task Technical affordances of NL On the task
  • What is networked learning?
    • Social aspects of NL
    • How do people engage in NL activity?
    • What constitutes a learning connection?
    • What is the quality of NL?
    • What are NL competencies?
    • Explore issues around
      • Multi-membership, multi-identiy
      • ‘ Coping’ with multiple perspectives
    • The use of ‘ ICT ’ to promote collaborative or cooperative connections between learners, their tutors and learning resources
    What is networked learning?
    • The use of ‘ social relationships ’ to promote collaborative or cooperative connections between learners, their tutors and learning resources
  • What is networked learning?
    • Networked learning views learning as a social network connection aimed at creating and maintaining a ‘web’ of social relationships for sharing, building and renegotiating knowledge together.
    Quote from a learning friend in the networked learning site: “ Let me emphasize the word networked, which translation to Spanish and Italian represent the kernel of intercultural dialogue: to see reality from several points of view, to ‘build reality’ ”
  • What is networked learning
    • Underpinning assumptions
    • Networked learning is based on the idea that people have a lot of experiences and knowledge and that professionalization is a process of peer learning connected with daily practice around shared work related problems (Leenheer, 2003)
    • Networks facilitate individual collaboration and leave it to the individuals to determine the content and form of knowledge sharing (Walton, 1999).
      • In such a network, power is distributed; everyone owns their own situation; those who can make continuous adaptations to discontinuous change survive and flourish.
      • People create through their network new shared meaning; they legitimise new ways of behaving; they provide systemic (as opposed to programmatic) solutions; and they provide a framework in which focused improvement efforts can be launched.
  • Why networked learning?
    • Networked learning has a broad focus
      • Crosses into many sectors: education, workplace, society, life long learning (as opposite to CSCL, CSCW)
      • Ranges from individual – collective learning
        • Egotistical to communal learning
      • Combines informal and formal learning
      • Combines social and technical aspects of learning
  • ego-network whole-network
  • Why networked learning?
    • Networked learning has a broad focus
      • Crosses into many sectors: education, workplace, societal, life long learning (as opposite to CSCL, CSCW)
      • Ranges from individual – collective learning
        • Egotistical to communal learning
      • Applies to informal and formal learning
      • Combines social and technical aspects of learning
  • Literature on teacher networks for professional development
  • Literature on teacher networks for professional development
    • Networks provide a social infrastructure
    • Teacher networks provides a social structure and context to support professional development (Stijnen, 2003).
    • Networks promote collaborations among members. They provide authentic examples of professional community built around shared work, shared interest, and shared struggle (Lieberman & Wood, 2002a).
    • Professionalization is most successful when embedded in communities and networks where experienced teachers, researchers and novice teachers work closely together (Ponte et al., 2002).
  • Literature on teacher networks for professional development
    • Networks provide a social infrastructure (cont.)
    • Networks to ‘prevent’ teacher drop-out
      • Online teacher networks to support beginning teachers during workplace learning (Poelmans, 2005; Smits, Dang, Dewinkele & Dhert, 2005; Fulton, Burns & Goldenberg, 2005; Pittinsky, 2005)
        • Recognition based on shared questions and work challenges
        • Reflect on daily practice
        • Develop mutual relationships
    • Teachers learn a lot more from what they tell each other than what they are told by an expert (Dang 2005):
      • Important to reflect on (shared) practical knowedge and expereinced work related problems
      • Refltion through dialogue with colleagues
  • Literature on teacher networks for professional development
    • Networks facilitate sharing and developing knowledge
    • Teacher networks provide numerous opportunities to recognize, articulate and share their own tacit knowledge with each other. (Lieberman & Wood, 2002a).
      • Exchange of ideas bind them together as professionals
    • Networks help ‘like-minded’ teachers with solving work-related problems through sharing experiences, discuss each other questions and provide feedback (Vandeberghe, 2001).
  • Literature on teacher networks for professional development
    • Networks help in realising change
    • When working outside of the traditional framework / comfort zone it is valuable to connect with others going through a similar transition (Dresner & Starvel, 2004).
    • Teacher networks are powerful when it comes to learn and implement school innovations (Lieberman & Wood, 2002b).
    • Link professionalization with experiences of daily practice – focus networks on real change of this daily practice (Tytler, 2007).
  • Literature on teacher networks for professional development
    • Networks assert influence
    • Networks have the ability to organise activities first, they develop support structures, recognise and est innovations before policy (Lieberman & Wood, 2002a)
    • Networks are characterised by shared / distributed leadership, which is a powerful lever for spreading the work of networks Earl & Katz, 2006)
    • Networks of teachers have the ability to influence and develop school policy (Stijnen, 2003)
  • Two inspiring examples
    • Teacher in the Woods : a collaboration between science teachers and ecological researchers
    • Network project on professional development on real world ecological research (Dresner & Worley, 2006)
    • Science learning & innovating science teaching
    • Short term effects:
      • Engaging teachers in real world field science research is an effective way of learning
      • Collegiality among teachers and scientists developed during the project enhances science learning
      • Collegiality among teachers provides opportunities to discuss pedagogy-related issues
    • Long term effects:
      • Collegiality provided confidence to implement innovation in the classroom
      • Networks continued to exist (voluntary) after the project
        • peer support, implementation and exchange materials
      • Networks spread to other science teachers
  • Two inspiring examples
    • National Writing Project : a programme aimed at developing professional development networks Lieberman & Wood (2002a).
    • 2 founding principles:
    • -Deep understanding arises from practice
    • -Teachers are the best teachers for other teachers
      • Summer school aimed at becoming a member of the network
        • Creating forums for teachers to teach best practices
        • Providing opportunities for teachers to write and read stories in response groups
      • Several roles
        • Become colleagues when giving teaching demonstrations and feedback
        • Learners ; by listening to presentations and receiving feedback
        • Researchers through engagement in joint research and professional discussion
        • Households as they rotate community facilitating jobs
      • Outcome
        • Strong sense of membership and shared leadership
        • Familiarity with the goals and shared ownership
        • Commitment to developing a shared learning agenda
        • Outgoing – trying to grow the network in their own local region.
  • Researching teacher networks
  • Researching teacher networks
    • Focus on practice-based research
      • Research in and with practice
    • Use a design team
      • Interpret findings and develop interventions
    • Interventions should be meaningful for professional development in daily practice as well as data collection
  • Two perspectives ego-network whole-network
  • Researching teacher networks
    • (De Laat, 2006)
  • Researching teacher networks
    • General questions
    • How they build connections?
      • Latent, weak, strong network ties
    • Understand how they utilize these connections
      • Successful NL activities, competencies, roles
    • Understand what they ‘produce’
      • What constitutes a learning tie?
      • What value do they create?
      • How does this benefit professional development?
    • See how they develop over time and what they can be supported
      • Facilitation, organisation backing
  • Research programme Ruud de moor Centrum
    • School-based projects on professional development: a networked learning approach
      • Aimed at teachers / groups of teachers
      • Building, supporting and evaluating teacher networks
      • Developing instruments and tools
    Social Technical Organisational
  • Research programme Ruud de moor Centrum
    • 3 Distinct phases
    • 1 Feasibility – network scan,
    • 2 Facilitation – network mirror & the brain
    • 3 Evaluation – barometer, (pre post test) evaluation studies
    • Overview of the instruments:
    • presentations on findings with teachers networks
      • Hindering/success factors
      • How to facilitate networks
      • Using the Network Mirror
      • Evaluating networked learning communities
  • 1 Feasibility – Network scan
  • 2 Facilitation – Network mirror 1 Visualise (informal) networks: - Who is talking to whom? 2 Feedback and an online generative dialogue with the entire population. - What are they talking about? - Why are they talking in such a way? 3 Interventions for facilitating and securing networked learning within organizations (Based on Homan, 2007)
  • 2 Facilitation – Network mirror
    • Step 1 Detecting social networks on a particular topic
    Each color is a cluster of schools in a particular region Each cluster consists of school spread over different locations with that region
  • 2 Facilitation – Network mirror
    • Step 2 online
    • generative dialogue and
    • group thinking
    • Some illustrative outcomes:
    • it’s important to start sharing practice / experiences
    • Desire to share products, methods, and lesson materials
    • Preference to focus on collaboration on the regional clusters first
  • 2 Facilitation – Network mirror
    • Step 3 Matching step 1 & 2.
    Design interventions with design team
  • 2 Facilitation – The brain Knowledge market of supply and demand ‘ Ebay’ for teachers
  • 3 Evaluation
    • Barometer
    (Smith & Coenders, 2002) Design team Design team Evaluation
  • … concluding remarks
    • Networked learning: You can’t get it by definition, you have to experience it
    • - Workshop - instruments
    • - Hotseats @ Networked learning Conference
      • 7 dec Charalambos Vrasidas
      • 18 jan Grainne Conole
      • 15 feb Gavriel Salomon & Rupert Wegerif
      • + Etienne Wenger & Yrjo Engestrom
    • - Cloudworks.ac.uk