The Art and Science of Dentistry - San Francisco 2013

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The Art and Science of Dentistry - San Francisco 2013

  1. 1. Moscone South San Francisco Thursday – Saturday August 15–17, 2013 The Art and Science of Dentistry Preliminary Program
  2. 2. Bundling is Optimum. Protecting dentists. It’s all we do. ® 800.733.0633 | tdicsolutions.com | CA Insurance Lic. #0652783 Discounts apply to individual policies and are not cumulative. To obtain the Professional Liability premium five (5) percent, two-year discount, California dentists must complete the current TDIC Risk Management seminar. Call 800.733.0634 for current deadlines and seminar details. Good Better Optimum 10% discount on Professional Liability when combined with Workers’ Compensation 10% discount on both Professional Liability + Office Property when combined Or, when you bundle three: 20% discount on Professional Liability 10% discount on Office Property 5% discount on Workers’ Compensation Bonus: Additional 5% discount on Professional Liability when you take the current TDIC Risk Management seminar.
  3. 3. Table of Contents Special Programs and Events Headlining Speakers.........................................................................................................2 CDA Party at the New Exploratorium...............................................................................3 Exhibit Hall and CDA Presents App.................................................................................4 Parents’ Page................................................................................................................5 The Spot Schedule.............................................................................................................8 Continuing Education and Registration Registration Information.....................................................................................................6 Registration Fees...............................................................................................................7 C.E. Information................................................................................................................9 Reserved Seating............................................................................................................10 Ticketed Event Summary...................................................................................................63 Registration Form............................................................................................................64 Workshops, Lectures and Programs Required Courses............................................................................................................11 Speaker Biographies................................................................................................. 12–19 Thursday Courses...................................................................................................... 20–32 Friday Courses.......................................................................................................... 33–46 Saturday Courses...................................................................................................... 47–62 Hotels Hotel Information............................................................................................................65 Hotel Reservation Form....................................................................................................66 Hotel Rates and Map.......................................................................................................67 Hotel Descriptions...........................................................................................................68 Meeting Highlights Register online by June 13, Pages 6, 7 Save time and money • Join in the fun at the Exploratorium, Page 3 • Download the CDA Presents app, Page 4 • Reserved seating options, Page 10 • Quickly earn quality C.E. with the Express Lecture Series, Page 24 • International Symposia of Dental Learning Pages 30 and 59 1
  4. 4. 2 Headlining Speakers Programs for Dentists Jeff J. Brucia, DDS Esthetic Dentistry Thursday lecture, Page 25 Friday workshop, Page 33 L. Stephen Buchanan, DDS, FICD, FACD Endodontics Friday workshop, Page 34 Saturday lecture, Page 52 Terrence E. Donovan, DDS Operative Dentistry Saturday lectures, Page 53 Robert A. Lowe, DDS, FACD, FASDA, FASD, ABAD Restorative Dentistry Friday lectures, Page 42 Saturday lectures, Page 56 K. William Mopper, DDS, MS Esthetic Dentistry Thursday lecture, Page 27 Friday workshops, Page 36 Speakers who don’t just inform, they inspire. The opportunity to learn from the most successful names in dentistry is just one of the many highlights of CDA Presents. We search the world to bring you speakers who will help you excel in every aspect of dentistry. International Restorative Symposia Takashi Watanabe, DDS Restorative Dentistry Thursday lectures, Page 30 Kiyokazu Minami, DDS Restorative Dentistry Saturday lectures, Page 59 Programs for Office Staff Nancy L. Andrews, RDH, BS Ergonomics Friday lecture, Page 37 Instrument Sharpening Friday workshop, Page 33 Teresa Duncan, MS Front Office Track Friday lectures, Page 39 Saturday morning lecture, Page 53 Kim Miller, RDH, BSDH Dental Hygiene Friday lectures, Page 43 Medical/Dental Connection Saturday morning lecture, Page 58
  5. 5. Party where art and science collide. Explore the new CDA’s Party in the Exploratorium Friday, August 16th, 7-10 p.m. Event # 050 $65 – Open to all registration types Purchase tickets at cdapresents.com Expl ratorium Image courtesy of ZUM, zumllc.com The beautiful new Exploratorium on the San Francisco Bay, a fun and creative space to explore and play, serves as the setting for this year’s CDA Party. Join us for mouth-watering delicacies, fascinating exhibits and live music. Image by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium
  6. 6. 4 Exhibit Hall Explore 80,000 square feet of dental innovation With numerous new product launches and nearly 400 exhibiting companies filling the vibrant exhibit hall, CDA Presents is one of the most anticipated dental tradeshows in the U.S. It’s the place to discover the latest innovations in dentistry. Grand Opening Thursday, 9:30 a.m. Exhibit Hall Hours Thursday, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday, 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Family Hours Daily: 9:30 a.m.–noon Search courses by day, topic or speaker. Find exhibitors by name and product categories and locate them directly on the exhibit hall map. Link straight to the C.E. website and avoid lines at the C.E. pavilion. Plus, download course handouts, take notes and more. Available for download approximately one month before the show from the App Store for iPhones or the Google Play Store for Android users. Visit cdapresents.com for updates. This app makes the show a snap. 4
  7. 7. 5 Parents’ Page Children at CDA Presents Children are allowed on the exhibit floor from 9:30 a.m. to noon each day. But don’t worry, we have options for every age the entire day through. Children are not permitted in educational courses. Child Care The licensed and bonded child care professionals at KiddieCorp will entertain your little ones with fun, fantastic and age-appropriate activities. 6 months – 6 years For infants, please provide diapers, changing supplies, milk, formula, baby food, etc. Label all items including lunches. Nutritious snacks and beverages are provided; meals can be supplied by parents or purchased at the children’s program registration area. Cost: Full day: $40 Half day: $20 (7 a.m.–1 p.m. or 1–6 p.m.) 7–12 years A fun program especially designed for older kids with activities, games and movies. Cost: Full day: $30 Half day: $15 (7 a.m.–1 p.m. or 1–6 p.m.) KiddieCorp registration and cancellation Register online at kiddiecorp.com/cdafallkids.htm • Advance registration deadline is July 5, 2013. • Cancellations must be received within four weeks of the start date for refunds • Late arrivals, 15 minutes after your reserved time, will forfeit reservations and refunds Questions? Contact KiddieCorp at 858.455.1718 or info@kiddiecorp.com. Exhibit floor visitation Children age 10 and younger may be on the exhibit floor during family hours, 9:30 a.m. to noon daily. No cost, just stop by registration for a sticker. Children age 11 and older may be on the exhibit floor at any time with the purchase of a $25 guest badge. No Strollers on the Exhibit Floor Strollers are not allowed on the exhibit floor at any time, but a stroller check is available for $2.
  8. 8. 6 Registration Information Register online today: cdapresents.com Here is some information you will be asked for when registering: • Name • Address • Phone number • Registration type • License number (if applicable) • Emergency contact person • Ticketed courses/events to purchase • Password • Email address (used for username and instant confirmation) For your convenience, you can choose to pick up your materials on site at eBadge Exchange. This flexible option gives the ability to make changes to your registration from your personal online dashboard at any time until July 12. Otherwise, register by June 13 to have materials mailed to you prior to the meeting. Remember, CDA dues must be current for 2013 to complete your registration as a member. Please note: Registrations are not accepted over the phone. On-site registration/bag and lanyard pickup Moscone South Convention Center Thursday 6:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Friday 6:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Saturday 6:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. What is the cost for CDA dentists? Zero. As a benefit of membership, the $890 registration fee is waived for CDA dentists. Staff and guests Dentists may register staff and guests, but not other dentists. All dentists, including nonmembers must register as dentists. Staff and guest fees are on the following page. If you register an employee who is no longer attending, you can exchange their badge on site for a new one at no charge. One-time $75 California nonmember rate* Nonmembers can save $815 with the $75 one-time meeting registration fee.* If you were a CDA member in 2011 or 2012, you are not eligible for the one-time nonmember $75 registration fee for 2013. Materials cannot be mailed in advance, but can be picked up at the designated area in registration. *Any nonmember who has taken advantage of this offer in the past is not eligible. The rate is for one-time use only. Registration deadlines June 13, 2013: To have materials mailed prior to the show. Mailed registration forms will not be accepted if postmarked after June 13. Forms received after this date will be returned. June 14 – Aug. 17, 2013: Online registration remains open and materials will be available at the eBadge Exchange booth at the Moscone South Convention Center. CDA mails registration materials at least two weeks prior to the meeting. If you do not receive materials within this time frame, call CDA at 800.232.7645. Cancellations and/or course changes can be made from your online registration dashboard or requested in writing until July 12, 2013. After this date, refunds will not be given. If badges and/or tickets have already been mailed, the appropriate materials must be returned with your refund request and postmarked by July 12 in order to be processed. Mail refund requests to: CDA Presents 1201 K Street, 16th Floor Sacramento, CA 95814
  9. 9. 7 Registration Fees Dentist registration categories Registration Type Pre-Reg. Fee On-Site Fee CDA member dentist (2013 dues must be current) Free Free ADA lifetime member Free Free Out-of-state ADA member dentist $200 $225 International dentist $200 $225 Active military dentist (VA, federal, state dentist) $75 $100 CA nonmember dentist (one-time rate) $75 $75 CA nonmember dentist $800 $890 Inactive dental license $250 $275 Dental student/CDA member Free Free Dental student/graduate non-CDA member $25 $50 Guest of dentist (includes ADHP nonmember) $5 $25 Please note: Dentists may register staff and guests, age 11 or older, but not other dentists. Dentists may not register under any category except dentist, and nonmembers must be identified. Saturday exhibits-only pass Nonmember dentists who want to explore the exhibit hall can register on site for a one-day pass on Saturday, Aug. 17. The cost is $175 and is for Saturday exhibit hall hours only. It is not valid for continuing education courses. To register, please visit the membership counter during on-site registration hours on Saturday, Aug. 17. Then experience all that the CDA Presents exhibit hall has to offer. Other registration categories Registration Type Pre-Reg. Fee On-Site Fee Non-exhibiting dental dealer, manufacturer, consultant $150 $175 Non-dental professional (MD, DVM, RN, etc.) $150 $175 Allied Dental Health Professional categories (ADHP) ADHP includes RDA, RDH, RDA(EF), RDH(EF), RDHAP, DA, business administrative staff (AS) and dental laboratory technician (LT). Registration Type Pre-Reg. Fee On-Site Fee ADHP CDA member* (2013 dues must be current) Free Free ADHP Non-CDA member registering with a dentist $5 $25 ADHP Non-CDA member registering without a dentist $20 $25 Guest of ADHP $20 $25 *An ADHP member is a dental professional who is not a dentist but has an independent, paid 2013 membership with CDA.
  10. 10. 8 The Spot Thursday 10–11 a.m. Office Policies and Procedures — Do You Have Them? (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Robyn Thomason 11 a.m.–noon Handling Refund Requests From Insurance Plans (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Patti Cheesebrough Noon–1 p.m. Dealing With Patients Who Won’t Pay Their Bill? (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Katie Fornelli 1–2 p.m. Employment Law: How to Stay Compliant in 2013 and Strategies for Social Media (non-eligible) Ali Oromchian, Esq. 2–3 p.m. Characteristics of Ethical Dental Professionals (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Brooke Kozak 3–4 p.m. Health Reform: What Small Businesses Need to Know (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Vincent J. Catalano, MB Friday 10–11 a.m. Paycheck Protection: How Disability Insurance Keeps Your Paycheck and Retirement Secure — presented by TDIC (non-eligible) Patrick Nelle 11 a.m.–noon Addressing Negative Online Reviews (C.E: non-eligible) Yasica Corum Noon–1 p.m. Managing Patient Conflicts (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Lori Alvi 1–2 p.m. CBCT in Private Practice: A Case-based Review (C.E.: Core – 1.0) John A. Khademi, DDS 4–5:30 p.m. Wine Seminar (Ticket Required) The Spot Educational Theater Schedule It’s the spot for free Wi-Fi access as well as a charging station. It’s the spot for C.E. and the Smart Dentist Series of free one-hour lectures. And, it’s a spot to relax and catch your breath after a hectic day on the exhibit hall floor. It’s The Spot, where something’s happening every day. Saturday 10–11 a.m. Office Policies and Procedures/Do You Have Them? (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Robyn Thomason 11 a.m.–noon. Handling Refund Requests From Insurance Plans (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Patti Cheesebrough Noon–1 p.m. Patient Records — Access and Rules (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Teresa Pichay 1–2 p.m. HPV and the Mouth – Is There a Relation- ship? (C.E.: Core – 1.0) Jacqueline Plemons, DDS, MS Reference On-Site Show Guide for updated program information. Wine FUNdamentals seminar Every Marriage Has Its Secrets — Learn The Secrets To Food and Wine Pairing! Join Sommelier Roxanne Langer and Chef Toussaint Potter as they demonstrate how to taste wine like a professional, prepare food like a culinary pro and pair the two for an amazing gastronomic delight! Taste through five wines while learning about the key flavors and nuances in each, discover the techniques for perfect food preparation with a live demonstration and then enjoy the art of the perfect pairing as you experience the flavors by sampling them together! Date/Time: Friday, Aug. 16, 4–5:30 p.m. Location: The Spot Fee: $30 Event #: 051
  11. 11. 99 Please remember • Courses must be attended in full and are verified by scan- in and scan-out times. Unverified attendance will not be eligible for credit. • All courses have limited seating and some do fill up and sell out quickly. • Videotaping, photography and audio recording with personal equipment are not allowed. • Some courses do not provide C.E. units. Please check each course description for C.E. details. • Speakers and products are not endorsed, officially or otherwise, by CDA, except CDA Endorsed Programs. • Course handouts are available for download two weeks prior to the show at cdapresents.com or via the CDA Presents app, downloadable at the App Store for iPhones or the Google Play Store for Android users. Note: Not all courses have handouts. • Some workshops have required prerequisites and/or supplies. If a course has requirements, they will be highlighted in an orange bar above the course description. Types of courses Lectures Free, nonticketed courses are available on a first-come, first- served basis. Preregistration is not required, but early arrival is recommended. Workshops These ticketed courses are available for purchase during preregistration or on site if space is still available. Express Lectures These free, nonticketed lectures feature up-and-coming speakers new to CDA Presents. Corporate Forums Corporate-sponsored courses that may or may not be ticketed. Helpful tips to receive your C.E. License numbers matter — Include the license numbers and formal names of all licensed attendees when you register. Plan ahead — Arrive at least 15 minutes early to all courses and plan an alternative in the event your preferred course is full. Late arrivals will not receive C.E. credit. Please take traffic into consideration. Scan in and out of each course — Arrival and departure times are used to issue C.E. credits. Scan upon entry and exit and remain in the course the entire time. Partial credit will not be granted and credit will not be given for overlapping course times or incomplete course attendance. Write down course codes — During a course, the host will provide attendees with a three-digit code, an additional way to assist in verifying your attendance. Write it down and keep it safe until you’ve received your official C.E. certificate post show. Verify your C.E. units — Visit the on-site C.E. Pavilion after attending your courses or verify them at cdapresents. com or via the CDA Presents app up to five days after the meeting. Print certificates online – C.E. certificates will be available approximately three weeks after the meeting. Licensed attendees will receive an email notification with a link to C.E. certificates. They can also be accessed via cdapresents.com or mailed upon request by calling CDA at 800.232.7645 three weeks post show. C.E. regulations To help you comply with the Dental Board of California regulations for C.E., CDA identifies each course as “Core,” “20%” or “non-eligible.” Core — Courses that directly enhance the licensee’s knowledge, skill and competence in the provision of service to patients or the community. Core courses must comprise at least 80 percent of the credits in a renewal cycle. 20% — Courses considered to be of direct benefit to the licensee or outside the scope of dental practice in California. These courses must comprise only 20 percent of the credits in a renewal cycle. Non-eligible — Courses that are considered to be of primary benefit to the licensee.CDA is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve nor endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. CDA designates each activity for a specified number of C.E. units. These courses meet the Dental Board of California requirements for continuing education units. C.E. Information
  12. 12. Reserved Seating $10 reserves your seat in these popular lectures Have you ever shown up on time or even early to a popular lecture only to find that it was already full? To alleviate that frustration, the following courses have been selected to designate a portion of the capacity as reserved seating. This opportunity is optional and only available in advance for the following lectures at cdapresents.com. Beyond these reserved seating options, all lectures remain free on a first- come, first-served basis. Details • Seats will be held up to 15 minutes after the program begins, after which time seats will be released if the room is full. • A separate entrance will be available for reserved seating ticket holders. • Ticket must be presented and is nonrefundable if lost, stolen or forgotten. • Reserved seating is grouped together in a designated section so we can provide better service. Thursday, August 15 Derek Mahony, BDS Early Interceptive Orthodontic Treatment for the General Dental Practitioner (a.m.) Page 27, Course # 052 Diagnosis and Treatment of TMD (p.m.) Page 27, Course # 053 Brad Newman SM4D – Social Media for Dentists (Campaign Strategy) Page 29, Course # 054 (a.m.) or 055 (p.m.) (Repeat lecture) Anastasia L. Turchetta, RDH Rock Your Communication and Image Within Your Practice (a.m.) Page 32, Course # 056 Take My Breath Away — Oral Malodor (p.m.) Page 32, Course # 057 Friday, August 16 George E. Bambara, DMD, MS Precision and Semi-precision Attachments: How, Where, When and Why? (a.m.) Page 37, Course # 058 Treatment Planning Attachments and Implants – A Nuts- and-Bolts Approach (p.m.) Page 37, Course # 059 Frank L. Higginbottom, DDS Digital Implant Dentistry: New Technology for Teeth and Implants (a.m.) Page 40, Course # 060 Current Concepts in Implant Dentistry: The State of the Implant Today (p.m.) Page 41, Course # 061 Kim Miller, RDH, BSDH Principle-based Periodontal Therapy and Treatment Planning; Getting Great Results One Patient at a Time (Full day) Page 43, Course # 062 Saturday, August 17 Ann Eshenaur Spolarich, RDH, PhD Autoimmune Diseases: Systemic and Oral Health and Pharmacologic Treatment Considerations (a.m.) Page 54, Course # 063 Pharmacologic and Dental Treatment Considerations for the Patient with Respiratory Disease (p.m.) Page 54, Course # 064 Derek Mahony, BDS The Art of the Smile (a.m.) Page 57, Course # 065 Dentist Role in Snoring and Sleep Apnea (p.m.) Page 57, Course # 066 David L. Meinz, MS, RD, FADA, CSP What Good Is a Dead Patient With Perfect Teeth? (a.m.) Page 58, Course # 067 32 Teeth and 100 Birthdays (p.m.) Page 58, Course # 068 1010
  13. 13. 11 Required Courses Friday, Aug. 16 California Dental Practice Act Time: 5–7 p.m. Course #: 003 Fee: $20Leslie D. Canham, CDA, RDA Infection Control Time: 7–9 a.m. Course #: 004 Fee: $20John A. Molinari, PhD Saturday, Aug. 17 California Dental Practice Act Time: 7–9 a.m. Course #: 005 Fee: $20Leslie D. Canham, CDA, RDA Infection Control Time: 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Course #: 006 Fee: $20Nancy L. Andrews, RDH, BS California Dental Practice Act Time: 7–9 a.m. Course #: 001 Fee: $20Ali Oromchian, Esq. Infection Control Time: 5–7 p.m. Course #: 002 Fee: $20John A. Molinari, PhD Thursday, Aug. 15 Required courses will be audio recorded and available for purchase. California Dental Practice Act and Infection Control The Dental Board of California mandates continuing education in infection control and the California Dental Practice Act for license and permit renewal. Please note: • Admission by ticket only. • Purchase tickets online at cdapresents.com. • Tickets are sold on site, if available, in the registration area. • Arrive 15 minutes prior to class. Late entries will not receive C.E. credit. • Seating is limited and tickets are sold on a first-come, first-served basis. • These classes are reserved for attendees who need to renew their licenses and are not for office staff or guests. Required units for license renewal For every renewal cycle, California state law requires licensed dentists and allied dental health professionals to complete 2 units in infection control and 2 units in the California Dental Practice Act. Infection Control for California Dental Board requirement for 2 units: This program provides you with the latest educational requirements specific to CCR section 1005, the Dental Board of California Infection Control Regulations. Note: This 2-hour course does not meet the infection control education requirement for unlicensed dental assistants. They must take the specific 8-hour course for that purpose. California Dental Practice Act Dental Board requirement for 2 units: This course meets the C.E. requirement for California Dental Practice Act education, including the new one-time course requirement for unlicensed dental assistants.
  14. 14. Speaker Biographies 12 Lori Alvi Ms. Alvi is the CDA Peer Review Manager. She helps members and their patients resolve disputes that may arise in the delivery of dental services. (Page 8) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Nancy L. Andrews, RDH, BS Ms. Andrews graduated from and taught at USC, and practiced dental hygiene for 20 years. She is a professor at West Coast University, Dental Hygiene. (Pages 11, 33, 37, 52) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Ms. Andrews has financial or other interests of some nature in Dux Dental, Crosstex, DentaPure, Hu-Friedy Mfg. Co., Kerr/TotalCare and Philips. Homayon Asadi, DDS Dr. Asadi is assistant professor, course director of Advanced Head and Neck Anatomy at the Dugoni School of Dentistry. He maintains a private practice in San Jose, Calif. (Page 47) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. George E. Bambara, DMD, MS Dr. Bambara is on faculty at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and holds Fellowships in the American College of Dentists and the International College of Dentists. (Pages 20, 37) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Brad Beck Mr. Beck has worked for the past 25 years in all aspects of the banking and finance industry. For the last 17 years, he has worked solely in the health care industry providing loans to dentists for all facets of their practices. (Page 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Beck has financial or other interests of some nature in Bank of America Practice Solutions. Doug Brandt, DMD, MS Dr. Brandt is the Staff Orthodontic Manager at Align Technology’s treatment facility in Costa Rica. He has been in private practice for the last 25 years and has a large adult-patient base. (Page 51) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Brandt has financial or other interests of some nature in Align Technology. Chris Brubaker Mr. Brubaker has nearly 15 years of experience in customer acquisition and online marketing for such firms as YouSendIt, Merchant Circle and Siemens. He focuses heavily on modern marketing techniques. (Pages 25, 57) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Brubaker has financial or other interests of some nature in Demandforce. Gretchen J. Bruce, DDS, MBA Dr. Bruce is an associate professor in the Department of Periodontics at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. (Page 50) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Jeff J. Brucia, DDS Dr. Brucia is practicing esthetic and restorative dentistry full time in San Francisco and is the co-director of the FACE institute where he chairs the department of Esthetics and Adhesive Material Science. He is the 2011 recipient of the Gordon J. Christensen Lecturer Recognition Award. (Pages 25, 33) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. L. Stephen Buchanan, DDS, FICD, FACD Dr. Buchanan maintains a private practice limited to endodontics and implant surgery. He is the founder of Dental Education Laboratories, a hands-on training center serving general dentists and endodontists. (Pages 34, 52) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Buchanan has financial or other interests of some nature in Sybron Endo, Dentsply Tulsa Dental, J. Morita, Care Credit and Young Innovations/Obtura Spartan. Leslie D. Canham, CDA, RDA In dentistry since 1972, Ms. Canham is an international speaker, consultant and trainer specializing in infection control, OSHA compliance, Dental Practice Act, HIPAA and accommodating disabled patients. (Page 11) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. William M. Carpenter, DDS, MS Dr. Carpenter has held the position of professor and director of Division of Pathology and Medicine at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco since 1986. (Pages 37, 47) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  15. 15. Speaker Biographies 13 Vincent Catalano, MBA Mr. Catalino is an employee benefits consultant with Arthur J. Gallagher and has spoken extensively on health reform and its implications. (Page 8) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Patti Cheesebrough Ms. Cheesebrough is a dental benefit plan specialist in the CDA Practice Support Center. She assists members with questions related to insurance billing and appeals. (Pages 8, 38) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Raymond Y. Choi, DDS Dr. Choi maintains a private general practice in Tustin, Calif. He graduated from the Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC and served as a clinical assistant professor in the department of Dental Medicine at USC. (Page 47) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Alma J. Clark, DDS Dr. Clark is a general dentist practicing in Martinez, Calif. She currently serves on the CDA Judicial Council. (Page 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David J. Clark, DDS Dr. Clark founded the Academy of Microscope Enhanced Dentistry. He lectures internationally and maintains a private practice in Tacoma, Wash. (Pages 38, 47, 48) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Clark has financial or other interests of some nature in Bioclear Matrix and SS White Burs. Yasica Corum Ms. Corum has been a TDIC Risk Management Analyst since 2009. She advises dentists in the areas of professional and employment liability and property risk management. (Page 8) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Marc Davis Mr. Davis is a fourth-generation general contractor with proven skills, expertise, knowledge and integrity to take dreams of business ownership to reality. He has worked on more than 500 dental and medical offices throughout the Northwest. (Page 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Davis has financial or other interests of some nature in Blue Northern Builders. Kevin J. Donly, DDS Dr. Donly is a professor and chair in the departments of Developmental Dentistry and Pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. (Pages 38, 52) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Donly has received grants and research support from many companies; he has no personal financial interests. Terence E. Donovan, DDS Dr. Donovan is professor and section head of Biomaterials in the Department of Operative Dentistry at the University of North Carolina, School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill. (Page 53) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Steven Duffin, DDS Dr. Duffin is a general dentist who has spent the past 30 years working largely in public health settings. He is an enthusiastic supporter of the medical management of caries. (Page 24) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Teresa Duncan, MS Ms. Duncan is an international speaker who focuses on revenue and management issues. She is a fellow of the American Association of Dental Office Managers. (Pages 39, 53) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David Ehsan, MD, DDS Dr. Ehsan is an oral and maxillofacial and implant surgeon in private practice in San Francisco. He is the surgical director of the San Francisco Implant Institute. (Pages 20, 39) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Ann Eshenaur Spolarich, RDH, PhD Dr. Eshenaur Spolarich is an author and speaker on pharmacology and the care of medically complex patients. She is a clinical associate professor at the Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. (Pages 40, 54) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Eshenaur Spolarich has financial or other interests of some nature in Philips, Colgate, LexiComp Inc. and Johnson & Johnson.
  16. 16. Speaker Biographies 14 David A. Felton, DDS, MS Dr. Felton is dean at the West Virginia University School of Dentistry. He is editor and chief of the Journal of Prosthodontics and examiner for the American Board of Prosthodontics. (Page 54) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Paul H. Feuerstein, DMD Dr. Feuerstein is technology editor of Dental Economics, ADA seminar series speaker and maintains a general practice in Massachusetts. (Pages 25, 34, 35, 48, 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Feuerstein has financial or other interests of some nature in Acteon, Dental Rat, Dexis, Garrison, Golden Dental Solutions, Kerr, Panasonic, Philips, Sirona, Six Month Smiles and Triodent. John C. Flucke, DDS Dr. Flucke is in private practice in Lee’s Summit, Mo. He is the Technology Editor of Dental Products Report and Peer Review Committee Chair for the state of Missouri. (Pages 25, 34, 35, 48, 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Flucke has financial or other interests of some nature in Kerr, Air Techniques, AMD Lasers and Acteon. Katie Fornelli Ms. Fornelli is a practice analyst with the CDA Practice Support Center. Her previous experience was as a senior consultant with a practice management firm, specializing in the development and enhancement of dental practices. (Pages 8, 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Mohsen Ghoreishi Mr. Ghoreishi is the CEO and president of the Kohan Group. They help dental professionals in the areas of architectural, engineering, interior design and construction administration of new offices or renovation of existing offices. (Page 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Ghoreishi has financial or other interests of some nature in the Kohan Group. Eva Grayzel, BA Ms. Grayzel is a champion for early detection; she founded an oral cancer awareness campaign, Six- Step Screening and is a published author. (Page 37) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Henrik E. Hansen, DDS Dr. Hansen is currently the chair of the CDA Council on Peer Review. He is past CDA trustee and ADA Council on Dental Benefits member. He received his dental degree from the UCSF School of Dentistry and maintains a private practice in Fairfield, Calif. (Page 40) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Niki Henson, RDA, AS Ms. Henson is the president of Cornerstone Dental Academy in Cypress, Texas. She is a published author and holds a degree in science. (Pages 35, 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Frank L. Higginbottom, DDS Dr. Higginbottom maintains a private practice of restorative, esthetic and implant dentistry in Dallas. He is also a professor in the Department of Restorative Sciences and Graduate Prosthodontics at Baylor College of Dentistry. (Pages 20, 40, 41) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Phill Hoover, MBA Mr. Hoover has been a part of the Bank of America team for 10 years. He focuses on providing financial solutions for successful dental transitions, acquisitions and mergers. (Page 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Hoover has financial or other interests of some nature in Bank of America. Terry E. Hoover, DDS Dr. Hoover is a full-time associate professor and vice chair of the Department of Dental Practice at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. (Page 51) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Orapin V. Horst, DDS, MS, MSD, PhD Dr. Horst maintains a San Francisco-based clinical practice specializing in endodontics. She is an assistant clinical professor at the UCSF School of Dentistry. (Page 24) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  17. 17. Speaker Biographies 15 Maria L. Howell, DDS Dr. Howell practices general dentistry in Garden Ridge, Texas. She is a clinical professor in the Department of Comprehensive Dentistry at UTHSC San Antonio with 25 years of teaching experience. (Page 41) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Martin J. Jablow, DMD, FAGD Dr. Jablow, America’s Dental Technology Coach, is a clinician, speaker and author. He received his dental degree from New Jersey Dental School in 1986 and practices in Woodbridge, N.J. (Pages 25, 34, 35, 48, 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Jablow has financial or other interests of some nature in Kerr, Air Techniques, AMD Lasers and Acteon. Peter L. Jacobsen, PhD, DDS Dr. Jacobsen directed the Oral Medicine Clinic at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco for 25 years. He is the author of the Little Dental Drug Booklet and currently practices general dentistry in San Francisco. (Page 26) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Curtis E. Jansen, DDS Dr. Jansen completed his dental degree and advanced education in prosthodontics at the Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. He maintains a private practice limited to prosthodontics and a dental laboratory in Monterey, Calif. (Pages 23, 36) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. John A. Khademi, DDS, MS Dr. Khademi is in private practice in Durango, Colo. As a 20-plus year member of the Radiological Society of North America, he comes from a background in medical radiology and imaging that allows him a different perspective on issues with CBCT imaging. (Pages 8, 26) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Khademi has financial or other interests of some nature in SS White and Carestream. Robert D. Kiger, DDS Dr. Kiger is currently chair of the CDA Judicial Council and serves as chief of Dental Services at the Loma Linda VA Medical Center. (Page 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Casey Kirk Ms. Kirk is CDA’s digital communications specialist. She is responsible for shaping and implementing the association’s social media and email marketing strategies. (Page 57) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. James S. Kohner, DDS Dr. Kohner is a periodontist who lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. He teaches courses on crown lengthening and soft tissue grafting domestically and internationally. (Pages 21, 41, 42) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Brooke Kozak Ms. Kozak is a human resources generalist. Prior to her role in human resources Ms. Kozak was the CDA Peer Review and Judicial Council manager. (Page 8) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Eugene E. LaBarre, DMD, MS Dr. LaBarre has been a full-time prosthodontics faculty member at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco since 1981 and is currently an associate professor in the Department of Removable Prosthodontics. (Page 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Douglas L. Lambert, DDS, FACD, FASDA, FASD, ABAD Dr. Lambert has authored articles and presented programs on contemporary dentistry while serving as an independent consultant for many dental manufacturers. Dr. Lambert is senior partner in an esthetic-based practice in Edina, Minn. (Page 56) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Thomas E. Lenhart II, DMD, FICD, FACD Dr. Lenhart is a board-certified dentist anesthesiologist. He provides general anesthesia to adults and children in the Bay Area and is an assistant clinical professor at UCSF School of Dentistry. (Pages 21, 27, 42) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Donald P. Lewis Jr., DDS, CFE Dr. Lewis is an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in Cleveland and presents fraud prevention seminars regularly. (Pages 35, 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  18. 18. Speaker Biographies 16 Frank Martinez Jr., DDS Dr. Martinez is a USC graduate and completed specialty training at the Naval Center in Bethesda, Md. He is in private practice and clinical faculty in the AEGD residency at the Dugoni School of Dentistry’s Union City Dental Care Center, and in the GPR residency at the VA hospital in Palo Alto, Calif. (Page 50) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David L. Meinz, MS, RD, FADA, CSP Mr. Meinz, America’s Personal Health Improvement Expert and author, is a frequent guest on radio and television and speaks internationally to audiences about living life to the fullest, with maximum energy and health. (Pages 43, 58) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Ann Milar Ms. Milar is the dental benefits analyst for CDA. She monitors and evaluates dental insurance industry developments on behalf of CDA members. (Page 38) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Kim Miller, RDH, BSDH Ms. Miller is the co-founder of PerioFrogz.com, a lead profitability coach with Inspired Hygiene, a published author and a columnist for RDH Magazine. (Pages 43, 58) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Kiyokazu Minami, DDS Dr. Minami has maintained a private practice in Osaka, Japan, since 1990. He is the former chair of the Academy of Clinical Dentistry and lectures for continuing education programs at Meikai University and Asahi University in Japan. (Page 59) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. John A. Molinari, PhD Dr. Molinari is director of Infection Control for The Dental Advisor. Previously, he served as professor and director of Infection Control at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry for 32 years. (Page 11) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Molinari has financial or other interests of some nature in Hu- Friedy Mfg. Co. and SciCan Inc. Jeffrey Lloyd, DDS Dr. Lloyd is a general dentist practicing in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. He currently serves on the CDA Judicial Council. (Page 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Robert A. Lowe, DDS, FAGD, FICD, FADI, FACD Dr. Lowe has maintained a full-time practice for 30 years, and is a world-recognized teacher and clinician. He taught for 10 years at Loyola University School of Dentistry. (Pages 42, 56) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. William P. Lundergan, DDS, MA Dr. Lundergan is professor and chair of the Department of Periodontics at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco and practices in the Faculty Dental Service Group. (Page 50) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Derek Mahony, DDS, MS Dr. Mahony is a visiting lecturer at the PUC-Rio University, Brazil, and practices the full gamut of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics including functional appliances, treatment of TMJ disorders and the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive airway problems such as snoring and sleep apnea. (Pages 27, 57) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Paul A. Manos, DDS Dr. Manos is the dental director for United Concordia Dental Plans of California Inc. Dr. Manos is a licensed dentist in California and graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry. (Page 43) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Nicholas Marongiu, DDS Dr. Marongiu is a general dentist practicing in La Jolla, Calif. He served as a guest member of the CDA Judicial Council in 2012, a member of New Dentist Committee and Liaison to CDA Presents Board of Managers. (Page 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  19. 19. Speaker Biographies 17 K. William Mopper, DDS, MS Dr. Mopper is in private practice and is recognized as a pioneer in direct resin bonding. He is an adjunct professor at the University of Illinois and co-founder of Cosmedent Inc. (Pages 27, 36) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Mopper is chair of Cosmedent Inc. Sherry Mostofi, Esq. Ms. Mostofi is a graduate of Yale Law School and serves as legal counsel throughout California specializing in the formation of dental corporations, dental practice leases and dental practice purchase and sales agreements. (Page 57) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Ms. Mostofi has financial or other interests of some nature in Mostofi Law Group. Mark Murphy, DDS Dr. Murphy is the lead faculty for Clinical Education at Microdental/DTI Dental Technologies Inc., and serves on the adjunct faculty at the University of Detroit Mercy and Michigan Schools of Dentistry. (Pages 28, 44) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Murphy has financial or other interests of some nature in Microdental DTI and Pankey Institute. Theodore A. Murray Jr., DDS Dr. Murray is a general dentist practicing in San Rafael, Calif. He is a former member of the CDA Judicial Council. (Page 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Dan Nathanson, DMD, MSD Dr. Nathanson is the professor and chair of Restorative Sciences/Biomaterials at Boston University including advanced prosthodontics, AEGD and biomaterials. (Page 28) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Anders Nattestad, DDS, PhD Professor Nattestad is director of the undergraduate Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Program at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. (Page 24) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Patrick Nelle Mr. Nelle is a TDIC Insurance Solutions sales agent. He is also the insurance liaison to California dental schools. He is committed to protecting dentists and their practices. (Pages 8, 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Brad Newman Mr. Newman is a leader in marketing and business development for dental offices. His focus is on social media campaigns, Internet commercials and organic search engine optimization. (Page 29) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Newman is the founder and chief officer of Dentainment. Brian B. Novy, DDS Dr. Novy is an associate professor of Restorative Dentistry at Loma Linda University, and maintains a private practice in Southern California. (Pages 29, 50) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Ali Oromchian, Esq. Mr. Oromchian is a principal at Dental & Medical Counsel, the leading law firm dedicated to serving the legal needs of dentists in the areas of contract negotiations, employment law and estate planning. (Pages 8, 11, 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Edwin T. Parks, DMD, MS Dr. Parks is a professor of Dental Diagnostic Sciences in the Department of Oral Pathology/ Medicine/Radiology at Indiana University School of Dentistry in Indianapolis. (Pages 21, 44) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Kirk L. Pasquinelli, DDS Dr. Pasquinelli maintains a private practice specializing in periodontics and dental implants in San Francisco. He is an assistant clinical professor at the UCSF School of Dentistry. (Page 60) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  20. 20. Speaker Biographies 18 Christopher J. Perry, MS, DMD, FAGD Dr. Perry is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of General Dentistry at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, and maintains a private practice focused on total dental care. (Pages 29, 60) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Michael W. Perry, DDS Dr. Perry is the founder and president of Momentum Dental Business Consulting and is a national speaker. He practices general dentistry in Santa Rosa, Calif. (Page 45) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Ove A. Peters, DMD, MS, PhD Dr. Peters is professor and co-chair in the Department of Endodontics at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. He is board- certified in endodontics and the recipient of the 2012 Louis I. Grossman Award. (Page 24) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Peters has financial or other interests of some nature in Dentsply Maillefer, Dentsply Tulsa, Sonendo, FKG, Coltene and MDA Technology Group. Teresa Pichay Ms. Pichay is a practice analyst for CDA. She works on managing the association’s wastewater, environmental and occupational health and safety issues. She currently develops regulatory compliance resources. (Page 8) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Jacqueline Plemons, DDS, MS Dr. Plemons is a Texas-based periodontist in private practice and is on the faculty at Baylor College of Dentistry. She lectures nationwide on periodontics and oral medicine. (Pages 8, 45, 60) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David M. Roshkind, DMD, MBA, FAGD, MALD Dr. Roshkind is past president of the Academy of Laser Dentistry and a certified laser educator. He is an assistant professor at the University of Florida. (Page 61) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Steven J. Sadowsky, DDS Dr. Sadowsky is the director of Implant Dentistry at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontists and has published 17 articles. (Page 51) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Patrick J. Sammon, PhD Dr. Sammon is a professor emeritus, Department of Oral Health Science, at the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry and has a joint appointment with the Department of Physiology, at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. (Pages 61, 62) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Jason Schepers Mr. Schepers has worked with Patterson Dental for 20 years, specializing in office design, equipment and technology. He has been involved with opening hundreds of successful practices throughout the Bay Area. (Page 23) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Schepers has financial or other interests of some nature in Patterson Dental. David Schwab, PhD Dr. Schwab is a professional speaker and practice management consultant who works with dentists in the U.S. and Canada. (Pages 45, 62) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Nicette L. Short, MPA Ms. Short is the manager of Legislative Affairs for CDA, where she is responsible for the association’s health care reform policy analysis and legislative activity. (Page 46) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Lee Silverstein, DDS, MS Dr. Silverstein is an associate clinical professor of Periodontics at the Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, Ga. Dr. Silverstein lectures nationally and internationally. (Page 22) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  21. 21. Speaker Biographies 19 Michael S. Simmons, DMD, FAGD Dr. Simmons maintains two Southern California dental practices focusing on sleep disorders, TMJ and orofacial pain along with general dentistry. He is a lecturer at UCLA and a clinical assistant professor at USC School of Dentistry. (Page 31) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Michael S. Sparer, JD, PhD Dr. Sparer is a professor and chair in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. (Page 43) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Robyn Thomason Ms. Thomason is the director of CDA’s Practice Support Center. She is also a subject matter expert in the area of human resources. (Page 8) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Kenneth W. Tittle, DDS, MS Dr. Tittle maintains private practices specializing in endodontics in Pleasant Hill and Walnut Creek, Calif. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Endodontics and an assistant professor of Endodontics at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. (Pages 31, 46) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Karen B. Troendle, DDS, MPH Dr. Troendle is a professor in the Department of Comprehensive Dentistry at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. She received her DDS in 1977, and her MPH in 1994. She has 35 years of teaching experience. (Page 41) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Anastasia L. Turchetta, RDH Ms. Turchetta is a spokesperson, video blogger and author who works with various companies and private practices on their social media engagements. She also develops and presents webinars, continuing education and keynote programs. (Page 32) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Ms. Turchetta has financial or other interests of some nature in Dentist Select. William A. van Dyk, DDS Dr. van Dyk practices general dentistry in San Pablo, Calif., and serves as an associate professor at the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. (Page 32) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Takashi Watanabe, DDS Dr. Watanabe currently maintains a private practice in Iwaki, Fukushima in Japan, and is a clinical professor and assistant director of continuing dental education at Meikai University School of Dentistry. He is president of the Japan Academy of Clinical Dentistry, and a member of the American Academies of Esthetic Dentistry and Periodontology. (Page 30) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David J. Weiss, Esq. Mr. Weiss founded the Law Offices of David J. Weiss in 1989. He continues his practice of specializing in the defense of hospital, medical, dental and legal professionals in general and administrative law matters and insurers in bad- faith litigation. (Pages 23, 36) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Gail F. Williamson, RDH, MS Ms. Williamson is a professor of Dental Diagnostic Sciences at Indiana University School of Dentistry. She is associate executive director of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. (Pages 21, 44) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.
  22. 22. Thursday Workshops 20 Things to know about the show Exhibit Hall hours Thursday and Friday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Room assignments Look for room assignments at cdapresents.com or in the On-Site Show Guide. Audio recordings Recordings of identified programs will be available on site on the Esplanade Level of the convention center or following CDA Presents at prolibraries.com/cda. Site Preservation for Implant Placement David Ehsan, MD, DDS This course is designed to teach basic site preservation prior to implant placement. Participants will learn socket healing after extraction, socket bone grafting with bone grafting material and membranes, immediate implant placement and immediate implant provisional fabrication. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon and repeats 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Course #: 009 (a.m.)/010 (p.m.) Fee: $300 Learning Outcomes 1. Describe socket healing after extraction. 2. How to perform socket preservation using bone grafting material and membrane. 3. Describe when to place immediate implant versus socket bone grafting. Implant Esthetics Workshop Supplies Recommended Frank L. Higginbottom, DDS Esthetic treatments involve treatment planning with surgical templates, proper temporary and final abutment selection, impression making and provisional fabrication. Laboratory communication is also important for esthetic results. Participants will learn techniques that will minimize obstacles to success. Participants will select and place abutments, attach impression copings and make an impression, and fabricate provisional restorations and custom impression copings. Attendees are encouraged to bring safety glasses and/or magnification loupes. Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. and repeats 1–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #: 011 (a.m.)/012 (p.m.) Fee: $195 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand surgical template demo and abutment selection. 2. Impression copings and impression techniques. 3. Temporary fabrication and custom impression copings. Hands-On Workshop: Implants and Attachments Supplies Recommended George E. Bambara, DMD, MS Participants will work on typodont models with implants placed in them. Two attachment abutment systems will be used for demonstration. An attachment abutment will be placed on the implant and torqued to the required torsion as directed by the specific implant abutment requirements. The process of how the male or female attachment is picked up in cold-cure acrylic will be demonstrated for each of the attachments’ abutment systems. Recommended supplies: Loupes, lab coat. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and repeats 2–5 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #: 007 (a.m.)/008 (p.m.) Fee: $210 Learning Outcomes 1. Select the proper implant attachment abutments. 2. How various angled attachment and straight abutments can correct for misaligned implants. 3. Cold-cure attachments in denture bases and replace worn out male retentive elements. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  23. 23. Thursday Workshops 21 Hands-on Workshop: Surgical Crown Lengthening Supplies Recommended James S. Kohner, DDS Attendees will experience a thorough review of the principles and clinical procedures needed to perform crown lengthening for functional restorative problems, as well as a review of all necessary parameters for anterior esthetic applications. Using both lecture presentation and two hands-on exercises, participants will understand the flaps as well as suturing methods needed. Two videos of the surgery will be shown. Attendees are encouraged to bring magnification loupes. Time: 8 a.m.–3:30 p.m. (break: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.) Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 6.0 Course #: 013 Fee: $595 Learning Outcomes 1. Diagnose the need for crown lengthening, plus understand limitations and contraindications. 2. Biologic width, flap design and suture technique. 3. Learn how to make predictable impressions, save chair time and be more profitable. Review of the Medical Emergency Kit Thomas E. Lenhart II, DMD This workshop is designed to review basic and advanced medical emergency kits. Dr. Lenhart will discuss the essential medications and equipment needed to provide adequate treatment for common medical emergencies. Time: 1:30–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Course #: 014 Fee: $125 Learning Outcomes 1. Recognize essential medications for common medical emergencies. 2. Understand emergency medications, airway adjuncts and other emergency kit contents. 3. Use emergency medications and kit contents properly. Are Your Pictures Perfect? Edwin T. Parks, DMD, MS Gail F. Williamson, RDH, MS This course is designed to help participants improve their radiographic skills and produce high-quality radiographs via lecture and hands-on instruction. Techniques used to produce optimal intraoral and panoramic images as well as radiation safety and protection for both patients and clinicians will be presented. This course is recommended for all dental professionals, especially hygienists and assistants. Time: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. and repeats 2–5 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #: 015 (a.m.)/016 (p.m.) Fee: $150 Learning Outcomes 1. Implement patient radiation dose reduction measures and patient management strategies. 2. Utilize optimal techniques for the acquisition of intraoral and panoramic radiographic images. 3. Identify and correct intraoral and panoramic image errors.
  24. 24. Thursday Workshops 22 Suturing for the General Practitioner Supplies Recommended Lee Silverstein, DDS, MS This hands-on, user-friendly course makes suturing easy with discussions on materials, needles, techniques and types of surgical knots. This course shows the how, when and why of suturing for particular clinical procedures. This course is a must for all members of the surgical team. Recommended supplies: Glasses and/or loupes. Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Course #: 017 Fee: $275 Learning Outcomes 1. Know the difference between surgical needles and the different types of suture thread materials. 2. Learn which suture thread, diameter and types of suture needles should be used in particular clinical situations. 3. Perform simple loop, figure and mattress sutures. Atraumatic Extraction and Socket Grafting for the General Practitioner Supplies Recommended Lee Silverstein, DDS, MS This hands-on, user-friendly course makes teeth removal easy while saving the bony socket. Learn how to use periotomes and regenerative barriers in a cost-effective and user-friendly way. This course will show the how, when and why of socket grafting in a trademarked, easy-to-understand fashion. Attendees are encouraged to bring safety glasses and/or magnification loupes. Time: 1–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Course #: 018 Fee: $275 Learning Outcomes 1. Learn how to atraumatically remove teeth. 2. Learn what types of regenerative barriers and materials to use. 3. Learn how to suture socket grafts. See Page 8 Check out the C.E.courses in
  25. 25. Thursday Workshops 23 Pitfalls to Avoid When Starting or Purchasing a New Practice Sponsored by CDA Endorsed Programs Phill Hoover—Bank of America Practice Solutions Brad Beck—Bank of America Practice Solutions Ali Oromchian—Dental & Medical Counsel Katie Fornelli—CDA Practice Support Center Patrick Nelle—TDIC Insurance Solutions Jason Schepers—Patterson Dental Marc Davis—Blue Northern Builders Mohsen Ghoreishi—The Kohan Group Join us in an intimate setting where you will have the opportunity to discuss the various aspects of starting a new practice. This roundtable format will feature five 30-minute sessions, each hosted by industry leaders. Ask yourself the following questions: Should I continue as an associate or should I become a practice owner? What options exist for practice ownership? How do I prepare for disaster? What methods exist to motivate and manage staff? What financing is available and what are the banks looking for? Get all of your questions answered in one place. Time: 9 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist C.E. units: non-eligible Course #: 019 Fee: $45 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the advantages of practice ownership and learn the right time to buy in. 2. Break the barriers to managing staff effectively. 3. Plan for the inevitable and avoid first-practice pitfalls. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com TDIC Risk Management: The High Cost of Shortcuts Sponsored by The Dentists Insurance Company Curtis E. Jansen, DDS David J. Weiss, ESQ Shortcuts have their place, but not in dentistry. Incomplete documentation, the omission of necessary procedures and failure to fully inform patients are why even the best dentist will likely experience a lawsuit at least once. Using real TDIC cases, this course will illustrate why effective patient communication and continuity of care are imperative to delivering excellent dentistry. Time: 9 a.m.–noon and repeats 2–5 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, spouse C.E. units: 20% – 3.0 Course #: 825/826 Fee: $50 – dentist and staff $25 – part-time TDIC policyholder (Must have a TDIC part-time Professional Liability policy to be eligible for this discount.) Free – new TDIC policyholder within first year This course is eligible for a 5 percent professional liability discount for TDIC policyholders. Learning Outcomes 1. Establish office procedures to respond when patients complain of pain. 2. Develop strategies to educate patients on treatment recommendations. 3. Deploy effective protocols for medical emergencies. This workshop is approved by:
  26. 26. tothe p odium. N EW Bethefirstto hear them! 24 The Medical Management of Caries — Back to the Future With G.V. Black Steven Duffin, DDS This course covers the history of cariology from 1890 to the present; the use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of caries; and the silver nitrate plus fluoride varnish protocol as developed in the presenter’s Oregon practice between 2006 and 2012. Participants will become familiar with the science and application of antimicrobials in the management of caries. Numerous clinical cases will be described. Time: 8–9:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 1.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Dentists will be able to implement a simple and effective medical management of caries in their practices. 2. Participants will be able to reference the literature from 1890 to the present. 3. Participants will be able to identify and measure caries arrest. Management of Dental Trauma: Guidelines and Future Directions Orapin V. Horst, DDS, MS, MSD, PhD The goal of this lecture is to provide a review of the scientific literature and rationale for diagnosis and treatment of traumatic dental injuries (TDI). New treatment recommendations, online educational resources and clinical cases will be discussed. Other topics in this lecture include mechanisms of TDI as well as pathogenesis of adverse reactions in dental and periodontal structures, signs, symptoms, severity levels and prevalence rates of these adverse events. Time: 10:30 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 1.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Participants should be able to identify signs, symptoms, severity levels and types of TDI and complications. 2. Participants should be able to describe appropriate diagnosis and treatment options for a given TDI. 3. Participants should be able to form appropriate care coordination strategies for a given TDI. Dentoalveolar Surgery Tips and Tricks for the General Practitioner Anders Nattestad, DDS, PhD Dentoalveolar surgery is a key competency of the general practitioner and a need that many patients present with. There is a great variability in the individual ability of general practitioners to offer this service to their patients. This session will provide tips and tricks that will allow general practitioners to improve the quality of their contributions to their patients in the area of dentoalveolar surgery. Time: 1–2:30 p.m. Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 1.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Choose the right patients to extend learning of dentoalveolar surgery. 2. Provide optimal care forr patients in the area of dentoalveolar surgery. 3. Learn how to complete atraumatic extractions that prepare a patient for later implant placement. Update in Endodontics — Procedures and Future Developments in Root Canal Treatment Ove A. Peters, DMD, MS, PhD This course will give a critical update in endodontic technology, highlighting the progress made in instrumentation, canal disinfection and root canal filling. At the same time, the biologic framework of endodontics must not be forgotten. Taken together these two items, technical advances and better understanding of biology, will help all clinicians to achieve better outcomes in root canal treatment. Time: 3:30–5 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student C.E. Units: Core – 1.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Able to list new tools and devices used in root canal treatment. 2. Understand microbial etiology of periodical inflammation and its treatment. 3. Critically evaluate current technology in endodontics for use in their practices. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com Thursday Express Lectures
  27. 27. Thursday Workshops 25 Thursday Lectures Maximize the Value of Your Most Powerful Asset: Your Reputation Sponsored by CDA Endorsed Programs Chris Brubaker, Marketing Director, Demandforce Using case studies and real-world examples, this course will explore the importance of online reputation and ways to manage one effectively. It will provide you with a practical guide on how to build your best possible reputation and teach you how to leverage your practice’s assets to attract the right type of new patients. Time: 3–5 p.m. Audience: general C.E. Units: non-eligible Learning Outcomes 1. Comprehending the importance of online reputation and concrete ways to manage one. 2. Leveraging patient reviews to enhance your web presence as a part of your practice marketing and overall business strategy. 3. Understanding which third-party sites are the most important as well as how social media and mobile apps play into online reputation. Restorative Materials Update 2013 Jeff J. Brucia, DDS Restorative care demands continuous learning in the areas of material science and restorative technique. The continuous evolution in adhesive materials and techniques combined with the ever-increasing demands for esthetic restorations has made tooth-colored dentistry a quality option for every treatment plan. The numerous choices in restorative materials can be confusing as to what is best indicated in a given situation. This course will focus on direct and indirect restoration. Time: 8:30–11 a.m. and continues noon–2:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the options available in adhesive systems including the new advancements in glass ionomers. 2. The materials and techniques for direct and indirect bonded restorations. 3. Repair fractured porcelain restorations predictably. Technology in Your Practice — What Is Here and What Is Coming? Paul H. Feuerstein, DMD John C. Flucke, DDS Martin J. Jablow, DMD, FAGD Three top technology experts will explore and explain the latest high-tech devices and processes, many that they use in their own general practices. Digital disease detection, digital impressions and cone beam imaging will be among the topics covered. Specific examples of current and future products will be reviewed in this unique format. Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and continues 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Learning Outcomes 1. Learn the latest technologies, products and Internet applications. 2. Understand high-tech diagnostic aids and digital impression/ CAD systems. 3. Recognize digital and 3-D radiography and associated implant and treatment planning. See page 8 Check out the C.E.courses in Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  28. 28. 26 Thursday WorkshopsThursday Lectures Drugs, Bugs and Dental Products: Prescription Drugs Peter L. Jacobsen, PhD, DDS Osteonecrosis of the jaw, severe diabetes, canker sores, herpes, unresponsive dental infections — what do these situations have in common? They are all about drugs in dentistry. This course will be an update on the drugs of choice for bacterial, fungal and viral infections, as well as a review of clinical and medical guidelines for prophylactic antibiotics in dental treatment. Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Differentiate trauma, canker sores and fever blisters and provide proper treatment recommendations. 2. Identify medically complex patients and be able to plan for proper prophylactic care for dental therapy. 3. Understand and avoid or minimize the risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw related to antiresorptive drugs. Drugs, Bugs and Over-the-Counter Dental Products: What to Prescribe Peter L. Jacobsen, PhD, DDS Cavities, plaque, gingivitis, bad breath, dentin sensitivity, dry mouth, white teeth, you name it, patients have it or want it and there are over-the- counter products that can solve it or deliver it. This course will cover the range of oral conditions and the oral care products available to address any problem. Understand the wide range of products that contain the same active ingredients. Decide which products you intend to recommend to your patients. Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Identify products and ingredients to manage dental decay. 2. Understand the causes of halitosis and the products and procedures available to manage it. 3. Understand the limited number of FDA-approved OTC ingredients available to manage oral cavity problems. Cone Beam CT: Acquisition, Reconstruction, Artifacts John A. Khademi, DDS, MS A perspective leveraging traditional mental models of radiography having a commonsensical, linear relationship between the attenuation of the X-ray beam and the displayed image, fails us with CBCT. The expectation of performing the interpretation task based on those linear mental models is a setup for problems starting with the physics, carried through the reconstruction process and amplified with occult biases present in both perception and cognition brought to the image interpretation task. Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the virtues and limitations of CBCT imagery in dentistry. 2. The reconstruction process and the differences between beam hardening, scatter and reconstruction artifact. 3. Identify and distinguish these artifacts from normal and abnormal anatomy and findings. Cone Beam CT: Perception, Cognition, Interpretation John A. Khademi, DDS, MS As important as understanding issues with CBCT reconstruction are to the interpretation task, the perceptual and cognitive issues are even more important. The interpretive task sits on these complex and often occult relationships between perception and cognition, which have not been well studied in dentistry. In contrast with the morning presentation, this is a fun presentation that will introduce by way of example and participation many of these issues and the associated language. Time: 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Identify the perceptual and cognitive issues relating to the interpretive task and clinical decision-making. 2. The limits and biases of human vision, perception and cognition and how to optimize perception. 3. Know when perceptual and cognitive biases are more likely to be present and interfere with interpretation. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  29. 29. Thursday Workshops 27 Thursday Lectures Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office Thomas E. Lenhart II, DMD, FICD, FACD Medical emergencies can and do happen everyday in dental offices around the country. Proper intervention and management can mean the difference between life and death. This course will help you to improve your ability to plan for, manage and handle common office medical emergencies. Time: 8–10:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Prepare for and practice the management of specific medical emergencies. 2. Understand the recognition and treatment of medical emergencies. 3. Identify and use emergency medical equipment and medications. Early Interceptive Orthodontic Treatment for the General Dental Practitioner Derek Mahony, DDS, MS This course will provide participants with useful clinical techniques to help children stop thumb sucking and improve the size and shape of their dental archers. Doctors will also learn how to deal with hypomineralized first molars and ectopic eruption of first molars, beneath the deciduous molar. This course is designed to give the pediatric dentist and general dentist first-hand knowledge of early-treatment orthodontics. Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech, office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand growth and development issues in the child. 2. Learn transitional dentition treatment. 3. Provide phase-one treatment to the patient to minimize more extensive treatment. Diagnosis and Treatment of TMD Derek Mahony, DDS, MS Dentists have the prime responsibility to diagnose and treat this common pain disorder. When patients present with disc displacement within the TM joint, the dentist should become involved by using splint therapy to obtain a more stable jaw relationship. Dentists will understand why many headaches are related to disc disorders, clenching and bruxing. Time: 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech, office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the anatomy of the TM joint and the causes of TM dysfunction. 2. The five stages of internal derangement. 3. Recommend the appropriate splint for treatment of the TM disorder, including orthodontic case finishing. Direct Resin Bonding: The Art and Science of Invisible Restorations — An Interactive Tour K. William Mopper, DDS, MS Learn to achieve consistently reliable results and recipes for success for every restorative situation, including Class III, IV, V, diastema closure, direct resin veneers and orthodontic realignment. Learn solutions to common esthetic problems and which composites are best utilized to solve them. Differences between microfill, microhybrid and nanofill will be shown. Learn to evaluate, select and use these materials. Opaquing, tinting, finishing and polishing will be shown. Learn proper anterior morphology. Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. and continues 1–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Learning Outcomes 1. Learn what different materials bring to your overall esthetic and functional results. 2. Why microfill, microhybrids and nanofills are necessary for certain procedures. 3. Know the proper understanding of opaquing and tints, as well as finishing and polishing.
  30. 30. 28 Thursday WorkshopsThursday Lectures Occlusion in Everyday Dentistry Mark Murphy, DDS Although we respect its importance, the thought of applying occlusal principles leaves many of us confused and frustrated. We will bring clarity and confidence to this critical component of predictable restorative dentistry. In this evidence-based review of the examination, differential diagnosis, records, treatment planning and splint therapy, our emphasis will include how to evaluate for risk assessment and easily communicate with your patients. Time: 8–10:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Apply current evidence to occlusal issues in everyday dentistry. 2. The risk assessment and predictable treatment of occlusal irregularities in restorative dentistry. 3. Take records, plan, deliver and adjust a bite splint with predictable excellence. Leadership, Vision and Communication for Dental Teams Mark Murphy, DDS Dr. Murphy will provide useful tips and ideas that you can put to use on “Monday morning.” As leaders, developing a vision-driven practice model that aligns the team is seminal to practice happiness and fulfillment. By understanding the communication process, how it works and why it sometimes doesn’t, you will be more affective and effective within the practice team and with patients, friends and family. Teams will know where they are headed, get along better and patients will say “yes” more often to you and your treatment plans when you develop relationships that encourage mutually agreed upon outcomes based on trust. Time: noon–2:30 p.m. Audience: general C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Develop supportive systems that support the goals and objectives of the practice. 2. Strengthen team and patient communication effectively. 3. Align the people and system towards a preferred future vision. Fixed Prosthodontics and Esthetics in the Digital Era: What Has Changed and What Should Not Dan Nathanson, DMD, MSD This course will provide participants with answers to these questions: Are PFM restorations superior to milled restorations? Can new technologies deliver the same quality as conventional methods? Should every dental office use a chair-side milling unit? Time: 8–10:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Upon completion, the participant will understand the different attributes of digital systems. 2. Participants will understand the rationale for use of materials and technologies for different clinical cases. 3. The participant will be able to make informed choices for treatment planning and reconstruction. Keeping Up With New Materials and Technologies in a Contemporary Restorative Practice Dan Nathanson, DMD, MSD The course presents new material options and techniques for restorative and prosthetic dentistry, describing attributes, indications and limitations of these technologies. Participants will receive clinical information related to use of innovative ceramics, cements, adhesives, etc., using clinical cases demonstrating their proper application and performance. Time: noon–2:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Participants will become familiar with new materials systems for restorative/prosthodontic practices. 2. Participants will understand the proper manipulation/use of new adhesive resins, cements and new post system. 3. Participants will be able to make an optimal selection of materials for specific indications.
  31. 31. Thursday Workshops 29 Thursday Lectures Treatment Planning for Success: Patient-centered, Team-driven Practice Management Christopher J. Perry, MS, DMD, FAGD Doctors: Are you tired of having all the pressures of success on your shoulders? Teams: Do you feel unfulfilled with your role in the practice and your responsibilities? This team-focused course will help you find the myriad of opportunities for increased production in your dental practice, from underutilized CDT codes to undiagnosed dentistry. You don’t need to revamp all of your practice systems to change the production in your practice dramatically. Time: 9–11:30 a.m. and continues 1–3:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff, spouse C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 per session Learning Outcomes 1. Treatment plan for success. 2. The ideal comprehensive examination. 3. How to find the why and turn it into successful, productive dentistry. SM4D – Social Media for Dentists (Campaign Strategy) Brad Newman This course will educate dental offices on the best ways to market themselves online using a variety of social media sites. We will explore tools such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest, Foursquare, YouTube and more. Leveraging the power of Internet commercials, Yelp and other platforms will also be covered. Coupled with a solid strategy and tenacious execution, social media can be a game- changer for dental offices. Time: 11:30 a.m. –2 p.m. and repeats 3–5:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff, spouse C.E. units: non-eligible Learning Outcomes 1. Maintain an online conversation that is fresh, relevant and targeted for the right audience. 2. What type of content works for social media sites. How to have a fun online personality, yet remain professional at all times. 3. Create a more dynamic and unique website; improve page rank on Google and organic search engine optimization; how to launch your social media campaign immediately. The Plaque Monologues Recommended Perequisite for Workshop on Page 50 Brian B. Novy, DDS Dental professionals are convinced plaque is their nemesis. We curse its presence and tell our patients they need to brush more frequently. Yet the scientific evidence indicates plaque (in some cases) can provide colonization resistance against cariogenic bacteria. What can we do for our patients to help them grow this beneficial plaque? Warning —this lecture may not be appropriate for those who enjoy finding cavities. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon and continues 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Learning Outcomes 1. Explain the mixed ecological approach to caries causation. 2. Understand when to recommend appropriate therapies. 3. Implement an effective caries prevention protocol. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  32. 32. The best of dentistry in the U.S., and now a worldwide perspective on dentistry. While dentistry in the U.S. is breaking new ground, the same can be said for alternative philosophies and treatment modalities the world over. Join us in a spirit of international camaraderie as we delve into new techniques and materials used by dentists across the globe. International Symposia of Dental Learning Multidisciplinary Treatment Approaches to Complicated Malocclusion Cases Takashi Watanabe, DDS In cases with malocclusion, a comprehensive treatment plan that incorporates all clinical fields including orthodontic treatment is needed. Clinical application of orthodontic treatment can help minimize the scope of prosthodontics intervention, improve plaque control and occlusion and efficiently enhance esthetics, thus significantly improving treatment quality and outcome prediction. However, the team approach that includes technicians, hygienists and assistants for complicated cases which needs comprehensive dental care is indispensable. This lecture will be live with simultaneous English interpretation via headphones. Time: 8:30–11 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Describe the diagnosis and treatment procedures based on multidisciplinary treatment planning. 2. Discuss the significance of a team approach. 3. Identify preferred orthodontic treatment methods for complicated cases. Clinical Applications of Orthodontic Treatment in the Esthetic Zone Takashi Watanabe, DDS This lecture will examine outcomes that can be achieved by including orthodontic treatment in the treatment options when solutions are sought for esthetics and functional problems accompanying malalignment in the anterior zone. Topics addressed will include improved methods with papilla recession, new orthodontic extrusion methods for implant site development, precautions for cases with crowded teeth and spaced dental arches, clinical applications of the Bolton analysis to obtain esthetic and function, and traction of impacted teeth, among other topics. This lecture will be live with simultaneous English interpretation via headphones. Time: noon–2:30 p.m. Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Describe the ways to achieve a harmonious balance between esthetics and function. 2. Discuss the new techniques in implant site development using orthodontic extrusion. 3. Identify possibilities for traction of impacted teeth.30
  33. 33. Thursday Workshops 31 Thursday Lectures Dental Sleep Medicine Essentials Michael S. Simmons, DMD, FAGD Restful sleep is an important component in maintaining health. This course will educate participants about sleep and sleep disorders. Learn which sleep disorders may be addressed in your dental practices, how to screen and find patients with sleep disorders, which treatment options you can offer and how to provide treatment. Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: general C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Describe the main sleep disorders that affect our society and which ones your dental office can address. 2. The basic physiology of sleep and many sleep disorders. 3. Identify patients with sleep disorders in your dental practice and describe treatment options. Dental Sleep Medicine — Contemporary and Advanced Concepts Michael S. Simmons, DMD, FAGD This course will address updates in dental sleep medicine along with discussion of contemporary concerns such as sleep disordered breathing and bruxism, brain damage and pediatric issues. Review of newer approaches in providing dental sleep medicine care will be covered along with examples of more complex cases and how they are managed. Time: 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Describe how bruxism is related to sleep. 2. The effects of sleep-disordered breathing on the brain. 3. Recommend specific and updated treatments for pediatric and adult patients with sleep-disordered breathing. Demystifying Root Resorption Kenneth W. Tittle, DDS, MS Root resorption is often asymptomatic and presents with subtle signs. Early detection of this entity is pivotal in rendering appropriate treatment to prevent tooth loss. This course will discuss the different types of root resorption and the associated prognoses. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing the characteristics of resorptions that are treatable and those that are not. Upon completion, the participant will have an understanding of the etiology and treatment of root resorption Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Identify the different types of root resorption. 2. Etiology of resorption and the predictability of treatment for the different types of resorption. 3. Devise predictable treatment plans that address resorption. Minimizing the Heartbreak of Root Fractures Kenneth W. Tittle, DDS, MS Teeth with vertical root fractures have often been a source of great expense for patients. Currently extraction is the only treatment for these teeth. We do, however, have more sophisticated methods for early detection and understanding of at-risk teeth. This course will review the etiology and predictors of vertical root fractures, describe methods for early detection and discuss endodontic and restorative techniques to minimize the occurrence of root fractures. Time: 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Discuss the contributing factors and preventive measures of root fractures and identify at-risk teeth. 2. Current methods of diagnosis for root fractures. 3. Employ current diagnostic, endodontic and restorative techniques to minimize the occurrence of root fractures. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  34. 34. 32 Thursday WorkshopsThursday Lectures Keys to a Successful Transition From Practice to Retirement: Preparation Is the Solution William A. van Dyk, DDS A life of successful practice can lead to years of enjoyable retirement if there is a plan in place. Otherwise, the inevitable end of practice can result in near poverty, resentment and frustration. This course is designed to make you aware of the issues around the big picture of practice transitions and the ways in which individual dentists can control their future through knowledge and planning. It involves family, staff, associates and patients in the positive outcome. Time: 9–11:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, dental student, spouse C.E. units: non-eligible Learning Outcomes 1. Fit your situation into the overall climate for practice transition. 2. The various issues and players that make up the planning of a successful transition. 3. Create a game plan for your practice that will result in successful retirement. The Right Associateship: A Stair-step Toward Success William A. van Dyk, DDS In the beginning of their dentistry careers, many graduates will enter an associateship. The pressures of high debt have made finding a job crucial to financial stability. However, a good associateship can also lead to early success, positive attitude about the profession and better quality dentistry. This course will spell out the tools to find and use a quality associateship for future success. Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student, spouse C.E. units: non-eligible Learning Outcomes 1. Evaluate the marketplace based on your needs. 2. Understand what is necessary for you to get the best available job. 3. Work the chosen location effectively to secure valuable employment. Rock Your Communication and Image Within Your Practice Anastasia L. Turchetta, RDH What if you could rock your team’s communication for patients of all generations, from case presentation to social media strategies, would you do it? If you answered yes, then grab your entire team to gain the edge and art of effective communication in today’s world of dentistry! Time: 9–11:30 a.m. Audience: general C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Identify what your professional image says about you. 2. Understand what used to work and what doesn’t work now with generational communication. 3. Use your power of influence via social media. Take My Breath Away – Oral Malodor Anastasia L. Turchetta, RDH Has your mouth ever felt so parched it was a struggle to speak or eat? Ever been offered a mint or gum and wondered whether it was really an act of kindness? Breathe a sigh of relief and solve this embarrassing situation for your patients so they blow you away with their smiles – not their breath! Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes 1. Review the common causes contributing to bad breath. 2. Recognize dental and medical conditions that contribute to bad breath. 3. Learn how to identify which products work and why. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  35. 35. Friday Workshops 33 Instrument Sharpening, Never A Dull Moment Supplies Recommended Nancy L. Andrews, RDH, BS Using a variety of hand and mechanical sharpeners, learn how to preserve the original instrument design and shape while creating sharp edges. Attendees will be guided by images and discussion as they perfect their hand-sharpening skills. Several mechanical sharpening devices will be compared. Attendees are recommended to bring magnification loupes. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Course #: 020 Fee: $50 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand how to preserve optimal instrument design while sharpening. 2. Practice with and compare various hand-sharpening techniques. 3. Use and compare various mechanical sharpening devices. Achieving Clinical Excellence With Esthetic Posterior Restorations Supplies Recommended Jeff J. Brucia, DDS This in-depth workshop will provide clinical experience in the area of adhesive dental treatment. Direct and indirect posterior esthetic restorative care will be completed. A review of dentin bonding materials will kick off a comprehensive, hands- on clinic on the careful planning and systematic coordination of the preparation, temporization, material selection and placement of these restorations. Attendees are recommended to bring magnification loupes. Time: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. (break: 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.) Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 5.0 Course #: 021 Fee: $500 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the differences between the many adhesive systems available today. 2. Clinical steps recommended for predictable results with direct and indirect posterior bonded restorations. 3. Overcome challenges when working in a less-than-ideal clinical environment. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com Things to know about the show Exhibit Hall hours Thursday and Friday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Room assignments Look for room assignments at cdapresents.com or in the On-Site Show Guide. Audio recordings Recordings of identified programs will be available on site on the Esplanade Level of the convention center or following CDA Presents at prolibraries.com/cda.
  36. 36. Friday Workshops 34 Radiographs Aren’t Just X-rays Anymore Paul H. Feuerstein, DMD John C. Flucke, DDS Martin J. Jablow, DMD, FAGD There has been a shift from intraoral film to sensors and phosphor plates. They reduce radiation, and add many diagnostic capabilities never before available. Panoramic units have gone digital and new cone beam CT offers 3-D imaging. Review the current sensors, software, digital panoramic units and explore the numerous reasons for every dentist to consider 3-D cone beam imaging. There will also be a look at guided implant surgery as well as convergence with other technologies. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Course #: 024 Fee: $65 Learning Outcomes 1. Know what to look for when comparing various products. 2. Learn what products are necessary to incorporate in a modern dental practice. 3. Make intelligent purchase decisions for the practice. The Art of Endodontics: A Hands-on Workshop Supplies Recommended L. Stephen Buchanan, DDS, FICD, FACD State-of-the-art endodontic procedures will be taught and practiced in anterior and premolar TrueTooth training replicas, using contemporary concepts of access, negotiation, shaping, irrigation and 3-D obturation. Digital imaging will be available to evaluate results. Attendees are recommended to bring magnification loupes. Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. and repeats 1–4 p.m. Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #: 022 (a.m.)/023 (p.m.) Fee: $350 Learning Outcomes 1. Achieve ideal convenience form while conserving all tooth structure possible. 2. Safely cut tapered shapes in canals with 1-3 rotary files. 3. Clean and fill complex lateral anatomy such as lateral and accessory canals. See Page 8 Check out the C.E.courses in
  37. 37. Friday Workshops 35 In-Office Digital Impressions and Laboratory CAD/CAM Paul H. Feuerstein, DMD John C. Flucke, DDS Martin J. Jablow, DMD, FAGD Many systems in the marketplace allow us to take impressions digitally. Some systems allow the creation and manufacturing of in-office restorations, while others can be sent to dental labs that have a digital workflow and even to labs that do not. Discover the differences between the systems while you try them. Learn from modern laboratories and materials companies about new products and processes. New retraction techniques will also be covered, including chemical, mechanical and laser systems. Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Course #: 025 Fee: $65 Learning Outcomes 1. Know what to look for when comparing various products. 2. Understand what products are necessary to incorporate in a modern dental practice. 3. Make intelligent purchase decisions for the practice. Don’t Let Your Provisionals Look Temporary Niki Henson, RDA, AS A unique blend of real-life applications, tips from an experienced assistant and esthetic solutions will enable you to learn how to fabricate a variety of provisional restorations. It’s the class you have always dreamed of – an instructor who has years of experience making temporaries, who can relate to your experiences and who can provide insight on what to do when unusual circumstances arise. During the workshop, two methods will be chosen to allow students to make their own provisional. Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. and repeats 1–4 p.m. Audience: RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #: 026 (a.m.)/027 (p.m.) Fee: $200 Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the steps, in order, to create a functional provisional restoration. 2. Ascertain purposes of provisional restorations including tissue conditioning, space retention and esthetics. 3. Discover the types of materials available to fabricate esthetic provisional restorations. Employee Embezzlement and Fraud: Detection, Protection and Prosecution Donald P. Lewis Jr., DDS, CFE This seminar gives attendees take-home, proven internal controls to safeguard their assets. This seminar is designed to empower attendees with enough knowledge to reduce the risk of becoming a victim. It also provides the tools needed to recognize fraud and embezzlement and provides a step-by-step action plan for prevention and prosecution. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon and repeats 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, spouse (office staff with written approval from dentist) C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 per session Course #: 028 (a.m.)/029 (p.m.) Fee: Dentist — $75 Dentist and spouse — $125 Learning Outcomes 1. Examine actual computer fraud cases and discover the reports that need to be reviewed. 2. Learn how to implement the internal controls. 3. How to prosecute and recover lost revenue.

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