AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY
2021 L Street NW, Suite 900
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-776-0544
Fax: 202-292-0269
meet...
Greetings from the President
It is an absolute honor to invite you to join me for the preeminent celebration of research, ...
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 1
Scientific Program......................................... 33
Scientific Sessions ................
2 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Education Program
2 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	
Continuing Medical Education CREDitS
The Amer...
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 3
What’s New
In a continuing effort to improve and enhance the
ASH annual meeting experience and o...
4 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Education Program
4 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	
Schedule At-a-Glance
The following schedule i...
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 5
10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.	Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall)
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.	Exhibits Open
10:00 a...
6 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Education Program
S U N D AY
Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award
for Lifetime Achievem...
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 7
Special Symposium on Innovation
and the Future of Hematology
Sunday, December 8, 1:00 P.M. – 2:3...
8 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
General Sessions
Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize
Monday, December 9, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m....
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 9
T U E S D AY
Announcement of Awards
Tuesday, December 10, 9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
William Dameshek...
10 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Education ProgramGeneral Sessions
Best of ASH
Tuesday, December 10, 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m....
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 11
F o r S c i e n t i s t s :
Friday Scientific Workshop on
Myeloid Development
Friday, December ...
12 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific
Literature Online
Sunday, December 8, 6:30 p.m....
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 13
Special Symposium on Quality:
Clinical Practice Guidelines
Saturday, December 7, 2:00 p.m. – 3:...
14 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 				14 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	
Special-Interest Sessions
F OR E D U C ATOR S :
Training Pro...
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15		 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15
The ASH annual meeting provides
hematology trainees with a variety...
Career-Development
Lunch Sessions
Saturday, December 7
11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
These sessions will provide an intimate ven...
Trainee Simultaneous
Didactic Sessions
Sunday, December 8
11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
During lunch on Sunday and Monday, ASH w...
18 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Education Program
Education Program Co-Chairs:
Wendy Stock, MD, The University
of Chicago,...
ASH 55th Annual Meeting 19
Chronic Lymphocytic
Leukemia: A New Treatment
Era is Born
CHAIR:
Michael Hallek, MD, University...
20 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 	 		
Finding Treatment for the Untreatable:
The Power of Chemical Biology
CHAIR:
Robert Hromas,...
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
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The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition

  1. 1. AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 2021 L Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036 Phone: 202-776-0544 Fax: 202-292-0269 meetings@hematology.org www.hematology.org AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY Ernest N. Morial Convention Center New Orleans, LA Meeting: December 7-10, 2013 Exposition: December 7-9, 2013 Preliminary Program 55th ASH® Annual Meeting and Exposition
  2. 2. Greetings from the President It is an absolute honor to invite you to join me for the preeminent celebration of research, education, and patient care in hematology at the 55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans. For those of you who have been to the meeting previously, you will notice that 2013 marks the debut of several new, expanded, or special sessions that have not been offered previously. Those of you attending for the first time are in for a treat as you will have access to the most diverse range of clinical and research sessions we have ever offered, along with enhanced networking opportunities. We will showcase the full spectrum of translation in hematology from new basic research to new insights into disease pathogenesis to new therapies for patients to outcome analyses. With that in mind, I wanted to highlight several offerings of this year’s meeting that I am particularly excited to share with you: • The Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology (Sunday, December 9, 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., page 7), to be held on Sunday just prior to the Plenary Scientific Session, will celebrate what would have been the 100th birthday of Wallace H. Coulter, a prolific inventor whose discoveries became the basis for CBC determinations and flow cytometry. I hope you’ll join me at this session that honors this occasion with lectures from two outstanding and creative physician-scientists, Drs. Stuart Orkin and Bruce Beutler, who will discuss how novel concepts and technologies should revolutionize hematology research and practice in the future. • The Presidential Symposium (Tuesday, December 10, 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., page 10), will delve into an important and timely topic – using genomics for clinical decision making – that you won’t want to miss. During this year’s Symposium Drs. James Downing, Matthew Walter, and David Ginsburg will discuss advances in genomic sequencing and when and how we might integrate this information into patient care decisions for individuals with acute leukemia, MDS, and clotting and bleeding disorders. • Two Special Symposia offered as part of the Scientific Program, one on approaches for inhibiting “undruggable” targets in cancer (Saturday, December 7, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., page 11) and another on the role of reduction/oxidation chemistry in hematology (Sunday, December 8, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., page 11), will explore topics that cut across our vast discipline, bringing together scientists with diverse interests. • For the first time, the Scientific Program will feature four ticketed Scientific Spotlight Sessions (pages 41-42). Similar to the Education Spotlights, these sessions are intended to focus on areas of special interest and, in some cases, address controversies in hematology. • More than any other meeting in the past, this year’s meeting will focus on honing and maintaining a sense of community among our various smaller, sometimes distinct, and sometimes overlapping, constituencies. We will employ several strategies at this year’s meeting to accomplish this objective, including grouping like sessions geographically and synchronizing the timing of the talks and QA periods, allowing attendees to slip seamlessly between presentations in nearby rooms. Tables and chairs will also be grouped outside sessions on similar topics to encourage informal conversations and networking among attendees with common clinical or research interests (see page 56 for more information). While there are many new features of this year’s meeting that I encourage you to explore, I would also like to call your attention to the superb programming in store for you via two of the hallmark offerings of each ASH annual meeting: the Education and Scientific Programs. This year’s Education Program, chaired by Drs. Wendy Stock and John Tisdale, will present the practicing hematologist with updates on the latest clinical advances via nearly 30 sessions on topics ranging from optimizing therapies for non-Hodgkin lymphoma to sports medicine and hematology. This year’s Scientific Program, chaired by Drs. José López and Kevin Shannon, will present the latest scientific breakthroughs – from non-coding RNAs in normal and malignant hematopoiesis to transfusion medicine for the pregnant mother, fetus, and neonate – in 18 key areas of hematology. Of course, the Society’s annual celebration of groundbreaking advances in hematology would not be complete without honoring some of the distinguished leaders in the field through awards and special lectures. I encourage you to read more about each of our 2013 honorees on pages 6-9. I am extremely proud of the exceptional, diverse program that my colleagues have assembled. I hope you will join me in December to experience these talks first-hand, reconnect with old friends, and enjoy the sights and sounds of historic New Orleans. Sincerely yours, Janis L. Abkowitz, MD President
  3. 3. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 1 Scientific Program......................................... 33 Scientific Sessions .................................................... 33 Scientific Spotlight Sessions ............................... 41 Meet the Scientist ............................................ 43 Continuing Conversations .................................. 44 Oral and Poster Sessions............................... 45 Social Events ................................................ 45 Welcome Reception .................................................. 45 Poster Hall Receptions ............................................... 45 Exposition .................................................... 46 Exhibit Hall Product Theaters ......................................... 46 ASH Booth ............................................................ 46 National Institutes of Health Booths ................................. 46 General Information Registration ................................................ 48 Continuing Medical Education INFORMATION ..... 50 Hotel Accommodations ................................. 51 Hotel Map.............................................................. 52 Travel Information ........................................ 54 Meeting Location ...................................................... 54 Visitor Safety........................................................... 54 Weather ................................................................ 54 Air Travel ............................................................... 54 Visa Application Process for International Travelers ................. 54 Public Transportation.................................................. 55 Car Rental ............................................................. 55 Parking ................................................................. 55 Shuttle Bus Service ................................................... 55 Attendee Services ......................................... 56 ASH Central ........................................................... 56 ASH MeetUps ......................................................... 56 Live Remote Session Viewing Lounges.............................. 56 ASH Job Center ....................................................... 56 Free Wi-Fi .............................................................. 56 Child Care ............................................................. 56 Lactation Room ....................................................... 56 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Guest Services ............... 56 and Dining Options ASH Publications and Meeting Materials ........... 57 Abstracts on Flash Drive .............................................. 57 Mobile Application .................................................... 57 Abstracts Online/Program Planner................................... 57 Hematology 2013..................................................... 57 Program Book ......................................................... 57 ASH News Daily ...................................................... 57 Meeting Rules and Regulations ...................... 58 Upcoming ASH Meetings ................................. 59 Acknowledgments ........................................ 60 Table of Contents 55th ASH® Annual Meeting and Exposition New Orleans, LA • Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Meeting Dates: December 7-10, 2013 • Exposition Dates: December 7-9, 2013 Program Information Continuing Medical Education Credits............... 2 Meeting Overview ............................................. 3 Important Dates ......................................................... 3 What’s New ............................................................. 3 Schedule At-a-Glance .................................................. 4 General Sessions ............................................ 6 Ham-Wasserman Lecture .............................................. 6 Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award ......................... 6 for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology ... 7 Plenary Scientific Session .............................................. 8 E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize .................................. 8 Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize ....................................... 8 Announcement of Awards • William Dameshek Prize ........................................... 9 • Henry M. Stratton Medal........................................... 9 • Mentor Award ...................................................... 9 Presidential Symposium .............................................. 10 Business Meeting ..................................................... 10 Best of ASH ........................................................... 10 Special-Interest Sessions ............................... 11 For Scientists: Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development .............. 11 Special Scientific Symposium: Approaches for ..................... 11 Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer Special Scientific Symposium: Redox in Hematology............... 11 How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal.................. 11 Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online .... 12 Special Symposium on the Basic Science of ....................... 12 Hemostasis and Thrombosis For Practicing Hematologists: American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance ................. 12 of Certification Learning Session Special Symposium on Quality: Clinical Practice Guidelines ...... 13 ASH Practice Partnership Lunch ........................... 13 Consultative Hematology Course ........................... 13 For Educators: Training Program Directors’ Workshop .............................. 14 Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop ........................... 14 For All: Grassroots Network Lunch .................................. 14 Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception . 14 The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing ............................ 14 Your Hematology Expertise Globally Trainee Activities and Services......................... 15 Trainee Day ............................................................ 15 Trainee Welcome Reception.......................................... 15 Career-Development Lunch Sessions ............................... 16 Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions ............................ 17 Trainee Lounge ........................................................ 17 Additional Opportunities and Resources of Interest to Trainees ... 17 Education Program ........................................ 18 Education Sessions ................................................... 18 Education Spotlight Sessions .............................. 30 How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas ....... 32 ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ASH 55th Annual Meeting 1
  4. 4. 2 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program 2 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Continuing Medical Education CREDitS The American Society of Hematology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Society of Hematology designates this live activity for a maximum of 36 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians not licensed in the United States who participate in this CME activity are also eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Please see page 50 for information on how to obtain these credits, as well as how to claim CME credits through the European Hematology Association.
  5. 5. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 3 What’s New In a continuing effort to improve and enhance the ASH annual meeting experience and offerings, each year the Society adds new sessions and programs. Attendees should take note of the new, expanded, or enhanced existing offerings listed below that are making their debut at this year’s annual meeting; these activities will be indicated throughout this brochure with the following icons: • Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology – new offering (page 7) • Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development – new offering (page 11) • Special Scientific Symposia – new offerings (page 11) • Special-Interest Session: “How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal” (formerly a Trainee Didactic Session) – enhanced session (page 11) • American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session – new timing (page 12) • ASH Practice Partnership Lunch – expanded event (page 13) • Scientific Program Session on Epigenetics and Genomics – new session offering (page 39) • Scientific Spotlight Sessions – new offering (page 41) • Continuing Conversations (formerly “Scientific Forums”) – enhanced sessions (page 44) • Hematology MeetUps – new offering (page 56) • Live Remote Session Viewing Lounges – new offering (page 56) Important Dates June 6 – August 8 Abstract Submission Website Open Only electronic submissions will be permitted. Visit the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) for abstract submission information. July 24 – August 13 Online Early-Bird Registration Open for ASH Members Only August 14 – November 6 Advance Registration Open for ASH Members and Non-Members October 4 Group Room Block Request and Cancellation Deadline (see page 51) October 4 Rooming Lists and Full Payments for Group Room Blocks Due to the ASH Housing Center (see page 51) October 22 – 29 Late-Breaking Abstract Submission Website Open The selection process for late-breaking abstracts is extremely competitive; a maximum of six abstracts will be selected, regardless of the number of submissions. This deadline is not intended as an extension of the general submission deadline. Abstract reviewers will focus on capturing abstracts with groundbreaking, novel data that otherwise could not be presented at the annual meeting. November 6 Advance Registration Deadline Registration must be received by this date in order to qualify for the reduced advance registration rates. November 6 Individual Hotel Reservation Deadline Reservations must be made by this date in order to qualify for the reduced room rate. November 6 Child-Care Registration Deadline (see page 56) Space is limited. Registration must be made by this date in order to secure child care. November 26 Meeting Registration Cancellation Deadline S Meeting Overview ASH 55th Annual Meeting 3
  6. 6. 4 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program 4 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Schedule At-a-Glance The following schedule is preliminary and subject to change. Updated program information can be found on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013); final schedule and meeting room assignments will be provided in the program materials distributed at the annual meeting. Thursday, December 5 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Registration Friday, December 6 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (Sponsored by nonprofit organizations) These symposia are not part of the official ASH annual meeting and are planned solely by the sponsoring organizations. Brief symposium descriptions are included in a separate booklet provided with this brochure. 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. Trainee Day (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge) 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (Sponsored by nonprofit and for-profit organizations) 12:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Training Program Directors’ Workshop 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Trainee Welcome Reception (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge) 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (Sponsored by nonprofit and for-profit organizations) Saturday, December 7 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Poster Hall) 9:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Viewing 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Grassroots Network Lunch 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How I Treat 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Meet the Scientist 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Continuing Conversations 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Career-Development Lunch Sessions (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge) 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Product Theaters in Exhibit Hall 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Ham-Wasserman Lecture 1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Education/Scientific Program 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Special Symposium: Clinical Practice Guidelines 3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Special Scientific Symposium: Approaches for Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Education/Scientific Program 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Presentations 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Welcome Reception (Poster Hall) 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception Sunday, December 8 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Poster Hall) 9:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Session II – Viewing 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Special Scientific Symposium: Redox in Hematology
  7. 7. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 5 10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Viewing 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Simultaneous Oral Sessions 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Education Program 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Spotlight Sessions 12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch (A light lunch will be provided in the Exhibit Hall) 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Product Theaters in Exhibit Hall 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge; lunch will be provided) 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize 2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Coffee Break (Poster Hall) 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Education Program 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Spotlight Sessions 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Presentations 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Hall Reception 6:15 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions Tuesday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Registration 7:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Late-Breaking Abstracts Session 9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m. Announcement of Awards • William Dameshek Prize • Henry M. Stratton Medal • Mentor Award 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m. Presidential Symposium 11:20 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Business Meeting 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. Best of ASH 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch (A light lunch will be provided in the Exhibit Hall) 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How I Treat 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Meet the Scientist 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Continuing Conversations 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge; lunch will be provided) 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ASH Practice Partnership Lunch 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Product Theaters in Exhibit Hall 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Plenary Scientific Session 4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Spotlight Sessions 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Spotlight Sessions 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing Your Hematology Expertise Globally 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Session II – Presentations 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Hall Reception Monday, December 9 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Education Program 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 7:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Consultative Hematology Course 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize ASH 55th Annual Meeting 5
  8. 8. 6 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program S U N D AY Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology Sunday, December 8, 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. This award, named for Wallace Henry Coulter, a prolific inventor who made important contributions to hematology and to ASH, is bestowed on an individual who has demonstrated a lifetime commitment and made outstanding contributions to hematology and who has made a significant impact on education, research, and practice. 6 ASH 55th Annual Meeting General Sessions S AT U R D AY Ham-Wasserman Lecture Saturday, December 7, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. This lectureship is named in honor of two past Society presidents, the late Thomas Hale Ham, MD, and the late Louis R. Wasserman, MD, distinguished hematologists who contributed extensively to the Society. The Ham-Wasserman Lecture is traditionally given by an individual from outside the United States who has made a major contribution to our understanding of an area that relates to hematology. Iron and Hepcidin: A Story of Recycling and Balance Speaker: Clara Camaschella, MD, Vita-Salute University and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy Iron is essential for life but toxic in excess. Fortunately, tight feedback mechanisms have evolved to maintain iron balance through regulation of iron uptake and recycling. At the cellular level, iron regulatory proteins, controlled by iron and oxygen, orchestrate the coordinated expression of iron import, storage, and export proteins. At the systemic level, the liver peptide hepcidin regulates iron homeostasis by controlling the surface expression of the iron exporter ferroportin. In turn, both circulating and tissue iron provide signals for hepcidin modulation. Disruption of this finely tuned system causes iron overload or deficiency, as observed in patients with genetic iron disorders and the corresponding animal models. Hepcidin deficiency characterizes hereditary hemochromatosis and “iron loading anemias,” while hepcidin overproduction causes iron deficiency in genetic iron-refractory anemia and iron sequestration in inflammatory disorders. In this lecture, Dr. Camaschella will discuss iron homeostasis and why it is important to hematology. She will discuss how BMP6-SMAD signaling upregulates liver hepcidin synthesis and how the erythron signal(s) hepcidin suppression when iron is needed for red cell production. She will also discuss the negative hepcidin regulator, liver protease TMPRSS6, and how hepcidin excess and iron deficiency result from its inactivation. Dr. Camaschella will describe preclinical studies in murine models that suggest that correcting low hepcidin states, either through hepcidin replacement or pharmacological inhibition of TMPRSS6, can ameliorate iron overload in hemochromatosis and β-thalasssemia. She will also review how iron restriction may improve thalassemic red cell production. In addition, she will discuss emerging data that suggest that reducing high hepcidin levels might improve the anemia of inflammation. Dr. Camaschella will explain the current approaches to manipulating the hepcidin axis and critically assess the potential clinical applications. The 2013 Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology will be presented to Sir David John Weatherall, MD, of the University of Oxford in Oxford, United Kingdom, for his remarkable career and commitment to hematology. Dr. Weatherall made the original molecular genetics discovery for the basis of thalassemia and is widely known for being one of the first physician-scientists to apply the power of molecular biology to hematologic disorders. His scientific accomplishments have been recognized by membership in The Royal Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Weatherall’s efforts have reached trainees and patients worldwide through the Institute of Molecular Medicine, which he founded in 1989, and the thalassemia and sickle cell programs he has established in developing countries. Dr. Weatherall’s dedication to hematology spans more than five decades, exemplifying excellence in research, clinical care, and education.
  9. 9. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 7 Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology Sunday, December 8, 1:00 P.M. – 2:30 P.M. CHAIR: Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Speakers: Stuart H. Orkin, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Molecular Hematopoiesis: Single Genes to Many Genes and Beyond Bruce A. Beutler, MD, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX Understanding Immunity by Making It Fail The Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology will celebrate what would have been Wallace H. Coulter’s 100th birthday. Mr. Coulter discovered the Coulter Principle – that electrical charge could be used to determine the size and number of particles in a solution – which became the basis for the Coulter CounterTM and then for flow cytometry. The ability to identify and count blood and marrow cells has revolutionized the practice of hematology laboratory and clinical medicine by allowing point-of-care complete blood count determinations, flow cytometric classification of leukemia and lymphoma, and the tracking of minimal residual disease. These technologies also allowed for countless research advances over the last 50 years. This Special Symposium features two outstanding translational scientists, both innovative thinkers and engaging speakers, who will discuss how novel concepts and technologies should revolutionize hematology in the future. Stuart H. Orkin, MD, is David G. Nathan Professor of Pediatrics and Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Harvard Medical School and Chair of the Department of Pediatric Oncology at the Dana- Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. He will speak on the systems biology of normal blood cell differentiation and discuss how genomics and other new technologies may impact our understanding of hematologic disease pathogenesis and lead to novel therapies. Bruce A. Beutler, MD, holds the Raymond and Ellen Willie Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and also directs UT Southwestern’s Center for Genetics of Host Defense. He received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his discovery of Toll-like receptors, mechanisms that allow mammalian immune systems to sense infections and trigger a powerful immune response. Dr. Beutler will speak on the importance of innate immunity and how understanding and harnessing the power of the immune system might impact hematology in the future. New This year Wallace Henry Coulter Mr. Coulter was a prolific inventor, innovator, and entrepreneur who founded the Coulter Corporation and continued to lead this global diagnostics company for 40 years. His Coulter CounterTM , an instrument used for counting and analyzing red blood cells, became an invaluable tool for clinical diagnostics and medical research. During his lifetime, Mr. Coulter was a strong supporter of ASH, and the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation has continued this legacy by providing the vision and funding for numerous ASH programs, including the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute, the ASH Scholar Awards, Highlights of ASH in Asia and Latin America, and much more. Though not a hematologist, Wallace Coulter was the only recipient of the ASH Distinguished Service Award for his enormous contributions to the practice of hematology. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 7
  10. 10. 8 ASH 55th Annual Meeting General Sessions Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize Monday, December 9, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. This two-part lectureship, named for the late Ernest Beutler, MD, past president of ASH and legendary physician-scientist, recognizes major advances related to a single topic. This award honors two individuals, one who has enabled advances in basic science and another for achievements in clinical science or translational research. Thrombopoietin: From Molecule to Medicine Speakers: Kenneth Kaushansky, MD, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY David J. Kuter, MD, DPhil, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA The discovery of thrombopoietin and methods to fractionate pure populations of hematopoietic cells has led to important insights into the origins of marrow megakaryocytes and how they differentiate into platelets. Recent work has identified the biochemical signals that are modified when thrombopoietin binds to its receptor and the physiological consequences of those events. Among the most influential effects are those on hematopoietic transcription factors, the molecules responsible for the survival, expansion, and differentiation of megakaryocytic precursors. Particular attention has also been paid to three distinct aspects of thrombopoietin and thrombopoiesis: the effects of the hormone on hematopoietic stem cells, the deviation from normal diploid cell behavior that results in polyploid megakaryocytes, and the fragmentation of megakaryocytic cytoplasm that results in the distinct form and function of the mature, circulating blood platelet. Taken together, these insights have provided a clearer understanding of the regulation of platelet production in both normal and pathological physiology. These discoveries lay important groundwork for intervention in patients with insufficient or excessive thrombopoiesis. However, the translation of basic scientific insights into improved therapies for disease is not always straightforward. Although studies with early recombinant thrombopoietins proved effective in a variety of thrombocytopenic disorders, their progress was halted with the rise of neutralizing antibodies. Newer thrombopoietin receptor agonists — potent stimulators of platelet production that are not antigenic — have been developed and have demonstrated clinical benefit in a wide variety of thrombocytopenic disorders such as immune thrombocytopenia, hepatitis C-related thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia. Dr. Kenneth Kaushansky will discuss the basic biology of thrombopoietin and its effect on megakaryocytes. Dr. David Kuter will review the clinical development of the recombinant thrombopoietins as well as the newer thrombopoietin receptor agonists. Plenary Scientific Session Sunday, December 8, 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. During this prestigious session and highlight of the annual meeting, attendees will hear the presentations of the highest-caliber scientific abstracts selected by the Program Committee from among the thousands submitted from around the world. Plenary Scientific Session speakers and topics will be announced on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) when the abstracts are posted online in early November. M O N D AY E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize Monday, December 9, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. This award and lectureship was created in 1992 and named after the late Nobel Prize laureate and past Society president E. Donnall Thomas, MD. The E. Donnall Thomas Prize recognizes pioneering research achievements in hematology. Sailing to Ithaka: Gene Therapy’s Odyssey from Investigational Agent to Therapeutic Product Speaker: Katherine A. High, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA The disease burden of inherited disorders is high, accounting for as many as 50 percent of admissions to children’s hospitals, and a substantial number of admissions to adult hospitals as well. Yet for many of these disorders, treatment options are limited. The goal of gene therapies is to expand therapeutic options for this group of patients, but this seemingly straightforward concept has proven challenging to reduce to practice. Laboratory and small-scale clinical studies have, after two decades of clinical investigation, resulted in clear-cut therapeutic successes in a few well-defined disease settings, and, in the case of lipoprotein lipase deficiency, have led to the first licensed gene therapy product for a genetic disease. In vivo gene transfer with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has led to sustained clinical improvements in the setting of inherited retinal degenerative diseases and of hemophilia B as well. Studies are underway for other hematologic disorders including porphyria, hemophilia A, and Gaucher’s disease. Some specific obstacles to clinical efficacy had been anticipated based on animal studies, but others were elucidated only through clinical studies that highlighted problems not predicted by pre-clinical studies. Resulting laboratory studies enabled solutions that have led to the current generation of successful clinical studies. A nuanced understanding of the interaction of AAV vectors with the human immune response, and with other homeostatic mechanisms, has allowed investigators to harness the power of gene identification and gene delivery vectors to provide long-lasting therapeutic outcomes for previously incurable diseases.
  11. 11. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 9 T U E S D AY Announcement of Awards Tuesday, December 10, 9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m. William Dameshek Prize The William Dameshek Prize, named for the late William Dameshek, MD, a past president of ASH and the original editor of Blood, recognizes a recent outstanding contribution to the field of hematology. The 2013 Dameshek Prize will be awarded to Andrew Weyrich, PhD, of The University of Utah in Salt Lake City for his outstanding leadership in helping move the field of platelet biology forward. In particular, he is credited with identifying mRNA splicing and translational mechanisms that allow platelets, which are anucleated cells, to generate new or upregulate existing proteins in response to environmental changes. This research has very broad implications, from basic platelet biology to the role of platelets in the disease process, especially those considered to be outside of hemostasis and thrombosis pathways. Dr. Weyrich’s innovative, paradigm-shifting work has placed him at the forefront of redefining platelet function. Henry M. Stratton Medal The Stratton Medal, named for the late Henry Maurice Stratton, co-founder of Grune and Stratton, the medical publishing house that first published Blood, honors two individuals each year: one in basic research and the other in clinical/translational research. Recipients of the Henry M. Stratton Medal are known for their outstanding, well-recognized contributions to hematology. The 2013 Stratton Medal for Basic Research will be awarded to Nancy Andrews, MD, PhD, of Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, for her seminal contributions to basic hematology research in the fields of iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis. Dr. Andrews has established herself as one of the world’s leading investigators in this area of hematology research, and her record of scientific achievement in non-malignant hematology is unmatched. She is also one of hematology’s most accomplished and visible academic leaders, demonstrated by her roles as the first female dean of a major U.S. medical school as well as past leadership roles as president of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and as an ASH Councillor. Her accomplishments as an outstanding teacher and mentor are evidenced by her receipt of ASH’s 2011 Mentor Award for Basic Science. The 2013 Stratton Medal for Clinical/ Translational Research will be awarded to Elaine Jaffe, MD, of the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, for her revolutionary work in the molecular characteristics of lymphoma. Dr. Jaffe is regarded by her peers as the pre- eminent hematopathologist of her generation. She has completed intriguing work on the interrelationship between Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, focusing on grey zone lymphomas that appear to represent the missing link between classical Hodgkin lymphoma and other B-cell malignancies and exploring the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that cause a B cell to become a Hodgkin cell. Her impact on hematology has been amplified by her leadership roles in national and international societies and activities and the phenomenal number of highly productive trainees she has mentored who are now in major leadership roles. Mentor Award The ASH Mentor Award was established to recognize hematologists who have excelled in mentoring trainees and colleagues. Each year the Society recognizes two mentors, one in the basic sciences and one in clinical investigation and training, who have had a significant, positive impact on their mentees’ careers and, through their mentees, have advanced research and patient care in the field of hematology. The 2013 award winners will be announced at the meeting.
  12. 12. 10 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education ProgramGeneral Sessions Best of ASH Tuesday, December 10, 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. Co-Chairs: José López, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Kevin Shannon, MD, University of California — San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Before heading home, make time to attend “Best of ASH” on Tuesday for a review of the key themes from this year’s meeting. Don’t miss this one-hour session, led by the 2013 Annual Meeting Scientific Program Co-Chairs, to hear about the biggest breakthroughs from the meeting’s more than 4,000 abstract presentations. Presidential Symposium Tuesday, December 10, 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m. Using Genomics for Clinical Decision Making: Are We There Yet? Chair: Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Speakers: James Downing, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Genomics in Pediatric Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Matthew J. Walter, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Genomics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes David Ginsburg, MD, University of Michigan and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI Genomics in Clotting and Bleeding Genomic sequencing has provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and progression of both benign and malignant hematologic disorders. Taken together with insights from large-scale RNA and protein analyses, this information has stimulated new research directions that are beginning to elucidate the pathways and regulatory events that promote the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells and regulate hemostasis. However, this new information has raised several important questions: Are these findings sufficiently robust to direct clinical decisions in individual patients? What are the successes of personalized medicine? What is its promise and what are the obstacles? How should a hematology clinician evaluate current (and soon-to-be available) data and integrate this information into patient care? During the 2013 ASH Presidential Symposium, three experts will discuss these issues as they relate to specific hematologic disorders and will also comment on the role of genomics in clinical decision making. Dr. James Downing will present his own and others’ work that defines the mutational events in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. He will provide an introduction to genomics and discuss how understanding leukemia-specific mutations and their consequences can help guide the care of children with acute leukemia. Dr. Matthew Walter will discuss the use of whole-genome sequencing of patient DNA to study myelodysplasia at diagnosis and at disease progression. He will discuss new insights into the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and how the clonal and subclonal architecture of MDS might have an impact on clinical decision making. Dr. David Ginsburg will discuss new insights into the pathogenesis of bleeding and clotting syndromes and the contributions of genetic modifiers to disease severity. Business Meeting Tuesday, December 10, 11:20 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. At least one month prior to the annual meeting, reports on ASH’s financial status, Blood, and awards, and information about the Society’s leadership nominations are made available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) for review by ASH members. The Business Meeting will offer a forum for members to raise issues of concern regarding the information presented in these documents and will conclude with the traditional passing of the gavel to the new ASH President.
  13. 13. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 11 F o r S c i e n t i s t s : Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development Friday, December 6, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. All are invited to this workshop on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of myeloid development. This is a true workshop, where each section leader will briefly summarize the current questions facing the field and then lead discussions on how best to answer those questions. New findings or novel techniques that provide insight into these questions will be an essential part of this discussion. There is no additional fee to attend this workshop. More information will be available online at www.hematology.org/ASH2013 in November. CO-CHAIRS: Alan Hall Rosmarin, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA Leonard Zon, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA Special Scientific Symposium: Approaches for Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 4:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M. Chair: Kevin Shannon, MD, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Speakers: Scott W. Lowe, PhD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Strategies for Targeting Mutant p53 Julian Downward, PhD, Cancer Research UK, London, United Kingdom Synthetic Lethal Approaches for Targeting Mutant KRAS Inhibitors that directly target cancer-associated mutant proteins frequently induce genotype-specific clinical responses. However, the most prevalent mutations found in cancer either disable tumor suppressor genes or encode oncogenic proteins with biochemical properties that are not amenable to chemical inhibition. Data from the Human Cancer Genome Atlas project and other large-scale sequencing efforts have shown that TP53 and KRAS are the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer. This session will address emerging strategies for therapeutically targeting p53 and oncogenic RAS in hematologic and non-hematologic cancers. Dr. Scott Lowe will address the role of p53 in coordinating cellular stress responses and maintaining genomic integrity as well as approaches for treating cancers with TP53 mutations. Dr. Julian Downward will review biochemical properties of the oncogenic RAS/GTPase activating protein (GAP) molecular switch, potential strategies for treating cancers with somatic RAS gene mutations, and the use of synthetic lethal screens to uncover vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically. Special Scientific Symposium: Redox in Hematology SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 9:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M. Chair: José López, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Speakers: Steven Lentz, MD, PhD, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Redox Regulation of Hemostasis Katya Ravid, PhD, DSc, Boston University, Boston, MA Redox Regulation of Megakaryopoiesis and Platelet Function: The Role of Lysyl Oxidase Joseph Loscalzo, MD, PhD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Redox and the Vessel Wall The influence of reduction/oxidation chemistry in hematology and in many other areas of biology and medicine, particularly the role of oxidation, is poorly understood and underappreciated. For example, oxidation is generally considered to be harmful with nonspecific effects; however, many of its effects are actually very specific and often necessary for normal function. In this session, the role of redox chemistry in three areas of hematology will be discussed. The three talks will share the common theme of how protein and cellular functions relevant to hematology are regulated by specific electron-transfer reactions. Dr. Steven Lentz will cover the role of redox in regulating hemostasis and thrombosis. Dr. Katya Ravid will discuss how reactive oxygen species influence hematopoiesis and thrombosis, including her own work on lysyl oxidase in megakaryopoiesis and platelet function. Dr. Joseph Loscalzo will discuss the role of redox switches in regulating vascular function. How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 11:15 A.M. – 12:15 P.M. CHAIR: Bob Lӧwenberg, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Blood, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands The ability to communicate one’s work effectively by publication in high- impact journals is a benchmark for success in academic medicine. Even high-quality work may not be accepted if not presented in a well-crafted manuscript. This talk will provide insight into the elements of a high-quality manuscript worthy of publication in Blood, and tips on avoiding common errors that might result in rejection. New This year New This year New This year ENHANCED SESSION Special-Interest Sessions
  14. 14. 12 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online Sunday, December 8, 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. The explosion of information on the Internet has led to powerful new search technologies to help make it easier for users to find what they need. Blood has partnered with Stanford University’s HighWire Press to provide robust search capabilities within Blood’s online journal site (http://bloodjournal.org). This session will describe the search and alert features available on Blood Online, including RSS feeds (online features that automatically deliver updated website content directly to users) and electronic table-of-contents alerts, to mine the scientific literature. Participants will also be introduced to the 2.0 technology now available with Blood Online and to new search and automatic alert features available from the HighWire portal. These features allow users to conduct in-depth queries and browse hundreds of online journals and Medline as well as the other ASH publications that HighWire hosts. Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis: 30 Years of Research into the Thrombotic Microangiopathies Presented by the Scientific Committees on Hemostasis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, and Platelets Tuesday, December 10, 7:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Co-Chairs: Maureane Hoffman, MD, PhD, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC Zaverio Marcello Ruggeri, MD, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA Michael H. Kroll, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Speakers: Joel Moake, MD, Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Introduction: von Willebrand Factor in Thrombotic Microangiopathies Bernhard Lämmle, MD, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland ADAMTS13 in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Mariana Noris, PhD, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Complement Activation Vahid Afshar-Kharghan, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Cross-Talk Between Hemostatic Factors and Complement in the Thrombotic Microangiopathies This special session is designed to expand the opportunity for exchange and communication among basic scientists in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. This year it will highlight the 30th anniversary of the discovery that ultra-large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers trigger episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The session will be introduced by Dr. Joel Moake, who will describe the discovery and how it supports our current understanding of the entire spectrum of thrombotic microangiopathic disorders. Dr. Bernard Lämmle will then discuss the role of ADAMTS13 in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; Dr. Mariana Noris will discuss how complement activation causes the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome; and Dr. Vahid Afshar-Kharghan will discuss cross-talk between ADAMTS13, vWF, platelets, and complement in other types of thrombotic microangiopathies. A presentation will be made by the 2013 recipient of the Mary Rodes Gibson Memorial Award in Hemostasis and Thrombosis, an award presented to the trainee with the highest-scoring abstract in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis at the ASH annual meeting. The three co-chairs will also deliver a 30-minute “Best of ASH in Hemostasis and Thrombosis” talk that summarizes notable abstracts from the ASH annual meeting. It is hoped that at the end of this session members of the audience will have new ideas about how scientific discoveries could be translated into tools to improve the diagnosis and treatment of all thrombotic microangiopathies. F OR P r a c t i c i n g H e mat o l o g i s t s : American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session Friday, December 6, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. CHAIR: Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA SPEAKERS: Paul Barr, MD, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY Lucy Godley, MD, PhD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA This Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Learning Session will feature an American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) medical knowledge module on hematology; it is intended for those who are enrolled in the MOC process and due to recertify in the next few years. Learning Sessions are conducted in an interactive group setting and are led by ABIM-certified physicians. The three-hour session will cover the 30 multiple-choice questions in the “2013 Update in Hematology” ABIM module. At the completion of this session, those enrolled in the ABIM MOC program can submit their answers to ABIM for scoring to receive MOC credit. Enrolled participants can order a copy of the module(s) online from ABIM’s website, www.abim.org. At the conclusion of the session, participants will transfer the answers to their online module and submit the module to ABIM for scoring. For additional information about ABIM’s MOC program requirements, visit www.abim.org or call the ABIM Contact Center at 800- 441-ABIM. Please note that this is not a board review activity; the workshop is designed to facilitate completion of ABIM’s Self-Evaluation of Medical Knowledge MOC requirement. Ticket Prices Member: $85 Associate Member: $50 Non-Member in Training: $85 Non-Member: $135 Tickets can be purchased online during the meeting registration process. Special-Interest Sessions ticketed session New Time
  15. 15. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 13 Special Symposium on Quality: Clinical Practice Guidelines Saturday, December 7, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Co-Chairs: Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Mary Cushman, MD, MSc, University of Vermont, Colchester, VT Speakers: Holger Schünemann, MD, MSc, PhD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Clinical Guideline Development Demystified: A Look Under the Hood Lee H. Schwamm, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA Applying Clinical Guidelines to Patient Care David Garcia, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Clinical Guidelines: Balancing Methodologic Rigor and User-Friendliness It is important to understand how clinical guidelines can be optimized to enhance quality of care in hematology. In recent years, clinical guidelines have proliferated with more sophisticated methodology and development standards. Several high-profile guidelines on the evaluation and management of blood-related diseases have recently been published. This session will review how clinical practice guidelines can be best developed and used to optimize quality of care for patients with blood disorders. Speakers will identify the challenges and controversies facing the field of guideline development and will propose a means to balance priorities to produce guidelines that are both rigorous and user-friendly and that empower end- users to incorporate guidelines into clinical practice. ASH Practice Partnership Lunch (APP) Sunday, December 8, 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Health Reform Implementation in 2014 – What Can Hematologists Expect? Chair: Steven L. Allen, MD, North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health System, Lake Success, NY Speaker: Kavita Patel, MD, Brookings Institution, Washington, DC The ASH Practice Partnership (APP) is ASH’s network for practice-based hematologists to elevate practice-related issues within the Society. The APP Lunch is a special session during the annual meeting designed for this community. During the first half of this session, attendees will hear from a national policy expert to obtain an “insider’s” view of the major provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) taking effect in 2014. The presentation will include an overview of the expansion of Medicaid, the development of state insurance exchanges for individuals and small businesses, and other private health insurance plan reforms that will impact physicians. Participants will also receive a description of ASH resources to help hematologists during PPACA implementation. The second half of the session will provide a networking opportunity for practice-based hematologists to meet with colleagues and ASH leaders. Consultative Hematology Course Monday, December 9, 7:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Intended for clinical hematologists based in community practice in North America, the 2013 Consultative Hematology Course will cover commonly encountered clinical problems that arise in everyday practice and require the expertise of a hematologist. It will focus on non-malignant hematology and will use case-based presentations and interactive discussions on topics such as thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, bleeding, white blood cell abnormalities, and other areas. The hands-on course will be led by faculty familiar with consultative practice issues. 7:30 a.m. Registration Breakfast (provided) 8:00 a.m. Welcome and Introductions 8:10 a.m. Confusing Thrombocytopenias Keith R. McCrae, MD, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute 8:40 a.m. Hemolytic Anemias Charles T. Quinn, MD, MS, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital 9:10 a.m. Clinical Conundrums in Transfusion Medicine Ravi Sarode, MD, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center 9:40 a.m. Coffee Break 10:00 a.m. Acquired Coagulation Disorders Alice Ma, MD, University of North Carolina 10:30 a.m. Thrombosis in Cancer Alok A. Khorana, MD, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute 11:00 a.m. New Oral Anticoagulants: When and How? Stephan Moll, MD, University of North Carolina School of Medicine 11:30 a.m. Summary and Closing Remarks 11:45 a.m. Course Adjourned Registration Category Rate* Member with Annual Meeting Registration $75 Non-Member with Annual Meeting Registration $125 Member without Annual Meeting Registration $125 Non-Member without Annual Meeting Registration $175 *Registration fee includes continental breakfast and coffee break. Advance online registration is limited to clinical hematologists practicing in North America; on-site registration will be possible for other groups if space is available. Please contact ashregistration@jspargo.com if interested in registering for this course and not registering for the annual meeting. ticketed session Expanded EVENT ticketed session
  16. 16. 14 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 14 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Special-Interest Sessions F OR E D U C ATOR S : Training Program Directors’ Workshop Friday, December 6, 12:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. The Training Program Directors’ Workshop provides an interactive forum for directors of all hematology-related training programs to learn from the foremost experts in the field and from each other. Chair: Alison W. Loren, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA DIDACTIC SESSIONS: SPEAKERS: Christian Cable, MD*, Scott White Healthcare, Temple, TX Elaine Muchmore, MD*, University of California – San Diego, San Diego, CA Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s Residency Review Committee Update Lisa M. Bellini, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Work and Play Well with Others: How to Remediate Fellows Roy Silverstein, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI When Role Models Fall Short: How to Remediate Faculty *Drs. Cable and Muchmore will be speaking as members of the Residency Review Committee on Internal Medicine. BREAKOUT SESSIONS: SPEAKERS: Lisa M. Bellini, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Dealing with “Problem Fellows” Roy Silverstein, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Dealing with “Problem Faculty” These sessions will provide training program directors outstanding opportunities to learn about and share best practices for critical issues facing their programs. Program directors who complete this workshop will be eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM . A buffet lunch will be available at 12:30 p.m. and the program will run from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop Sunday, December 8, 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Don’t Just Sit There: Active Learning in Medical School Chair: Christian Cable, MD, Scott White Healthcare, Temple TX Speaker: Thomas R. Viggiano, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN The session will include a didactic presentation on the principles of and rationale for active learning, the current mandate for teaching in medical schools. As educators are given less lecture time for teaching and students are expected to learn more independently, how can a hematology course adapt? F OR A L L : Grassroots Network Lunch* Saturday, December 7, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. ASH has become influential with policymakers because of the strength of its “Grassroots Network” of ASH members who contact their elected officials to share the Society’s messages, concerns, and recommendations. The Grassroots Network Lunch provides a forum for all interested members to learn how they can participate in ASH’s advocacy efforts, communicate with Congress and the White House, and become effective advocates for hematology. Discussion will focus on ASH’s legislative and regulatory priorities, including response to the National Institutes of Health budget crisis, an overview of the Society’s 2013 advocacy accomplishments, and a preview of the Society’s 2014 advocacy agenda. *Registration information will be sent to ASH Grassroots Network members later this summer. Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception Saturday, December 7, 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to this event, which will showcase training and research opportunities geared toward increasing the diversity of scholars in the field of hematology. The highlight of the session will be scientific presentations from the ASH Minority Medical Student Award Program participants. The reception will also feature poster presentations by students participating in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Minority Research Supplement and an announcement about the ASH-AMFDP Award, a partnership between ASH and the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Representatives from the National Institutes of Health will also attend to provide information about their training and research offerings. Please join us to hear the impressive research presentations and learn more about these exciting opportunities. The event will conclude with a buffet dinner and networking session. The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing Your Hematology Expertise Globally Sunday, December 8, 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. ASH and its partner organization Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) are looking for hematology experts with a passion for teaching and training who want to broaden their horizons through a short-term volunteer experience in a developing country. This one-hour session will feature presentations on the current volunteer programs in Cambodia, Peru, Tanzania, and Uganda. Attendees will learn about these programs, the educational needs in both clinical and laboratory hematology, and their roles as potential volunteers. The session will provide insight into how volunteering with HVO can improve hematology care overseas, confront hematology health challenges globally, and reignite volunteers’ passion for medicine. A question-and-answer session with program directors from respective volunteer sites will follow the presentations. Bring your sense of adventure and learn how a brief visit can make a very big impact. ticketed session
  17. 17. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15 The ASH annual meeting provides hematology trainees with a variety of high- quality educational, career-development, and networking opportunities. To help trainees make the most of their meeting experience, a number of activities and services have been identified as most relevant to the unique interests of undergraduates, medical and graduate students, residents, and fellows (MD and PhD). These events are open only to Associate members; Medical Student, Graduate Student, and Resident members; and non-members in training wearing blue trainee meeting badges. To register for the meeting as a trainee, please see page 49. Trainee Day Friday, December 6 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. This year’s program will provide attendees with the opportunity to learn about statistics and trial design, career development, mechanisms of funding, and how to manage a collaborative research team. Co-Chairs: Sherine Elsawa, PhD, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, IL Martha Mims, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Didactic Session Speakers: Susan Hilsenbeck, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Statistics and Clinical Trial Design This lecture will provide an introduction to the main statistical ideas and techniques used in clinical trial design and analysis. Dr. Hilsenbeck will focus on clinical aspects of trial design, including randomization, sample size, data analysis, and stopping rules. Donna Neuberg, ScD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Statistics and Basic/Translational Trial Design Dr. Neuberg will focus on interpretation of data from correlative studies with an emphasis on genomic and proteomic data and correlation with clinical outcome. First-Rotation Breakout Sessions Speakers: David Largaespada, PhD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Mechanisms of Basic Science Funding Stephanie Lee, MD, MPH, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Mechanisms of Clinical Research Funding Irene Ghobrial, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Mechanisms of Translational Research Funding This session will focus on funding alternatives for the basic science lab as well as clinical and translational studies. Speakers will not only cover traditional funding strategies, emphasizing National Institutes of Health K awards, but they will also discuss identifying and applying for alternative sources of funding, including institutional pilot and seed grant awards, foundation grants, grants from other government agencies, grants from specialty societies like ASH, and support from pharmaceutical companies. Attendees will have the option of attending one of three different sessions geared toward the basic scientist, the clinical investigator, and the translational investigator. Second-Rotation Breakout Sessions Speakers: Donna Woulfe, PhD, University of Delaware, Newark, DE How to Manage a Collaborative Basic Research Team Kieron Dunleavy, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD How to Manage a Collaborative Clinical Research Team Catherine Bollard, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX How to Manage a Collaborative Translational Research Team This session will focus on assembling a research team, identifying collaborators, negotiating roles on the collaborative team, avoiding collaboration pitfalls, and resolving disagreements. Attendees will have the option of attending one of three different sessions geared toward the basic scientist, the clinical investigator, and the translational investigator. Third-Rotation Breakout Sessions Speakers: Charles Mullighan, MBBS, MSc, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Basic Career Development John Gribben, MD, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, United Kingdom Translational Career Development Nigel Key, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Clinical Career Development This session will focus on the basics of finding a job in hematology, how to interview, and how to negotiate. This session will also focus on early stages of career development such as how to identify a mentor and how to develop short-term and long-term career goals. Attendees will have the option of attending one of three different sessions geared toward the basic scientist, the clinical investigator, and the translational investigator. Trainee Welcome Reception Friday, December 6 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Held on Friday afternoon following Trainee Day, this informal social event provides the opportunity for undergraduates, medical students, graduate students, residents, and fellows (MD and PhD) to gather with their colleagues. During the reception, there will be brief introductory remarks from the ASH President. Members of the Trainee Council will also be available to provide an overview of ASH trainee resources and of annual meeting events and sessions most relevant to trainees. Trainee Activities and Services ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15
  18. 18. Career-Development Lunch Sessions Saturday, December 7 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. These sessions will provide an intimate venue for trainees to meet with leaders in hematology to discuss professional development questions. ASH has invited a diverse group of more than 30 distinguished researchers and physicians to participate, representing the wide array of practice areas within hematology. Faculty will be available to discuss careers in clinical, translational, and basic research. There will also be representatives present to discuss PhD careers, careers in industry settings, and careers in private and clinical practice. This event is open only to Associate members; Medical Student, Graduate Student, and Resident members; and non-members in training wearing blue trainee meeting badges. A boxed lunch will be provided. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis. As seating is limited, attendees are strongly encouraged to arrive early. No additional participants will be allowed in the rooms once these sessions are filled. CHAIR: Reed E. Drews, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA SPEAKERS: Adult Hematology/Clinical Research: Malignant Hematology/Bone Marrow Transplant Session 1 Jacalyn Rosenblatt, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Oliver W. Press, MD, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Session 2 Kenneth C. Anderson, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Martin Tallman, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Adult Hematology/Clinical Research: Non-Malignant Hematology Session 1 Kojo Elenitoba-Johnson, MD, BloodCenter of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Lawrence Goodnough, MD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Session 2 Mark Zumberg, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Laboratory Translational Hematology Session 1 Alvin Schmaier, MD, MS, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Jeffrey Zwicker, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Session 2 Elaine Majerus, MD, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO David Ginsburg, MD, University of Michigan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI Industry Careers Session 1 Jamie Freedman, MD, PhD, OPKO Health, Inc., Miami, FL Jeff Lawrence, MD, Ipsen Pharma, Milford, MA Session 2 Richard Gaynor, MD, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN Jane Huang, MD, Genentech, Inc., San Francisco, CA Government Careers: U.S. Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health Session 1 Donna DiMichele, MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Terry Bishop, PhD, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Session 2 Andre L. Kindzelski, MD, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Ann Farrell, MD, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Careers Session 1 Alan D’Andrea, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Elizabeth Raetz, MD, New York University, New York, NY Session 2 Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Stephen Hunger, MD, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO PhD Careers Session 1 Edward Srour, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN Diane F. Jelinek, PhD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Adrian Gee, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Session 2 Vesna Najfeld, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Nancy Speck, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA James Engel, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Private Practice Careers Session 1 David Shepard, MD, Northwest Georgia Oncology Centers, Marietta, GA Jodi Mones, MD, Bronx River Medical Associates, Bronx, NY Session 2 Burton F. Alexander III, MD, Virginia Oncology Associates, Virginia Beach, VA Sarah “Sally” Scott, MD, Montana Cancer Center, Missoula, MT Residents and Medical Students Academic Program in Hematology and Hematology/ Oncology Session 1 Reed E. Drews, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Scott Gitlin, MD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Session 2 Alice Ma, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Allison Loren, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 16 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Trainee Activities and Services
  19. 19. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions Sunday, December 8 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. During lunch on Sunday and Monday, ASH will offer didactic sessions designed to provide trainees with an overview of timely and relevant career-oriented issues. A boxed lunch will be provided. Space is available on a first-come, first- served basis. As seating is limited, attendees are strongly encouraged to arrive early. No additional participants will be allowed in the rooms once these sessions are filled. CHAIR: Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA SPEAKERS: Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Time Management and Balance It seems that lives are becoming ever more complex. The demands of career and personal life can seem overwhelming at times. In this session, Dr. Wun will review the time- management challenges facing a busy clinician, clinician scientist, or physician scientist as well as describe strategies for dealing with these challenges and various models for achieving work/life balance. Jan A. Nolta, PhD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Bridging the Translational Divide: The Role of the PhD Translating basic science discoveries to clinical applications is the major goal of much of biomedical research. One of the barriers that exists to successful translation is the cultural difference between basic science investigators and physician scientists. Although a bidirectional understanding of this difference is essential, the perspective of the non-clinician PhD will be emphasized in this session. Working at the intersection of biomedical science and clinical medicine, the PhD can develop the skills to participate in and lead translational research teams to improve human health. Monday, December 9 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. CHAIR: Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Speakers: Theodore Warkentin, MD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Giving a Scientific Presentation Presentation of one’s scholarly work is an essential task for an academic career and the effective communication techniques that allow for engaging presentations need to be learned and honed over time. This session will cover presentation styles and proper construction of slides and posters, highlighting common presentation pitfalls as well as tactics to help engage an audience. Attendees will learn how to make the most of opportunities to present their scholarly work and receive valuable feedback. Lillian Sung, MD, PhD, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Practical Biostatistics 101 This session is designed to help translate the complexities of statistics into relevant clinical applications and will provide a practical clinician perspective on key biostatistical concepts and terms as well as basic study designs, touching on relevant clinical endpoints with an emphasis on clinical examples. Trainee Lounge Trainees are invited to visit the Trainee Lounge located in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center (specific room location to be provided in the on-site materials). The lounge provides a relaxing place for trainees to meet with colleagues, access the Internet, and recharge with complimentary refreshments. The lounge will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 7, 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 8, and Monday, December 9, and from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon on Tuesday, December 10. Additional Opportunities and Resources of Interest to Trainees Special Symposium on Innovation .................... 7 and the Future of Hematology Special Scientific Symposium: ......................... 11 Approaches for Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer Special Scientific Symposium: ......................... 11 Redox in Hematology Special Interest Session: How to .....................11 Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal Blood and Beyond: Searching ......................... 12 the Scientific Literature Online Special Symposium on the Basic .................... 12 Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis Special Symposium on Quality: ....................... 13 Clinical Practice Guidelines Grassroots Network Lunch ............................... 14 Promoting Minorities in Hematology ............... 14 Presentations and Reception Education Session – “Junior-Faculty ............... 29 Development Education Program: Which Grant is Right for Me?” Education Spotlight Sessions .......................... 30 How I Treat: Bringing Science ......................... 32 to Clinical Dilemmas Scientific Spotlight Sessions ............................ 41 Meet the Scientist ................................................ 43 Continuing Conversations ................................. 44 ASH Booth ............................................................ 46 National Institutes of Health Booths ............... 46 ASH Job Center ................................................... 56 Are you a post-doctoral fellow residing outside North America? Consider participating in ASH’s International Post-Doctoral Fellows (IPDF) program, which allows post-doctoral fellows to access valuable ASH resources at no charge for up to four years. The program is open to postdoctoral fellows with an MD, PhD, or equivalent medical degree, who reside outside Canada, Mexico, or the United States; register for the ASH annual meeting as a non-member in training; and are enrolled in an approved hematology or oncology training program. Benefits include a complimentary online subscription to Blood and online access to Hematology (the Education Program) and The Hematologist. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/IPDF. If registering for the annual meeting as a non-member in training, see page 49 for special instructions. Are you a North American undergraduate student or trainee, but not a member of ASH? Please visit www.hematology.org/Membership for details about becoming a trainee member. Fellows: ASH offers a deeply discounted Associate membership for those in approved hematology or hematology/oncology training programs. Medical Students, Graduate Students and Residents: ASH now offers a complimentary student membership. Visit www.hematology.org/membership to take advantage of these free benefits. Undergraduate Students: Consider participating in ASH’s North American Undergraduate Student Benefit program. This program provides undergraduate students with a complimentary online subscription to Blood, advance annual meeting notifications, and eligibility for reduced meeting registration at the non-member-in-training rate. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/NASB. If registering for the annual meeting as a non-member in training, see page 49 for special instructions. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 17
  20. 20. 18 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program Education Program Co-Chairs: Wendy Stock, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL John Tisdale, MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD The 2013 Education Program will be held Saturday, December 7, through Monday, December 9. Each session will be offered twice unless otherwise noted. A question- and-answer period will occur at the end of each individual speaker presentation. Chapters based on these sessions will be published in Hematology 2013. Allogeneic Transplant for High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Are We Improving Outcomes? CHAIR: Koen van Besien, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY SPEAKERS: Koen van Besien, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY Allogeneic Transplant for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Graft-Versus-Leukemia Versus Graft-Versus- Host Disease and Disease Recurrence Charles F. Craddock, MBBCh, DPhil, Centre for Clinical Hematology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom Pharmacologic Methods to Reduce Disease Recurrence Andrew Artz, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Older Patients/Older Donors: Choosing Wisely While allogeneic transplantation is an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in remission and for those with myelodysplastic syndromes, its utility is limited by the risks it presents for relapse, treatment-related mortality, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Dr. Koen van Besien will discuss strategies to modulate GVHD and their impact on graft- versus-leukemia effects, including the relative merits of various post-transplant GVHD prevention methods of in vitro and in vivo T-cell depletion. He will also discuss how donor selection may also modulate transplant outcomes. Dr. van Besien will then discuss high-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, including HLA-DP typing, the role of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, and the potential role of non-inherited maternal antigens and inherited paternal antigens in umbilical cord blood or haploidentical transplant. Dr. Charles Craddock will next discuss risk factors for relapse after transplant, pharmacologic interventions to decrease the risk for recurrence, and methods for optimizing their utility. Dr. Andrew Artz will focus his presentation on transplant for older adults. Patients 60 years and older are frequently considered for transplant; however, more resistant disease, co-morbid conditions, and other health impairments may affect their outcomes. Dr. Artz will discuss the assessment and outcomes of older transplant candidates as well as donor selection for older adults, including the use of older sibling donors. Changing Paradigms in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: From the Genome to the Patient CHAIR: Anjali S. Advani, MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH SPEAKERS: Christine Harrison, PhD, Newcastle University Leukemia Research Cytogenetics Group, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom Targeting Signaling Pathways in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: New Insights Mary V. Relling, PharmD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Pharmacogenomics of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: New Insights into Treatment Toxicity and Efficacy Anjali S. Advani, MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Changing Paradigms: New Antibodies and Their Role This session will focus on recent advances in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), including new insights into targeting signaling pathways, the use of pharmacogenomics to help better determine treatment toxicity and efficacy, and encouraging clinical results of antibodies as treatment for this disease. Dr. Christine Harrison will review the clinical and prognostic characteristics of the cytogenetic and genetic abnormalities that have led to treatment changes in ALL. She will discuss new genetic aberrations within defined signaling pathways, identified by genomic and next-generation sequencing approaches that provide potential novel therapeutic targets with the prospect of reduced toxicity. Dr. Mary Relling will discuss how germline genomic variation affects treatment toxicity and efficacy in ALL. She will discuss how genome- wide approaches have identified variations important for response and for adverse effects of therapy as well as how pharmacogenomic testing is now being incorporated into the routine clinical care of patients with ALL. Dr. Anjali Advani will review the expression and prognostic impact of the various antigens on the cell surface in ALL. She will also discuss the various therapies targeting these antigens, including naked antibodies, immunotoxins, and immunoconjugates; the results of these antibodies in clinical trials; and plans to further incorporate these drugs in the treatment of ALL.
  21. 21. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 19 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A New Treatment Era is Born CHAIR: Michael Hallek, MD, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany SPEAKERS: Michael Hallek, MD, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany Signaling the End of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? New Frontline Treatment Strategies John G. Gribben, MD, DSc, Barts Cancer Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, United Kingdom Immunotherapeutic Strategies Including Transplant: Eradication of Disease! Tait Shanafelt, MD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Treatment of Older Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Key Questions and Current Answers This session will focus on recent advances in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The most recent, targeted drugs for CLL, as well as therapeutic concepts for elderly, non-fit patients with CLL and immunotherapeutic approaches to achieve long-lasting remissions will be discussed. Dr. Michael Hallek will review the currently available diagnostic and therapeutic tools and give an integrated recommendation of how to manage CLL in 2013. Particular emphasis will be placed on the integration of novel, targeted agents for CLL therapy into one sequential treatment approach. Dr. John Gribben will review some of the clinical key features of CLL, which induces a state of immunosuppression, causing increased susceptibility to infections and failure of an anti-tumor immune response. He will then report the state of the art on allogeneic stem cell transplantation and other immunotherapeutic approaches such as CLL vaccines, CXCR4 antagonists, adoptive cellular immunotherapies (e.g., chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cells), CD40 ligand gene therapy, and the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide. Dr. Tait Shanafelt will discuss how CLL is a leukemia of advanced age, and how the management of patients with CLL is more complex than in many other malignancies. This review will address several key questions in the management of elderly patients with CLL, including why the classification of the “fitness” of CLL patients is necessary, what criteria should be used to classify patient fitness, when elderly patients should be treated, how therapy should be selected for elderly patients, and which therapy is best for each individual patient. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Refining/Redefining the State of the Art CHAIR: Timothy P. Hughes, MD, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia SPEAKERS: Timothy P. Hughes, MD, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia Which Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor? An Embarrassment of Riches... Vivian G. Oehler, MD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Update on Current Monitoring Recommendations: Practical Points for Clinical Practice Richard Van Etten, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA Alternative Approaches to Eradicating the Malignant Clone: Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor Combinations and Beyond This session will focus on recent advances in our understanding of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), examining how these translate to clinical efforts to prevent disease progression and drug resistance as well as strategies to maximize achievement of long-term disease control. Consequently, a new era in CML therapy is beginning in which our ultimate goal is to help our patients achieve treatment-free remission in addition to prolonging their survival. Dr. Timothy Hughes will discuss current therapeutic options for the newly diagnosed CML patient, including the multiple frontline therapy options available to patients in many countries. During his presentation, Dr. Hughes will compare the efficacy and safety of the three frontline tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and propose a decision-making process that incorporates patient co-morbidities, disease- risk assessments, and appropriate long-term treatment goals to provide a customized approach to CML therapy. Dr. Vivian Oehler will review appropriate cytogenetic and molecular monitoring procedures that are indicated during the first few years of therapy, when the main focus is prevention of disease progression and drug resistance. Dr. Oehler will also review the rationale for long-term molecular monitoring, driven by the need to detect poor drug adherence and to confirm the achievement of a deep molecular response. Dr. Richard Van Etten will review the critical pathways driving leukemic stem cell survival in CML and discuss the most promising approaches to leukemia eradication. This will include an update on the use of TKIs in combination with stem cell targeting agents and the potential role of manipulating the immune response or targeting the marrow microenvironment to achieve long-term disease control. Clinical Dilemmas in Acute Myeloid Leukemia CHAIR: Mark J. Levis, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD SPEAKERS: Gary J. Schiller, MD, University of California – Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Treatment Today ... and Tomorrow Peter Paschka, MD, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemias: Does Targeting KIT Improve on High-Dose Intermittant ARA-C Consolidation? Mark J. Levis, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD FLT3 Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: What Is the Best Approach in 2013? With the advent of more complex molecular and cytogenetic testing, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is routinely sorted into multiple different sub-types, each with distinctive clinical characteristics. Practitioners are now confronted with new clinical dilemmas when deciding how to use risk-adapted therapy in an attempt to achieve maximum benefit for their patients. This session will focus on recent advances in the classification of AML that may influence the course of treatment chosen. Dr. Gary Schiller will review emerging AML classification schemes, focusing in particular on how high-risk disease can now be defined. He will discuss how this classification might influence decision making regarding induction and consolidation regimens, including stem cell transplantation and non-standardized therapies. Dr. Peter Paschka will provide an overview on the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of core binding factor AML (CBF-AML). In particular, he will discuss the role of KIT mutations in the biology and prognostication of CBF-AML and will review recent efforts to target this receptor in the context of existing therapeutic regimens. Dr. Mark Levis will review the complexities of interpreting FLT3 mutation results for AML patients and will discuss how the results can be used to guide treatment decisions. He will also discuss the potential for allogeneic transplant and small molecule FLT3 inhibitors to improve the survival of these patients.
  22. 22. 20 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Finding Treatment for the Untreatable: The Power of Chemical Biology CHAIR: Robert Hromas, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL SPEAKERS: Burt Adelman, MD, DYAX Corp., Burlington, MA Opening Up Drug Development To Everyone Stephen Frye, PhD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Drug Discovery in Academic Institutions Jonathan Drachman, MD, Seattle Genetics, Inc., Bothell, WA Antibody-Drug Conjugates: The Chemistry Behind Empowering Antibodies to Fight Cancer Cancer drug development has been incremental for more than three decades, but a recent advancement, chemical biology, has accelerated the pace of discovery. Chemical biology fits a drug to a defined protein target, inhibiting specific pathways required for cancer cell survival and proliferation. This advancement not only provides hope for finding new therapies for previously untreatable diseases, but also makes drug development accessible to a wider range of investigators. This session will provide an introduction to this new advancement in drug development, and speakers will describe avenues available for hematologists of varied backgrounds to participate. Dr. Burt Adelman will discuss the shift to direct study of defined protein targets in specific human diseases as the most productive strategy to accelerate drug discovery and validation, as predictive animal models of human disease do not exist for many of the most important disorders that lack treatment. Dr. Stephen Frye will describe the opportunities for academics to contribute to the discovery of new therapeutics. Embedding medicinal chemists with cancer biologists creates collaborative opportunities for drug discovery as well as synthesis of chemical biology compounds to better elucidate the role of specific proteins and pathways. Several case studies, including the discovery of the acute lymphocytic leukemia MER kinase inhibitors and discovery of chemical epigenetic regulators, will be presented. Dr. Jonathan Drachman will present the technological advances in monoclonal antibodies, stable linkers, conjugation chemistry, and potent cytotoxic small molecules that have led to the great potential of antibody-drug conjugates. Graft Engineering and Adoptive Immunotherapy: Tackling Resistance CHAIR: Helen E. Heslop, MD, Baylor College of Medicine Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Houston, TX SPEAKERS: Michael R. Verneris, MD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Natural Killer Cells and Regulatory T Cells: How to Manipulate a Graft for Optimal Graft- Versus-Leukemia Helen E. Heslop, MD, Baylor College of Medicine Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Houston, TX T-Cell Therapy for Viral Infections Crystal Mackall, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD T-Cell Adoptive Immunotherapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia This session will focus on recent advances in adoptive immunotherapy strategies after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Speakers will review the current status of approaches using different cellular therapy products to improve transplant outcome by promoting immune reconstitution and augmenting antiviral and anti-leukemic activity. Dr. Michael Verneris will review the use of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing to select donors with potential natural killer (NK) alloreactivity. He will also review different strategies for adoptive transfer of fresh or expanded NK cells post transplant to enhance the graft-versus-tumor effect. Dr. Verneris will then discuss different approaches to select or expand regulatory T-cell populations and the results of clinical trials involving this cell product conducted with the goal of preventing graft- versus-host disease while preserving graft- versus-leukemia activity. Dr. Helen Heslop will review different approaches to reconstitute antiviral immunity after transplant using expanded virus-specific T-cell products specific to one or multiple viruses. She will then discuss current strategies to allow more widespread application of this strategy, including the use of closely matched banked cells or more rapidly available products from the transplant donor, such as directly selected or rapidly expanded cells. Dr. Crystal Mackall will review the results of recent studies using chimeric antigen receptors targeting the CD19 antigen to treat relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia after transplant or to treat residual disease pre transplant. She will then discuss alternative target antigens such as CD22 and review considerations for choosing a target antigen and developing a chimeric antigen construct. Education Program

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