The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
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The American Society of Hematology-2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition Presentation Transcript

  • 1. AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 2021 L Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036 Phone: 202-776-0544 Fax: 202-292-0269 meetings@hematology.org www.hematology.org AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY Ernest N. Morial Convention Center New Orleans, LA Meeting: December 7-10, 2013 Exposition: December 7-9, 2013 Preliminary Program 55th ASH® Annual Meeting and Exposition
  • 2. Greetings from the President It is an absolute honor to invite you to join me for the preeminent celebration of research, education, and patient care in hematology at the 55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans. For those of you who have been to the meeting previously, you will notice that 2013 marks the debut of several new, expanded, or special sessions that have not been offered previously. Those of you attending for the first time are in for a treat as you will have access to the most diverse range of clinical and research sessions we have ever offered, along with enhanced networking opportunities. We will showcase the full spectrum of translation in hematology from new basic research to new insights into disease pathogenesis to new therapies for patients to outcome analyses. With that in mind, I wanted to highlight several offerings of this year’s meeting that I am particularly excited to share with you: • The Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology (Sunday, December 9, 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., page 7), to be held on Sunday just prior to the Plenary Scientific Session, will celebrate what would have been the 100th birthday of Wallace H. Coulter, a prolific inventor whose discoveries became the basis for CBC determinations and flow cytometry. I hope you’ll join me at this session that honors this occasion with lectures from two outstanding and creative physician-scientists, Drs. Stuart Orkin and Bruce Beutler, who will discuss how novel concepts and technologies should revolutionize hematology research and practice in the future. • The Presidential Symposium (Tuesday, December 10, 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., page 10), will delve into an important and timely topic – using genomics for clinical decision making – that you won’t want to miss. During this year’s Symposium Drs. James Downing, Matthew Walter, and David Ginsburg will discuss advances in genomic sequencing and when and how we might integrate this information into patient care decisions for individuals with acute leukemia, MDS, and clotting and bleeding disorders. • Two Special Symposia offered as part of the Scientific Program, one on approaches for inhibiting “undruggable” targets in cancer (Saturday, December 7, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., page 11) and another on the role of reduction/oxidation chemistry in hematology (Sunday, December 8, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., page 11), will explore topics that cut across our vast discipline, bringing together scientists with diverse interests. • For the first time, the Scientific Program will feature four ticketed Scientific Spotlight Sessions (pages 41-42). Similar to the Education Spotlights, these sessions are intended to focus on areas of special interest and, in some cases, address controversies in hematology. • More than any other meeting in the past, this year’s meeting will focus on honing and maintaining a sense of community among our various smaller, sometimes distinct, and sometimes overlapping, constituencies. We will employ several strategies at this year’s meeting to accomplish this objective, including grouping like sessions geographically and synchronizing the timing of the talks and Q&A periods, allowing attendees to slip seamlessly between presentations in nearby rooms. Tables and chairs will also be grouped outside sessions on similar topics to encourage informal conversations and networking among attendees with common clinical or research interests (see page 56 for more information). While there are many new features of this year’s meeting that I encourage you to explore, I would also like to call your attention to the superb programming in store for you via two of the hallmark offerings of each ASH annual meeting: the Education and Scientific Programs. This year’s Education Program, chaired by Drs. Wendy Stock and John Tisdale, will present the practicing hematologist with updates on the latest clinical advances via nearly 30 sessions on topics ranging from optimizing therapies for non-Hodgkin lymphoma to sports medicine and hematology. This year’s Scientific Program, chaired by Drs. José López and Kevin Shannon, will present the latest scientific breakthroughs – from non-coding RNAs in normal and malignant hematopoiesis to transfusion medicine for the pregnant mother, fetus, and neonate – in 18 key areas of hematology. Of course, the Society’s annual celebration of groundbreaking advances in hematology would not be complete without honoring some of the distinguished leaders in the field through awards and special lectures. I encourage you to read more about each of our 2013 honorees on pages 6-9. I am extremely proud of the exceptional, diverse program that my colleagues have assembled. I hope you will join me in December to experience these talks first-hand, reconnect with old friends, and enjoy the sights and sounds of historic New Orleans. Sincerely yours, Janis L. Abkowitz, MD President
  • 3. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 1 Scientific Program......................................... 33 Scientific Sessions .................................................... 33 Scientific Spotlight Sessions ............................... 41 Meet the Scientist ............................................ 43 Continuing Conversations .................................. 44 Oral and Poster Sessions............................... 45 Social Events ................................................ 45 Welcome Reception .................................................. 45 Poster Hall Receptions ............................................... 45 Exposition .................................................... 46 Exhibit Hall Product Theaters ......................................... 46 ASH Booth ............................................................ 46 National Institutes of Health Booths ................................. 46 General Information Registration ................................................ 48 Continuing Medical Education INFORMATION ..... 50 Hotel Accommodations ................................. 51 Hotel Map.............................................................. 52 Travel Information ........................................ 54 Meeting Location ...................................................... 54 Visitor Safety........................................................... 54 Weather ................................................................ 54 Air Travel ............................................................... 54 Visa Application Process for International Travelers ................. 54 Public Transportation.................................................. 55 Car Rental ............................................................. 55 Parking ................................................................. 55 Shuttle Bus Service ................................................... 55 Attendee Services ......................................... 56 ASH Central ........................................................... 56 ASH MeetUps ......................................................... 56 Live Remote Session Viewing Lounges.............................. 56 ASH Job Center ....................................................... 56 Free Wi-Fi .............................................................. 56 Child Care ............................................................. 56 Lactation Room ....................................................... 56 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Guest Services ............... 56 and Dining Options ASH Publications and Meeting Materials ........... 57 Abstracts on Flash Drive .............................................. 57 Mobile Application .................................................... 57 Abstracts Online/Program Planner................................... 57 Hematology 2013..................................................... 57 Program Book ......................................................... 57 ASH News Daily ...................................................... 57 Meeting Rules and Regulations ...................... 58 Upcoming ASH Meetings ................................. 59 Acknowledgments ........................................ 60 Table of Contents 55th ASH® Annual Meeting and Exposition New Orleans, LA • Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Meeting Dates: December 7-10, 2013 • Exposition Dates: December 7-9, 2013 Program Information Continuing Medical Education Credits............... 2 Meeting Overview ............................................. 3 Important Dates ......................................................... 3 What’s New ............................................................. 3 Schedule At-a-Glance .................................................. 4 General Sessions ............................................ 6 Ham-Wasserman Lecture .............................................. 6 Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award ......................... 6 for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology ... 7 Plenary Scientific Session .............................................. 8 E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize .................................. 8 Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize ....................................... 8 Announcement of Awards • William Dameshek Prize ........................................... 9 • Henry M. Stratton Medal........................................... 9 • Mentor Award ...................................................... 9 Presidential Symposium .............................................. 10 Business Meeting ..................................................... 10 Best of ASH ........................................................... 10 Special-Interest Sessions ............................... 11 For Scientists: Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development .............. 11 Special Scientific Symposium: Approaches for ..................... 11 Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer Special Scientific Symposium: Redox in Hematology............... 11 How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal.................. 11 Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online .... 12 Special Symposium on the Basic Science of ....................... 12 Hemostasis and Thrombosis For Practicing Hematologists: American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance ................. 12 of Certification Learning Session Special Symposium on Quality: Clinical Practice Guidelines ...... 13 ASH Practice Partnership Lunch ........................... 13 Consultative Hematology Course ........................... 13 For Educators: Training Program Directors’ Workshop .............................. 14 Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop ........................... 14 For All: Grassroots Network Lunch .................................. 14 Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception . 14 The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing ............................ 14 Your Hematology Expertise Globally Trainee Activities and Services......................... 15 Trainee Day ............................................................ 15 Trainee Welcome Reception.......................................... 15 Career-Development Lunch Sessions ............................... 16 Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions ............................ 17 Trainee Lounge ........................................................ 17 Additional Opportunities and Resources of Interest to Trainees ... 17 Education Program ........................................ 18 Education Sessions ................................................... 18 Education Spotlight Sessions .............................. 30 How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas ....... 32 ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ticketed session ASH 55th Annual Meeting 1
  • 4. 2 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program 2 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Continuing Medical Education CREDitS The American Society of Hematology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Society of Hematology designates this live activity for a maximum of 36 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians not licensed in the United States who participate in this CME activity are also eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Please see page 50 for information on how to obtain these credits, as well as how to claim CME credits through the European Hematology Association.
  • 5. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 3 What’s New In a continuing effort to improve and enhance the ASH annual meeting experience and offerings, each year the Society adds new sessions and programs. Attendees should take note of the new, expanded, or enhanced existing offerings listed below that are making their debut at this year’s annual meeting; these activities will be indicated throughout this brochure with the following icons: • Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology – new offering (page 7) • Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development – new offering (page 11) • Special Scientific Symposia – new offerings (page 11) • Special-Interest Session: “How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal” (formerly a Trainee Didactic Session) – enhanced session (page 11) • American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session – new timing (page 12) • ASH Practice Partnership Lunch – expanded event (page 13) • Scientific Program Session on Epigenetics and Genomics – new session offering (page 39) • Scientific Spotlight Sessions – new offering (page 41) • Continuing Conversations (formerly “Scientific Forums”) – enhanced sessions (page 44) • Hematology MeetUps – new offering (page 56) • Live Remote Session Viewing Lounges – new offering (page 56) Important Dates June 6 – August 8 Abstract Submission Website Open Only electronic submissions will be permitted. Visit the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) for abstract submission information. July 24 – August 13 Online Early-Bird Registration Open for ASH Members Only August 14 – November 6 Advance Registration Open for ASH Members and Non-Members October 4 Group Room Block Request and Cancellation Deadline (see page 51) October 4 Rooming Lists and Full Payments for Group Room Blocks Due to the ASH Housing Center (see page 51) October 22 – 29 Late-Breaking Abstract Submission Website Open The selection process for late-breaking abstracts is extremely competitive; a maximum of six abstracts will be selected, regardless of the number of submissions. This deadline is not intended as an extension of the general submission deadline. Abstract reviewers will focus on capturing abstracts with groundbreaking, novel data that otherwise could not be presented at the annual meeting. November 6 Advance Registration Deadline Registration must be received by this date in order to qualify for the reduced advance registration rates. November 6 Individual Hotel Reservation Deadline Reservations must be made by this date in order to qualify for the reduced room rate. November 6 Child-Care Registration Deadline (see page 56) Space is limited. Registration must be made by this date in order to secure child care. November 26 Meeting Registration Cancellation Deadline S Meeting Overview ASH 55th Annual Meeting 3
  • 6. 4 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program 4 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Schedule At-a-Glance The following schedule is preliminary and subject to change. Updated program information can be found on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013); final schedule and meeting room assignments will be provided in the program materials distributed at the annual meeting. Thursday, December 5 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Registration Friday, December 6 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (Sponsored by nonprofit organizations) These symposia are not part of the official ASH annual meeting and are planned solely by the sponsoring organizations. Brief symposium descriptions are included in a separate booklet provided with this brochure. 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. Trainee Day (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge) 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (Sponsored by nonprofit and for-profit organizations) 12:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Training Program Directors’ Workshop 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Trainee Welcome Reception (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge) 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (Sponsored by nonprofit and for-profit organizations) Saturday, December 7 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Poster Hall) 9:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Viewing 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Grassroots Network Lunch 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How I Treat 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Meet the Scientist 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Continuing Conversations 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Career-Development Lunch Sessions (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge) 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Product Theaters in Exhibit Hall 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Ham-Wasserman Lecture 1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Education/Scientific Program 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Special Symposium: Clinical Practice Guidelines 3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Special Scientific Symposium: Approaches for Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Education/Scientific Program 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Presentations 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Welcome Reception (Poster Hall) 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception Sunday, December 8 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Poster Hall) 9:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Session II – Viewing 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Special Scientific Symposium: Redox in Hematology
  • 7. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 5 10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Viewing 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Simultaneous Oral Sessions 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Education Program 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Spotlight Sessions 12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch (A light lunch will be provided in the Exhibit Hall) 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Product Theaters in Exhibit Hall 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge; lunch will be provided) 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize 2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Coffee Break (Poster Hall) 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Education Program 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Spotlight Sessions 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Presentations 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Hall Reception 6:15 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions Tuesday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Registration 7:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Late-Breaking Abstracts Session 9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m. Announcement of Awards • William Dameshek Prize • Henry M. Stratton Medal • Mentor Award 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m. Presidential Symposium 11:20 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Business Meeting 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. Best of ASH 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch (A light lunch will be provided in the Exhibit Hall) 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How I Treat 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Meet the Scientist 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Continuing Conversations 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions (Open only to trainees wearing a blue badge; lunch will be provided) 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ASH Practice Partnership Lunch 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Product Theaters in Exhibit Hall 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Plenary Scientific Session 4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Spotlight Sessions 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Spotlight Sessions 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing Your Hematology Expertise Globally 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Session II – Presentations 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Hall Reception Monday, December 9 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Education Program 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 7:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Consultative Hematology Course 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize ASH 55th Annual Meeting 5
  • 8. 6 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program S U N D AY Announcement of Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology Sunday, December 8, 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. This award, named for Wallace Henry Coulter, a prolific inventor who made important contributions to hematology and to ASH, is bestowed on an individual who has demonstrated a lifetime commitment and made outstanding contributions to hematology and who has made a significant impact on education, research, and practice. 6 ASH 55th Annual Meeting General Sessions S AT U R D AY Ham-Wasserman Lecture Saturday, December 7, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. This lectureship is named in honor of two past Society presidents, the late Thomas Hale Ham, MD, and the late Louis R. Wasserman, MD, distinguished hematologists who contributed extensively to the Society. The Ham-Wasserman Lecture is traditionally given by an individual from outside the United States who has made a major contribution to our understanding of an area that relates to hematology. Iron and Hepcidin: A Story of Recycling and Balance Speaker: Clara Camaschella, MD, Vita-Salute University and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy Iron is essential for life but toxic in excess. Fortunately, tight feedback mechanisms have evolved to maintain iron balance through regulation of iron uptake and recycling. At the cellular level, iron regulatory proteins, controlled by iron and oxygen, orchestrate the coordinated expression of iron import, storage, and export proteins. At the systemic level, the liver peptide hepcidin regulates iron homeostasis by controlling the surface expression of the iron exporter ferroportin. In turn, both circulating and tissue iron provide signals for hepcidin modulation. Disruption of this finely tuned system causes iron overload or deficiency, as observed in patients with genetic iron disorders and the corresponding animal models. Hepcidin deficiency characterizes hereditary hemochromatosis and “iron loading anemias,” while hepcidin overproduction causes iron deficiency in genetic iron-refractory anemia and iron sequestration in inflammatory disorders. In this lecture, Dr. Camaschella will discuss iron homeostasis and why it is important to hematology. She will discuss how BMP6-SMAD signaling upregulates liver hepcidin synthesis and how the erythron signal(s) hepcidin suppression when iron is needed for red cell production. She will also discuss the negative hepcidin regulator, liver protease TMPRSS6, and how hepcidin excess and iron deficiency result from its inactivation. Dr. Camaschella will describe preclinical studies in murine models that suggest that correcting low hepcidin states, either through hepcidin replacement or pharmacological inhibition of TMPRSS6, can ameliorate iron overload in hemochromatosis and β-thalasssemia. She will also review how iron restriction may improve thalassemic red cell production. In addition, she will discuss emerging data that suggest that reducing high hepcidin levels might improve the anemia of inflammation. Dr. Camaschella will explain the current approaches to manipulating the hepcidin axis and critically assess the potential clinical applications. The 2013 Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology will be presented to Sir David John Weatherall, MD, of the University of Oxford in Oxford, United Kingdom, for his remarkable career and commitment to hematology. Dr. Weatherall made the original molecular genetics discovery for the basis of thalassemia and is widely known for being one of the first physician-scientists to apply the power of molecular biology to hematologic disorders. His scientific accomplishments have been recognized by membership in The Royal Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Weatherall’s efforts have reached trainees and patients worldwide through the Institute of Molecular Medicine, which he founded in 1989, and the thalassemia and sickle cell programs he has established in developing countries. Dr. Weatherall’s dedication to hematology spans more than five decades, exemplifying excellence in research, clinical care, and education.
  • 9. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 7 Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology Sunday, December 8, 1:00 P.M. – 2:30 P.M. CHAIR: Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Speakers: Stuart H. Orkin, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Molecular Hematopoiesis: Single Genes to Many Genes and Beyond Bruce A. Beutler, MD, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX Understanding Immunity by Making It Fail The Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology will celebrate what would have been Wallace H. Coulter’s 100th birthday. Mr. Coulter discovered the Coulter Principle – that electrical charge could be used to determine the size and number of particles in a solution – which became the basis for the Coulter CounterTM and then for flow cytometry. The ability to identify and count blood and marrow cells has revolutionized the practice of hematology laboratory and clinical medicine by allowing point-of-care complete blood count determinations, flow cytometric classification of leukemia and lymphoma, and the tracking of minimal residual disease. These technologies also allowed for countless research advances over the last 50 years. This Special Symposium features two outstanding translational scientists, both innovative thinkers and engaging speakers, who will discuss how novel concepts and technologies should revolutionize hematology in the future. Stuart H. Orkin, MD, is David G. Nathan Professor of Pediatrics and Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Harvard Medical School and Chair of the Department of Pediatric Oncology at the Dana- Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. He will speak on the systems biology of normal blood cell differentiation and discuss how genomics and other new technologies may impact our understanding of hematologic disease pathogenesis and lead to novel therapies. Bruce A. Beutler, MD, holds the Raymond and Ellen Willie Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and also directs UT Southwestern’s Center for Genetics of Host Defense. He received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his discovery of Toll-like receptors, mechanisms that allow mammalian immune systems to sense infections and trigger a powerful immune response. Dr. Beutler will speak on the importance of innate immunity and how understanding and harnessing the power of the immune system might impact hematology in the future. New This year Wallace Henry Coulter Mr. Coulter was a prolific inventor, innovator, and entrepreneur who founded the Coulter Corporation and continued to lead this global diagnostics company for 40 years. His Coulter CounterTM , an instrument used for counting and analyzing red blood cells, became an invaluable tool for clinical diagnostics and medical research. During his lifetime, Mr. Coulter was a strong supporter of ASH, and the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation has continued this legacy by providing the vision and funding for numerous ASH programs, including the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute, the ASH Scholar Awards, Highlights of ASH in Asia and Latin America, and much more. Though not a hematologist, Wallace Coulter was the only recipient of the ASH Distinguished Service Award for his enormous contributions to the practice of hematology. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 7
  • 10. 8 ASH 55th Annual Meeting General Sessions Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize Monday, December 9, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. This two-part lectureship, named for the late Ernest Beutler, MD, past president of ASH and legendary physician-scientist, recognizes major advances related to a single topic. This award honors two individuals, one who has enabled advances in basic science and another for achievements in clinical science or translational research. Thrombopoietin: From Molecule to Medicine Speakers: Kenneth Kaushansky, MD, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY David J. Kuter, MD, DPhil, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA The discovery of thrombopoietin and methods to fractionate pure populations of hematopoietic cells has led to important insights into the origins of marrow megakaryocytes and how they differentiate into platelets. Recent work has identified the biochemical signals that are modified when thrombopoietin binds to its receptor and the physiological consequences of those events. Among the most influential effects are those on hematopoietic transcription factors, the molecules responsible for the survival, expansion, and differentiation of megakaryocytic precursors. Particular attention has also been paid to three distinct aspects of thrombopoietin and thrombopoiesis: the effects of the hormone on hematopoietic stem cells, the deviation from normal diploid cell behavior that results in polyploid megakaryocytes, and the fragmentation of megakaryocytic cytoplasm that results in the distinct form and function of the mature, circulating blood platelet. Taken together, these insights have provided a clearer understanding of the regulation of platelet production in both normal and pathological physiology. These discoveries lay important groundwork for intervention in patients with insufficient or excessive thrombopoiesis. However, the translation of basic scientific insights into improved therapies for disease is not always straightforward. Although studies with early recombinant thrombopoietins proved effective in a variety of thrombocytopenic disorders, their progress was halted with the rise of neutralizing antibodies. Newer thrombopoietin receptor agonists — potent stimulators of platelet production that are not antigenic — have been developed and have demonstrated clinical benefit in a wide variety of thrombocytopenic disorders such as immune thrombocytopenia, hepatitis C-related thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia. Dr. Kenneth Kaushansky will discuss the basic biology of thrombopoietin and its effect on megakaryocytes. Dr. David Kuter will review the clinical development of the recombinant thrombopoietins as well as the newer thrombopoietin receptor agonists. Plenary Scientific Session Sunday, December 8, 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. During this prestigious session and highlight of the annual meeting, attendees will hear the presentations of the highest-caliber scientific abstracts selected by the Program Committee from among the thousands submitted from around the world. Plenary Scientific Session speakers and topics will be announced on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) when the abstracts are posted online in early November. M O N D AY E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize Monday, December 9, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. This award and lectureship was created in 1992 and named after the late Nobel Prize laureate and past Society president E. Donnall Thomas, MD. The E. Donnall Thomas Prize recognizes pioneering research achievements in hematology. Sailing to Ithaka: Gene Therapy’s Odyssey from Investigational Agent to Therapeutic Product Speaker: Katherine A. High, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA The disease burden of inherited disorders is high, accounting for as many as 50 percent of admissions to children’s hospitals, and a substantial number of admissions to adult hospitals as well. Yet for many of these disorders, treatment options are limited. The goal of gene therapies is to expand therapeutic options for this group of patients, but this seemingly straightforward concept has proven challenging to reduce to practice. Laboratory and small-scale clinical studies have, after two decades of clinical investigation, resulted in clear-cut therapeutic successes in a few well-defined disease settings, and, in the case of lipoprotein lipase deficiency, have led to the first licensed gene therapy product for a genetic disease. In vivo gene transfer with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has led to sustained clinical improvements in the setting of inherited retinal degenerative diseases and of hemophilia B as well. Studies are underway for other hematologic disorders including porphyria, hemophilia A, and Gaucher’s disease. Some specific obstacles to clinical efficacy had been anticipated based on animal studies, but others were elucidated only through clinical studies that highlighted problems not predicted by pre-clinical studies. Resulting laboratory studies enabled solutions that have led to the current generation of successful clinical studies. A nuanced understanding of the interaction of AAV vectors with the human immune response, and with other homeostatic mechanisms, has allowed investigators to harness the power of gene identification and gene delivery vectors to provide long-lasting therapeutic outcomes for previously incurable diseases.
  • 11. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 9 T U E S D AY Announcement of Awards Tuesday, December 10, 9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m. William Dameshek Prize The William Dameshek Prize, named for the late William Dameshek, MD, a past president of ASH and the original editor of Blood, recognizes a recent outstanding contribution to the field of hematology. The 2013 Dameshek Prize will be awarded to Andrew Weyrich, PhD, of The University of Utah in Salt Lake City for his outstanding leadership in helping move the field of platelet biology forward. In particular, he is credited with identifying mRNA splicing and translational mechanisms that allow platelets, which are anucleated cells, to generate new or upregulate existing proteins in response to environmental changes. This research has very broad implications, from basic platelet biology to the role of platelets in the disease process, especially those considered to be outside of hemostasis and thrombosis pathways. Dr. Weyrich’s innovative, paradigm-shifting work has placed him at the forefront of redefining platelet function. Henry M. Stratton Medal The Stratton Medal, named for the late Henry Maurice Stratton, co-founder of Grune and Stratton, the medical publishing house that first published Blood, honors two individuals each year: one in basic research and the other in clinical/translational research. Recipients of the Henry M. Stratton Medal are known for their outstanding, well-recognized contributions to hematology. The 2013 Stratton Medal for Basic Research will be awarded to Nancy Andrews, MD, PhD, of Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, for her seminal contributions to basic hematology research in the fields of iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis. Dr. Andrews has established herself as one of the world’s leading investigators in this area of hematology research, and her record of scientific achievement in non-malignant hematology is unmatched. She is also one of hematology’s most accomplished and visible academic leaders, demonstrated by her roles as the first female dean of a major U.S. medical school as well as past leadership roles as president of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and as an ASH Councillor. Her accomplishments as an outstanding teacher and mentor are evidenced by her receipt of ASH’s 2011 Mentor Award for Basic Science. The 2013 Stratton Medal for Clinical/ Translational Research will be awarded to Elaine Jaffe, MD, of the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, for her revolutionary work in the molecular characteristics of lymphoma. Dr. Jaffe is regarded by her peers as the pre- eminent hematopathologist of her generation. She has completed intriguing work on the interrelationship between Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, focusing on grey zone lymphomas that appear to represent the missing link between classical Hodgkin lymphoma and other B-cell malignancies and exploring the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that cause a B cell to become a Hodgkin cell. Her impact on hematology has been amplified by her leadership roles in national and international societies and activities and the phenomenal number of highly productive trainees she has mentored who are now in major leadership roles. Mentor Award The ASH Mentor Award was established to recognize hematologists who have excelled in mentoring trainees and colleagues. Each year the Society recognizes two mentors, one in the basic sciences and one in clinical investigation and training, who have had a significant, positive impact on their mentees’ careers and, through their mentees, have advanced research and patient care in the field of hematology. The 2013 award winners will be announced at the meeting.
  • 12. 10 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education ProgramGeneral Sessions Best of ASH Tuesday, December 10, 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. Co-Chairs: José López, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Kevin Shannon, MD, University of California — San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Before heading home, make time to attend “Best of ASH” on Tuesday for a review of the key themes from this year’s meeting. Don’t miss this one-hour session, led by the 2013 Annual Meeting Scientific Program Co-Chairs, to hear about the biggest breakthroughs from the meeting’s more than 4,000 abstract presentations. Presidential Symposium Tuesday, December 10, 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m. Using Genomics for Clinical Decision Making: Are We There Yet? Chair: Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Speakers: James Downing, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Genomics in Pediatric Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Matthew J. Walter, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Genomics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes David Ginsburg, MD, University of Michigan and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI Genomics in Clotting and Bleeding Genomic sequencing has provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and progression of both benign and malignant hematologic disorders. Taken together with insights from large-scale RNA and protein analyses, this information has stimulated new research directions that are beginning to elucidate the pathways and regulatory events that promote the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells and regulate hemostasis. However, this new information has raised several important questions: Are these findings sufficiently robust to direct clinical decisions in individual patients? What are the successes of personalized medicine? What is its promise and what are the obstacles? How should a hematology clinician evaluate current (and soon-to-be available) data and integrate this information into patient care? During the 2013 ASH Presidential Symposium, three experts will discuss these issues as they relate to specific hematologic disorders and will also comment on the role of genomics in clinical decision making. Dr. James Downing will present his own and others’ work that defines the mutational events in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. He will provide an introduction to genomics and discuss how understanding leukemia-specific mutations and their consequences can help guide the care of children with acute leukemia. Dr. Matthew Walter will discuss the use of whole-genome sequencing of patient DNA to study myelodysplasia at diagnosis and at disease progression. He will discuss new insights into the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and how the clonal and subclonal architecture of MDS might have an impact on clinical decision making. Dr. David Ginsburg will discuss new insights into the pathogenesis of bleeding and clotting syndromes and the contributions of genetic modifiers to disease severity. Business Meeting Tuesday, December 10, 11:20 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. At least one month prior to the annual meeting, reports on ASH’s financial status, Blood, and awards, and information about the Society’s leadership nominations are made available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) for review by ASH members. The Business Meeting will offer a forum for members to raise issues of concern regarding the information presented in these documents and will conclude with the traditional passing of the gavel to the new ASH President.
  • 13. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 11 F o r S c i e n t i s t s : Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development Friday, December 6, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. All are invited to this workshop on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of myeloid development. This is a true workshop, where each section leader will briefly summarize the current questions facing the field and then lead discussions on how best to answer those questions. New findings or novel techniques that provide insight into these questions will be an essential part of this discussion. There is no additional fee to attend this workshop. More information will be available online at www.hematology.org/ASH2013 in November. CO-CHAIRS: Alan Hall Rosmarin, MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA Leonard Zon, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA Special Scientific Symposium: Approaches for Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 4:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M. Chair: Kevin Shannon, MD, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Speakers: Scott W. Lowe, PhD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Strategies for Targeting Mutant p53 Julian Downward, PhD, Cancer Research UK, London, United Kingdom Synthetic Lethal Approaches for Targeting Mutant KRAS Inhibitors that directly target cancer-associated mutant proteins frequently induce genotype-specific clinical responses. However, the most prevalent mutations found in cancer either disable tumor suppressor genes or encode oncogenic proteins with biochemical properties that are not amenable to chemical inhibition. Data from the Human Cancer Genome Atlas project and other large-scale sequencing efforts have shown that TP53 and KRAS are the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer. This session will address emerging strategies for therapeutically targeting p53 and oncogenic RAS in hematologic and non-hematologic cancers. Dr. Scott Lowe will address the role of p53 in coordinating cellular stress responses and maintaining genomic integrity as well as approaches for treating cancers with TP53 mutations. Dr. Julian Downward will review biochemical properties of the oncogenic RAS/GTPase activating protein (GAP) molecular switch, potential strategies for treating cancers with somatic RAS gene mutations, and the use of synthetic lethal screens to uncover vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically. Special Scientific Symposium: Redox in Hematology SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 9:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M. Chair: José López, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Speakers: Steven Lentz, MD, PhD, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Redox Regulation of Hemostasis Katya Ravid, PhD, DSc, Boston University, Boston, MA Redox Regulation of Megakaryopoiesis and Platelet Function: The Role of Lysyl Oxidase Joseph Loscalzo, MD, PhD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Redox and the Vessel Wall The influence of reduction/oxidation chemistry in hematology and in many other areas of biology and medicine, particularly the role of oxidation, is poorly understood and underappreciated. For example, oxidation is generally considered to be harmful with nonspecific effects; however, many of its effects are actually very specific and often necessary for normal function. In this session, the role of redox chemistry in three areas of hematology will be discussed. The three talks will share the common theme of how protein and cellular functions relevant to hematology are regulated by specific electron-transfer reactions. Dr. Steven Lentz will cover the role of redox in regulating hemostasis and thrombosis. Dr. Katya Ravid will discuss how reactive oxygen species influence hematopoiesis and thrombosis, including her own work on lysyl oxidase in megakaryopoiesis and platelet function. Dr. Joseph Loscalzo will discuss the role of redox switches in regulating vascular function. How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 11:15 A.M. – 12:15 P.M. CHAIR: Bob Lӧwenberg, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Blood, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands The ability to communicate one’s work effectively by publication in high- impact journals is a benchmark for success in academic medicine. Even high-quality work may not be accepted if not presented in a well-crafted manuscript. This talk will provide insight into the elements of a high-quality manuscript worthy of publication in Blood, and tips on avoiding common errors that might result in rejection. New This year New This year New This year ENHANCED SESSION Special-Interest Sessions
  • 14. 12 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online Sunday, December 8, 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. The explosion of information on the Internet has led to powerful new search technologies to help make it easier for users to find what they need. Blood has partnered with Stanford University’s HighWire Press to provide robust search capabilities within Blood’s online journal site (http://bloodjournal.org). This session will describe the search and alert features available on Blood Online, including RSS feeds (online features that automatically deliver updated website content directly to users) and electronic table-of-contents alerts, to mine the scientific literature. Participants will also be introduced to the 2.0 technology now available with Blood Online and to new search and automatic alert features available from the HighWire portal. These features allow users to conduct in-depth queries and browse hundreds of online journals and Medline as well as the other ASH publications that HighWire hosts. Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis: 30 Years of Research into the Thrombotic Microangiopathies Presented by the Scientific Committees on Hemostasis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, and Platelets Tuesday, December 10, 7:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Co-Chairs: Maureane Hoffman, MD, PhD, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC Zaverio Marcello Ruggeri, MD, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA Michael H. Kroll, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Speakers: Joel Moake, MD, Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Introduction: von Willebrand Factor in Thrombotic Microangiopathies Bernhard Lämmle, MD, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland ADAMTS13 in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Mariana Noris, PhD, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Complement Activation Vahid Afshar-Kharghan, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Cross-Talk Between Hemostatic Factors and Complement in the Thrombotic Microangiopathies This special session is designed to expand the opportunity for exchange and communication among basic scientists in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. This year it will highlight the 30th anniversary of the discovery that ultra-large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers trigger episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The session will be introduced by Dr. Joel Moake, who will describe the discovery and how it supports our current understanding of the entire spectrum of thrombotic microangiopathic disorders. Dr. Bernard Lämmle will then discuss the role of ADAMTS13 in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; Dr. Mariana Noris will discuss how complement activation causes the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome; and Dr. Vahid Afshar-Kharghan will discuss cross-talk between ADAMTS13, vWF, platelets, and complement in other types of thrombotic microangiopathies. A presentation will be made by the 2013 recipient of the Mary Rodes Gibson Memorial Award in Hemostasis and Thrombosis, an award presented to the trainee with the highest-scoring abstract in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis at the ASH annual meeting. The three co-chairs will also deliver a 30-minute “Best of ASH in Hemostasis and Thrombosis” talk that summarizes notable abstracts from the ASH annual meeting. It is hoped that at the end of this session members of the audience will have new ideas about how scientific discoveries could be translated into tools to improve the diagnosis and treatment of all thrombotic microangiopathies. F OR P r a c t i c i n g H e mat o l o g i s t s : American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session Friday, December 6, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. CHAIR: Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA SPEAKERS: Paul Barr, MD, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY Lucy Godley, MD, PhD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA This Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Learning Session will feature an American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) medical knowledge module on hematology; it is intended for those who are enrolled in the MOC process and due to recertify in the next few years. Learning Sessions are conducted in an interactive group setting and are led by ABIM-certified physicians. The three-hour session will cover the 30 multiple-choice questions in the “2013 Update in Hematology” ABIM module. At the completion of this session, those enrolled in the ABIM MOC program can submit their answers to ABIM for scoring to receive MOC credit. Enrolled participants can order a copy of the module(s) online from ABIM’s website, www.abim.org. At the conclusion of the session, participants will transfer the answers to their online module and submit the module to ABIM for scoring. For additional information about ABIM’s MOC program requirements, visit www.abim.org or call the ABIM Contact Center at 800- 441-ABIM. Please note that this is not a board review activity; the workshop is designed to facilitate completion of ABIM’s Self-Evaluation of Medical Knowledge MOC requirement. Ticket Prices Member: $85 Associate Member: $50 Non-Member in Training: $85 Non-Member: $135 Tickets can be purchased online during the meeting registration process. Special-Interest Sessions ticketed session New Time
  • 15. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 13 Special Symposium on Quality: Clinical Practice Guidelines Saturday, December 7, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Co-Chairs: Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Mary Cushman, MD, MSc, University of Vermont, Colchester, VT Speakers: Holger Schünemann, MD, MSc, PhD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Clinical Guideline Development Demystified: A Look Under the Hood Lee H. Schwamm, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA Applying Clinical Guidelines to Patient Care David Garcia, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Clinical Guidelines: Balancing Methodologic Rigor and User-Friendliness It is important to understand how clinical guidelines can be optimized to enhance quality of care in hematology. In recent years, clinical guidelines have proliferated with more sophisticated methodology and development standards. Several high-profile guidelines on the evaluation and management of blood-related diseases have recently been published. This session will review how clinical practice guidelines can be best developed and used to optimize quality of care for patients with blood disorders. Speakers will identify the challenges and controversies facing the field of guideline development and will propose a means to balance priorities to produce guidelines that are both rigorous and user-friendly and that empower end- users to incorporate guidelines into clinical practice. ASH Practice Partnership Lunch (APP) Sunday, December 8, 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Health Reform Implementation in 2014 – What Can Hematologists Expect? Chair: Steven L. Allen, MD, North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health System, Lake Success, NY Speaker: Kavita Patel, MD, Brookings Institution, Washington, DC The ASH Practice Partnership (APP) is ASH’s network for practice-based hematologists to elevate practice-related issues within the Society. The APP Lunch is a special session during the annual meeting designed for this community. During the first half of this session, attendees will hear from a national policy expert to obtain an “insider’s” view of the major provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) taking effect in 2014. The presentation will include an overview of the expansion of Medicaid, the development of state insurance exchanges for individuals and small businesses, and other private health insurance plan reforms that will impact physicians. Participants will also receive a description of ASH resources to help hematologists during PPACA implementation. The second half of the session will provide a networking opportunity for practice-based hematologists to meet with colleagues and ASH leaders. Consultative Hematology Course Monday, December 9, 7:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Intended for clinical hematologists based in community practice in North America, the 2013 Consultative Hematology Course will cover commonly encountered clinical problems that arise in everyday practice and require the expertise of a hematologist. It will focus on non-malignant hematology and will use case-based presentations and interactive discussions on topics such as thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, bleeding, white blood cell abnormalities, and other areas. The hands-on course will be led by faculty familiar with consultative practice issues. 7:30 a.m. Registration Breakfast (provided) 8:00 a.m. Welcome and Introductions 8:10 a.m. Confusing Thrombocytopenias Keith R. McCrae, MD, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute 8:40 a.m. Hemolytic Anemias Charles T. Quinn, MD, MS, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital 9:10 a.m. Clinical Conundrums in Transfusion Medicine Ravi Sarode, MD, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center 9:40 a.m. Coffee Break 10:00 a.m. Acquired Coagulation Disorders Alice Ma, MD, University of North Carolina 10:30 a.m. Thrombosis in Cancer Alok A. Khorana, MD, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute 11:00 a.m. New Oral Anticoagulants: When and How? Stephan Moll, MD, University of North Carolina School of Medicine 11:30 a.m. Summary and Closing Remarks 11:45 a.m. Course Adjourned Registration Category Rate* Member with Annual Meeting Registration $75 Non-Member with Annual Meeting Registration $125 Member without Annual Meeting Registration $125 Non-Member without Annual Meeting Registration $175 *Registration fee includes continental breakfast and coffee break. Advance online registration is limited to clinical hematologists practicing in North America; on-site registration will be possible for other groups if space is available. Please contact ashregistration@jspargo.com if interested in registering for this course and not registering for the annual meeting. ticketed session Expanded EVENT ticketed session
  • 16. 14 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 14 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Special-Interest Sessions F OR E D U C ATOR S : Training Program Directors’ Workshop Friday, December 6, 12:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. The Training Program Directors’ Workshop provides an interactive forum for directors of all hematology-related training programs to learn from the foremost experts in the field and from each other. Chair: Alison W. Loren, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA DIDACTIC SESSIONS: SPEAKERS: Christian Cable, MD*, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX Elaine Muchmore, MD*, University of California – San Diego, San Diego, CA Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s Residency Review Committee Update Lisa M. Bellini, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Work and Play Well with Others: How to Remediate Fellows Roy Silverstein, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI When Role Models Fall Short: How to Remediate Faculty *Drs. Cable and Muchmore will be speaking as members of the Residency Review Committee on Internal Medicine. BREAKOUT SESSIONS: SPEAKERS: Lisa M. Bellini, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Dealing with “Problem Fellows” Roy Silverstein, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Dealing with “Problem Faculty” These sessions will provide training program directors outstanding opportunities to learn about and share best practices for critical issues facing their programs. Program directors who complete this workshop will be eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM . A buffet lunch will be available at 12:30 p.m. and the program will run from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop Sunday, December 8, 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Don’t Just Sit There: Active Learning in Medical School Chair: Christian Cable, MD, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple TX Speaker: Thomas R. Viggiano, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN The session will include a didactic presentation on the principles of and rationale for active learning, the current mandate for teaching in medical schools. As educators are given less lecture time for teaching and students are expected to learn more independently, how can a hematology course adapt? F OR A L L : Grassroots Network Lunch* Saturday, December 7, 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. ASH has become influential with policymakers because of the strength of its “Grassroots Network” of ASH members who contact their elected officials to share the Society’s messages, concerns, and recommendations. The Grassroots Network Lunch provides a forum for all interested members to learn how they can participate in ASH’s advocacy efforts, communicate with Congress and the White House, and become effective advocates for hematology. Discussion will focus on ASH’s legislative and regulatory priorities, including response to the National Institutes of Health budget crisis, an overview of the Society’s 2013 advocacy accomplishments, and a preview of the Society’s 2014 advocacy agenda. *Registration information will be sent to ASH Grassroots Network members later this summer. Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception Saturday, December 7, 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to this event, which will showcase training and research opportunities geared toward increasing the diversity of scholars in the field of hematology. The highlight of the session will be scientific presentations from the ASH Minority Medical Student Award Program participants. The reception will also feature poster presentations by students participating in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Minority Research Supplement and an announcement about the ASH-AMFDP Award, a partnership between ASH and the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Representatives from the National Institutes of Health will also attend to provide information about their training and research offerings. Please join us to hear the impressive research presentations and learn more about these exciting opportunities. The event will conclude with a buffet dinner and networking session. The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing Your Hematology Expertise Globally Sunday, December 8, 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. ASH and its partner organization Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) are looking for hematology experts with a passion for teaching and training who want to broaden their horizons through a short-term volunteer experience in a developing country. This one-hour session will feature presentations on the current volunteer programs in Cambodia, Peru, Tanzania, and Uganda. Attendees will learn about these programs, the educational needs in both clinical and laboratory hematology, and their roles as potential volunteers. The session will provide insight into how volunteering with HVO can improve hematology care overseas, confront hematology health challenges globally, and reignite volunteers’ passion for medicine. A question-and-answer session with program directors from respective volunteer sites will follow the presentations. Bring your sense of adventure and learn how a brief visit can make a very big impact. ticketed session
  • 17. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15 The ASH annual meeting provides hematology trainees with a variety of high- quality educational, career-development, and networking opportunities. To help trainees make the most of their meeting experience, a number of activities and services have been identified as most relevant to the unique interests of undergraduates, medical and graduate students, residents, and fellows (MD and PhD). These events are open only to Associate members; Medical Student, Graduate Student, and Resident members; and non-members in training wearing blue trainee meeting badges. To register for the meeting as a trainee, please see page 49. Trainee Day Friday, December 6 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. This year’s program will provide attendees with the opportunity to learn about statistics and trial design, career development, mechanisms of funding, and how to manage a collaborative research team. Co-Chairs: Sherine Elsawa, PhD, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, IL Martha Mims, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Didactic Session Speakers: Susan Hilsenbeck, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Statistics and Clinical Trial Design This lecture will provide an introduction to the main statistical ideas and techniques used in clinical trial design and analysis. Dr. Hilsenbeck will focus on clinical aspects of trial design, including randomization, sample size, data analysis, and stopping rules. Donna Neuberg, ScD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Statistics and Basic/Translational Trial Design Dr. Neuberg will focus on interpretation of data from correlative studies with an emphasis on genomic and proteomic data and correlation with clinical outcome. First-Rotation Breakout Sessions Speakers: David Largaespada, PhD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Mechanisms of Basic Science Funding Stephanie Lee, MD, MPH, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Mechanisms of Clinical Research Funding Irene Ghobrial, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Mechanisms of Translational Research Funding This session will focus on funding alternatives for the basic science lab as well as clinical and translational studies. Speakers will not only cover traditional funding strategies, emphasizing National Institutes of Health K awards, but they will also discuss identifying and applying for alternative sources of funding, including institutional pilot and seed grant awards, foundation grants, grants from other government agencies, grants from specialty societies like ASH, and support from pharmaceutical companies. Attendees will have the option of attending one of three different sessions geared toward the basic scientist, the clinical investigator, and the translational investigator. Second-Rotation Breakout Sessions Speakers: Donna Woulfe, PhD, University of Delaware, Newark, DE How to Manage a Collaborative Basic Research Team Kieron Dunleavy, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD How to Manage a Collaborative Clinical Research Team Catherine Bollard, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX How to Manage a Collaborative Translational Research Team This session will focus on assembling a research team, identifying collaborators, negotiating roles on the collaborative team, avoiding collaboration pitfalls, and resolving disagreements. Attendees will have the option of attending one of three different sessions geared toward the basic scientist, the clinical investigator, and the translational investigator. Third-Rotation Breakout Sessions Speakers: Charles Mullighan, MBBS, MSc, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Basic Career Development John Gribben, MD, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, United Kingdom Translational Career Development Nigel Key, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Clinical Career Development This session will focus on the basics of finding a job in hematology, how to interview, and how to negotiate. This session will also focus on early stages of career development such as how to identify a mentor and how to develop short-term and long-term career goals. Attendees will have the option of attending one of three different sessions geared toward the basic scientist, the clinical investigator, and the translational investigator. Trainee Welcome Reception Friday, December 6 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Held on Friday afternoon following Trainee Day, this informal social event provides the opportunity for undergraduates, medical students, graduate students, residents, and fellows (MD and PhD) to gather with their colleagues. During the reception, there will be brief introductory remarks from the ASH President. Members of the Trainee Council will also be available to provide an overview of ASH trainee resources and of annual meeting events and sessions most relevant to trainees. Trainee Activities and Services ASH 55th Annual Meeting 15
  • 18. Career-Development Lunch Sessions Saturday, December 7 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. These sessions will provide an intimate venue for trainees to meet with leaders in hematology to discuss professional development questions. ASH has invited a diverse group of more than 30 distinguished researchers and physicians to participate, representing the wide array of practice areas within hematology. Faculty will be available to discuss careers in clinical, translational, and basic research. There will also be representatives present to discuss PhD careers, careers in industry settings, and careers in private and clinical practice. This event is open only to Associate members; Medical Student, Graduate Student, and Resident members; and non-members in training wearing blue trainee meeting badges. A boxed lunch will be provided. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis. As seating is limited, attendees are strongly encouraged to arrive early. No additional participants will be allowed in the rooms once these sessions are filled. CHAIR: Reed E. Drews, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA SPEAKERS: Adult Hematology/Clinical Research: Malignant Hematology/Bone Marrow Transplant Session 1 Jacalyn Rosenblatt, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Oliver W. Press, MD, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Session 2 Kenneth C. Anderson, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Martin Tallman, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Adult Hematology/Clinical Research: Non-Malignant Hematology Session 1 Kojo Elenitoba-Johnson, MD, BloodCenter of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Lawrence Goodnough, MD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Session 2 Mark Zumberg, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Laboratory & Translational Hematology Session 1 Alvin Schmaier, MD, MS, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Jeffrey Zwicker, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Session 2 Elaine Majerus, MD, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO David Ginsburg, MD, University of Michigan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI Industry Careers Session 1 Jamie Freedman, MD, PhD, OPKO Health, Inc., Miami, FL Jeff Lawrence, MD, Ipsen Pharma, Milford, MA Session 2 Richard Gaynor, MD, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN Jane Huang, MD, Genentech, Inc., San Francisco, CA Government Careers: U.S. Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health Session 1 Donna DiMichele, MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Terry Bishop, PhD, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Session 2 Andre L. Kindzelski, MD, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Ann Farrell, MD, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Careers Session 1 Alan D’Andrea, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Elizabeth Raetz, MD, New York University, New York, NY Session 2 Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Stephen Hunger, MD, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO PhD Careers Session 1 Edward Srour, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN Diane F. Jelinek, PhD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Adrian Gee, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Session 2 Vesna Najfeld, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Nancy Speck, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA James Engel, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Private Practice Careers Session 1 David Shepard, MD, Northwest Georgia Oncology Centers, Marietta, GA Jodi Mones, MD, Bronx River Medical Associates, Bronx, NY Session 2 Burton F. Alexander III, MD, Virginia Oncology Associates, Virginia Beach, VA Sarah “Sally” Scott, MD, Montana Cancer Center, Missoula, MT Residents and Medical Students Academic Program in Hematology and Hematology/ Oncology Session 1 Reed E. Drews, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Scott Gitlin, MD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Session 2 Alice Ma, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Allison Loren, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 16 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Trainee Activities and Services
  • 19. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions Sunday, December 8 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. During lunch on Sunday and Monday, ASH will offer didactic sessions designed to provide trainees with an overview of timely and relevant career-oriented issues. A boxed lunch will be provided. Space is available on a first-come, first- served basis. As seating is limited, attendees are strongly encouraged to arrive early. No additional participants will be allowed in the rooms once these sessions are filled. CHAIR: Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA SPEAKERS: Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Time Management and Balance It seems that lives are becoming ever more complex. The demands of career and personal life can seem overwhelming at times. In this session, Dr. Wun will review the time- management challenges facing a busy clinician, clinician scientist, or physician scientist as well as describe strategies for dealing with these challenges and various models for achieving work/life balance. Jan A. Nolta, PhD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Bridging the Translational Divide: The Role of the PhD Translating basic science discoveries to clinical applications is the major goal of much of biomedical research. One of the barriers that exists to successful translation is the cultural difference between basic science investigators and physician scientists. Although a bidirectional understanding of this difference is essential, the perspective of the non-clinician PhD will be emphasized in this session. Working at the intersection of biomedical science and clinical medicine, the PhD can develop the skills to participate in and lead translational research teams to improve human health. Monday, December 9 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. CHAIR: Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Speakers: Theodore Warkentin, MD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Giving a Scientific Presentation Presentation of one’s scholarly work is an essential task for an academic career and the effective communication techniques that allow for engaging presentations need to be learned and honed over time. This session will cover presentation styles and proper construction of slides and posters, highlighting common presentation pitfalls as well as tactics to help engage an audience. Attendees will learn how to make the most of opportunities to present their scholarly work and receive valuable feedback. Lillian Sung, MD, PhD, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Practical Biostatistics 101 This session is designed to help translate the complexities of statistics into relevant clinical applications and will provide a practical clinician perspective on key biostatistical concepts and terms as well as basic study designs, touching on relevant clinical endpoints with an emphasis on clinical examples. Trainee Lounge Trainees are invited to visit the Trainee Lounge located in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center (specific room location to be provided in the on-site materials). The lounge provides a relaxing place for trainees to meet with colleagues, access the Internet, and recharge with complimentary refreshments. The lounge will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 7, 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 8, and Monday, December 9, and from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon on Tuesday, December 10. Additional Opportunities and Resources of Interest to Trainees Special Symposium on Innovation .................... 7 and the Future of Hematology Special Scientific Symposium: ......................... 11 Approaches for Inhibiting “Undruggable” Targets in Cancer Special Scientific Symposium: ......................... 11 Redox in Hematology Special Interest Session: How to .....................11 Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal Blood and Beyond: Searching ......................... 12 the Scientific Literature Online Special Symposium on the Basic .................... 12 Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis Special Symposium on Quality: ....................... 13 Clinical Practice Guidelines Grassroots Network Lunch ............................... 14 Promoting Minorities in Hematology ............... 14 Presentations and Reception Education Session – “Junior-Faculty ............... 29 Development Education Program: Which Grant is Right for Me?” Education Spotlight Sessions .......................... 30 How I Treat: Bringing Science ......................... 32 to Clinical Dilemmas Scientific Spotlight Sessions ............................ 41 Meet the Scientist ................................................ 43 Continuing Conversations ................................. 44 ASH Booth ............................................................ 46 National Institutes of Health Booths ............... 46 ASH Job Center ................................................... 56 Are you a post-doctoral fellow residing outside North America? Consider participating in ASH’s International Post-Doctoral Fellows (IPDF) program, which allows post-doctoral fellows to access valuable ASH resources at no charge for up to four years. The program is open to postdoctoral fellows with an MD, PhD, or equivalent medical degree, who reside outside Canada, Mexico, or the United States; register for the ASH annual meeting as a non-member in training; and are enrolled in an approved hematology or oncology training program. Benefits include a complimentary online subscription to Blood and online access to Hematology (the Education Program) and The Hematologist. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/IPDF. If registering for the annual meeting as a non-member in training, see page 49 for special instructions. Are you a North American undergraduate student or trainee, but not a member of ASH? Please visit www.hematology.org/Membership for details about becoming a trainee member. Fellows: ASH offers a deeply discounted Associate membership for those in approved hematology or hematology/oncology training programs. Medical Students, Graduate Students and Residents: ASH now offers a complimentary student membership. Visit www.hematology.org/membership to take advantage of these free benefits. Undergraduate Students: Consider participating in ASH’s North American Undergraduate Student Benefit program. This program provides undergraduate students with a complimentary online subscription to Blood, advance annual meeting notifications, and eligibility for reduced meeting registration at the non-member-in-training rate. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/NASB. If registering for the annual meeting as a non-member in training, see page 49 for special instructions. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 17
  • 20. 18 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program Education Program Co-Chairs: Wendy Stock, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL John Tisdale, MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD The 2013 Education Program will be held Saturday, December 7, through Monday, December 9. Each session will be offered twice unless otherwise noted. A question- and-answer period will occur at the end of each individual speaker presentation. Chapters based on these sessions will be published in Hematology 2013. Allogeneic Transplant for High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Are We Improving Outcomes? CHAIR: Koen van Besien, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY SPEAKERS: Koen van Besien, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY Allogeneic Transplant for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Graft-Versus-Leukemia Versus Graft-Versus- Host Disease and Disease Recurrence Charles F. Craddock, MBBCh, DPhil, Centre for Clinical Hematology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom Pharmacologic Methods to Reduce Disease Recurrence Andrew Artz, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Older Patients/Older Donors: Choosing Wisely While allogeneic transplantation is an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in remission and for those with myelodysplastic syndromes, its utility is limited by the risks it presents for relapse, treatment-related mortality, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Dr. Koen van Besien will discuss strategies to modulate GVHD and their impact on graft- versus-leukemia effects, including the relative merits of various post-transplant GVHD prevention methods of in vitro and in vivo T-cell depletion. He will also discuss how donor selection may also modulate transplant outcomes. Dr. van Besien will then discuss high-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, including HLA-DP typing, the role of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, and the potential role of non-inherited maternal antigens and inherited paternal antigens in umbilical cord blood or haploidentical transplant. Dr. Charles Craddock will next discuss risk factors for relapse after transplant, pharmacologic interventions to decrease the risk for recurrence, and methods for optimizing their utility. Dr. Andrew Artz will focus his presentation on transplant for older adults. Patients 60 years and older are frequently considered for transplant; however, more resistant disease, co-morbid conditions, and other health impairments may affect their outcomes. Dr. Artz will discuss the assessment and outcomes of older transplant candidates as well as donor selection for older adults, including the use of older sibling donors. Changing Paradigms in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: From the Genome to the Patient CHAIR: Anjali S. Advani, MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH SPEAKERS: Christine Harrison, PhD, Newcastle University Leukemia Research Cytogenetics Group, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom Targeting Signaling Pathways in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: New Insights Mary V. Relling, PharmD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Pharmacogenomics of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: New Insights into Treatment Toxicity and Efficacy Anjali S. Advani, MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Changing Paradigms: New Antibodies and Their Role This session will focus on recent advances in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), including new insights into targeting signaling pathways, the use of pharmacogenomics to help better determine treatment toxicity and efficacy, and encouraging clinical results of antibodies as treatment for this disease. Dr. Christine Harrison will review the clinical and prognostic characteristics of the cytogenetic and genetic abnormalities that have led to treatment changes in ALL. She will discuss new genetic aberrations within defined signaling pathways, identified by genomic and next-generation sequencing approaches that provide potential novel therapeutic targets with the prospect of reduced toxicity. Dr. Mary Relling will discuss how germline genomic variation affects treatment toxicity and efficacy in ALL. She will discuss how genome- wide approaches have identified variations important for response and for adverse effects of therapy as well as how pharmacogenomic testing is now being incorporated into the routine clinical care of patients with ALL. Dr. Anjali Advani will review the expression and prognostic impact of the various antigens on the cell surface in ALL. She will also discuss the various therapies targeting these antigens, including naked antibodies, immunotoxins, and immunoconjugates; the results of these antibodies in clinical trials; and plans to further incorporate these drugs in the treatment of ALL.
  • 21. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 19 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A New Treatment Era is Born CHAIR: Michael Hallek, MD, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany SPEAKERS: Michael Hallek, MD, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany Signaling the End of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? New Frontline Treatment Strategies John G. Gribben, MD, DSc, Barts Cancer Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, United Kingdom Immunotherapeutic Strategies Including Transplant: Eradication of Disease! Tait Shanafelt, MD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Treatment of Older Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Key Questions and Current Answers This session will focus on recent advances in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The most recent, targeted drugs for CLL, as well as therapeutic concepts for elderly, non-fit patients with CLL and immunotherapeutic approaches to achieve long-lasting remissions will be discussed. Dr. Michael Hallek will review the currently available diagnostic and therapeutic tools and give an integrated recommendation of how to manage CLL in 2013. Particular emphasis will be placed on the integration of novel, targeted agents for CLL therapy into one sequential treatment approach. Dr. John Gribben will review some of the clinical key features of CLL, which induces a state of immunosuppression, causing increased susceptibility to infections and failure of an anti-tumor immune response. He will then report the state of the art on allogeneic stem cell transplantation and other immunotherapeutic approaches such as CLL vaccines, CXCR4 antagonists, adoptive cellular immunotherapies (e.g., chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cells), CD40 ligand gene therapy, and the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide. Dr. Tait Shanafelt will discuss how CLL is a leukemia of advanced age, and how the management of patients with CLL is more complex than in many other malignancies. This review will address several key questions in the management of elderly patients with CLL, including why the classification of the “fitness” of CLL patients is necessary, what criteria should be used to classify patient fitness, when elderly patients should be treated, how therapy should be selected for elderly patients, and which therapy is best for each individual patient. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Refining/Redefining the State of the Art CHAIR: Timothy P. Hughes, MD, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia SPEAKERS: Timothy P. Hughes, MD, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia Which Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor? An Embarrassment of Riches... Vivian G. Oehler, MD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Update on Current Monitoring Recommendations: Practical Points for Clinical Practice Richard Van Etten, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA Alternative Approaches to Eradicating the Malignant Clone: Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor Combinations and Beyond This session will focus on recent advances in our understanding of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), examining how these translate to clinical efforts to prevent disease progression and drug resistance as well as strategies to maximize achievement of long-term disease control. Consequently, a new era in CML therapy is beginning in which our ultimate goal is to help our patients achieve treatment-free remission in addition to prolonging their survival. Dr. Timothy Hughes will discuss current therapeutic options for the newly diagnosed CML patient, including the multiple frontline therapy options available to patients in many countries. During his presentation, Dr. Hughes will compare the efficacy and safety of the three frontline tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and propose a decision-making process that incorporates patient co-morbidities, disease- risk assessments, and appropriate long-term treatment goals to provide a customized approach to CML therapy. Dr. Vivian Oehler will review appropriate cytogenetic and molecular monitoring procedures that are indicated during the first few years of therapy, when the main focus is prevention of disease progression and drug resistance. Dr. Oehler will also review the rationale for long-term molecular monitoring, driven by the need to detect poor drug adherence and to confirm the achievement of a deep molecular response. Dr. Richard Van Etten will review the critical pathways driving leukemic stem cell survival in CML and discuss the most promising approaches to leukemia eradication. This will include an update on the use of TKIs in combination with stem cell targeting agents and the potential role of manipulating the immune response or targeting the marrow microenvironment to achieve long-term disease control. Clinical Dilemmas in Acute Myeloid Leukemia CHAIR: Mark J. Levis, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD SPEAKERS: Gary J. Schiller, MD, University of California – Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Treatment Today ... and Tomorrow Peter Paschka, MD, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemias: Does Targeting KIT Improve on High-Dose Intermittant ARA-C Consolidation? Mark J. Levis, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD FLT3 Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: What Is the Best Approach in 2013? With the advent of more complex molecular and cytogenetic testing, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is routinely sorted into multiple different sub-types, each with distinctive clinical characteristics. Practitioners are now confronted with new clinical dilemmas when deciding how to use risk-adapted therapy in an attempt to achieve maximum benefit for their patients. This session will focus on recent advances in the classification of AML that may influence the course of treatment chosen. Dr. Gary Schiller will review emerging AML classification schemes, focusing in particular on how high-risk disease can now be defined. He will discuss how this classification might influence decision making regarding induction and consolidation regimens, including stem cell transplantation and non-standardized therapies. Dr. Peter Paschka will provide an overview on the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of core binding factor AML (CBF-AML). In particular, he will discuss the role of KIT mutations in the biology and prognostication of CBF-AML and will review recent efforts to target this receptor in the context of existing therapeutic regimens. Dr. Mark Levis will review the complexities of interpreting FLT3 mutation results for AML patients and will discuss how the results can be used to guide treatment decisions. He will also discuss the potential for allogeneic transplant and small molecule FLT3 inhibitors to improve the survival of these patients.
  • 22. 20 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Finding Treatment for the Untreatable: The Power of Chemical Biology CHAIR: Robert Hromas, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL SPEAKERS: Burt Adelman, MD, DYAX Corp., Burlington, MA Opening Up Drug Development To Everyone Stephen Frye, PhD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Drug Discovery in Academic Institutions Jonathan Drachman, MD, Seattle Genetics, Inc., Bothell, WA Antibody-Drug Conjugates: The Chemistry Behind Empowering Antibodies to Fight Cancer Cancer drug development has been incremental for more than three decades, but a recent advancement, chemical biology, has accelerated the pace of discovery. Chemical biology fits a drug to a defined protein target, inhibiting specific pathways required for cancer cell survival and proliferation. This advancement not only provides hope for finding new therapies for previously untreatable diseases, but also makes drug development accessible to a wider range of investigators. This session will provide an introduction to this new advancement in drug development, and speakers will describe avenues available for hematologists of varied backgrounds to participate. Dr. Burt Adelman will discuss the shift to direct study of defined protein targets in specific human diseases as the most productive strategy to accelerate drug discovery and validation, as predictive animal models of human disease do not exist for many of the most important disorders that lack treatment. Dr. Stephen Frye will describe the opportunities for academics to contribute to the discovery of new therapeutics. Embedding medicinal chemists with cancer biologists creates collaborative opportunities for drug discovery as well as synthesis of chemical biology compounds to better elucidate the role of specific proteins and pathways. Several case studies, including the discovery of the acute lymphocytic leukemia MER kinase inhibitors and discovery of chemical epigenetic regulators, will be presented. Dr. Jonathan Drachman will present the technological advances in monoclonal antibodies, stable linkers, conjugation chemistry, and potent cytotoxic small molecules that have led to the great potential of antibody-drug conjugates. Graft Engineering and Adoptive Immunotherapy: Tackling Resistance CHAIR: Helen E. Heslop, MD, Baylor College of Medicine Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Houston, TX SPEAKERS: Michael R. Verneris, MD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Natural Killer Cells and Regulatory T Cells: How to Manipulate a Graft for Optimal Graft- Versus-Leukemia Helen E. Heslop, MD, Baylor College of Medicine Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Houston, TX T-Cell Therapy for Viral Infections Crystal Mackall, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD T-Cell Adoptive Immunotherapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia This session will focus on recent advances in adoptive immunotherapy strategies after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Speakers will review the current status of approaches using different cellular therapy products to improve transplant outcome by promoting immune reconstitution and augmenting antiviral and anti-leukemic activity. Dr. Michael Verneris will review the use of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing to select donors with potential natural killer (NK) alloreactivity. He will also review different strategies for adoptive transfer of fresh or expanded NK cells post transplant to enhance the graft-versus-tumor effect. Dr. Verneris will then discuss different approaches to select or expand regulatory T-cell populations and the results of clinical trials involving this cell product conducted with the goal of preventing graft- versus-host disease while preserving graft- versus-leukemia activity. Dr. Helen Heslop will review different approaches to reconstitute antiviral immunity after transplant using expanded virus-specific T-cell products specific to one or multiple viruses. She will then discuss current strategies to allow more widespread application of this strategy, including the use of closely matched banked cells or more rapidly available products from the transplant donor, such as directly selected or rapidly expanded cells. Dr. Crystal Mackall will review the results of recent studies using chimeric antigen receptors targeting the CD19 antigen to treat relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia after transplant or to treat residual disease pre transplant. She will then discuss alternative target antigens such as CD22 and review considerations for choosing a target antigen and developing a chimeric antigen construct. Education Program
  • 23. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 21 Hodgkin Lymphoma: New and Old CHAIR: Anas Younes, MD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY SPEAKERS: Anas Younes, MD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Novel Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma Peter W.M. Johnson, MD, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom Management of Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Is There Still a Role for Radiation? Michelle Fanale, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma: What is the Optimal Treatment? After more than three decades of relative dormancy, the treatment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is rapidly changing. More novel agents are being evaluated for the treatment of HL, some of which are rapidly being incorporated in combination regimens. The use of functional imaging to stratify patients for curative regimens is also increasingly being used in clinical trials. Dr. Anas Younes will review the status of drug development for patients with HL, including the incorporation of brentuximab vedotin in frontline and pre-transplant settings. Dr. Peter Johnson will review recent results of randomized trials for the treatment of patients with early stage HL, including the use of functional imaging. Dr. Michelle Fanale will provide an update on current treatment options for patients with lymphocyte predominant HL. Multiple Myeloma CHAIR: Ola Landgren, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD SPEAKERS: Ola Landgren, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance and Smoldering Multiple Myeloma: Biological Insights and Early Treatment Strategies Maria-Victoria Mateos, MD, PhD, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain How Should We Treat Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Patients? Philip L. McCarthy, MD, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY Multiple Myeloma: Strategies for Induction, Transplantation, Consolidation, and Maintenance for Transplant-Eligible Patients After decades of virtually no progress, multiple myeloma survival has improved significantly in the last 10 years. Indeed, multiple myeloma has perhaps seen more remarkable progress in treatment and patient outcomes than any other cancer during the last decade. In his talk about monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), Dr. Ola Landgren will review current insights on biology in combination with novel treatment strategies in “early myeloma” (high-risk smoldering myeloma). He will also discuss how these new insights are challenging traditional concepts on how to manage the disease. Dr. Maria-Victoria Mateos will discuss combinations of both newer and older drugs that offer different ways to treat patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma, focusing on those who are transplant-ineligible. The talk with cover induction, consolidation, and maintenance therapy for these patients. Dr. Philip McCarthy will focus on transplant-eligible myeloma patients, covering induction, consolidation, transplant, and maintenance therapy for these patients. The transplant portion of Dr. McCarthy’s talk will cover both autologous and allogeneic transplant. Myelodysplastic Syndromes: What Makes Therapy Effective? CHAIR: Rafael Bejar, MD, PhD, University of California – San Diego, La Jolla, CA SPEAKERS: Rafael Bejar, MD, PhD, University of California – San Diego, La Jolla, CA Prognostic Models in Myelodysplastic Syndromes Yogenthiran Saunthararajah, MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Key Clinical Observations After Frontline Treatment for Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Practical Solutions For Better Outcomes Uwe Platzbecker, MD, University Hospital Dresden, Dresden, Germany Who Benefits From Allogeneic Transplant for Myelodysplastic Syndromes – New Insights This session will focus on recent advances in the clinical care of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including improvements in risk stratification, details of current and upcoming therapeutic options, and considerations important for the selection and management of patients receiving allogeneic transplants for this condition. Dr. Rafael Bejar will review various clinical models in use by physicians to predict prognosis in patients with MDS. He will discuss the differences between each system, explain how these models are best applied, and identify their limitations. Finally, he will describe the promise of additional biomarkers, including molecular genetics, to refine both the classification and risk stratification of patients with MDS. Dr. Yogenthiran Saunthararajah will briefly review approved therapies for MDS, concentrating on selection criteria such as disease risk, patient features, and likelihood of benefit. He will then discuss emerging therapeutic options, including combinations and repurposing of approved agents, novel approaches with newer drugs in clinical trials, and identification of pathways that may be targets for future therapies. Dr. Uwe Platzbecker will describe indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in MDS patients. He will discuss practical considerations in selecting candidates for transplant and focus on recent advances that broaden the availability of this potentially curative therapy, improve the management of patients before and after transplantation, and better predict long-term outcomes.
  • 24. 22 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program Myeloproliferative Diseases: It’s Not ONLY About JAK CHAIR: Olatoyosi Odenike, MBBS, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL SPEAKERS: Jason Gotlib, MD, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, CA JAK Inhibition in the Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Lessons Learned From the Bench and Bedside Omar Abdel-Wahab, MD, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Epigenetic Dysregulation in the Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Olatoyosi Odenike, MBBS, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Beyond JAK Inhibitor Therapy in Myelofibrosis This session will focus on the molecular pathogenesis of the Philadelphia-chromosome- negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including recent advances in this area and the opportunities that these provide for current and future therapeutic approaches in these diseases. Dr. Jason Gotlib will review the pathogenetic relevance of deregulation of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway in MPNs and the clinical application of JAK inhibitors in these diseases. He will discuss the trials that led to the approval of ruxolitinib for myelofibrosis and emerging data from other JAK inhibitors in advanced phases of clinical investigation. Dr. Gotlib will also review the management issues related to use of these agents in clinical practice, including current understanding of the biologic basis for clinical resistance. Dr. Omar Abdel-Wahab will review recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis of the MPNs. He will focus on mutations in genes and pathways involved in epigenetic regulation and will discuss recent insights into the role of these mutations in the pathogenesis and progression of MPNs. Dr. Abdel-Wahab will also briefly review the known areas of intersection between pathways involved in epigenetic regulation and mutated tyrosine kinases. Dr. Olatoyosi Odenike will discuss the potential that exists for harnessing epigenetic deregulation in myelofibrosis for therapeutic benefit. She will discuss recently completed trials with histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors in the MPNs. Dr. Odenike will also review immunomodulatory approaches in myelofibrosis and other novel agents under clinical investigation in this disease. Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas I: Optimizing Therapy CHAIR: Sonali M. Smith, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL SPEAKERS: Nathan Fowler, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Targeting B-Cell Receptor Signaling: Changing the Paradigm Sonali M. Smith, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Dissecting Follicular Lymphomas: High Versus Low Risk Michael E. Williams, MD, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA Transplant for Mantle Cell Lymphoma: Is It The Right Thing To Do? This session will focus on recent advances in the treatment of lymphomas using targeted agents against the B-cell receptor and its key signaling components, risk stratification and treatment options for patients with follicular lymphoma, and the evolving role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Dr. Nathan Fowler will review the importance of the B-cell receptor in normal and malignant B lymphocytes, focusing on downstream kinases that mediate critical signals related to survival, proliferation, and metabolism. He will discuss key targets within the B-cell receptor pathway, including Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, spleen tyrosine kinase, and phosphoinositide 3’-kinase delta. In addition, he will review clinical activity of new agents against these targets and how this information might change the future treatment paradigm in lymphoma. Dr. Sonali Smith will focus on follicular lymphoma and how risk stratification might affect the management approach. Because follicular lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease, a number of agents are available, but the practice community lacks clear guidance on optimal treatment for individual patients. A more refined understanding of prognosis and biology may aid treatment selection, particularly with new agents. Dr. Smith will review clinical tools, including the follicular lymphoma international prognostic index (I and II) and emerging biologic features that affect disease behavior. Dr. Michael Williams will discuss the rationale for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with mantle cell lymphoma and how new agents and consolidation or maintenance strategies are challenging that paradigm. He will review clinical data with new agents in both the frontline and relapsed settings and discuss how these approaches could supplant more aggressive therapies for some patients. In addition, Dr. Williams will describe how newer information on mantle cell lymphoma subtypes might affect the selection of intensive versus less intensive approaches.
  • 25. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 23 Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas II: Breakthroughs in Treatment of High-Grade Lymphomas CHAIR: Wyndham Wilson, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD SPEAKERS: Elias Campo, MD, PhD, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Understanding MYC-Driven Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas: Pathogenesis and Classification Wyndham Wilson, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Treatment Strategies for Aggressive Lymphomas: What Works? John P. Leonard, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY Targeting the Epigenome and Other New Strategies: Beyond R-CHOP This session will provide the latest insights into the molecular biology and novel treatments of high-grade lymphomas. It will focus on molecular pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Burkitt lymphoma and targets such as BCR, MYC, and BCL-2. Driver pathways will be discussed and potential drugable targets identified. Treatment will be discussed within the context of targets and what works. Dr. Elias Campo will provide a brief introduction of MYC function, highlighting the paradox of promoting oncogenesis and apoptosis. Dr. Campo will discuss MYC function in the germinal centers and implications for lymphoma pathogenesis as well as MYC gene alterations in aggressive lymphomas and pathogenetic mechanisms. Dr. Campo will also discuss the clinical impact of MYC and open methodological and conceptual questions. Dr. Wyndham Wilson will provide a brief introduction to the molecular taxonomy of aggressive B-cell lymphoma and discuss mechanisms of oncogenesis of activated B-cell (ABC) and primary mediastinal DLBCL as well as Burkitt lymphoma. He will discuss strategies for targeting the B-cell receptor in ABC DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma and conclude with a discussion of the most effective approaches in high-grade lymphomas. Dr. John Leonard will provide a brief introduction to the role of the epigenome in high-grade lymphomas. He will discuss strategies for clinically targeting germinal center B-cell DLBCL through modulation of BCL-6 and the epigenome and other novel treatment strategies in DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma, including novel immunomodulatory treatments. Pediatric Hematology: Insights Applicable to All! CHAIR: Patrick Brown, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD SPEAKERS: Patrick Brown, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Treatment of Infant Leukemias: Challenge and Promise Gritta E. Janka, MD, PhD, University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Pathogenesis and Treatment Andrea Biondi, MD, University of Milano- Bicocca, Monza, Italy Novel Clinical Trials for Pediatric Leukemias: Lessons Learned from Genomic Analyses Hematologic malignancies represent the most common form of cancer in children. Additionally, insights into the biology and management of hematologic malignancies and non-malignant, life-threatening hematologic diseases in children are often applicable to adult forms of these diseases. Examples include acute leukemia in infants and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a disorder of immune regulation that can occur in all age groups but is particularly common in children. Increasingly, molecular analyses are incorporated clinically into risk stratification of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and have identified potential therapeutic targets that will require novel clinical trial designs. Dr. Patrick Brown will discuss the unique features of infant leukemia and the recent biologic discoveries that have generated interest in certain molecularly targeted agents, reviewing insights from recent laboratory and clinical studies and a proposal for an international collaborative research effort for this rare disease. Dr. Gritta Janka will discuss results from international cooperative clinical trials that have identified increasingly effective treatment strategies for HLH and uncovered insights into its molecular pathogenesis that can be applied to patients across the wide age spectrum of this disease. Dr. Andrea Biondi will review lessons learned from recent ALL trials that included molecular evaluation of early response in risk stratification and will discuss how genomic analyses will help to further refine different prognostic and targeted therapeutic strategies. She will discuss how leukemic subsets defined by molecular drivers are becoming increasingly small and how new drugs and collaboration across large, well- characterized patient populations will be required for continued progress. A Fresh Look at Drug Approval: Moving Away From Tradition CHAIR: Mark Crowther, MD, St. Joseph’s Hospital and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada SPEAKERS: Victoria M. Richon, PhD, Sanofi Oncology, Cambridge, MA Oncology Drug Discovery in Rare Indications: Opportunities and Challenges Michael R. Grever, MD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Accelerating Safe Drug Development: An Ideal Approach to Approval Mark Crowther, MD, St. Joseph’s Hospital and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Phase IV Research – What Happens When the Rubber Hits the Road? Drug discovery and the pathway to market is a key driver of innovation in medical care. However, the pathway to licensure and widespread use is difficult to understand and appears to be more difficult now than before. Effective development and implementation of novel medications is particularly important in hematology: diseases can be infrequent, morphologically similar disorders can have markedly different biologies, and the biology of specific conditions is often understood at the molecular level. These factors result in novel, yet highly specific, treatments that can produce remissions and, in some cases, cure. This session will focus on three phases of new drug development and will aim to provide attendees with an overview of how drugs are developed, validated, and monitored after approval. Dr. Victoria Richon will provide insight into the earliest phases in drug development, moving scientific observations from the basic science laboratory to clinical trials and beyond, with a particular focus on rare diseases. Dr. Michael Grever will explore the pathway to licensure and provide insight into an optimal pathway for drug approval. Dr. Mark Crowther will use real world examples to demonstrate how the period immediately following drug approval is critical to both our understanding of how a drug will be used in the clinic and how its use will be regulated.
  • 26. 24 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Advances in Clotting Factors: From Bench to Bedside CHAIR: Margaret V. Ragni, MD, University of Pittsburgh, Hemophilia Center of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA SPEAKERS: Randal J. Kaufman, PhD, Sanford/Burnham Medical Research Institute, La Jolla, CA Molecular Approaches for Improved Clotting Factors for Hemophilia Amy D. Shapiro, MD, Indiana Hemophilia Treatment Center, Indianapolis, IN Long-Lasting Recombinant Factor VIII Proteins for Hemophilia A Margaret V. Ragni, MD, University of Pittsburgh, Hemophilia Center of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA The Old and New: Prothrombin Complex Concentrates, Factor VIIa, and Long-Lasting Clotting Proteins for Hemophilia and Other Bleeding Disorders This session will focus on the latest developments in optimizing clotting factors for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. Speakers will review the molecular basis and clinical pharmacology of the new long-lasting recombinant clotting factor proteins, including fusion proteins linked to albumin and Fc IgG fragments as well as pegylated proteins. Dr. Randal Kaufman will provide an overview of the molecular design of the new long-lasting clotting factors, including fusion proteins linked to albumin, fusion proteins linked to the IgG Fc fragment, and pegylated proteins. He will also review the mechanism by which these innovative proteins improve half-life, delay clearance, and enhance hemostatic mechanisms in congenital hemophilia. Dr. Amy Shapiro will discuss the clinical translation of novel, long-lasting recombinant factor VIII proteins to manage hemophilia A. The safety, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and future clinical use of these novel proteins will be reviewed. Dr. Margaret Ragni will focus on the use of prothrombin complex concentrates and VIIa to reverse bleeding associated with trauma, surgery, congenital bleeding disorders, and new oral anticoagulants. She will also review the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of long- lasting recombinant factor IX and other rare coagulation proteins. Aplastic Anemia CHAIR: Neal S. Young, MD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD SPEAKERS: Neal S. Young, MD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Current Concepts in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Aplastic Anemia Gérard Socié, MD, PhD, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation for the Treatment of Aplastic Anemia: Current Results and Expanding Donor Possibilities Judith C. Marsh, MD, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom Management of the Refractory Patient: What Are the Options? This session will focus on the pathophysiology and management of the paradigmatic marrow failure disease severe acquired aplastic anemia. Markedly improved treatment outcomes in this disease are successes of modern hematology, and the close link between the clinic and the laboratory has yielded insights into basic cell biology, immunology, and genetics of marrow stem cells. Dr. Neal Young will summarize current views of pathophysiology with emphasis on the stem cell deficit and the role of telomere biology in predisposing to marrow failure and driving malignant transformation in some patients. He will describe current results with immunosuppressive regimens and the advantages and risks of stem cell stimulation in the clinic. Dr. Gérard Socié will summarize data supporting marrow as a stem cell source as well as the combination of cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin as conditioning and cyclosporine and methotrexate for graft-versus- host disease prophylaxis, as deviation from these standard therapies decreases otherwise excellent survival rates. With 80 to 90 percent of patients surviving, recognition and management of late effects and improving quality of life are now the main objectives of transplantation from sibling donors. For patients who relapse or are refractory to immunosuppressive therapy, transplantation from an unrelated donor should be considered, with results aided by the advent of high resolution molecular human leukocyte antigen typing. Dr. Judith Marsh will examine the difficult problem of the patient refractory to standard therapies, discussing the critical role of supportive care, treatment algorithms, and the importance of clinical research protocols in improving overall outcomes. Bad BUGS: Infections Causing Lymphoma CHAIR: Lawrence D. Kaplan, MD, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA SPEAKERS: Ralf Ulrich Trappe, MD, German Study Group on PTLD, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany Epstein-Barr Virus and Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease: What To Do? Lawrence D. Kaplan, MD, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA HHV8: Kaposi’s, Castleman’s, and Primary Effusion Lymphomas Sung-Hsin Kuo, MD, PhD, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan H. pylori and MALT: What’s New? This session will explore viral and bacterial agents that have established associations with specific lymphomas and will include a discussion about what is known about their role in lymphomagenesis and the best approaches to clinical management of their associated diseases. Dr. Ralf Ulrich Trappe will review the available data on risk factors, prophylaxis, and treatment of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after adult solid organ transplantation, focusing on data from prospective clinical trials and the role of Epstein-Barr virus in the post-transplant setting. He will address immunosuppression reduction, toxicities of chemotherapy, and strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Dr. Trappe will also discuss specific disease characteristics and treatment strategies for rare PTLD subtypes. Dr. Lawrence Kaplan will discuss the role of Human Herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8, KSHV) in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma and in the rare lymphoproliferative disorders that are observed most often with HIV infection, including multicentric Castleman disease and primary effusion. Management strategies for these lymphoproliferative disorders will also be discussed. Dr. Sung-Hsin Kuo will review the molecular mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)- induced gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, both indirect antigen- driven lymphomagenesis and the direct interaction between H. pylori and lymphoma B cells. He will then discuss whether early-stage gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with and without histologic evidence of MALT are also H. pylori-related and curable by H. pylori eradication therapy. Education Program
  • 27. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 25 Clinical Production and Applications of Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy CHAIR: Richard Childs, MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD SPEAKERS: William Murphy, PhD, University of California – Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA The Basis for Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: Biology Richard Childs, MD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Bringing Natural Killer Cells to the Clinic: Ex Vivo Manipulation Jeffrey Miller, MD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Therapeutic Applications: Natural Killer Cells in the Clinic THIS SESSION IS JOINTLY SPONSORED WITH AABB. Dr. William Murphy will review the biology of natural killer (NK) cells, connecting extensive mouse data involving viral infection resistance, use in tumor therapy with human NK cell activities, and NK cell subsets and licensing using both syngeneic and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant models. He will also discuss the similarities and differences between human and mouse NK cells and aspects on the mouse models used to study them. Dr. Richard Childs will review recent advances in methods to expand large numbers of highly activated clinical grade NK cells ex vivo for adoptive infusion in humans, characterizing important phenotypic and functional differences observed between freshly isolated, interleukin 2 (IL-2) activated, and ex vivo expanded NK populations. He will discuss in vitro and xenogeneic data demonstrating how modifications to ex vivo expansion approaches can alter the NK cell phenotype, improving engraftment following adoptive transfer and the efficiency of NK cell homing to bone marrow where hematologic malignancies reside. Dr. Jeffrey Miller will review the clinical experience using allogeneic NK cell adoptive transfer in cancer, the role of lymphodepleting therapy, and post-infusion cytokine administration (IL-2 versus interleukin 15) to enhance NK cell survival, persistence, and in vivo expansion. He will discuss xenogeneic models of adoptive transfer intended to accelerate translational research of NK cell products. Dr. Miller will also discuss future strategies to target NK cells with greater specificity. Congenital Bleeding Disorders CHAIR: Neil Josephson, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA SPEAKERS: David Lillicrap, MD, Queen’s University Richardson Laboratory, Kingston, Ontario, Canada von Willebrand Disease Neil Josephson, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA The Hemophilias and Their Clinical Management Reyhan Diz-Küçükkaya, MD, Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul, Turkey Inherited Platelet Disorders Including Glanzmann Thrombasthenia and Bernard- Soulier Syndrome Dr. David Lillicrap will summarize the most recent developments in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) and will describe how molecular testing might be best incorporated into the diagnostic approach for this condition. He will also provide recommendations on the optimal strategy for the phenotypic assessment of VWD and for the choice and evaluation of hemostatic therapy for this disorder. Dr. Neil Josephson will review the spectrum of pathology found in patients with mild to severe hemophilia. He will review evidence-based treatment approaches and discuss areas of uncertainty where there are not enough data to inform best practice guidelines. In addition, he will touch on the development of new treatment technologies that offer the promise of improving clinical outcomes for patients with hemophilia. Dr. Reyhan Diz-Küçükkaya will summarize the classification of clinical and molecular characteristics of known inherited platelet disorders including Bernard Soulier syndrome and Glanzmann thrombasthenia. She will discuss current challenges in the laboratory diagnosis of inherited platelet disorders and will review the management of bleeding in patients with these conditions. Disorders of Platelet Destruction CHAIR: Cindy Neunert, MD, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA SPEAKERS: Cindy Neunert, MD, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA Current Management of Immune Thrombocytopenia Cheng Hock Toh, MD, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom Current Consideration and Management of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation James T. Crawley, PhD, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom Current Understanding and Management of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Disorders of platelet destruction represent a diverse group of conditions, each with their own unique underlying mechanisms. Common disorders encountered by the clinician include immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). This session is designed to provide an overview of current discoveries regarding disease pathophysiology and mechanisms of platelet destruction. Furthermore, the speakers will explore the relationship between these discoveries and development of treatment options. Dr. Cindy Neunert will discuss the pathogenesis and management of ITP, outlining recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of ITP. She will concentrate on the relationship of these findings to current treatment modalities, including immunomodulatory therapies and thrombopoietin agonists, and will present results from clinical trials. Dr. Cheng Hock Toh will review the classic mechanism of DIC and present new findings related to histone-NETs-platelet interactions resulting in damage to the platelet membrane. These findings highlighting the coagulation- inflammation-innate immunity crosstalk will be discussed in relation to improved identification of at-risk patients and clinical management. Dr. James Crawley will highlight the biology, biochemistry, and mode of action of ADAMTS13 in the context of platelet function and integrate this with our current understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited and acquired TTP that have resulted in novel strategies for the treatment and management of this disease.
  • 28. 26 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Genomics in Hematology 101 for the Practicing Clinician CHAIR: Sandeep Dave, MD, Duke University Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, Durham, NC SPEAKERS: Stefan K. Bohlander, MD, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand ABCs of Genomics Richard F. Schlenk, MD, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany Genomic Applications in the Clinic: Use in Treatment Paradigm of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Sandeep Dave, MD, Duke University Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, Durham, NC Application of Genomic Stratification for the Treatment of Lymphoma Genomic approaches have the potential to transform our approach to the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic diseases. This session is devoted to introducing basic concepts of genomics technologies, including microarrays and high-throughput sequencing and their clinical application. Dr. Stefan Bohlander will focus on the “ABCs of Genomics,” a basic introduction to the application of genomics and next-generation sequencing. Dr. Richard Schlenk will discuss the clinical application of genomics in acute myeloid leukemia. Dr. Sandeep Dave will discuss the application of genomics to improve the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of lymphoma. Hemoglobinopathies: Fresh Ideas for Management CHAIR: Swee Lay Thein, MBBS, DSc, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom SPEAKERS: Swee Lay Thein, MBBS, DSc, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom Genetic Association Studies in Hemoglobinopathies Paul Frenette, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY Novel Therapies Targeting Vaso-Occlusion in Sickle Cell Anemia Eliane Gluckman, MD, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France Allogeneic Transplantation Strategies Including Haploidentical Transplantation For the majority of patients affected with thalassemia and sickle cell disease, the two main hemoglobinopathies, treatment options are limited to blood transfusion, hydroxyurea, supportive care, and management of complications related to the disease and iron overload. While these treatment options have inproved the general medical care, they are not curative – significant morbidity and mortality remain. Bone marrow transplantation remains the only cure and, although well accepted as a treatment option for patients with thalassemia, there is ongoing debate regarding the treatment of sickle cell anemia with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This session will explore fresh ideas for management and treatment based on recent findings in genetic and genomic studies as well as functional studies in vascular pathology. Although both disorders are caused by mutations affecting a single gene, the β globin, there is immense variation in the severity of their clinical disease. Dr. Swee Lay Thein will briefly review our current understanding of the genetics underlying the immense variation in the clinical heterogeneity of thalassemia and sickle cell disease, summarizing data from recent genetic association studies and exploring how these results can be exploited to devise new drug targets and to predict disease severity. Dr. Paul Frenette will briefly review interaction of blood cells with the vessel wall and discuss how dysregulation of the dynamic cellular and molecular networks can lead to vascular pathology. He will also discuss novel therapeutic strategies targeting vaso-occlusion and perfusion/reperfusion injury in sickle cell anemia. Dr. Eliane Gluckman will review the current employment of hemopoietic stem cell transplantation for thalassemia and sickle cell disease. She will discuss the use of cord blood, myeloablative versus nonmyeloablative preparative regimens, and the use of haploidentical donors. HIV in Hematology: What’s New? CHAIR: Nancy Berliner, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA SPEAKERS: Nancy Berliner, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Pathogenesis and Clinical Implications of HIV-Related Anemia in 2013 Richard F. Little, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Update on the Treatment of HIV-Associated Hematologic Malignancies Stephen J. Forman, MD, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA Transplantation in HIV-Infected Subjects: Is Cure Possible? Tremendous advances in combination anti- retroviral therapy (cART) have transformed the clinical manifestations and prognosis of HIV. In this session, speakers will review the current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV and HIV-related hematologic complications in the post-cART era. Despite great improvement in prognosis and survival conferred by cART, anemia remains a strong negative predictor of survival in HIV patients. Dr. Nancy Berliner will speculate on the pathogenesis of anemia in HIV as a model of premature aging and discuss the prognostic significance of anemia presenting before, during, and after cART. Current therapies for HIV have changed the pattern and natural history of HIV- related malignancies. Dr. Richard Little will discuss these changes in relation to the treatment and prognosis of HIV- related hematologic malignancy. Recent reports of successful allogeneic stem cell transplantation have led to hopeful speculation that HIV may become a curable disease. Dr. Stephen Forman will discuss the potential role of allogeneic and autologous transplant of gene-modified stem cells in the treatment of patients with HIV. He will also discuss the role of pre- and post-transplantation cART therapy and prospects for long-term control or cure of HIV. Education Program
  • 29. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 27 Infectious Disease Complications Encountered by the Practicing Hematologist CHAIR: John R. Wingard, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL SPEAKERS: Juan Gea-Banacloche, MD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Evidence-Based Approach to Treatment of Febrile Neutropenia in Hematologic Malignancies Thomas J. Walsh, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY Treatment of Fungal Disease in the Setting of Neutropenia Matteo Bassetti, MD, PhD, Santa Maria Della Misericordia University Hospital, Udine, Italy Multiply-Resistant Bacteria: What Is the Threat? This session will focus on the major challenges bacterial and fungal infections present to the practicing hematologist. Dr. Juan Gea-Banacloche will discuss the multiple challenges posed by febrile neutropenia and review evidence-based approaches to treatment of the condition in hematologic malignancies. He will review multiple issues, including risk stratification, antibiotic regimens for treatment and prophylaxis, myeloid growth factors, and strategies for managing persistent fever. Dr. Thomas Walsh will review treatment approaches for fungal disease in the setting of neutropenia. He will discuss the appropriate use of imaging, biomarkers, new drugs and drug combinations, and strategies to enhance early initiation of therapy to improve treatment outcomes. Dr. Matteo Bassetti will address the growing threat posed by multiply-resistant bacteria. Despite progress in antimicrobial therapies and strategies, the emergence of antibiotic resistance may soon thwart our efforts. This challenge comes at a time in which there is a dearth of new classes of drugs to combat resistant microbes. Understanding the mechanisms of resistance, our antibiotic practices, and the adaptive responses of microbes to antibiotics may offer new strategies to meet this challenge. Management of Sickle Cell Disease CHAIR: Jean L. Raphael, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX SPEAKERS: Jean L. Raphael, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Sickle Cell Disease Pain Management and the Medical Home Stella T. Chou, MD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Transfusion Therapy in Sickle Cell Disease: A Balancing Act John B. Porter, MD, University College London, London, United Kingdom The Consequences and Management of Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease This session will focus on recent innovations in the treatment of sickle cell disease related to pain management in the patient-centered medical home, indications for acute and chronic transfusion therapy, strategies to prevent alloimmunization, and management of iron overload. Dr. Jean Raphael will provide an overview of the patient-centered medical home as an emerging model of patient care with multiple benefits, including improved health outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. He will review the current literature on the medical home as it relates to sickle cell disease. Dr. Raphael will also describe strategies by which core components of the medical home can be used to improve pain management in sickle cell disease. Dr. Stella Chou will review indications for acute and chronic transfusion therapy for patients with sickle cell disease and discuss whether the indications should be broadened. She will discuss the benefits of transfusion weighed against the inherent risks of alloimmunization and iron overload and describe current and emerging strategies to minimize transfusion complications. Dr. John Porter will review the mechanisms of iron metabolism and pathophysiology of transfusional iron overload in sickle cell disease. He will discuss physiologic factors such as hypoxia, iron stores, and inflammation that have downstream effects on systemic iron metabolism. Dr. Porter will then provide an overview of the laboratory assessment, treatment, and measurement of response to therapy for iron overload. He will describe the indications for chelation therapy and the range of chelators currently available for treatment. Management of Thromboembolic Disease CHAIR: Philip S. Wells, MD, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada SPEAKERS: Philip S. Wells, MD, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada The Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism Giancarlo Agnelli, MD, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy Risk Assessment and Optimal Agents for Extended Treatment in Patients in Unprovoked Venous Thromboembolism Kenneth A. Bauer, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Pros and Cons of Novel Anticoagulants This session will provide a broad overview of the diagnosis and management of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), collectively known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). The session will feature information on novel oral anticoagulants and will include a discussion intended to aid practitioners in making long-term treatment decisions in patients with unprovoked VTE. Dr. Philip Wells will address the management of VTE, beginning with the diagnostic process. Diagnosis requires the deployment of a pretest probability assessment with established tools, D-dimer testing, and imaging used in accordance to proven diagnostic algorithms. If performed completely and carefully, this will reduce costly imaging and will help identify false positive results conforming to the ABIM Foundation’s “Choosing Wisely” initiative. Treatment will prevent the worsening of the VTE in the short term, prevent recurrent events in the long term, and ultimately prevent death. Dr. Giancarlo Agnelli will present the controversial issue of treatment duration in patients with unprovoked VTE, evaluating the respective risks and benefits of prolonged anticoagulation therapy as the basis of this discussion. Clinical tools to predict the risk of major bleeding and recurrent VTE will be presented along with data from clinical trials that have evaluated management of patients with unprovoked VTE. The potential role of the novel oral anticoagulants for extended preventative therapy will also be discussed. Dr. Kenneth Bauer will review the pharmacology of novel oral anticoagulant drugs, drawing comparisons within the drug class as well as to current therapies in order to assist physicians in making treatment decisions. A review of recent studies for acute treatment and prophylaxis will provide the background for his arguments.
  • 30. 28 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Sports Medicine in Hematology CHAIR: Alexis A. Thompson, MD, MPH, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL SPEAKERS: Kimberly G. Harmon, MD, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA The Use of Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Non-Surgical Management of Sports Injuries: Hype or Hope? Jakob Mørkeberg, PhD, Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark Blood Manipulation – Current Challenges from an Anti-Doping Perspective Alexis A. Thompson, MD, MPH, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL Sickle Cell Trait Testing and Athletic Participation: A Solution in Search of a Problem? This session will focus on the intersections of hematology and sports medicine illustrated by three high-profile topics. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy to aid in the healing of musculoskeletal injuries has become popular among professional athletes; however, the efficacy of these autologous injections is controversial. Sports medicine specialist Dr. Kimberly Harmon will describe the rationale for PRP using evidence from clinical studies. Tactics for enhancing athletic performance such as the use of recombinant human erythropoietin or autologous red cell infusions are banned in most competitive sports and surveillance for their use has received great attention. The types of blood manipulations used by athletes today, as well as the detection strategies of researchers in this rapidly evolving field, will be discussed by Dr. Jakob Mørkeberg, a researcher who studies blood doping in professional cycling. Dr. Alexis Thompson will describe the epidemiology and pathophysiology of sickle cell trait in the context of athletics in light of the recent adoption by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) of a policy requiring all U.S. college athletes to undergo screening for sickle cell trait as a prerequisite to athletic participation, and the subsequent development and release of an ASH policy statement publicly opposing this practice. Dr. Thompson will discuss the many issues raised by the NCAA and ASH policies that have broad public health implications that may impact practicing hematologists as well as sickle cell researchers. Transfusion Medicine CHAIR: Susan Leitman, MD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD SPEAKERS: Zbigniew “Ziggy” M. Szczepiorkowski, MD, PhD, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH Transfusion Guidelines: When to Transfuse Susan Leitman, MD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Hemochromatosis: The New Blood Donor James C. Zimring, MD, PhD, Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA Fresh Versus Old Blood: Are There Differences and Do They Matter? This session will focus on recent advances in the development and implementation of guidelines for optimal patient blood management, examining both the use of subjects with genetic iron overload disorders as blood donors and the basic science studies and clinical trials investigating the role of fresher versus older red cell units in clinical practice. Dr. Ziggy Szczepiorkowski will review recently published guidelines on optimizing patient blood management, concentrating on objective data supporting transfusion thresholds for red cells, platelets, and plasma components. He will discuss outcomes of clinical trials evaluating lower versus higher hemoglobin transfusion triggers, prophylactic versus therapeutic platelet transfusions, and the effect of platelet dose on clinical outcomes. Dr. Szczepiorkowski will also discuss the effect of implementing patient blood management guidelines in an academic medical center. Dr. Susan Leitman will review the etiology of and clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, treatment, and assessment of response to phlebotomy therapy of genetic hemochromatosis syndromes involving variant HFE alleles. She will review the practical aspects, regulatory considerations, safety, advantages of, and hindrances to establishing widespread programs for use of hemochromatosis subjects as blood donors, emphasizing the implications for universal population screening for HFE mutations. Dr. James Zimring will describe the morphological, biochemical, and functional changes that red blood cells undergo during prolonged storage in vitro and the impact such changes may have on transfusion safety and efficacy in vivo. He will review the controversial and sometimes contradictory results of recent trials investigating the use of fresher versus older red cell units in neonatal, surgical, cardiac, and intensive care settings. Education Program
  • 31. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 29 Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy: A Clinical and Scientific Perspective CHAIR: John R. Hess, MD, MPH, University of Washington, Seattle, WA SPEAKERS: John B. Holcomb, MD, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX Optimal Trauma Resuscitation with Plasma as the Primary Resuscitative Fluid: The Surgeon’s Perspective Nathan J. White, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Mechanisms of Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy John R. Hess, MD, MPH, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Resuscitation in Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy This session will focus on recent advances in the clinical recognition and management of trauma-associated and induced coagulopathy and will review the evolving understanding of mechanisms and epidemiology of injury- related coagulation system failure. Speakers will describe the constraints placed on effective resuscitation by the limitations of available crystalloid and colloid fluids and blood components. Dr. John Holcomb will review the epidemiology of trauma, the occurrence of coagulopathy in severe trauma, and how coagulopathy increases mortality even in the best trauma centers. He will discuss the history of patterns of resuscitation and the use of plasma as a primary resuscitation fluid, and will also describe the large National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pragmatic, Randomized Optimal Platelets and Plasma Ratios trial underway in 12 U.S. academic trauma centers. Dr. Nathan White will review the evolving mechanisms of coagulation system dysfunction found to arise during severe injury with hemorrhagic shock, focusing on intrinsic anticoagulation, consumption, and fibrinolysis. He will review the relative contributions of these mechanisms to coagulopathy during increasingly severe injury and will highlight how they interact to produce traumatic coagulation system dysfunction. Dr. John Hess will review the options for treating trauma-induced coagulopathy in conjunction with other trauma resuscitation goals and how the composition of conventional blood components and the delay in obtaining coagulation laboratory results constrains the options of trauma resuscitation teams. He will also discuss the American College of Surgeons’ Trauma Quality Improvement Program’s evolving guidelines for transfusion services. Updates in Aggressive Thrombotic Disease CHAIR: Wendy Lim, MD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada SPEAKERS: Gowthami Arepally, MD, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Wendy Lim, MD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Antiphospholipid Syndrome Charles W. Francis, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY Chemotherapy-Associated Thrombosis This session will focus on recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of thromboembolic disorders characterized by or associated with thrombocytopenia that, despite anticoagulation, are frequently complicated by progressive or recurrent thrombosis. Dr. Gowthami Arepally will review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a frequently considered diagnosis in the thrombocytopenic hospitalized patient. Emphasis will be placed on the clinical and laboratory diagnostic elements that distinguish patients with HIT from patients with other causes of thrombocytopenia. Dr. Wendy Lim will review antiphospholipid syndrome, an autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thromboembolic events or pregnancy complications in patients with laboratory evidence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The diagnosis and antithrombotic management of these patients, including those with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, will be discussed. Dr. Charles Francis will discuss predicting thrombotic risk in cancer patients, the role of prophylactic anticoagulation, and treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis in patients who receive chemotherapy or develop recurrent thrombotic complications despite anticoagulation. Junior Faculty Development Education Program: Which Grant is Right for Me? CHAIR: Kevin R. Imrie, MD, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada SPEAKERS: Allison King, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Identifying Grant Funding: Mentored Career Development and Transition Awards Jorge A. Di Paola, MD, University of Colorado – Denver, Aurora, CO How to Respond to the Pain of Reviewers’ Critiques Funding Q&A Panel Discussion Ellen M. Werner, PhD, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Terry Rogers Bishop, PhD, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Louis J. DeGennaro, PhD, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, White Plains, NY Pavan Reddy, MD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI THIS SESSION IS OFFERED ONCE This session will focus on issues critical to the career development of junior faculty members. Dr. Allison King will share practical advice for identifying career development grants. She will provide an overview of available granting agencies and provide guidance to more senior fellows and junior faculty members on securing grants that fit their work and future career plans. Dr. Jorge Di Paola will provide guidance on how to respond to reviewers’ critiques. He will provide insight into the learned skill of addressing comments and will specifically address commonly encountered comments. The session will conclude with a question- and-answer panel in which representatives of the National Institutes of Health and various foundations will provide information about their organizations and answer questions.
  • 32. 30 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Education Program This year ASH will offer Education Spotlight Sessions on five exciting topics. Each 90-minute session will be presented once on either Sunday or Monday, in a small-venue format for approximately 150 ticketed attendees. Speakers will discuss the topic with ample time reserved for audience questions and participation. The talks will facilitate discussions of evidence-based practice, decision making, and controversies in diagnosis and management. The lectures will address the current state of knowledge, translational and clinical applications, and future directions. Ticket Prices (per session) Member: $25 Associate Member: $25 Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident Member: $25 Non-Member in Training: $25 Allied Health Professional: $35 Non-Member: $40 The Education Spotlight Sessions are restricted to medical professionals only; no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Individuals are limited to one ticket per session. Tickets may be purchased during the online registration process. Attention Trainees! A number of tickets for the Education Spotlight Sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member; Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident member; or non-member in training will be required to purchase a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter at the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Pro/Con Debate: Is There Still a Pivotal Role for Fresh Frozen Plasma in the Management of Perioperative Bleeding? Sunday, December 8 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CO-CHAIRS: Beverley J. Hunt, MD, King’s College London, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom Yes, Fresh Frozen Plasma Is Still Needed Sibylle Kozek, MD, Evangelical Hospital Vienna, Vienna, Austria No, Coagulation Factor Concentrates Should Be Preferred Because there were no trials to assess the utility of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) after its introduction post World War II, it was assumed to be of benefit, leading to a casual approach to its use in the decades that followed. However, the new millennium has been characterized by concerns about the unintended consequences of FFP, especially of transfusion-transmitted disease and potential immunologic complications. In recent years, clinicians have begun to move toward the use of recombinant proteins or virus-inactivated plasma-derived blood products, now widely available in Europe, as an alternative treatment in several scenarios; however, this has led to controversy and a growing clinical divide in current management. Nowhere is the divide greater than in the field of acute traumatic coagulopathy, particularly across the Atlantic. In many European centers, acute traumatic coagulopathy is managed by coagulation factor concentrates and tranexamic acid alone; however, in North America FFP is used. Moreover, current evidence of the risk- benefit analysis of FFP and coagulation factor replacement in preventing and treating many bleeding disorders remains inadequate. Dr. Beverley Hunt will discuss why FFP is still needed and where continuing use of FFP is required. Dr. Sibylle Kozek will discuss the alternative use of coagulation factor concentrates. Challenging Cases from the OB Ward: Consultative Hematology Sunday, December 8 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CO-CHAIRS: Andra James, MD, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Management of Peri-Partum Complications Peter A. Kouides, MD, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY Thrombosis and Pregnancy Dr. Andra James will speak about peri-partum complications of pregnancy, specifically preeclampsia. The underlying cause is unknown; however, clinical manifestations derive from maternal endothelial cell damage, presumably as a result of circulating factors from an ischemic placenta. Concomitant with endothelial damage are changes in clotting factor levels and sometimes a decrease in platelet number. Preeclampsia and related conditions, such as hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy, can result in coagulopathy. The hematologist may become involved in care when a patient with preeclampsia risk factors is considered for anticoagulant therapy during pregnancy, when a patient with a form of preeclampsia requires treatment for severe thrombocytopenia, or when a patient develops coagulopathy or thrombosis as a consequence of preeclampsia. Dr. Peter Kouides will discuss thrombosis and pregnancy. Approximately 80 percent of thrombotic events in pregnancy are a result of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The risk of VTE during pregnancy increases four- to five-fold during pregnancy and another 20-fold after delivery. Not only are women treated with anticoagulants during pregnancy for current VTE, but anticoagulants are also used for prophylaxis. Most women with a history of VTE are candidates for prophylaxis; however, some women are limited to anticoagulants during the postpartum period. There are no large trials of anticoagulants in pregnancy, and recommendations for their use are based on case series and the opinions of experts. At the time of delivery, anticoagulation can be manipulated to reduce the risk of bleeding complications while minimizing the risk of thrombosis. Education Spotlight Sessions ticketed session
  • 33. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 31 Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine Sunday, December 8 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. CO-CHAIRS: Mahendra S. Rao, MBBS, PhD, National Institutes of Health Center for Regenerative Medicine, Bethesda, MD Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Derivation and Propagation Tim M. Townes, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL iPS Cells: Current State of the Art This session will describe additional uses of cord blood and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs represent a unique, relatively inexpensive source of clinical-grade material for which an infrastructure for donation, storage, and distribution already exists. Provided appropriate consents are written, it is possible to consider non-traditional uses of cord blood and HSCs. In the field of HSC transplantation, groups are exploring expansion of HSC and double cord transfusions as well as cell engineering and gene correction strategies. Other investigators are exploring the presence of other stem cell populations that may be present in blood samples such as mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cell progenitors, and hemangioblasts. More recently investigators have shown that cord blood and marrow is an excellent source of cells to generate pluripotent cells, which may be used in a variety of different treatments. Yet other investigators are exploring transdifferentiation strategies to treat patients with CD34 immunoreactive cells, while others are exploring the use of differentiated cell populations for the treatment of a variety of disorders. The speakers in this session will summarize their efforts in this new and exciting field. Transition Point in Hematologic Malignancies: What to Do When Cure is No Longer Possible Monday, December 9 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon CO-CHAIRS: Christopher Daugherty, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Defining the Transition Point and the Challenges of Prognosis Disclosure Christina Ullrich, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Partnering with Palliative Care: How Together We Can Hope for the Best and Prepare for the Rest For patients with high-risk or advanced malignancies and their families, opportunities to discuss prognosis and goals of care and to address advance care planning are associated with a variety of benefits, including reduced emotional distress and better patient ratings of physician communication and quality of care, among others. In the setting of acute and refractory hematologic malignancies, where death often acutely looms and disease-directed treatment is associated with significant and acute morbidity and mortality, the ethical imperative for effective doctor-patient communication about prognosis (both with and without further therapy) becomes uncommonly complex and challenging. Using a case-based approach with significant opportunities for audience commentary, this session will provide a framework for addressing these issues in the setting of acute and refractory hematologic malignancies while also highlighting current understanding of patient and physician perspectives. For physicians caring for these patients, there is a great need to dispel misconceptions about the definition of palliative care and to highlight ways in which the disciplines of palliative care and oncology/ transplantation can complement one another. Strategies and benefits of integrating palliative care into patient care will be discussed. Specific discussion will focus on a program involving an automatic triggering of palliative care consultation in the particularly emotionally charged setting of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children. Allogeneic Transplant in Asia: New Approaches Monday, December 9 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon CO-CHAIRS: Dai-Hong Liu, MD, PhD, Peking University/ Institute of Hematology, Beijing, China Haplo-Transplantation Has the Edge: Strategies from the “One-Child” Policy of China Vikram Mathews, MD, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India Allogeneic Transplantation in India: Indications and Approach Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has proven to be one of the best therapeutic options for certain hematologic malignancies. However, in most Asian countries a combination of factors, including but not limited to limited resources, inadequate facilities to cope with demand, and a shortage of trained personnel, restrict its widespread application in appropriate clinical settings. In addition, China’s “one-child” policy has been in effect for more than 30 years. For those patients lacking human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-compatible siblings, a haplo-identical family donor is one of the acceptable alternatives. Based on the immune regulatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on healthy donors and a series of laboratory studies, over the last decade researchers at Peking University have developed a novel approach for HLA-mismatched/haploidentical myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo- HSCT) without in vitro T-cell depletion. To date, haplo-HSCT accounts for approximately 30 percent of the total allo-HSCT cases each year in China. Dr. Dai-Hong Liu will present the current status of haplo-HSCT in China with a focus on the strategies to improve its clinical outcomes. Dr. Vikram Mathews will present the evolution, growth, and challenges faced by the allogeneic stem cell program in India. He will present data on allogeneic stem cell transplants in thalassemia major, a major health problem in Southeast Asia. Patients with thalassemia major often present late for allo-HSCT, and many of the algorithms used for risk stratification and treatment in a developed country fail to accurately prognosticate clinical outcomes in these high-risk patients. Dr. Mathews will present the valuable clinical experience gained from utilizing novel approaches to overcome the challenges presented by allo-HSCT in such high-risk groups.
  • 34. 32 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Saturday, December 7 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Sunday, December 8 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. The “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions are designed to provide an opportunity for a small number of attendees to meet with a clinical expert in a setting that fosters interaction. This year, ASH has invited experts from all over the world to facilitate informal discussions allowing participants to present their questions and gain new perspectives. A boxed lunch will be provided. Ticket Prices (per session) Member: $45 Associate Member: $45 Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident Member: $45 Non-Member in Training: $45 Allied Health Professional: $45 Non-Member: $60 The “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions are restricted to medical professionals only; no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Tickets are limited and only available on site on a first-come, first-served basis. Only one ticket per person is allowed. Tickets can be purchased at the Ticketed Sessions counter in the registration area of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center beginning Thursday, December 5, during registration hours until all tickets are sold. The room assignment will be indicated on the ticket and in the on-site materials. Please check your ticket carefully to ensure proper date, time, location, and session choice. Attention Trainees! A number of tickets for the “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member; Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident member; or non-member in training will be required to purchase a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter at the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Schedule Subject to Change Please note that the “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” session schedule included here is not final. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) in late September to view an updated schedule. Michaela Liedtke, MD, Stanford University Cancer Center, Stanford, CA Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Andrew Artz, MD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Allogeneic Transplant for High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia William G. Wierda, MD, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Jorge Cortes, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Chronic Myeloid Leukemia William Blum, MD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Acute Myeloid Leukemia Andrew M. Evens, DO, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA Hodgkin Lymphoma Andrzej J. Jakubowiak, MD, PhD, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI Multiple Myeloma Guillermo Garcia-Manero, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Myelodysplastic Syndromes Jason Gotlib, MD, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, CA Myeloproliferative Diseases Christopher Flowers, MD, Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, Atlanta, GA Follicular Lymphomas Michael E. Williams, MD, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA Mantle Cell Lymphoma Jane N. Winter, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patrick Brown, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Infant Leukemia Gritta E. Janka, MD, PhD, University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Helen E. Heslop, MD, Baylor College of Medicine Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Houston, TX Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease Neil Josephson, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA Hemophilia James N. George, MD, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Richard F. Little, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD AIDS Lymphoma Kenneth A. Bauer, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA Thromboembolic Disease Miguel R. Abboud, MD, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon Sickle Cell Disease Susan F. Leitman, MD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Hemochromatosis Gowthami Arepally, MD, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas Education Program ticketed session
  • 35. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 33 Scientific Program Co-Chairs: José López, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA Kevin Shannon, MD, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA The 2013 Scientific Committee Sessions will be held Saturday, December 7, and Sunday, December 8. Each session will be offered twice, including a session organized by the new ASH Ad Hoc Scientific Committee on Epigenetics and Genomics (see page 39). A question-and- answer period will occur at the end of each individual speaker presentation. Invited abstracts of these sessions will be published in the Program Book and on the flash drive containing the annual meeting abstracts. In addition, this information will be available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) in early November. Looking for additional opportunities to interact with Scientific Program speakers? Sessions marked with this icon are associated with an additional Continuing Conversations session with the session chair and speakers. See page 44 for more details on the Continuing Conversations series. Scientific Committee on Blood Disorders in Childhood Developmental Hematopoiesis Gone Awry Chair: Michael A. Pulsipher, MD, The University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT Speakers: Elaine Dzierzak, PhD, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands Ontogeny of Hematopoiesis Nancy A. Speck, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Inherited and Acquired RUNX1 Mutations in Hematologic Disorders Marshall Horwitz, MD, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Insights from Familial Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes This session will explore recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways regulating hematopoiesis and how aberrations in these pathways contribute to hematologic disease. Presentations will span basic scientific and patient-oriented studies to address fundamental questions in developmental hematopoiesis. Dr. Elaine Dzierzak will describe how hematopoietic stem cells form in the embryo and will also review key regulatory pathways involved in this process. Dr. Nancy Speck will focus on the RUNX1 gene that is mutated in a familial leukemia syndrome and is essential for hematopoietic stem cell formation in the embryo. She will describe how loss-of-function RUNX1 mutations affect hematopoietic stem cell formation and function. Dr. Marshall Horwitz will present recent insights from genetic studies of familial myelodysplastic syndromes and familial leukemia syndromes. He will also discuss the role of these genes in hematopoiesis and how mutations in these genes contribute to clonal evolution. Scientific Committee on Hematopathology and Clinical Laboratory Hematology Innovations in Analyzing Hematopoietic Cell Phenotype and Function Chair: LoAnn Peterson, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL Speakers: Garry Nolan, PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA All Roads Lead to Rome: Phenotypic Channeling to Uniform Differentiation Structures from Diverse Leukemia Genotypes by Mass Cytometry Kojo S.J. Elenitoba-Johnson, MD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Lost in Post-Translation, Found by Mass Spectrometry: Identification of Novel Biomarkers and Biologic Insights in Lymphoma Pathogenesis Mark Miller, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Two-Photon Imaging of Immune Cell Dynamics: Moving from 2D Fixed Tissue Sections to 3D Dynamic Histology In Vivo This session will focus on innovative techniques that are being used to analyze hematopoietic cell phenotype and function. Speakers will cover new insights that these techniques have contributed to our knowledge of the pathogenesis of leukemias and lymphomas as well as our knowledge of immune cell function in benign conditions. Dr. Garry Nolan and his colleagues have developed a novel mass flow cytometry technique that enables examination of large numbers of parameters on a single cell and allows for analysis of signaling responses in complex systems. Dr. Nolan will discuss the application of this technique and its impact on increasing our knowledge of leukemia cell biology. Dr. Kojo Elenitoba-Johnson utilizes mass spectrometry-driven proteomics to identify proteins and post-translational modifications expressed by specific types of lymphomas. Dr. Elenitoba-Johnson will discuss the use of this technology for the identification of novel biomarkers and novel biologic insights underlying lymphoma pathogenesis and their therapeutic implications. Dr. Mark Miller will discuss the principles and advantages of two-photon (2P) microscopy for studying cellular immune responses in vivo. Dr. Miller will present multiple examples in which imaging single-cell dynamics have uncovered novel immunological phenomena during infection, autoimmunity, and cancer. While 2P imaging has been used extensively to study immune cell trafficking and function in mice, more recently the technique has helped scientists acquire a multi- dimensional picture of disease in unfixed human biopsy tissues. New This year Continuing Conversations Scientific Program
  • 36. 34 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Scientific Committee on Hematopoiesis Non-Coding RNAs in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis Chair: John F. DiPersio, MD, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO Speakers: Mitchell J. Weiss, MD, PhD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Role of Long Coding RNAs in Epigenetic Modulation of Hematopoiesis Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Genome Regulation by Long Non-Coding RNAs Pier Paolo Pandolfi, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ceRNAs and ceRNA Networks in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis and Their Therapeutic Implications The dark side, or non-coding portion of the human genome, comprises only 1.5 percent of the entire genome. If one also considers the untranslated regions (UTRs), this increases to just 2 percent. Although there has been an explosion of data demonstrating the clinical relevance of one class of short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) called microRNAs (miRNAs) in both normal development and in diseases such as cancer, less is known about the structure and function of other midsized and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) such as large intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs), transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs), and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). This session will provide the latest scientific evidence for the roles of ncRNAs in health and disease with particular focus on their critical contributions to both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Dr. Mitchell Weiss will provide a comprehensive review of the field of non-coding RNAs and define the various classes and members. He will then provide a more focused review of the structure and function of the heterogeneous group of ncRNAs called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Finally, he will discuss the work of his laboratory and others to identify and characterize long non-coding RNAs that are expressed during hematopoiesis and their roles specifically during erythro-megakaryopoiesis. Dr. Howard Chang will discuss complicated interactions of lncRNAs, lincRNAs with various transcription factors resulting in altered chromatin states. These interactions are likely to play important roles in both normal and altered biologic processes, including cancer. Dr. Chang will attempt to define the rules that determine how lncRNAs alter transcriptional activity, the genes that they regulate, and their roles in dysregulated states such as cancer. Dr. Pier Paolo Pandolfi will discuss exciting new data focused on the roles of pseudogenes, lincRNAs, and miRNAs in the pathogenesis of leukemia and lymphoma as also studied in vivo in the mouse. He will also focus on circular competing endogenous RNA (ceRNAs) and pseudo-ceRNAs and give important attention to how understanding the ceRNA language will facilitate efforts to deconvolute ceRNA networks in hematopoietic malignancies. Scientific Committee on Hemostasis Engineering a New Generation of Hemostatic Agents Chair: Maureane Hoffman, MD, PhD, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC Speakers: Egon Persson, PhD, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark Engineering FVIIa Variants with Enhanced Activity Robert Peters, PhD, Biogen Idec Hemophilia, Cambridge, MA Prolonging the Half-Life of Hemostatic Factors via the Neonatal Fc Receptor Alan E. Mast, MD, PhD, BloodCenter of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI The Potential to Enhance Hemostasis by Inhibiting Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor This is an exciting time for the hemophilia community, as a number of new hemostatic agents are in various stages of development or in clinical trials, including variants of naturally occurring coagulation proteins that have been engineered to have greater activity and/or longer duration of action. Such novel therapeutics hold the promise of improving the quality of life for hemophilia patients. This session will explore the scientific basis for some of the novel approaches. Dr. Egon Persson will describe the conformational changes induced when factor VIIa binds to its cofactor, tissue factor, and how changing a limited number of amino acids can induce similar conformational changes. This allows the design of FVIIa variants with increased intrinsic activity. Dr. Robert Peters will discuss how the neonatal Fc receptor acts to prolong the lifetime of immunoglobulins and albumin and how this property can be utilized to enhance the half-life of therapeutic agents. Dr. Alan Mast will discuss the prospect that inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor might lead to increased thrombin generation and improved hemostasis in hemophilia. Scientific Committee on Immunology and Host Defense T-Cell Tolerance and Exhaustion Chair: Gay M. Crooks, MBBS, University of California – Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA Speakers: Maria Grazia Roncarolo, MD, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy T-Cell-Mediated Suppression: From Bench to Bedside E. John Wherry, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Molecular Basis of T-Cell Exhaustion Stanley Riddell, MD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Selecting T-Cell Subsets for Adoptive T-Cell Therapy to Optimize Potency and Persistence Immune responses are dynamically regulated by a complex interplay between activating and inhibitory signals. This session will explore recent advances in our understanding of some of the factors that limit T-cell responses, and thus result in prevention of autoimmunity or alloimmunity as well as diminished anti-tumor or anti-viral immunity. Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo will review current understanding of the spectrum of regulatory T cells and the results of clinical approaches to utilize such cells to prevent or treat autoimmunity and graft-versus-host disease. She will also discuss current concepts regarding mechanisms of T-cell-mediated immune suppression. Dr. E. John Wherry will discuss the emerging understanding of cell intrinsic factors that regulate whether T cells exposed to chronic antigens maintain functionality or become senescent. Using studies of chronic viral infection in mice and in humans, Dr. Wherry will discuss the role of T-box transcription factors and other pathways that regulate T-cell exhaustion versus memory. Dr. Stanley Riddell will discuss the role that T-cell exhaustion plays in limiting the effectiveness of adoptive cell therapies for chronic viral infection and cancer. He will discuss current approaches to preempt exhaustion in the context of adoptive immunotherapy trials, including the use of selected subsets of naïve, central memory, or stem cell memory cells for genetic manipulation. Scientific Program Continuing Conversations
  • 37. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 35 Scientific Committee on Iron and Heme Heme, Not Just for Globins Chair: Barry H. Paw, MD, PhD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Speakers: Iqbal Hamza, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park, MD Hematology From The Ground Up: Lessons From C. Elegans To Be Determined Vertebrate Heme Transporters, FLVCR1, Erythropoiesis, and Beyond Hervé Puy, MD, INSERM U773, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France Heme-Related Blood Disorders This scientific session will focus on the biochemistry of heme biosynthesis, the cell biology of heme transporters, and human diseases resulting from defects in heme synthesis and its transport to various subcellular compartments. The role of heme in various biological processes, besides its well-known role in hemoglobin production, will be reviewed. Recent advances in the identification of novel transporters of heme will be discussed in reference to the cell biology of erythropoiesis and iron/heme homeostasis. Disorders of heme production and transport will be reviewed. Dr. Iqbal Hamza will present an overview of the role of heme in various biological processes, its biochemical synthesis, and the recent identification of novel heme transporters and their functional implications. Genetic model systems that have provided insight into the identification and functional characterization of these novel heme transporters will be presented, including the effects on iron/heme homeostasis. This session will also focus on the roles and biological implications of the Feline Leukemia Virus subgroup C Receptor1 (FLVCR1) isoforms 1a and 1b in the export of heme from the cytoplasm and mitochondria of developing red cells and of other cell types. Dr. Hervé Puy will discuss the clinical disorders resulting from defects in the production of heme and its transport. Interventional therapies for these heme-related blood disorders will be reviewed. Scientific Committee on Lymphoid Neoplasia Targeting Apoptosis in Lymphoid Malignancies Chair: Scott Armstrong, MD, PhD, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Speakers: Douglas R. Green, PhD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Matters of Life and Death: Give and Take in the BCL-2 Family Andreas Strasser, PhD, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Victoria, Australia Role of BCL-2 Family in Lymphoid Malignancies Anthony Letai, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Therapeutic Targeting of the BCL-2 Family This session will describe the mechanisms of programmed cell death, their deregulation in lymphoid cancers, and the development of new clinical approaches. Recent discoveries have provided new insights into the mechanisms of programmed cell death. Our understanding of how these processes are corrupted in cancer development is expanding rapidly and leading to new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Dr. Douglas Green will describe the current understanding of programmed cell death and highlight recently defined cell death mechanisms that cells employ in response to inflammatory, metabolic, and nutritional derangements. Dr. Andreas Strasser will present work from mouse models of lymphoid malignancies and define the role of specific cell death proteins in the maintenance of lymphoid malignancies that set the stage for clinical translation. Dr. Anthony Letai will present recent insights from translational studies that demonstrate a relationship between the activity of cell death mechanisms and the ability to predict response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. He will also update recent clinical studies that assess small molecules targeting antiapoptotic mechanisms in lymphoid malignancies. Continuing Conversations
  • 38. 36 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Scientific Program Scientific Committee on Myeloid Biology The Molecular Biology of Congenital Neutropenia Chair: Elizabeth Eklund, MD, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL Speakers: Daniel Link, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO Mechanisms of Neutrophil Release From the Bone Marrow Ivo P. Touw, PhD, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands Malignant Transformation in Congenital Neutropenia Julia Skokowa, MD, PhD, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Aberrant G-CSFR Signaling in Congenital Neutropenia Neutrophils are an essential component of the innate immune response and are a major contributor to inflammation. Consequently, neutrophil homeostasis is tightly regulated. This is achieved by balancing neutrophil production, release from the bone marrow, and senescence. Genetic alterations that impair neutrophil production or release result in severe congenital neutropenia (CN). CN is complicated by recurrent life-threatening opportunistic bacterial infections and increased incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To alleviate neutropenia, CN patients are routinely treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a major regulator of granulopoiesis that induces proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells toward granulocytes and monocytes. Transformation of CN to AML is associated with the acquisition of somatic mutations in the gene encoding the G-CSF receptor (CSF3R). Dr. Daniel Link will review the chemokine signals that regulate neutrophil trafficking from the bone marrow and the congenital neutropenias associated with alterations in this pathway. Dr. Ivo Touw will discuss the consequences of CSF3R mutations on G-CSF responses and the leukemic evolution of CN. Development of CSF3R mutations is followed by the acquisition of additional genetic defects in CSF3R mutant clones over time. Dr. Julia Skokowa will describe signaling systems that operate downstream of G-CSFR and have implications for this process, including activation of the WNT pathway, SIRT deacetylation, and activation of the nuclear transport protein HCLS1. Scientific Committee on Myeloid Neoplasia Molecular Complexity and Novel Targeting Therapies for Myeloid Neoplasms: The Future is Here! Chair: Guido Marcucci, MD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Speakers: Michael Deininger, MD, PhD, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Receptors Craig B. Thompson, MD, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Targeting Epigenetic Readers Guy Sauvageau, MD, PhD, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Novel Targeting Strategies for Leukemia- Initiating Cells in Myeloid Neoplasms Acute and chronic myeloid neoplasms have been well characterized for cytogenetic and molecular aberrations and this knowledge has been used for the improvement of disease classifications, outcome risk stratification, and treatment guidance. Emerging genomic sequencing technologies have provided insight into the landscape of genomic and epigenetic alterations that occur in these myeloid diseases and have led to the subsequent formulation of novel mechanistic hypotheses, the identification of previously unrecognized molecular subsets of patients, and the design of new molecularly targeting therapies. However, the discovered molecular complexity of the myeloid neoplasms has also emphasized the challenges that can be encountered in devising targeting therapies that are specific for distinct molecular aberrations as well as minimally toxic and highly effective. This session will be devoted to the review of the molecular targeting approaches that are currently available for patients with myeloid neoplasms and to the discussion of the novel emerging therapies. Dr. Michael Deininger will review the state of the art of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia, the challenge of broadening their application to other acute and chronic myeloid neoplasms, and the utility of emerging novel pharmacologic strategies that interfere with leukemogenic kinase signaling. Dr. Craig Thompson will review recent discoveries regarding the biology and clinical impact of emerging mutations in epigenetic modifiers and how they can be effectively targeted in myeloid neoplasms with new compounds currently being tested in early clinical trials. Dr. Guy Sauvageau will review the role of leukemia-initiating cells in the mechanisms of chemoresistance of myeloid neoplasms and how newly devised high-throughput strategies can be utilized for the screening of novel effective compounds targeting this highly resistant disease niche.
  • 39. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 37 Scientific Committee on Platelets Platelets and Cancer Chair: Michael H. Kroll, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Speakers: Chris Holmes, MD, PhD, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT Tumor Biology and our Current Understanding of the Role of Platelets: An Overview Richard Hynes, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Platelets, Tumor Cell Invasiveness, and Metastasis Tatiana V. Byzova, PhD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Platelets and the Tumor Cell Microenvironment Anil Sood, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Causes and Consequences of Cancer- Associated Thrombocytosis Animal studies published 45 years ago showed that thrombocytopenia protected against tumor cell metastases, but mechanisms of this effect and its relevance to the biology of human malignancies has been uncertain. Research is now beginning to elucidate specific mechanisms by which platelets affect the biology of cancer, suggesting areas of clinical translation applicable to a broad spectrum of human malignancies. The purpose of this session is to present new data about how platelets influence the growth and spread of cancer and how recent discoveries about platelet- cancer interactions might be applied to clinical therapeutics. Dr. Chris Holmes will review the essential concepts of oncogenesis and cancer spread, provide an overview of the current state of the emerging field of platelets and cancer, and provide a framework for presentation of the state-of-the-art work of the session. Dr. Richard Hynes will discuss how platelets promote cancer cell metastases, including pro- metastatic changes in solid tumor cell phenotype, blood stream invasion, vascular transit, and microvascular arrest followed by tumor cell adhesion and extravasation at distant sites. Dr. Tatiana Byzova will discuss how platelets actively modify the tumor microenvironment to support the growth of metastatic foci, emphasizing the interaction between platelets and the skeleton in the spread of prostate cancer. Dr. Anil Sood will discuss the phenomenon of cancer-associated thrombocytosis, focusing on its cause and consequences, and will interpret data describing mechanisms by which thrombocytosis promotes the growth and spread of ovarian cancer. Scientific Committee on Red Cell Biology From Red Cell Biology to Principles of Cell Regulation Chair: Emery Bresnick, PhD, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI Speakers: John Stamatoyannopoulos, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Gene Regulation: A Genomic Perspective Merav Socolovsky, MBBS, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA Systems Biology and Epigenetic Mechanisms in Erythropoiesis Stuart H. Orkin, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Genetics and Epigenetics of Fetal Hemoglobin Control This session will focus on the use of red cells to elucidate principles of cell regulation relevant to diverse aspects of hematology. In recent years, genomic data have been accrued at a rate that severely challenges existing analytical methodologies, and negotiating complex datasets can be daunting. The presentations will illustrate cutting-edge genomic and mechanistic analyses to dissect problems in chromosome biology, erythroid cell maturation, and hemoglobin switching that have considerable importance from fundamental and clinical perspectives. Dr. John Stamatoyannopoulos will discuss the ENCODE project and the development of principles to understand chromosome biology and gene regulation. Dr. Merav Socolovsky will describe epigenetic and cell cycle regulatory mechanisms governing erythroid cell maturation. Dr. Stuart Orkin will present recent insights into transcriptional networks that control hemoglobin switching. Scientific Committee on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine The Stem Cell Epigenome Chair: George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Speakers: Richard Young, PhD, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Control of the Stem Cell Gene Expression Program Andrew Feinberg, MD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Epigenetics of Hematopoiesis, Stem Cell Reprogramming, and Cancer Leonard I. Zon, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA The Role of Chromatin Factors in Hematopoietic Development The hematopoietic system is a major paradigm for understanding how epigenetic cues guide the differentiation of stem cells into distinct functional lineages. The direct chemical modification of DNA and chromatin-associated proteins is orchestrated by a complex network of enzymes, some of which are mutated or dysregulated in leukemia, myelodysplasia, lymphoma, and a host of other malignancies and developmental disorders. Defining the key molecular features of epigenetic regulation promises to inform efforts to model blood diseases, direct stem cell differentiation, and develop new therapeutic strategies. In this session, three leading scientists will present the latest insights into transcriptional regulation and chromatin control with particular attention to hematopoiesis and stem cell dynamics. Dr. Richard Young, a leader in defining transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, will discuss his lab’s progress in mapping the regulatory circuitry that controls cell state and differentiation in embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells. Dr. Andrew Feinberg pioneered the field of cancer epigenetics and has led efforts to develop and apply genome-scale epigenetic tools to common human disease generally. He will describe the role of epigenetic changes in normal development and reprogramming in induced pluripotent stem cells and cancer. Dr. Leonard Zon, who has revealed many fundamental insights into blood development by exploiting the zebrafish genetic system, will discuss genetic and chemical screens that have revealed new chromatin targets critical for hematopoietic stem cell development, function, and malignancy. Continuing Conversations
  • 40. 38 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Scientific Program Scientific Committee on Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Vessel Wall, Atherosclerosis, and Arterial Thrombosis Chair: Zaverio Marcello Ruggeri, MD, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA Speakers: Meinrad Gawaz, MD, Eberhard Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany Leukocyte Adhesion and Activation in Atherothrombosis Gwendalyn Randolph, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Monocyte Trafficking, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis Daniel Simon, MD, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH Platelet Transcriptional Profiling and Atherothrombosis Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative process of the arterial wall characterized by the subendothelial accumulation of lipids in critical areas of the arterial tree, affecting millions of men and women worldwide. Alterations of lipid metabolism accompanied by changes in carbohydrate metabolism with insulin resistance are key determinants of atherosclerotic plaque formation. In addition, it is now generally recognized that inflammation, the second key hallmark of atherosclerosis, plays a major role in the onset of the disease as well as, most importantly, in causing plaque disruption and instability that may be followed by local thrombosis. This session will highlight three major topics representative of ongoing research efforts aimed at achieving a detailed understanding of the pathogenic molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and its acute thrombotic complications. Dr. Meinrad Gawaz will discuss the role of platelet interaction with leukocytes in atherothrombosis, with emphasis on the reciprocal influence of leukocyte-platelet cross- talk in the atherosclerotic plaque environment. Platelets are an important link between inflammation, thrombosis, and atherogenesis. Leukocyte as well as platelet activation influence the balance of inflammatory procoagulant and anticoagulant pathways, and increased thrombin production is likely a key determinant of both atherosclerotic plaque progression and acute thrombotic arterial occlusion. Dr. Gwendalyn Randolph will discuss the role of monocyte trafficking in the onset and development of atherosclerotic lesions. Her studies are based on earlier literature concluding that the removal of monocyte-derived cells from sites of inflammation requires emigration to lymph nodes through lymphatic vessels. More recent experimental work in the context of atherosclerosis and acute inflammation indicates that the process of emigration plays a quantitatively minor role in the removal of macrophages; instead, macrophage burden is primarily regulated by monocyte recruitment and local apoptosis. Dr. Randolph’s laboratory is seeking to understand how changes in cholesterol metabolism in the artery wall regulate monocyte recruitment to plaques and how this signal can be turned off to promote disease regression. Dr. Daniel Simon will concentrate on research aimed at determining genetic predictors of myocardial infarction using transcriptional profiling of platelets. This functional genomic approach has identified new targets that regulate vascular inflammation and thrombosis, including the elucidation of a novel pathway of thrombosis that does not affect bleeding time or hemostasis. Therefore, therapeutic inhibition of this pathway may achieve antithrombotic effects with a reduced risk of bleeding complications. Scientific Committee on Transfusion Medicine Transfusion Medicine for the Pregnant Mother, Fetus, and Neonate: From Bedside to Bench Chair: Steven L. Spitalnik, MD, Columbia University, New York, NY Speakers: Jeanne Hendrickson, MD, Yale University, New Haven, CT Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization and Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn: New Approaches Using Animal Models Heyu Ni, MD, PhD, University of Toronto, Canadian Blood Services, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia: Lessons Learned From Animal Models C. Ellen van der Schoot, MD, PhD, Sanquin Research Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Prenatal Fetal DNA Testing for Predicting HDFN, FNAIT, and RhIG Candidacy This session will focus on recent developments of some of the transfusion medicine issues that affect the health of the pregnant mother, her fetus, and the resulting newborn child. Specifically, speakers will describe recent results from animal model experiments that elucidate the development of maternal alloimmunity against red blood cell and platelet alloantigens and the mechanisms and consequences of immune- mediated blood cell destruction in the fetus and neonate. In addition, speakers will discuss how to apply this new knowledge in the clinic by describing cutting-edge molecular methods for identifying and preventing high-risk human pregnancies. Dr. Jeanne Hendrickson will describe new mouse models for studying the mechanisms underlying the immunogenicity of red blood cell alloantigens. She will also describe new mouse models for studying the pathophysiology, treatment, and prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Dr. Heyu Ni will describe new mouse models for studying fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). He will also discuss how these models allow rigorous testing of hypotheses addressing the pathophysiology and therapies of this disorder. Dr. C. Ellen van der Schoot will describe new methods of prenatal fetal DNA testing for predicting which human pregnancies are at risk for HDFN and/or FNAIT. She will also discuss how these approaches can be used clinically to determine which women should receive Rh immune globulin to prevent Rh disease.
  • 41. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 39 Scientific Committee on Transplantation Biology Burgeoning Roles of B Cells in Transplant Chair: Stefanie Sarantopoulos, MD, PhD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Speakers: Ann Marshak-Rothstein, PhD, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA From B-Cell Tolerance to Autoimmunity Thomas F. Tedder, PhD, Duke University, Durham, NC Regulatory B Cells (B10 Cells) in Human Disease Jerome Ritz, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Role of B Cells in Graft-Versus-Leukemia and Graft-Versus-Host Disease This session will focus on the evidence delineating how B cells act as potential pathologic mediators or immune regulators in human diseases. Beyond their ability to produce antibodies and act as antigen-presenting cells in anti-microbial responses, B cells are now identified as vital contributors to immune pathology. Dr. Ann Marshak-Rothstein will lay the foundation for active discussion by relaying how B-cell tolerance is maintained. She will present data behind the current understanding of important mechanisms by which autoantibody-antigen complexes trigger receptor signaling and promote autoimmunity. Dr. Thomas Tedder will present evidence supporting the role of B cells as negative regulators of graft rejection. He will also outline the mechanisms by which interleukin 10-producing B cells regulate T cells to maintain immune tolerance. Dr. Jerome Ritz will summarize work demonstrating the relevance of B-cell and antibody responses to the development of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) responses. Modulation of B-cell immunity in patients with GVHD and GVL may improve outcomes for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ad Hoc Scientific Committee on Epigenetics and Genomics Histone Modifications in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis Chair: Ross Levine, MD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Speakers: Kristian Helin, PhD, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark TET Proteins and Histone Modifications in Hematopoiesis Brian J.P. Huntly, MD, PhD, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom Role of Epigenetic Readers in Pathogenesis and Therapy of Acute Leukemias Robert A. Copeland, PhD, Epizyme, Inc., Cambridge, MA Protein Methyltransferase Inhibitors as Personalized Cancer Therapeutics This session will focus on the role of epigenetic modifications in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, including recently described DNA and histone modifications that affect gene expression, self-renewal, and transformation. The session will begin with discussion of recent studies of DNA modifications and alterations in histone state and how these alterations affect gene expression and hematopoietic function. Subsequent talks will focus on how alterations in these epigenetic modifications contribute to disease states and how epigenetic alterations in hematologic malignancies have led to the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets. Dr. Kristian Helin will discuss recent data elucidating the role of TET proteins and of novel histone modifications in gene regulation and hematopoietic function, including insights from genome-wide epigenomic studies. Dr. Brian Huntly will discuss recent studies of how epigenetic readers, which recognize specific histone marks, contribute to hematopoietic stem cell function and to malignant transformation and how these studies have led to new insights into mechanisms of leukemic transformation. Dr. Robert Copeland will discuss recent studies elucidating the role of mutations in epigenetic modifiers in hematologic malignancies and the subsequent development of specific epigenetic therapies targeting DOT1L and EZH2. Continuing Conversations New This year
  • 42. 40 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Scientific Program Ad Hoc Scientific Committee on Bone Marrow Failure Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Chair: Monica Bessler, MD, PhD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Speakers: Akiko Shimamura, MD, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Clinical Spectrum and Molecular Pathophysiology of Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Johanna M. Rommens, PhD, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Lessons from the Mouse Model Alan John Warren, PhD, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom Linking Defective Ribosome Maturation to Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, neutropenia, and metaphyseal dysostosis. Patients with SDS have an increased risk of developing myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In the majority of patients, the disease is caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. Dr. Akiko Shimamura will review the wide spectrum of clinical disease manifestations of SDS as well as the challenges in clinical and molecular diagnosis, the course of the disease, and current treatment options. Dr. Johanna Rommens will discuss insights into the diverse disease pathology gained through modeling SDS in the mouse. Dr. Alan Warren will discuss studies from his lab identifying a fundamental conserved role for the SBDS protein in maturation of the large ribosomal subunit. He will discuss new data identifying pathways responsible for disease that suggest potential targets for drug development. Ad Hoc Scientific Committee on Plasma Cell Neoplasia Genomic Instability and Plasma Cells Chair: Nikhil C. Munshi, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Boston, MA Speakers: David G. Schatz, PhD, Yale University, New Haven, CT Protecting the Genome: Mechanisms Targeting Somatic Hypermutation Andy Futreal, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX The Mutational Profile of Plasma Cell Disorders Peter J. Campbell, PhD, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom Genomic Evolution and Clinical Correlates This session will focus on understanding the genomic changes in myeloma, with emphasis on the role of aberrant somatic hypermutation in genome alterations and the landscape of myeloma mutations. The session will highlight the heterogeneous mutational spectrum, discuss the findings that the driver mutations are often subclonal and may co-exist in the same patient, and that, in most cases, there is a complex subclonal structure which evolves over time. Dr. David Schatz will focus on the mechanism by which somatic hypermutation (SHM) is targeted preferentially to immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. He will discuss recent data showing that Ig enhancers and enhancer-like elements constitute the central components of the DNA elements that recruit SHM preferentially to Ig loci and the protein factors that bind these DNA elements to facilitate SHM. These findings have implications for the mistargeting of SHM to non-Ig loci, including proto-oncogenes such as BCL6 and MYC, and are likely relevant to the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies including multiple myeloma. Dr. Andy Futreal will discuss the current status of somatic genetic changes in multiple myeloma. He will discuss striking heterogeneity of somatic mutations affecting both known cancer genes as well as novel candidate gene mutations previously not implicated in myeloma. Dr. Futreal will correlate identified cancer genes with disease subtypes and their significance and compare the results in myeloma with other malignancies, especially B-cell tumors. Dr. Peter Campbell will discuss diverse mutational processes that often act at different times, leading to complex clonal architecture and diverse processes contributing to the mutational repertoire. He will characterize subclonal and overlapping driver mutations, implying the striking variability of the initiation of molecular events that are associated with progression. Use of serial sample data and diverse patterns of clonal evolution including linear evolution, differential clonal response, and branching evolution will be discussed and compared with similar processes ongoing in other malignancies with implications for therapeutic decisions.
  • 43. Scientific Spotlight Sessions This year ASH will offer Scientific Spotlight Sessions on four exciting topics. Each 90-minute session will be presented once on either Sunday or Monday, in a small-venue format for approximately 150 ticketed attendees. Speakers will discuss the topic with ample time reserved for audience questions and participation. The talks will facilitate discussions of evidence-based practice, decision making, and controversies in diagnosis and management. The lectures will address the current state of knowledge, translational and clinical applications, and future directions. Ticket Prices (per session) Member: $25 Associate Member: $25 Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident Member: $25 Non-Member in Training: $25 Allied Health Professional: $35 Non-Member: $40 The Scientific Spotlight Sessions are restricted to medical professionals only; no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Individuals are limited to one ticket per session. Tickets may be purchased during the online registration process. Attention Trainees! A number of tickets for the Scientific Spotlight Sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member; Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident member; or non-member in training will be required to purchase a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter at the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Hemoglobin and Vascular Pathology Monday, December 9, 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon CO-CHAIRS: Jonathan S. Stamler, MD, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Mark T. Gladwin, MD, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA MODERATOR: Marilyn J. Telen, MD, Duke University, Durham, NC SPEAKERS: Jonathan S. Stamler, MD, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Vasodilation by Red Blood Cells in Health and Disease Mark T. Gladwin, MD, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Hemolytic Anemia as a Mechanism for Vasculopathy and Pulmonary Hypertension in Sickle Cell Disease and Other Hemolytic Conditions The roles of free hemoglobin and nitric oxide (NO) have been the focus of intense investigation and controversy in the context of vascular biology in hemolytic anemias. Several lines of evidence have been interpreted as indicating that plasma- free hemoglobin results in depletion of soluble NO, leading to many of the complications seen in hemolytic syndromes. Other investigators point to the role of cellular hemoglobin as critical to oxygen sensing and delivery of vasodilatory NO to hypoxic tissues, while cellular abnormalities such as oxidative membrane damage that interfere with this process of NO-dependent hypoxic vasodilation are pathogenic. In addition, S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), bioactive NO counterparts resistant to hemoglobin scavenging, convey a large part of the ubiquitous influence of NO and have been shown to have a broad array of intracellular effects through protein nitrosylation, a process also implicated in multiple human diseases. Dr. Jonathan Stamler will talk about vasodilation by red blood cells (RBCs) in health and disease. He will provide historical perspective, review signaling pathways through which RBCs elicit vasodilation, and frame understanding in the context of respiratory cycle physiology. He will also discuss the role of aberrant S-nitrosylation in RBC-based disorders and the ubiquity of signaling through S-nitrosylation, touching on work on hemoglobins in mammals, microbes, and worms. Dr. Mark Gladwin will discuss the results of several large new studies of patients with sickle cell disease for the presence of pulmonary hypertension. These studies have identified a significant association of increasing pulmonary pressure with more severe hemolytic anemia and other specific disease sequelae. Dr. Gladwin will review the evidence for a mechanistic linkage between intravascular hemolysis and vasculopathy in pre-clinical animal models, in vascular studies in patients, in large human cohort studies, and in transfusion medicine. New This year ticketed session ASH 55th Annual Meeting 41
  • 44. Scientific Spotlight Sessions ticketed session 42 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Scientific Program Where Are Platelets Made? Monday, December 9 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. CO-CHAIRS: Steffen Massberg, MD, Hospital of the Ludwig- Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany Insights into Megakaryopoiesis and Thrombopoiesis From In Vivo Imaging Mortimer Poncz, MD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Where are Platelets Released and Why Does That Matter? Several million platelets must be produced every hour to maintain their physiological blood levels and avoid the risk of bleeding. In adults, platelets are generated in the bone marrow compartment from megakaryocytes, terminally differentiated myeloid cells with a typical morphology and diameters of up to 100 micrometers. Megakaryocytes develop from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which give rise to an increasingly restricted lineage culminating in the formation of megakaryocytic precursors. Recognizable megakaryocyte precursors are first noted in a collagen-rich, osteoblastic niche. During their final termination, megakaryocytes relocate to a perivascular, anatomical microdomain where megakaryocytes interact with sinusoidal endothelial cells and potentially also with additional perivascular cells in an environment enriched for a number of ligands such as vitronectin and fibronectin. Once they have settled in the perivascular niche, mature megakaryocytes form dynamic transendothelial pseudopods which extend into the lumen of bone marrow sinusoids. What happens next is still open to discussion. The common view is that these intravascular pseudopodial extensions, termed proplatelets, continue to elongate under the sheer force of the blood flow and become tapered into multiple platelet-sized beads connected to each other and their maternal megakaryocytes by thin cytoplasmic bridges. Thrombopoiesis, the release of platelets and the final step of platelet formation, occurs next within the blood, where new platelets are shed from the tips of intravascular proplatelets. An alternative view is that large cytoplasmic fragments or whole megakaryocytes are released into the bloodstream to then shed platelets predominantly in the pulmonary vascular bed. The molecular pathways that shape the relocation of megakaryocytes and the anatomical, cellular, and molecular domains involved in the control of the production of platelets from mature megakaryocytes will be addressed by the speakers. Dr. Steffen Massberg will review the results of recent in vivo studies addressing the process of megakaryo- and thrombopoiesis, emphasizing what we have learned from recent studies in mice that have applied sophisticated imaging approaches including intravital 2-photon microscopy to visualize these processes. Dr. Mortimer Poncz will discuss historical studies of an alternative model where megakaryocytes may also release platelets in the pulmonary vascular bed as well as human and murine data supporting this model. Besides being of biological interest, understanding final thrombopoiesis will be critical in developing therapeutic strategies utilizing ex vivo-grown megakaryocytes for platelet transfusion. Status of NOTCH1 as a Therapeutic Target in T-Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemias Monday, December 9 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. CO-CHAIRS: Jon C. Aster, MD, PhD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Targeting NOTCH Signaling in Human T-Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemias Adolfo A. Ferrando, MD, PhD, Columbia University, New York, NY Mechanisms of Resistance to Anti-NOTCH1 Therapies in Murine Models of T-Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemias The identification nine years ago of activating mutations in NOTCH1 in more than 60 percent of T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemias (T-ALL) and the availability of small molecule gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) capable of effectively blocking NOTCH activation elicited intense interest in treating T-ALL by targeting NOTCH. However, despite the completion of several Phase I trials evaluating GSIs in patients with relapsed or refractory T-ALL, the promise of anti-NOTCH1 therapy has yet to be fulfilled. Over the last several years, we have gained a detailed understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of oncogenic NOTCH1 signaling in T-ALL and have developed alternative approaches for targeting of NOTCH1 that may soon be available for clinical testing. This, together with the identification of activating mutations in NOTCH1 in other hematologic tumors such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma, has created renewed interest in NOTCH as a therapeutic target. Dr. Jon Aster will discuss the emerging roles of NOTCH signaling in diverse hematologic malignancies, new opportunities for therapeutic interventions, and challenges and possible solutions to mechanisms of GSI resistance in human T-ALL. Dr. Adolfo Ferrando will review the results of studies analyzing the mechanisms of resistance to anti-NOTCH1 therapies in murine models of T-ALL and the role of GSI/glucocorticoid combinations in the treatment of this disease. Epigenetic Mechanisms and DOT1L in MLL- Rearranged Leukemia Monday, December 9 2:45 p.m.- 4:15 p.m. CO-CHAIRS: Scott Armstrong, MD, PhD, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY DOT1L and Histone Methylation as Therapeutic Targets in MLL-Rearranged Leukemias Robert Gould, PhD, Epizyme, Inc., Cambridge, MA Development and Clinical Translation of Small Molecule DOT1L Inhibitors for MLL- Rearranged Leukemias It is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic gene regulatory mechanisms such as histone methylation play an important role in the development of multiple cancers. This insight has prompted excitement that inhibition of histone methyltransferases may represent new therapeutic opportunities. Leukemias with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene on chromosome 11q23 are a quintessential cancer driven by mutation of a regulator of epigenetic mechanism. MLL- rearranged leukemia predicts a poor patient outcome and is associated with aberrant histone methylation. Recent studies have demonstrated that the Histone 3 lysine 79 (H3K79) methyltransferase DOT1L is required for maintenance of leukemia-causing gene expression programs and survival of MLL- rearranged leukemia cells. This understanding prompted the development of small molecule DOT1L inhibitors, which demonstrate remarkable anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity against leukemia cells harboring MLL-translocations. Dr. Scott Armstrong will discuss genetic, epigenomic, and mechanistic studies in mouse models of MLL-rearranged leukemia and human leukemia cells, which demonstrate a critical role for DOT1L and H3K79 methylation. Dr. Robert Gould will discuss the development of specific DOT1L inhibitors and highlight preclinical studies that led to the clinical translation of DOT1L inhibitors that are now being assessed in ongoing early phase clinical trials.
  • 45. Meet the Scientist Saturday, December 7 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Sunday, December 8 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. The “Meet-the-Scientist” sessions are designed to provide an opportunity for a small number of attendees to meet with a scientific expert in a setting that fosters interaction. This year, ASH has invited experts from around the world to facilitate informal discussions allowing participants to present their questions and gain new perspectives. A boxed lunch will be provided. Ticket Prices (per session) Member: $45 Associate Member: $45 Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident Member: $45 Non-Member in Training: $45 Allied Health Professional: $45 Non-Member: $60 The “Meet-the-Scientist” sessions are restricted to medical professionals only; no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Tickets are limited and only available on site on a first-come, first- served basis. Only one ticket per person is allowed. Tickets can be purchased at the Ticketed Session counter in the registration area of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center beginning Thursday, December 5, during registration hours until all tickets are sold. The room assignment will be indicated on the ticket. Please check your ticket carefully to ensure proper date, time, location, and session choice. Attention Trainees! A number of tickets for the “Meet-the- Scientist” sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member; Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident member; or non-member in training will be required to purchase a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter in the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Schedule Subject to Change Please note that the Meet-the-Scientist Session schedule included here is not final. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) in late September to view the schedule. Kimberly Stegmaier, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA High-Throughput Screening to Uncover Leukemia Vulnerabilities Adolfo A. Ferrando, MD, PhD, Columbia University, New York, NY Status of NOTCH1 as a Therapeutic Target in T-Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Mignon Loh, MD, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Integrating Genomic Data into Clinical Trials in Pediatric Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Akiko Shimamura, MD, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Peter J. Campbell, PhD, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom Genomics of Plasma Cell Malignancies Marshall Horwitz, MD, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Molecular Basis of Familial Myelodysplastic Syndromes Kojo S.J. Elenitoba-Johnson, MD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Flow Cytometric Analysis of Cancer Signaling Ivo P. Touw, PhD, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands Leukemic Progression in Congenital Neutropenia Michael Deininger, MD, PhD, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Use of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Myeloid Malignancies Daniel Link, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO Regulation of Neutrophil Trafficking from the Bone Marrow and the Stem Cell Niche Denisa D. Wagner, PhD, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Platelets/Leukocyte Interactions During Inflammation Daniel Simon, MD, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH Role of Platelets in Vascular Disease David Gailani, MD, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN The Plasma Contact System in Human Disease James R. Downing, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Mechanism of Leukemogenesis Katherine A. High, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Gene Therapy for Hemophilia and Other Congenital Disorders ASH 55th Annual Meeting 43
  • 46. 44 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 44 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Continuing Conversations Scientific Program Saturday, December 7 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Sunday, December 8 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Continuing Conversations sessions are informal discussions with scientific program session speakers that will give interested individuals, especially trainees and junior investigators, increased accessibility both to information on the topic and to the opinions of experts in those particular fields. The dynamic nature of these sessions is meant to provide an increased opportunity for scientific peers to form collaborations and partnerships. The format of these sessions is a round- table discussion for a limited audience of 40 participants. Attendees should come prepared to actively participate in the discussions. Continuing Conversations sessions are restricted to medical professionals only; no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Tickets are limited and only available on site on a first- come, first-served basis. There is no additional fee; however, only one ticket per person is allowed. Tickets are sold on site at the Ticketed Sessions Counter at the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Attention Trainees! A number of tickets for Continuing Conversations sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member; Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident member; or non-member in training will be required to obtain a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter at the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Schedule Subject to Change Please note that this Continuing Conversations session schedule is not final. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) in late September to view the schedule. Continuing Conversation on Non-Coding RNAs in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis: Strategies to Address the Next Questions Chair: John F. DiPersio, MD, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO Speakers: Mitchell J. Weiss, MD, PhD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Pier Paolo Pandolfi, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Continuing Conversation on Targeting Apoptosis in Lymphoid Malignancies: Strategies to Address the Next Questions Chair: Scott Armstrong, MD, PhD, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Speakers: Douglas R. Green, PhD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Andreas Strasser, PhD, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Victoria, Australia Anthony Letai, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA Continuing Conversation on Histone Modifications in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis: Strategies to Address the Next Questions Chair: Ross Levine, MD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Speakers: Kristian Helin, PhD, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Brian J.P. Huntly, MD, PhD, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom Robert A. Copeland, PhD, Epizyme, Inc., Cambridge, MA Continuing Conversation on Platelets and Cancer: Strategies to Address the Next Questions Chair: Michael H. Kroll, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Speakers: Richard Hynes, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Tatiana V. Byzova, PhD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Anil Sood, MD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ticketed sessionContinuing Conversations ENHANCED SESSION
  • 47. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 45 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 45 Abstracts selected for oral and poster presentations feature the latest research in the field and are considered the best of the thousands submitted for the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting. A detailed schedule listing individual oral and poster abstract presentations and the full abstracts will be included on the abstracts on flash drive which will be mailed in mid-November to all registrants who register for the meeting by November 6. In addition, this information will be provided on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) in early November. Simultaneous Oral Sessions The Plenary Scientific Session (Sunday, December 8; 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.) is traditionally a highlight of the annual meeting and includes the top six abstracts as selected by the Program Committee. The Late-Breaking Abstracts Session (Tuesday, December 10; 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.) will feature up to six abstracts completed after the general abstract submission deadline that highlight novel and substantive studies of high impact. These abstracts will be published online only and will not be part of the special abstracts issue of Blood. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. (Plenary Scientific Session) 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. MONDAY, DECEMBER 9 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. 6:15 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. (Late-Breaking Abstracts Session) New Abstract Category: Chemical Biology and Experimental Therapeutics (802) ASH has introduced a new abstract category for 2013 to include abstracts of the study and treatment of normal and malignant hematologic biology using small molecules and approaches rooted in organic chemistry. Abstracts on the science of proteomics, combinatorial chemistry, target identification and validation, screening methods, high-throughput assay development, hit-to-lead methodology, and lead optimization techniques are appropriate for this category. For more information please visit www.hematology.org/ASH2013. The abstract submission deadline is Thursday, August 8, 2013, 11:59 p.m. (PDT). Poster Sessions Posters will be available for viewing in Hall E of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center at the times listed below. Meeting attendees will also have the opportunity to meet the abstract authors to discuss their research and ask questions during the presentation times listed. Saturday, December 7 9:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Viewing 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Presentations Sunday, December 8 9:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Session II – Viewing 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Poster Session II – Presentations Monday, December 9 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Viewing 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Presentations Welcome Reception Saturday, December 7, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. All meeting attendees are invited to attend this kick-off event. Enjoy a relaxing evening with your friends and colleagues. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and drinks will be served. This event will take place in the poster hall (Hall E) of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Poster Hall Receptions Sunday, December 8, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Monday, December 9, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. ASH invites meeting attendees to take advantage of these receptions to meet abstract authors, discuss their research, and ask questions. Light snacks and beverages will be served. New This year Social Events Oral and Poster Sessions
  • 48. 46 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Exposition Nearly 300 pharmaceutical companies, medical suppliers, clinical diagnostic and research-based companies, publishers, and nonprofit organizations will be participating in the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition. The state- of-the-art exhibit hall will feature the latest technology and research as well as a wide range of products and services. The exposition will be held in Halls B-D of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Badges will be required for entrance. For safety and liability reasons, ASH does not permit children 12 years of age or younger at any time in the exhibit areas. During move-in or move-out, NO ONE under the age of 18 will be permitted within the exhibit areas. (Please refer to page 56 for information on the child-care program.) Exhibit Hours Saturday, December 7 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Sunday, December 8 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday, December 9 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Product Theaters Product Theaters are designed to provide exhibitors the ability to present new research findings on products, provide product details, and give demonstrations to small groups of annual meeting attendees (no more than 150) within the exhibit hall. The Product Theater sessions offered at the times listed below will be solely promotional in nature; therefore continuing medical education credits will not be offered: Product Theater Session Times Saturday, December 7 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Sunday, December 8 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Monday, December 9 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) for Product Theater program information. See What the Society Has to Offer: Visit the ASH Booth ASH is more than just an annual meeting; it is the premier hematology organization in the world. ASH is proud to offer its members many valuable resources, including the new ASH Self-Assessment Program, Fifth Edition. Come say hello and see what the Society has to offer at the ASH Booth (#2501). Get the latest information on grants and awards, publications, educational materials, and ASH meetings and find out how you can help move hematology forward with a contribution to ASH Foundation programs. Be sure to pick up the most recent issues of Blood, see what materials are available to hematologists around the world, and discover free online ASH resources. Our friendly staff will be glad to answer any questions and hear your feedback about the annual meeting or the Society. Consider this an open invitation to visit the booth Saturday, Sunday, and Monday to see how ASH can do more for you. Be sure to pick up a small giveaway as a token of our appreciation for attending the annual meeting. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Booths Several Institutes from the NIH will have booths in the exhibit hall that will offer opportunities to discuss many areas of hematology, research grants, career-development programs, and NIH policies. 46 ASH 55th Annual Meeting
  • 49. General Information ASH 55th Annual Meeting 47
  • 50. 48 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Registration How to Register Online: www.hematology.org/ASH2013 On Site: Registration will be located in the Great Hall in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center beginning Thursday, December 5, at 3:00 p.m. If you are unable to register online, registration forms can be requested by contacting ashregistration@jspargo.com. Questions? Contact the ASH Registration Center Phone: 888-273-5704 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 703-449-6418 – International Email: ashregistration@jspargo.com Fax: 703-563-2715 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 703-563-2715 – International Mail: ASH Registration Center c/o J. Spargo and Associates 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030 Assistance is available from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), Monday through Friday. The ASH Registration Center will be closed on weekends and holidays. New this year with registration and housing, all attendees will use their ASH username (email address) and ASH password to start the registration Web process. If someone else will be processing your registration and hotel reservations for you, it will be important for them to know your ASH username (email) and password before registration opens to ensure swift processing of your registration. If you have forgotten your ASH username or password, you may request or reset your password by going to www.hematology.org and clicking on “My Account” for instructions. ASH Member-Only Registration July 24 – August 13 ASH members who have paid their dues for 2013 are eligible for early-bird registration from July 24 until August 13. Members can register and make hotel reservations at www.hematology.org/ASH2013. If you need to renew your membership for 2013, visit www.hematology.org and click on “My Account” to log in or call 866-828-1231; international callers dial 001 202-776-0544. Advance Registration (Members and Non-Members) August 14 – November 6 From August 14 until November 6, both members and non-members can register for the meeting. Attendees who register after November 6 will be charged on-site registration rates. Meeting badges will be mailed to all advance registrants in mid-November. Late and On-Site Registration After November 6 Attendees who register after November 6 will be charged the late/on-site registration fee. On-site registration will begin on Thursday, December 5, at 3:00 p.m. local time in the Great Hall in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Registration Hours Thursday, December 5 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Friday, December 6 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Saturday, December 7 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Sunday, December 8 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday, December 9 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. To avoid long lines at the on-site registration counters, ASH encourages you to register for the meeting in advance. Registration Fees Registration Categories Advance On-Site Member (Active and International) $460 $515 Non-Member $900 $1,050 Associate Member $95 $95 Medical Student, Graduate Student, or Resident Member $95 $95 Non-Member in Training $195 $1,050 Allied Health Professional $460 $515 Spouse/Guest $115 $115 Honorary/Emeritus Member No Charge No Charge Registration fees can be paid by credit card or by check only. Wire transfers will not be accepted. What is included in the registration fee? • Abstracts on Flash Drive* • Hematology 2013 (the ASH Education Program) • Program Book • Access to ASH Annual Meeting Mobile Application • Admission to the General, Special-Interest, Education, Scientific, Oral, and Poster Sessions • Admission to the Exhibit Hall** • Admission to receptions in the Poster Hall** • Boxed lunch in the Exhibit Hall on Sunday and Monday** • Daily Coffee Breaks in the Exhibit Hall** *The Abstract Book will only be provided in electronic (flash drive) format; the print book has been discontinued. The annual meeting schedule and full program will be available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) in early November, and attendees are encouraged to use the online personal scheduler. **Spouse/guest registrants will receive only the items marked with two asterisks. Meeting Cancellation Policy The American Society of Hematology reserves the right to modify or cancel any or all activities associated with this meeting due to unforeseen circumstances. In the event that we have to unexpectedly cancel this annual meeting, the full registration fee, less a processing charge, will be returned to each registrant. Registration Cancellation Policy Registration cancellations must be submitted to the ASH Registration Center in writing via ashregistration@jspargo.com by November 26 to receive a refund, less a $75 processing fee. See ASH Registration Center contact information above. Refunds will not be granted after November 26. Registration Badges Badges and abstracts on flash drive will be mailed to all advance registrants beginning the week of November 11. If you do not receive your badge prior to the meeting, please go to the registration area in the Great Hall of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center to pick up your badge and meeting materials on site. New This year
  • 51. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 49 Meeting Materials Due to popular demand for an electronic version of annual meeting abstracts, the printed Abstract Book was discontinued in 2012. Abstracts are only being provided on flash drive and online. Advance registrants will receive the flash drive in mid-November with their registration materials. The annual meeting abstracts and the full annual meeting program will be available online on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) in early November. Registrants may also use the ASH Annual Meeting mobile application to download the abstract and annual meeting program to a smartphone (e.g., iPhone, Android, Blackberry) or tablet (iPad or Android). Group Registration If you are planning to register a group, please contact the ASH Registration Center at ashgroupreg@jspargo.com. Registration Categories and Membership Application Deadlines Active/International Members August 14, 2013 - March 1, 2014 Applications for Active and International membership are considered by the Executive Committee twice per year; applications received between now and the annual meeting will not be processed in time for applicants to register as ASH members for the 2013 annual meeting. Please consider applying by March 1, 2014, to become a member in time for the 2014 ASH Annual Meeting. Associate Members August 14, 2013 - November 6, 2013 Associate membership applications are reviewed on a rolling basis and must be received by November 6, 2013, to be eligible for reduced member meeting registration rates. Applicants who are accepted will be billed for their 2013 membership dues immediately upon approval. Dues must be paid in full in order to qualify for the Associate member meeting registration rate. Medical Student, Graduate Student, and Resident Members August 14, 2013 - November 6, 2013 ASH now offers membership categories for medical students, graduate students, and residents (trainees who have not yet entered hematology training) residing in the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Applications for these categories are reviewed on a rolling basis and must be received by November 6, 2013, to be eligible for reduced member meeting registration rates. Applicants who are accepted will be notified and will be immediately eligible to register for the annual meeting as members since they do not pay membership dues. For more information on eligibility requirements and to submit an application, visit www. hematology.org/Membership. Membership applications may be submitted on site at the ASH Resource Center during the annual meeting. Resulting memberships will begin in 2014. Non-Members in Training August 14, 2013 – November 6, 2013 Any resident or post-doctoral fellow with an MD or PhD in a recognized hematology or oncology training program as well as any undergraduate, graduate, or medical student may register as a non-member in training. To receive the non-member-in-training advance registration rate of $195, you must register and submit your verification by November 6. Non-members in training who register after the advance registration deadline of November 6 will be charged the non-member rate of $1,050. Residents and Post-Doctoral Fellows: During the online registration process, you will need to provide: • Program director’s name and contact information • Name of the program that you are enrolled in • Length (in years) of the program • Program start date (month and year) • Expected program completion date (month and year) As part of our continuing efforts to provide valuable opportunities to international hematologists, ASH has established the International Post-Doctoral Fellows (IPDF) program, which allows post-doctoral fellows to access valuable ASH resources at no charge for up to four years. The program is open to post-doctoral fellows with an MD, PhD, or equivalent medical degree who reside outside the United States, Canada, or Mexico; register for the ASH annual meeting as a non-member in training; and are enrolled in an approved hematology or oncology training program. Benefits include: • A complimentary online subscription to Blood • Online access to Hematology (the Education Program) and The Hematologist • Advance annual meeting notifications • Eligibility for reduced meeting registration at the non-member-in- training rate Those registering online for the ASH annual meeting as non-members in training will be invited to apply. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/IPDF. Undergraduate, Graduate, and Medical Students: During the online registration process, you will need to provide: • Name of your university/institution • Name and contact information for your school counselor • Field of study • Start date and expected month and year of graduation A verification letter (on official letterhead confirming that the registrant is a trainee) is required. An email notification will automatically be sent to your program director or school counselor requesting a signed letter of verification after your registration is received. Individuals who registered in the non-member in training category last year and are still enrolled in their training programs will not need to send a letter verifying their enrollment status. Verification letters may be emailed (in PDF format) to ashverification@jspargo.com. Verification may also be mailed to the address below. Fax copies will not be accepted. ASH Registration Center c/o J. Spargo and Associates 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030 Individuals will be officially registered for the meeting once ASH confirms their training status. The North American Undergraduate Student Benefit is designed for U.S., Canadian, and Mexican undergraduate students who have an interest in hematology but are not yet eligible for ASH membership. The benefit provides: • A complimentary online subscription to Blood • All annual meeting notices in advance, as well as reduced (i.e., Non-Member in Training) registration rates. Those registering online for the ASH annual meeting as non-members in training will be invited to apply. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/NASB. Allied Health Professional August 14, 2013 – November 6, 2013 To register in this category, an individual will need to provide evidence of his/her status as an allied health professional. Individuals who qualify for this category include nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physician assistants, clinical nurse specialists, pharmacists, research technicians, and technologists. New This year
  • 52. 50 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Registration Continuing Medical Education (CME) information Verification of one’s status as an allied health professional must be submitted prior to the meeting to receive meeting materials in advance. ASH strongly encourages registrants to send their verification by email in PDF format to ashverification@jspargo.com. Verification may also be sent by mail to the address below. Fax copies will not be accepted. ASH Registration Center c/o J. Spargo and Associates 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030 Verification entails providing a letter from the registrant’s immediate supervisor on institutional letterhead confirming the name of the organization and the registrant’s position there, a copy of a state license, proof of membership in another affiliated association, or a copy of an institutional identification card. Registrants who do not provide verification will be charged the ASH non-member registration rate. Spouse/Guest Spouses and guests are welcome to register for the ASH annual meeting. Spouses and guests will receive a badge that allows access to the exhibit hall including daily coffee breaks and Sunday and Monday boxed lunches, the Saturday evening welcome reception, and Sunday and Monday poster hall receptions. This registration rate does not include entrance to the Education and Scientific Program sessions or poster viewing sessions, and does not include meeting materials. Educational Objectives Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to: • Employ the knowledge gained regarding the diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant hematologic disorders to improve patient care; • Discuss state-of-the-art research in hematology; and • Analyze the potential contribution of novel, not-yet-approved modalities of therapy to current evidence-based management of hematologic disorders. Accreditation The American Society of Hematology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Society of Hematology designates this live activity for a maximum of 36 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. CME Certificate Eligibility ASH is accredited to provide AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ to physicians only. Physicians not licensed in the United States who participate in this CME activity are also eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. How to Obtain a CME Certificate A processing fee of $25 will be charged for CME certificates. If you plan to claim CME credit for attending the meeting, please check the appropriate box during the registration process. Attendees may complete the process to claim their CME credits and print their CME certificates by completing the annual meeting program evaluation on site at any of the Internet stations available at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Alternately, the evaluation can be accessed through the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) by clicking the CME Credits link. The online process for claiming CME credits and printing a CME certificate for the 55th ASH Annual Meeting must be completed no later than April 11, 2014. Certificate of Attendance Non-physicians and other health-care professionals attending the meeting can receive a Certificate of Attendance on site at any of the Internet stations available at Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Alternately, the evaluation can be accessed through the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) by clicking the Certificate of Attendance link. There is no charge to meeting registrants for this service. The online process for receiving a Certificate of Attendance for the 55th ASH Annual Meeting must be completed no later than April 11, 2014. European Hematology Association CME ASH is applying for CME accreditation with the European Hematology Association (EHA). An EHA Processing Fee of $25 U.S. Dollars will be charged for attendees wishing to claim EHA-CME Credit Points. If you plan to claim EHA-CME credit for attending the meeting, please check the appropriate box during the registration process. For information about claiming EHA CME, please stop by the ASH CME desk or email cme@hematology.org. Conflict-of-Interest Policy for the ASH Annual Meeting ASH is committed to providing quality, objective, balanced, and scientifically rigorous continuing medical education activities that are free from commercial and non-commercial bias. In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), all meeting session chairs, speakers, and moderators are required to disclose any conflicts they may have in writing prior to the meeting and to read these relationships aloud as displayed at the start of their presentations. All poster presenters are required to disclose any conflicts they may have in writing prior to the meeting and display their disclosures on their poster boards. If bias, actual or perceived, occurs during the presentations, session attendees are encouraged to address such bias during the question-and-answer periods following the presentations. Annual meeting contributors are asked to disclose any relationships of the following types: employment, consultancy, equity ownership, research funding, honoraria, patents and royalties, speakers bureau, membership on an entity’s board of directors or advisory committee, and any other financial relationship. Any questions about this policy or concerns regarding disclosures should be directed to the ASH Meeting and CME Information desk in ASH Central located in the Great Hall Foyer on the first floor of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.
  • 53. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 51 Hotel rooms have been reserved throughout the city of New Orleans for meeting attendees. Page 52-53 of this brochure includes a map of the New Orleans area with hotel locations marked, as well as a list of participating hotels and their room rates. ASH will provide complimentary shuttle service between these hotels and the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, except as noted on the list of participating hotels. For more information on this service, see page 55. Headquarters/Members-Only Hotels The Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel and the New Orleans Marriott on Canal Street are the official co-headquarters hotels for the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting and are designated for ASH members only. In addition, the following hotels are available exclusively to Society members: • Hampton Inn and Suites New Orleans – Convention Center • Hilton New Orleans Riverside • New Orleans Downtown Marriott at the Convention Center • New Orleans Marriott on Canal Street • Westin New Orleans Canal Place • Wyndham Riverfront New Orleans Non-members, international tour groups, and exhibitors will not be able to reserve rooms in these hotels. Hotel Reservations You must register for the meeting before you make your hotel reservation. Hotel reservations must be made directly with the ASH Housing Center no later than Wednesday, November 6, using any of the methods listed below. Online reservation is strongly encouraged, though hotel reservation forms can also be requested by contacting meetings@hematology.org or 202-776-0544. Online: www.hematology.org/ASH2013 Phone: 888-273-5704 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 703-449-6418 – International Fax: 888-273-5706 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 703-631-6288 – International Mail: ASH Housing Center c/o J. Spargo and Associates 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030 For additional information regarding hotel reservations, please contact the ASH Housing Center at the phone numbers listed above. Agents are available to answer questions from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), Monday through Friday. Please note that the ASH Housing Center is closed on weekends and holidays. Questions may also be emailed to the ASH Housing Center at ashhousing@jspargo.com. Hotel Confirmations/Deposits All hotel reservations must be guaranteed by a major credit card or by check made payable to the hotel. A deposit amount of two nights’ room rate (plus tax) will be charged to your credit card if you do not cancel at least five days prior to your arrival date. If you plan to guarantee your hotel reservation by check, please be sure to indicate this on your Hotel Reservation Form. The check must be made payable to the hotel and received by the ASH Housing Center by November 6. If the ASH Housing Center does not receive the check by November 6, your hotel reservation will be cancelled. The ASH Housing Center will mail, fax, or email a confirmation in response to every reservation requested. If you make a hotel reservation online, you will receive a confirmation instantly, and if you make a hotel reservation by fax or mail, a written confirmation will be sent to you by mail, fax, or email within five business days of receipt. If you do not receive your confirmation, please call the ASH Housing Center to verify that your request has been received. ASH Cancellation/Change Policy You may cancel or make changes to your hotel reservation either in writing or online until 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) Wednesday, November 13, 2013. Written requests should be sent to the ASH Housing Center and will be acknowledged with a confirmation as soon as possible or within five business days. After this date, all changes to accommodations must be made directly through your hotel. Between November 13 and November 18, housing records will be transferred from the ASH Housing Center to the individual hotels; therefore, attendees are strongly encouraged to wait until after Monday, November 18, to contact the hotels directly to make changes or cancellations. To cancel or change a hotel reservation online, you will need your confirmation number and the email address you used to make your reservation. Online requests are acknowledged with an immediate email confirmation. A cancellation must be made at least five days prior to your scheduled arrival date or you will be assessed a cancellation fee equivalent to two nights’ room rate (plus tax). The hotel will not hold your room if you do not arrive on the first night of your reservation and you will lose your deposit. This hotel cancellation policy will be strictly enforced. Please retain the cancellation confirmation from the ASH Housing Center or the cancellation number provided to you by the hotel, as this proof of cancellation will be required to resolve any credit card disputes. Group Room Reservations A group room reservation is defined as two or more rooms. All requests for group room blocks must be received at the ASH Housing Center by October 4. The ASH Housing Center will provide a website for all groups to manage their own room blocks and rooming lists online. A Group Booking Agreement, including a password, will be sent to each group contact after the group room reservations are approved by ASH. After October 4, the ASH Housing Center will cancel any group room reservations for which it has not received a rooming list and full payment. Any rooms not accounted for on the rooming list will automatically be released.Cancellations must also be made by October 4. Any cancellations after October 4 will result in forfeiture of the entire payment. The rules and regulations governing group room reservations are explicitly detailed on the Group Room Reservation Form. Please contact the ASH Housing Center at 888-273-5704 (U.S. and Canada toll free) or 703-449-6418 (international) for additional instructions on how to obtain a group room block. Hotel Accommodations
  • 54. 52 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Hotel Map 1 Astor Crowne Plaza New Orleans French Quarter 739 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $232/$232 2 Best Western Plus St. Christopher Hotel 114 Magazine Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $120/$120 3 Blake Hotel New Orleans 500 Saint Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 $169/$169 4 Bourbon Orleans Hotel 717 Orleans Street New Orleans, LA 70116 $234/$234 5 Country Inn & Suites by Carlson New Orleans French Quarter 315 Magazine Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $189/$189 6 Courtyard New Orleans Downtown/Convention Center* 300 Julia Street New Orleans, LA 70460 $199/$199 7 Courtyard New Orleans Downtown Near the French Quarter 124 Saint Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70460 $189/$189 8 Courtyard New Orleans Downtown/Iberville (formerly known as Iberville Suites) 910 Iberville Street New Orleans, LA 70116 $219/$219 9 Dauphine Orleans Hotel 415 Dauphine Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $178/$178 10 DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel New Orleans 300 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $208/$208 11 Drury Inn & Suites 820 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $139/$139 12 Embassy Suites New Orleans – Convention Center* 315 Julia Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $228/$228 13 Four Points by Sheraton French Quarter 541 Bourbon Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $185/$185 14 French Quarter Chateau LeMoyne – A Holiday Inn Hotel 301 Dauphine Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $170/$170 15 Hampton Inn & Suites New Orleans - Convention Center (ASH MEMBERS ONLY)* 1201 Convention Center Blvd New Orleans, LA 70130 $189/$189 16 Hampton Inn New Orleans – Downtown/ French Quarter 226 Carondelet Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $173/$173 17 Hampton Inn New Orleans (St. Charles Avenue) 3626 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70115 $169/$169 18 Hilton Garden Inn New Orleans Convention Center* 1001 S. Peters Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $202.50/ $202.50 19 Hilton Garden Inn New Orleans French Quarter/CBD 821 Gravier Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $203/$203 20 Hilton New Orleans Riverside – HEADQUARTER HOTEL (ASH MEMBERS ONLY) Two Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $262/$262 21 Hilton New Orleans/ St. Charles Avenue 333 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 $239/$239 22 Holiday Inn Downtown Superdome 330 Loyola Avenue New Orleans, LA 70112 $174/$174 23 Hotel Le Marais 717 Conti Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $229/$229 24 Hotel Mazarin 730 Bienville Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $259/$259 25 The Hotel Modern New Orleans 936 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 $245/$245 26 Hotel Monteleone 214 Royal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $261/$261 27 Hyatt French Quarter 800 Iberville Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $249/$249 28 Hyatt Place New Orleans/ Convention Center* 881 Convention Center Boulevard New Orleans, LA 70130 $249/$249 29 Hyatt Regency New Orleans 601 Loyola Avenue New Orleans, LA 70113 $252/$252 30 InterContinental New Orleans 444 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 $249/$249 31 JW Marriott New Orleans 614 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $263/$263 32 La Quinta Inn and Suites Downtown 301 Camp Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $169/$169 33 Le Pavillon Hotel 833 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $289/$289 34 Loews New Orleans Hotel 300 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $282.50/$282.50 35 The Masion Dupuy Hotel 1001 Toulouse Street New Orleans, LA 70116 $199/$199 36 Maison St. Charles Quality Inn & Suites 1319 St. Charles Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $169/$169 37 New Orleans Downtown Marriott at the Convention Center (ASH MEMBERS ONLY)* 859 Convention Center Boulevard New Orleans, LA 70130 $249/$249 38 New Orleans Marriott on Canal Street – HEADQUARTER (ASH MEMBERS ONLY) 555 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $259/$259 39 Omni Royal Crescent Hotel 535 Gravier Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $224/$224 40 Omni Royal Orleans 621 St. Louis Street New Orleans, LA 70140 $237/$237 41 The Queen & Crescent Hotel 344 Camp Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $139/$139 42 Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel* 700 Tchoupitoulas Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $249/$249 43 Renaissance New Orleans Pere Marquette Hotel 817 Common Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $249/$249 45 Residence Inn New Orleans Downtown* 345 St. Joseph Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $209/$209 45 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel 921 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $284/$284 46 The Roosevelt New Orleans, A Waldorf Astoria Hotel 123 Baronne Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $292/$292 47 Royal Sonesta Hotel 300 Bourbon Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $259/$259 48 Royal St. Charles 135 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 $169/$169 49 Sheraton New Orleans Hotel 500 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $258/$258 50 Springhill Suites New Orleans Downtown* 301 St. Joseph Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $209/$209 51 Staybridge Suites 501 Tchoupitoulas Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $179/$179 52 W New Orleans 333 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $248/$248 53 W New Orleans – French Quarter 316 Chartres Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $248/$248 54 Westin New Orleans Canal Place (ASH MEMBERS ONLY) 100 Rue Iberville New Orleans, LA 70130 $228/$228 Please Note: Room rates & taxes are subject to change without notice. Quoted rates are single & double occupancy. Additional fees may apply for two beds or additional occupancy. *Shuttle service will not be provided to these hotels as they are within walking distance of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The hotels listed here have been reserved for annual meeting attendees. ASH will provide complimentary shuttle service between these hotels and the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center unless otherwise indicated. For more information on this service, please see page 55.
  • 55. 55 The Whitney, A Wyndham Hotel 610 Poydras Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $162/$162 56 Windsor Court Hotel 300 Gravier Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $279/$279 57 Wyndham Garden Baronne Plaza New Orleans 201 Baronne Street New Orleans, LA 70112 $152/$152 58 Wyndham New Orleans - French Quarter (formerly known as Holiday Inn French Quarter) 124 Royal Street New Orleans, LA 70130 $160/$160 59 Wyndham Riverfront New Orleans (ASH MEMBERS ONLY)* 701 Convention Center Boulevard New Orleans, LA 70130 $222/$222 59 54 55 56 52 53 24 51 23 50 49 48 47 46 45 42 44 43 13 41 3 40 39 38 37 36 Garden District Hotels 35 34 33 31 32 8 29 26 25 30 28 58 22 21 20 18 19 17 16 15 12 11 10 9 7 5 6 27 14 4 2 57 1 ASH 55th Annual Meeting 53
  • 56. 54 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Travel Information Meeting Location The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center is located in the heart of downtown New Orleans at 900 Convention Center Blvd. Key meeting areas will be located as follows: • Registration – Great Hall, Level 1 • ASH Central – Great Hall Foyer, Level 1 • General Session room – Hall F, Level 1 • Exhibit Hall – Halls B-D, Level 1 • PosterHall – Hall E, Level 1 • Other session rooms – Levels 2 and 3 New Orleans is one of America’s most celebrated and historic cities. Experience it all by visiting any one of the following areas in the downtown area for a true taste of the Big Easy, including the Faubourg Marigny, French Quarter, Central Business District, Warehouse and Arts District, Magazine Street corridor, Garden District, and the famed St. Charles Avenue. For more information about New Orleans’ popular attractions, visit www.neworleanscvb.com. Visitor Safety To stay safe during your visit to New Orleans, please follow the tips provided below: • Always lock your front and/or patio doors. Use the safety chain/lock for security. • Never open your room door unless you know who is there. If you did not call for the hotel service offered by the person at the door, call hotel security or the front desk to see if they have sent someone to your room. • Place valuables in a safety deposit box in your room or at the hotel office. Do not leave valuables in your car. • When checking into a hotel, consult the floor plan on the back of your room door to familiarize yourself with fire and emergency exits. • When driving, keep all car doors locked. Weather New Orleans has a subtropical climate with pleasant year-round temperatures. Temperatures in December typically range from 45° to 65° F (7° to 18° C). Because rainfall is common in New Orleans, attendees should bring a light jacket and a small umbrella. Air Travel EWA Travel, Inc., has been selected as the official travel agency for the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting in New Orleans. All flights to New Orleans land at Armstrong International Airport (MSY). To make your travel arrangements, please contact: EWA Travel, Inc. Phone: 800-705-8580 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 520-797-0291 – International Email: marika@ewatravel.com Agents are available for reservations from 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time), Monday through Friday. Visa Application Process for International Travelers If you are not a U.S. citizen and are planning to attend the annual meeting, advance planning is critical. Citizens of some foreign countries will need a visa to enter the United States and attend the ASH Annual Meeting.  Therefore, ASH encourages you to start your visa application process as soon as possible. Because of new U.S. State Department regulations, U.S. embassies and consulates may require a face-to-face interview for most non-immigrant visa applications. You should apply for your visa at least three to four months before the annual meeting. To schedule an interview for the visa application process, please contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. For more information, please visit http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/ temp_1305.html. Effective January 20, 2010, citizens of countries participating in the Visa Waiver Program may be unable to enter the U.S. without Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) approval from the U.S. Government. For more information on the visa waiver countries or how to apply for ESTA authorization, please visit http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/id_visa/esta/. If you would like to request an invitation letter from the American Society of Hematology for your visa application, you must first register and pay in full for the meeting. To obtain a visa invitation letter, have your registration confirmation number available and visit the visa link (http://show.jspargo.com/ash13/visa/default.asp) in your registration confirmation email. Please contact ashregistration@jspargo.com for any questions regarding visa invitation letters.
  • 57. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 55 Public Transportation A fixed cab fare rate of $33 (one to two people) is charged for cabs departing from the airport to most areas of New Orleans. For parties of two or more, the fare is $14 per person. New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (RTA) services, including bus transportation and streetcars, are $1.25 each way. There are 33 bus and streetcar lines that run daily. Bus service allows transportation throughout the city’s major corridor, extending from the Faubourg Marigny to Riverbend. Airport Shuttle, Inc., is the official ground transportation for Armstrong International Airport, with service to and from New Orleans’ hotels and other designated locations. Fare is $20 per person one way, and a discounted rate of $38 per person round trip is also available. Additionally, a shuttle service will be provided from the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center to Armstrong International Airport on Monday, December 9, and Tuesday, December 10, for $20 per person. Tickets may be purchased on site at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Car Rental Hertz is offering 2013 ASH Annual Meeting attendees special rental car rates, including unlimited mileage. Reservations can be made from all metro New Orleans Hertz locations, online at www.hertz.com, or by calling 800-654-2240 (in the U.S.) or 405-749-4434 (International and Canada). Be sure to mention CV# 04PW0003 when booking your rental. Rates are available from November 30 through December 17. Hertz car rental desks are also available downtown at the New Orleans Marriott on Canal Street and directly across from the convention center at 901 Convention Center Boulevard. Hours vary by location. Hertz CV number: 04PW0003 Website: www.hertz.com Phone: 800-654-2240 – United States (toll free) 405-749-4434 – International and Canada Car Class Daily (per day) Weekend (per day) Weekly (5-7 days) A – Economy $47 $28 $199 B – Compact $53 $31 $209 C – Mid-Size $57 $33 $222 D – Standard 2/4 DR $60 $38 $238 F – Full-Size 4 DR $63 $40 $254 G – Premium $68 $45 $289 I – Luxury $88 $71 $389 L – Standard SUV $82 $71 $369 R – Minivan $85 $73 $379 U – Convertible $82 $71 $356 Parking The fee for parking at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center is $10 per car for all-day parking*. The convention center accepts cash, traveler’s checks, American Express, MasterCard, and Visa. There are also many parking lots surrounding the convention center. These lots are privately owned and operated, and prices vary. *Parking rates are subject to change and provided for planning purposes only. Shuttle Bus Service ASH will provide complimentary shuttle service between the majority of hotels in ASH’s housing block (see page 52) and the Ernest. N. Morial Convention Center.  Shuttles will run during the periods listed below. Service frequency will vary throughout the day. Look for detailed shuttle bus schedules in your hotel lobby. Shuttle Bus Schedule Thursday, December 5 NO SHUTTLE SERVICE Friday, December 6 6:30 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. Saturday, December 7 6:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Sunday, December 8  6:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Monday, December 9 6:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, December 10 6:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Service will not be provided for the following hotels as they are within walking distance of the convention center: • Courtyard New Orleans Downtown/Convention Center • Embassy Suites New Orleans - Convention Center • Hampton Inn & Suites New Orleans - Convention Center • Hilton Garden Inn New Orleans Convention Center • Hyatt Place New Orleans/Convention Center • New Orleans Downtown Marriott at the Convention Center • Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel • Residence Inn New Orleans Downtown • Springhill Suites New Orleans Downtown • Wyndham Riverfront New Orleans
  • 58. 56 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Attendee Services ASH Central – Attendee Services in One Location ASH will bring all essential attendee services together in one convenient location, ASH Central, which will be located in the Great Hall Foyer on Level 1 of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Attendee services, email stations, comfortable lounge areas, an information desk, and much more will be available in ASH Central. ASH Resource Center in ASH Central Be sure to stop by the ASH Resource Center counter to learn about ASH membership, apply for or renew your membership, update your address, or purchase ASH products. ASH offers a variety of products to aid hematologists in their professional development. Plan to stop by to peruse the latest ASH educational products, including: • American Society of Hematology Self-Assessment Program (ASH® -SAP), Fifth Edition • 2013 Annual Meeting Abstracts on Flash Drive • Hematology 2013 (the Education Program) • 2013 Highlights of ASH® DVD • 2013 ASH® State-of-the-Art Symposium DVD These items will also be available for purchase in the online ASH Store at www.hematology.org/Store. Hematology MeetUps Multiple seating areas with tables and chairs will be placed throughout the convention center to enable attendees to meet one another for informal, impromptu conversations and small meetings. Look for “Hematology MeetUp” areas designated on the convention center map to find the nearest location. Live Remote Session Viewing Lounges New seating areas located at each end of the convention center will enable attendees to experience sessions located across the convention center without having to walk the long distance from one end to the other. Each remote session viewing lounge will have television monitors/screens displaying the slides from a selection of sessions located in the opposite end of the building. Participants will be provided with a set of headphones so they may listen to the selected speaker. Note: Not all sessions will be broadcast into the remote session viewing lounges. ASH Job Center The ASH Job Center is a free online resource that connects you to open hematology and hematology-oncology job opportunities around the world. Search for opportunities by job title, location, type of employment, or educational requirements. Stop by the designated Job Center computers at the meeting or visit the site today at www.hematology.org/JobCenter to search open positions. Have an open position to fill? Give your job posting maximum visibility with increased traffic to the ASH website during the annual meeting. Email jobcenter@hematology.org for more information. Free Wi-Fi ASH is pleased to offer Internet access to all attendees in public lobbies and meeting rooms at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, as well as meeting rooms and adjacent pre-function space at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel. This complimentary service is provided to support annual meeting activities requiring Internet access, Web browsing, and email connectivity.  Child Care For safety reasons, children under the age of 12 (including infants in carriers and strollers or hand- carried infants and toddlers) are not permitted in the Exhibit Hall or Poster Hall. Additionally, ASH prohibits children and infants in sessions as they may distract the speakers and other attendees. ASH has made arrangements with KiddieCorp to provide subsidized child-care services at the meeting beginning on Saturday, December 7, and ending on Tuesday, December 10. KiddieCorp staff members are bonded and trained child- care specialists. The cost for child-care service is subsidized by ASH. The cost to parents is $5 per hour, per child with a two-hour minimum required per child, per day. Snacks, light meals, and beverages will be provided each day. Pre-registration is recommended to ensure participation. Space is limited, so please register your child by November 6. For additional program information and registration material, please contact KiddieCorp’s Program Manager, Michelle Devore, at 858-455-1718 or visit the company’s website at www.kiddiecorp.com. The child-care room will be located in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, and child- care hours will be listed on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) in the near future. Lactation Room A private, draped lactation area will be available for nursing mothers in the childcare room in the Ernest N. Morial Convential Center during the annual meeting. This area will also be equipped with a table, chair, and electrical outlet. The hours will be listed on the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ASH2013) in the near future. Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Guest Services and Dining Options A wide variety of services and amenities are available at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center: Information Desks Convention Center staff are available to provide assistance with brochures and maps, lost and found, wheelchair service, and information about the location of key ASH meeting areas. Restaurant Reservations Desk Located in the Great Hall Foyer, the Restaurant Reservations Desk features brochures for attractions in the metro New Orleans area and offers complimentary restaurant reservation services. Coat/Baggage Check Attendees can check coats for $2 and bags for $3 per item during the meeting at the coat check located in the Great Hall Foyer and in Lobby E. Hours Friday, December 6 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Saturday, December 7 7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Sunday, December 8 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday, December 9 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. ATMs ATM machines are located throughout the facility. Avail, Plus, Honor, Discover, MasterCard, Visa, Cirrus, and Alert cards are accepted. The UPS Store Business Center Located in Lobby F, The UPS Store is a full- service business center. Mobility scooters and wheelchairs can also be rented from The UPS Store. Dining Options Centerplate offers a wide variety of dining options, including portable cafes in the public lobbies, concessions in the exhibit hall, and a food court offering a wide range of cuisines. New This year New This year
  • 59. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 57 Attendees will have a variety of options for receiving annual meeting content, including the oral and poster session abstracts. In addition to a flash drive containing the abstracts and a link to the online program and scheduler, registrants may use the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting mobile application to download the abstracts and annual meeting program to a smartphone (e.g., iPhone, Android, Blackberry) or tablet (iPad or Android). ASH News Daily, the daily on-site newspaper of the annual meeting, will also be accessible via a mobile-friendly website. Abstracts on Flash Drive The printed Abstract Book was discontinued in 2012. Abstracts will instead be available on flash drive. The flash drive will include the full text of all annual meeting abstracts as well as the full annual meeting program (accurate as of the mid- October print date) and allow users to search for and mark presentations of interest. The flash drive will be mailed with meeting badges in mid-November to those who register during early-bird and advance registration. Attendees who register after the advance registration deadline may pick up their flash drive on site. Extra copies of the abstracts on flash drive may be ordered on site for $70 per copy for members and $100 per copy for non-members. (ASH will not be responsible for shipping flash drives purchased on site.) Members and Blood subscribers who are NOT attending the annual meeting will receive the abstracts on a flash drive in the mail in December. The final program will be available online in early November, and attendees are encouraged to use the online program planner and the ASH Annual Meeting mobile application (see below). Mobile Application Looking for annual meeting information at your fingertips? Download the official 2013 ASH Annual Meeting mobile application, which will provide program and exhibitor information, abstracts, maps, messaging capability, and other general annual meeting information.  The application includes the full text of annual meeting abstracts and articles from Hematology 2013 (the ASH Education Program). The application allows users to add a session to their device’s calendar to build their itinerary for the meeting. The 2013 ASH Annual Meeting application will be available for download on iPhone, Android, and Blackberry smartphones as well as on iPad and Android tablets. Attendees are encouraged to download the application when it is published in late November. Abstracts Online/ Program Planner Check the ASH website (www.hematology.org/ ASH2013) in early November for the full text of the annual meeting abstracts. The online system will allow you to search the full and up-to-date annual meeting program and generate your own personal annual meeting schedule, which can be printed or downloaded to your smartphone or tablet. Attendees can also use the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting mobile application to download the abstracts and annual meeting program to their smartphones or tablets. A mobile-friendly Web version of the online abstracts/program planner is also available to attendees who prefer to access this information using a mobile Web browser. Hematology 2013 Hematology 2013, the ASH Education Program, provides an updated and comprehensive review of each of the topics covered in the annual meeting education sessions. The manuscripts are written by the Education Program speakers and undergo peer review. A chapter on the Ham-Wasserman Lecture, as well as evidence- based mini-reviews related to the topics covered in this year’s Education Program, will also be included. Hematology 2013 will be distributed on site to registrants, and extra copies may be purchased for $80 per copy for members and $130 per copy for non-members. (ASH will not be responsible for shipping books purchased on site.) ASH members not attending the meeting will be mailed a copy of Hematology 2013 in January 2014. Program Book This book contains the master schedule and complete annual meeting program (as of the mid-October print date), including detailed information for the general and special-interest sessions, trainee activities, Education and Scientific Programs, oral and poster sessions, and ticketed events. A listing of exhibitors and Friday Satellite Symposia is also included. Please note that the Abstract Book on flash drive will also contain program information (as of the mid-October print date) for the meeting. For the most up-to-date program information, attendees are encouraged to use the online program planner at www.hematology.org/ ASH2013 (available in early November) or download the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting mobile application for smartphones and tablets. ASH News Daily The on-site daily meeting newspaper, ASH News Daily, will be available to attendees each day. Four separate issues of ASH News Daily, covering the four days of the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting, will feature informative articles on a wide range of Education and Scientific Program sessions and abstract presentations written by distinguished ASH members. Each issue of ASH News Daily will highlight the day’s sessions and events and provide information about the city of New Orleans. This publication will be distributed throughout the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, made available on all of the shuttle buses, and delivered to select hotels. A mobile version of ASH News Daily will be available to allow readers to access newspaper content from their laptops, tablets, or smartphones. Meeting attendees will receive an email each morning with the link to that day’s issue. ASH Publications and Meeting Materials
  • 60. 58 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Meeting Rules and Regulations Photography/Recording Materials contained in the ASH annual meeting presentations, including slides, audio, abstracts, and posters, are protected by copyright. Any photography, filming, or audio-video recording of the presentations or posters is strictly prohibited, except by registered members of the media. An exception is made for non-flash photography and audio recording using hand-held equipment, so long as it is strictly for personal, non-commercial use and not disruptive. Attendees taking photos or audio/video recording in the exhibit hall for personal use must obtain permission from the exhibiting company before engaging in such activities within a particular booth. Violators of this policy will be escorted and barred from the session or exhibit hall. Repeat offenders will have their meeting badges revoked and will not be allowed to continue to attend the meeting. Please note that annual meeting content may not be published or reproduced in any medium (including social media) without express written permission from ASH (or, in the case of the posters, from the author). Disclaimer ASH will have professional photographers present at the annual meeting; therefore, please note that any photographs taken at the meeting may be used in future ASH publications, online, or in other Society materials. Attendance or participation in the meeting constitutes an agreement with ASH by the registrant for the Society to use and distribute the registrant’s image or voice in photographs, videotapes, audiotapes, or other electronic media pertaining to annual meeting events and activities. No Smoking Smoking will not be permitted in any of the hallways, lobbies, meeting rooms, exhibits, or poster sessions at the convention center. Please refrain from smoking unless you are outside the building. Prohibited Session Room Behavior In crowded sessions, please honor the instructions provided by ASH staff. You may be told not to stand against the walls in these rooms or not to block the aisles. Please note that if a room reaches full capacity, you may be denied entry, as ASH must obey the guidelines established by the Fire Marshall in New Orleans. Participation of Financial Professionals The ASH annual meeting is a public forum; therefore, financial professionals and other individuals whose principal reason for attending the annual meeting is to seek business opportunities or obtain information affecting investment positions are welcome to register. However, the educational and scientific aspects of the annual meeting are always top priority. It is important that financial professionals identify themselves when speaking with presenters, particularly when asking questions for which the answers may have implications for corporate valuation or positions in equity markets. Speakers and moderators are also asked to give preference to questioners with scientific or clinical inquiries. Children Under 12 For safety reasons, children under the age of 12 (including infants in carriers and strollers or hand-carried infants and toddlers) are not permitted in the exhibit hall and poster sessions. Additionally, ASH prohibits children and infants in the sessions, as they may distract the speakers and disrupt other attendees. (See page 56 for child-care services provided at the meeting.)
  • 61. ASH 55th Annual Meeting 59 2013 State-of-the-Art Symposium The theme of this year’s State-of-the-Art Symposium is “Recent Advances in Hematologic Malignancies Including a Special Focus on Thrombosis.” This annual, clinically focused, CME-accredited symposium is designed to offer the same high caliber of educational content for which the ASH annual meeting is known. The symposium will feature leading experts who will present current best practices for treatment in the field of hematology. The State-of-the-Art Symposium will be held in two locations in 2013: Chicago, IL September 27-28 Los Angeles, CA October 11-12 Advance registration is now open. Visit www.hematology.org/SAS for the most current information on this meeting. Consultative Hematology Courses Two Consultative Hematology Courses will be conducted in 2013. The courses will provide practitioners an opportunity to update their core knowledge of hematology. The first will take place on Friday, September 27, 2013, prior to the State-of-the-Art Symposium in Chicago; the second will be held on Monday, December 9, during the annual meeting (details regarding this ticketed session can be found on page13 of this brochure). Please visit www.hematology.org/chc for more information. 2014 2014 Highlights of ASH® in North America These smaller, clinically focused meetings, held a few weeks after the annual meeting, provide another opportunity to hear leading experts present unbiased analyses of the 55th ASH Annual Meeting abstracts and sessions; attendees also learn more about the evolving therapies, latest treatment options, and their clinical applications that were discussed at the meeting. The program format is designed to allow practitioners, fellows, academicians, and allied health professionals the opportunity to discuss some of the most rapidly evolving developments in the field with experts as well as colleagues. The 2014 Highlights of ASH in North America meetings will be held in six locations: International Highlights of ASH® The international Highlights of ASH meetings provide opportunities for hematologists who would otherwise not travel to attend the annual meeting a chance to take advantage of expert analysis of the 55th ASH Annual Meeting closer to home. The content is similar to the North American Highlights of ASH program with the addition of new topics that are relevant to the region. The 2014 International Highlights of ASH meetings will be held in Singapore and Florianópolis, Brazil. For more information, please visit the ASH website at www.hematology.org/Highlights. 56th ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition Moscone Center San Francisco, CA Meeting: December 6-9, 2014 Exposition: December 6-8, 2014 Plan Ahead for Next Year ASH members receive special advantages for ASH annual meetings, including advance copies of the Preliminary Program, the ability to book rooms in the prime hotels reserved exclusively for ASH members, and reduced registration rates that are significantly less than those for non-members. If you are interested in becoming a member of the Society, you may submit an application online at www.hematology.org/Membership. If you have questions about eligibility or benefits, please contact ASH Headquarters at membership@hematology.org or 202-776-0544. Applications for Active and International membership must be received by March 1, 2014, in order to take advantage of these benefits in time for the annual meeting in December. Don’t miss out on these special opportunities for the 2014 ASH Annual Meeting! Dallas and New York January 17 - 18 Atlanta and San Francisco January 24 - 25 Miami and Seattle January 31 - February 1 Chicago, IL Singapore San Francisco, CA Florianópolis, Brazil Los Angeles, CA Upcoming ASH Meetings
  • 62. 60 ASH 55th Annual Meeting Acknowledgments The ASH leadership would like to acknowledge the many individuals involved in the program planning process. Special thanks are due to: Wendy Stock, MD 2013 Education Program Co-Chair and Program Committee Member John F. Tisdale, MD 2013 Education Program Co-Chair and Program Committee Member José López, MD 2013 Scientific Program Co-Chair and Program Committee Member Kevin M. Shannon, MD 2013 Scientific Program Co-Chair and Program Committee Member Stephanie J. Lee, MD, MPH Secretary, Abstract Review Coordinator, and Program Committee Member Linda J. Burns, MD President-Elect and Program Committee Member Kenneth C. Anderson, MD ASH Councillor and Executive Editor, Hematology 2013 Kenneth A. Bauer, MD Deputy Editor, Hematology 2013 Martin S. Tallman, MD Deputy Editor, Hematology 2013 Additional Program Committee Members Steven L. Allen, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Practice Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD 2014 Scientific Program Co-Chair Peter D. Emanuel, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Communications Jonathan Friedberg, MD 2014 Education Program Co-Chair Robert A. Hromas, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Scientific Affairs Marc J. Kahn, MD, MBA Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, ASH News Daily Steven Lentz, MD, PhD 2014 Scientific Program Co-Chair Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, Blood Charles J. Parker, MD Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, The Hematologist Margaret V. Ragni, MD, MPH 2014 Education Program Co-Chair Andrew W. Roberts, MD, PhD Liaison, Chair, International Members Committee Gary J. Schiller, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Training Programs Jane N. Winter, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Educational Affairs 2013 ASH Executive Committee OFFICERS Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President Linda J. Burns, MD, President-Elect David A. Williams, MD, Vice President Stephanie J. Lee, MD, MPH, Secretary Richard Larson, MD, Treasurer COUNCILLORS Kenneth C. Anderson, MD Michael A. Caligiuri, MD Joseph M. Connors, MD Jonathan D. Licht, MD Margaret A. Shipp, MD Marilyn J. Telen, MD Alexis A. Thompson, MD, MPH John C. Winkelmann, MD
  • 63. Greetings from the President It is an absolute honor to invite you to join me for the preeminent celebration of research, education, and patient care in hematology at the 55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans. For those of you who have been to the meeting previously, you will notice that 2013 marks the debut of several new, expanded, or special sessions that have not been offered previously. Those of you attending for the first time are in for a treat as you will have access to the most diverse range of clinical and research sessions we have ever offered, along with enhanced networking opportunities. We will showcase the full spectrum of translation in hematology from new basic research to new insights into disease pathogenesis to new therapies for patients to outcome analyses. With that in mind, I wanted to highlight several offerings of this year’s meeting that I am particularly excited to share with you: • The Special Symposium on Innovation and the Future of Hematology (Sunday, December 9, 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., page 7), to be held on Sunday just prior to the Plenary Scientific Session, will celebrate what would have been the 100th birthday of Wallace H. Coulter, a prolific inventor whose discoveries became the basis for CBC determinations and flow cytometry. I hope you’ll join me at this session that honors this occasion with lectures from two outstanding and creative physician-scientists, Drs. Stuart Orkin and Bruce Beutler, who will discuss how novel concepts and technologies should revolutionize hematology research and practice in the future. • The Presidential Symposium (Tuesday, December 10, 9:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m., page 10), will delve into an important and timely topic – using genomics for clinical decision making – that you won’t want to miss. During this year’s Symposium Drs. James Downing, Matthew Walter, and David Ginsburg will discuss advances in genomic sequencing and when and how we might integrate this information into patient care decisions for individuals with acute leukemia, MDS, and clotting and bleeding disorders. • Two Special Symposia offered as part of the Scientific Program, one on approaches for inhibiting “undruggable” targets in cancer (Saturday, December 7, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., page 11) and another on the role of reduction/oxidation chemistry in hematology (Sunday, December 8, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., page 11), will explore topics that cut across our vast discipline, bringing together scientists with diverse interests. • For the first time, the Scientific Program will feature four ticketed Scientific Spotlight Sessions (pages 41-42). Similar to the Education Spotlights, these sessions are intended to focus on areas of special interest and, in some cases, address controversies in hematology. • More than any other meeting in the past, this year’s meeting will focus on honing and maintaining a sense of community among our various smaller, sometimes distinct, and sometimes overlapping, constituencies. We will employ several strategies at this year’s meeting to accomplish this objective, including grouping like sessions geographically and synchronizing the timing of the talks and Q&A periods, allowing attendees to slip seamlessly between presentations in nearby rooms. Tables and chairs will also be grouped outside sessions on similar topics to encourage informal conversations and networking among attendees with common clinical or research interests (see page 56 for more information). While there are many new features of this year’s meeting that I encourage you to explore, I would also like to call your attention to the superb programming in store for you via two of the hallmark offerings of each ASH annual meeting: the Education and Scientific Programs. This year’s Education Program, chaired by Drs. Wendy Stock and John Tisdale, will present the practicing hematologist with updates on the latest clinical advances via nearly 30 sessions on topics ranging from optimizing therapies for non-Hodgkin lymphoma to sports medicine and hematology. This year’s Scientific Program, chaired by Drs. José López and Kevin Shannon, will present the latest scientific breakthroughs – from non-coding RNAs in normal and malignant hematopoiesis to transfusion medicine for the pregnant mother, fetus, and neonate – in 18 key areas of hematology. Of course, the Society’s annual celebration of groundbreaking advances in hematology would not be complete without honoring some of the distinguished leaders in the field through awards and special lectures. I encourage you to read more about each of our 2013 honorees on pages 6-9. I am extremely proud of the exceptional, diverse program that my colleagues have assembled. I hope you will join me in December to experience these talks first-hand, reconnect with old friends, and enjoy the sights and sounds of historic New Orleans. Sincerely yours, Janis L. Abkowitz, MD President
  • 64. AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 2021 L Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036 Phone: 202-776-0544 Fax: 202-292-0269 meetings@hematology.org www.hematology.org AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY Ernest N. Morial Convention Center New Orleans, LA Meeting: December 7-10, 2013 Exposition: December 7-9, 2013 Preliminary Program 55th ASH® Annual Meeting and Exposition