Clinical Nutrition Week 2014
January 18–21 • Savannah, GA
Savannah International Trade &
Convention Center

PROVIDING
ESSE...
Saturday

Elizabeth Paul, RD, CSP, LDN, CNSC
Carol Semrad, MD
Yuri Villaran, MD, FACP, FCCP, CNSC

Update your skills and ...
Saturday

Moderator:

Description:

Post Graduate Course #1: Fluid,
Electrolyte, and Acid-Base
Status (PG1-2014)*

Nilesh ...
Saturday

Maximizing Mother’s Milk Production
Laurie A. Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, RD, IBCLC, Research
Assistant and Professor o...
Saturday

President’s Address: Addressing research, promoting and expanding the
CNW14 is the premier forum for clinical nu...
sunday
january 19, 2014

national efforts to deal with the crisis
3. Implement measures in health systems to best address
...
Moderators:
Gail Cresci, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Staff, Digestive
Disease & Lerner Research Institutes; Assistant Professor...
In Search of Lean
Body Mass (S40)

3.Identify two interventions to improve
delivery of nutrition support to critically ill...
• World Famous Pralines–Experience Savannah’s very own Pralines during the opening
reception provided by River Street Swee...
monday
january 20, 2014

Moderator:
Peter F. Nichol, MD, PhD
UAN: 0216-0000-14-025-L04-P
Level: Advanced

Dudrick Symposiu...
Childhood and Adolescent Bariatrics: Where Are We Now
and Where Do We Need to Go?
Stavra A. Xanthakos, MD, Assistant Profe...
Enterocutaneous Fistulas,
High Output Ostomies, and the
Interdisciplinary Nutrition
Support Team (M42)
4:30 - 6:00 pm
Obje...
F. Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency: Etiology, Prevention,
Treatment, and Working Around the Shortages
1. List the risk fac...
tuesday
january 21, 2014
Rhoads Lecture and Awards
Ceremony (T10):

Can’t make it to Savannah? Participate right from your...
Update on Special Topics in
Vitamin D (T20)

3. Provide a practical tool to improve nutrition practices at
the bedside by ...
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)

2,769 views
2,569 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,769
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 (CNW14)

  1. 1. Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 January 18–21 • Savannah, GA Savannah International Trade & Convention Center PROVIDING ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE & CONNECTIONS GLOBALLY RECOGNIZED FACULTY INTERACTIVE SESSIONS COMPANIES SHOWCASING THE NEWEST PRODUCTS & SERVICES INTERDISCIPLINARY ATTENDEES PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS www.nutritioncare.org/cnw14
  2. 2. Saturday Elizabeth Paul, RD, CSP, LDN, CNSC Carol Semrad, MD Yuri Villaran, MD, FACP, FCCP, CNSC Update your skills and select from nine pre-conference courses designed to provide you with the in-depth knowledge you need to take your career to the next level. Enhance your learning experience and maximize your networking opportunities by attending one of our preconference workshops. Nutrition Support Review Course (NSRC-2014)* Description: A.S.P.E.N.’s Nutrition Support Review Course provides an overview of nutrition support therapy that can be used as a tool for helping you identify personal knowledge gaps. Whether you are preparing for a certification examination or seeking additional professional growth, recognizing these knowledge gaps allows you to use your professional development time and energy more effectively. The Nutrition Support Review Course divides topics into core subjects, areas of major emphasis for practice and the certification examinations, and specialty subjects. This course will include a broad overview of the core subjects including GI physiology, nutrition assessment, parenteral nutrition, and enteral nutrition. The review of specialty areas, such as pediatric nutrition support, home care, and fluid and electrolytes, is intended to hit the highlights of the subject. Don’t miss this invaluable review of nutrition support therapy! Objectives: 1. Assess personal knowledge of nutrition support and identify areas requiring further study for the nutrition support specialty certification examination or other professional growth 2. Review core nutrition support topics including GI physiology, nutrition assessment, parenteral nutrition, and enteral nutrition 3. Highlight specialty areas of nutrition support such as pediatric nutrition support, home care, and drug-nutrient interactions Connie Brewer, RPH, BCNSP Todd Canada, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP Anne Coltman, MS, RD, CNSC Shanna Hager, PharmD, BCNSP Cassandra Kight, PhD, RD, CNSC Susan Lundy, MS, RD, LD, CNSC Todd Mattox, BS, PharmD, BCNSP Antoinette Neal, RN, CRNI, CNSC, VA-BC Pediatric Content Virtual Content Parenteral Nutrition Order Writing Workshop (PNW-2014)* 7:00 am – 4:00 pm Description: 7:00 am – 4:00 pm Planning Committee: UAN: 0216-0000-14-004-L04-P LEVEL: Intermediate The workshop is designed to train clinicians to assess a patient requiring PN and subsequently initiate and manage the PN therapy for that patient. The workshop will be offered in two 4-hour sessions. The first session will emphasize the basic concepts of PN order writing and management and the second session will allow for application of the knowledge gained through work in small groups with faculty experts. Workshop capacity is limited to 40 participants. This small class size will be optimal for hands-on learning to ensure each participant completes the course with improved skills in creating and managing PN orders. Get your calculator and register today for this invaluable course! Objectives: 1. Create and write a PN formula according to the patient’s nutrition assessment 2. Create a safe PN formula order per compounding and stability limits 3. Identify potential nutrient interactions in a PN solution and adjust the PN order accordingly 4. Manage PN in a patient from initiation to achieving the goal rate and beyond 5. Manage electrolytes in PN in the face of abnormal patient laboratory values and medications 6. Manage PN while accounting for differences in patient diagnoses and age Faculty: M. Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, OH Jessica Monczka, RD, LDN, CNSC, Clinical Dietitian Specialist, Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, Orlando Health, Orlando, FL Susan Brantley, MS, RD, LDN, CNSC, Metabolic Support Nutritionist, Univ. of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville, Knoxville, TN Beth Krzywda, ANP, MSN, Nurse Practitioner Hepatic Biliary Pancreatic Team, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration Michael D. Kraft, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Clinical, Social and Administrative Sciences, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy; Clinical Coordinator and Clinical Specialist, Surgery/Nutrition Support, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI Moderator: Karrie Derenski, PharmD BCNSP CNSC, Metabolic Support Coordinator, Department of Pharmacy, Cox Health, Springfield, MO UAN: 0216-0000-14-052-L04-P Level: Basic Research Workshop: The Metabolic Basis of Cancer Nutrition Therapy (RW-2014)* Description: This one-day research workshop will provide key knowledge and a conceptual framework with which to understand and study the metabolic basis of cancer nutrition therapy. Unlike simple malnutrition, cancer patients’ negative energy balance and profound skeletal muscle wasting is driven by a combination of reduced food intake and abnormal metabolism (ie, elevated energy expenditure, insulin resistance, lipolysis, and proteolysis), which aggravate weight loss and are provoked by systemic inflammation and catabolic factors. These metabolic changes explain why cancer-associated malnutrition cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutrition support. The goal of this workshop is to provide new findings on the specific nature of the metabolic changes that underlie malignant disease, and details of specific nutrition therapies that may reverse abnormal metabolism, permit robust anabolic responses, and improve cancer treatment outcomes. Objectives: 1. Outline key concepts in cancer-related malnutrition 2. Integrate new knowledge on human metabolism in the tumor-bearing state toward applications in cancer nutrition therapy 3. Understand specific limitations to successful nutrition therapy in cancer patients 4. Identify potential future research directions in this arena Faculty and Topics: Welcome and Introductions Vickie Baracos, PhD, Research Workshop Course Director; Professor Palliative Care Medicine, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada Virtual Content Anabolic Resistance of Skeletal Muscle: How May Anabolism Be Restored? Philip Atherton, PhD, AFHEA, Associate Professor, University of Nottingham, Derby, UK Muscle mTORC1 Signaling and the Response of Protein Synthesis to Nutrients and Activity Blake Rasmussen, PhD, Lloyd and Sue Ann Hill Professor of Healthy Aging, Interim Chair, Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX Emergent Therapies in the Treatment of Cancer Cachexia Jim Dalton PhD, Vice President, CSO, GTx, Inc., Memphis, TN 7:30 am – 4:00 pm Pediatric Content Does Cancer “Look Like” Diabetes: Insulin Resistance of Amino Acid and Glucose Metabolism Stephanie Chevalier, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Deficits of Lean Body Mass in Patients with Cancer: Prevalence and Implications for Cancer Nutrition Therapy Carla Prado, PhD, Assistant Professor, College of Human Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Dose Responsiveness of Protein Anabolism to Essential Amino Acid Supplementation: Evidence from Cancer Patients Nicolaas Deutz, MD, PhD, Professor, Ponder Endowed Chair, Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Nutrition Intervention with EPA during Cancer Therapy: A Double Benefit for Increasing Lean Body Mass and Decreasing Chemotherapy Toxicity Vera Mazurak, PhD, Associate Professor, Human Nutrition, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Heritable Risk Factors for Cancer- Associated Malnutrition and Wasting Vickie Baracos, PhD, Professor Palliative Care Medicine, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada Synthesis of Presentations / Discussions Vickie Baracos, PhD, Professor Palliative Care Medicine, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada Moderator: Vickie Baracos, PhD UAN: 0216-0000-14-001-L01-P Level: Advanced Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration Sat u rday saturday january 18, 2014
  3. 3. Saturday Moderator: Description: Post Graduate Course #1: Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Status (PG1-2014)* Nilesh M. Mehta, MD, Associate in Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA UAN: 0216-0000-14-002-L04-P Level: Intermediate 7:00 – 11:00 am This course will address contemporary and core issues related to nutrition therapy for the critically ill child. The speakers are experts in the field with extensive research and clinical experience, and are known for their teaching and speaking abilities worldwide. The course will begin with basic concepts of nutrition, followed by a review of body composition (clinical aspects and latest research) as a novel outcome marker, followed by a summary of the five most important papers published in the field in the past two years. A relevant research paper presentation will also be included. Ample interaction with the expert panel will complete the experience of a truly state-of-the-art discussion on the subject. Objectives: 1. Describe the basic biochemistry principles of nutrition support for the child 2. Discuss the current science and clinical aspects of body composition monitoring as a novel outcome marker in children 3. Identify the top five papers on pediatric critical care nutrition in the past two years Faculty and Topics: Biochemistry Basics of Critical Care Nutrition – Key Concepts Tom Jaksic, MD, PhD, Vice-Chairman, Pediatric General Surgery, Boston Children’s Hospital; Surgical Director, Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation; W. Hardy Hendren Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Top 5 Papers in Pediatric Critical Care Nutrition from 20122014 Walter Chwals, MD, FACS, FCCM, FAAP, Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics, Tufts University School of Medicine; Surgeon-in-Chief, Floating Hospital for Children, Boston, MA Body Composition Monitoring As a Novel Nutrition Outcome Marker – Basic Concepts and Current State of the Art Jorge A. Coss Bu, MD, Associate Director of Research, Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 7:00 – 11:00 am Description: Learn how to diagnose and treat the various extracellular and intracellular electrolyte disorders in your nutrition support patients. Develop a better understanding of arterial blood gases, acid-base balance, and how the nutrition support practitioner plays an important role in the correction of these abnormalities in patients. Case studies will be used to maximize the learning experience. Objectives: 1. Identify common etiologies of hyponatremia and hypernatremia associated with nutrition support and develop appropriate treatment options 2. Describe the etiologies and treatment of intracellular electrolyte disorders in the intensive and nonintensive care setting 3. List the common acid-base disorders seen in the nutrition support patient and identify appropriate treatment options Faculty and Topics: Understanding Acid-Base Balance and ABG’s Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, Chief of Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Baptist Health Systems; Clinical Associate Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS Sodium and Fluid Disorders and Treatment Gordon Sacks, PharmD, BCNSP, FCCP, Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Auburn University, Auburn, AL Intracellular Electrolyte Disorders and Treatment Todd Canada, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Division of Pharmacy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Moderator: Post Graduate Course #3: Introduction to Compounding Part 1: Parenteral Nutrition Solutions (PG3-2014)* Pediatric Considerations in PN Compounding Kathleen Gura, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, FPPAG, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Department of GI/Nutrition, Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation (CAIR), Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA Homecare Issues Don Filibeck, PharmD, MBA, Vice President, Pharmacy Operations, Axelacare Health Solutions, Dublin, OH 7:00 – 11:00 am Description: The ability to safely compound a parenteral nutrition solution is a skill that many pharmacists feel that they don’t have. Practitioners must balance the patient’s clinical needs with the basic tenets of aseptic technique and physical and chemical compatibility. Knowledge of the differences in vascular access and parenteral delivery systems must also be considered. This course will provide a basic overview necessary for the safe provision of parenteral nutrition. It is geared toward the pharmacist new to the field and for nonpharmacists with a desire to understand the nuances of PN compounding. Objectives: 1. Calculate the composition of a parenteral nutrition solution based on the clinician’s order 2. Predict the suitability of a parenteral nutrition solution given patient-specific parameters 3. Describe the complications that can occur if an unstable parenteral nutrition solution is infused and identify ways to prevent them Supply Issues: Outsourcing Considerations Eric H. Frankel, MSE, PharmD, BCNSP, Metabolic Support Service & Neonatal Clinical Lead Pharmacist, Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, MO Moderator: Mary Baker, PharmD, MBA UAN: 0216-0000-14-007-L04-P Level: Basic Nutrition for the Practicing Pediatric Clinician Part 2: Nutrition for the High Risk Neonate (NPPC2- 2013)* 12:00 – 4:00 pm Description: Faculty and Topics: Setting the Stage: Environmental Considerations for Safe Compounding USP 797 Mary Baker, PharmD, MBA, Director, Medical Services, Hospira, Inc, Lake Forest, IL This session is focused on providing practitioners with cutting edge and innovative nutrition strategies for the feeding the high risk neonatal infant. From Prescription to Formulations: Doing the Math Carol Rollins, MS, RD, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC, Coordinator, Nutrition Support Team, University Medical Center; Clinical Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 1. Develop strategies to improve growth rates of neonates in the NICU with effective enteral and parenteral feeding regimens 2. Identify the role of human milk in the NICU and subsequently utilize human milk feeding in practice to improve outcomes of high risk neonates 3. Implement strategies to assist mother’s in achieving adequate milk supply 4. Identify methods of human milk fortification 5. Prescribe nutritional supplements for mothers and infants to promote optimal nutrition in the NICU Compatibility Considerations: Calcium/Phosphorus and Beyond Todd Canada, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Division of Pharmacy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Total Nutrient Admixtures: How to Compound a Safe TNA Mark Klang MS, RPh, BCNSP, PhD, Core Head, Research Pharmacy, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP Objectives: Faculty and Topics: Parenteral Nutrition in the Neonate Jackie Wessel, MEd, RD, CNSC, CSP, CLE, Neonatal Nutritionist, Nutrition Services, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH UAN: 0216-0000-14-005-L04-P Level: Basic Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration Sat u rday Nutrition for the Practicing Pediatric Clinician Part 1: Pediatric Critical Care Nutrition (NPPC1-2014)*
  4. 4. Saturday Maximizing Mother’s Milk Production Laurie A. Nommsen-Rivers, PhD, RD, IBCLC, Research Assistant and Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Savvy about Supplements in the NICU Christina Valentine, MD, MS, RD, Assistant Professor and Neonatologist, Division of Neonatology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Moderator: Christina Valentine, MD, MS, RD UAN: 0216-0000-14-003-L04-P Level: Intermediate Post Graduate Course #2: Update in Critical Care Nutrition—What is the State of Art? (PG2-2014)* 12:00 – 4:00 pm Description: This course is designed for the practicing nutrition support specialist. It will focus on state-of-the-art evaluation, monitoring, and delivery of nutrition therapy to high-risk ICU populations. The course will begin with an overview of the latest evidence for our understanding of ICU metabolism, nutrition risk, and the optimal delivery of calories and protein. The latest data from new trials of enteral and parenteral feeding will be reviewed and perspectives will be given on how to apply these studies to your practice. The appropriate nutrition evaluation of the ICU patients will also be discussed and a rational approach to determining the quantity of calorie and protein requirements will be addressed. The faculty will then discuss some key challenging patient types, including ICU patients with renal failure, burns, and the high-risk surgical patient. Key controversial topics of specific nutrient-delivery and the many new trials addressing these issues will be addressed including antioxidants and probiotics. The course will conclude with a panel discussion and case presentations, which will illustrate how to apply the wide range of new data to your critical care nutrition practice. Objectives: 1. Understand latest evidence for ICU nutrition and high risk surgical patients and how to overcome barriers to optimal delivery of calories and protein Pediatric Content Virtual Content 2. Discuss evaluation of lean body mass and examine longterm outcomes in ICU patients and how the two may be related 3. Provide optimal nutrition therapy for high-risk patient populations in the ICU, such as burn and neuro ICU patients 4. Analyze the latest data from key clinical trials and summarize what we have learned from these trials, including a new understanding on the potential safety and role of parenteral nutrition Marc Jeschke, MD, PhD, FACS, FRCSC, Director, Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre; Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute; Associate Professor, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Faculty and Topics: Robert Martindale, MD, PhD, FACS, Chief, Division of General Surgery; Medical Director, Hospital Nutritional Services, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR How much Protein in the ICU? New Data Gordon Doig, PhD, Associate Professor, Northern Clinical School Intensive Care Research Unit, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Peri-op Nutrition, CHO Loading Prior, and Earlier Post-op Feeding Kate Wilcutts, MS, RD, CNSC, Dietitian, Nutrition Support Team – Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA Body Composition in Acute Illness Marina Mourtzakis, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada Selenium and Micronutrients: What is the Future? Gunnar Elke, MD, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany Overcoming Barriers to Feeding in the ICU Beth Taylor, MS, RD, CNSC, FCCM, Nutrition Support Specialist, Surgical ICU, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO A New Era in Parenteral Nutrition: Safer Then Before? Paul Wischmeyer, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology, Associate-Chairman for Clinical and Translational Research, Director of Nutrition Therapy Services, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Recent Clinical Trials in Critical Care: What Have We Learned? Daren Heyland, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Full Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen’s University; Director of Research for the Critical Care Program and Director of the Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada Nutrition for Special ICU Populations: Nutrition for the Neuro Critical Care Patient Gigi Vigue, RD, CNSC, Nutrition Support Specialist, Medical Intensive Care Unit, University of Colorado Health, Aurora, Colorado Nutrition for Special ICU Populations Nutrition in Burn Injuries Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration Moderators: Stephen McClave, MD, FASPEN, Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY UAN: 0216-0000-14-006-L04-P Level: Intermediate Post Graduate Course #4: Introduction to Compounding Part 2: Impact of Drug Shortages (PG4-2014)* 12:00 – 4:00 pm Description: The drug shortage crisis has significantly affected nutrition support practice. Adverse outcomes such as increased costs, breaches in patient safety, and increased morbidity and mortality have been described. Managing product shortages is particularly challenging for pediatric clinicians. This course will focus on lessons learned from one institution’s experience with parenteral nutrition product shortages, including how shortages have been managed and the effects of the shortages on patient outcomes. Potential options for lessening the crisis, including beyond use dating of parenteral nutrition solutions, the safety and feasibility of using products beyond their expiration dates, and the availability of foreign products will also be discussed. Objectives: 1. Discuss the determinants for the availability of parenteral nutrition products and the role of the FDA in the drug shortage crisis 2. Summarize the consequences of limited product supply of macronutrients and micronutrients in patients receiving PN therapy 3. Develop management plans for product shortages in patients that minimize the risk of nutrient deficiency and incorporate principles of patient safety Pediatric Content Virtual Content Faculty and Topics: The Drug Shortage Crisis in the United States: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going? Gilbert Burckart, PharmD, Associate Director for Pediatrics, Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD Without a Trace: Navigating Through the Milieu of Trace Element Shortages Catherine Crill, PharmD, BCNSP, Assistant Professor, Clinical Pharmacy and Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN Restriction During Lipid Shortages and Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency: How Much is Enough? Chasity Shelton, PharmD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN What’s Short Now? The Use of Commercial Premixed Parenteral Nutrition Solutions Rebecca Chhim, PharmD, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN When the Gut Doesn’t Work, Can You Still Use it? Mineral Supplementation via the Enteral Route Oscar Herrera, PharmD, Fellow, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN Administration of Parenteral Nutrition During the Shortage Crisis: Cost Implications Michael Christensen, PharmD, BS, AS, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN Can We Solve the Crisis? Considerations for Beyond Use Dating, Product Expiration and Foreign Product Availability Richard Helms, PharmD, Professor and Chair, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN Moderator: Catherine Crill, PharmD, BCNSP UAN: 0216-0000-14-008-L05-P Level: Intermediate Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration Sat u rday Human Milk Fortification in the NICU Setting Carrie Smith, MS, RD, Clinical Dietitian, Food and Nutrition Services, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, UC Health, Cincinnati, OH
  5. 5. Saturday President’s Address: Addressing research, promoting and expanding the CNW14 is the premier forum for clinical nutrition availability of robust and relevant evidence for clinical nutrition and practice. If you’re looking to Hospital Malnutrition - Our Time you will want to attend this meeting. Research explore cutting-edge, clinical nutrition research is paramount to the education that CNW14 provides so that you may impact the lives of your patients. Here’s a sneak peak of the research initiatives that will be front and center: Is Now! (R10) A.S.P.E.N. is pleased to offer attendees multiple opportunities to connect with your peers, engage with exhibitors and sponsors, and more importantly, hear from leading clinical nutrition experts. These events are complimentary to all registered CNW attendees, but space is limited and each event requires separate registration. • has been assembled for Workshop on Saturday, 4:30 - 6:30 pm A first-rate facultyMetabolic Basis of CancerCNW14’s ResearchThis is an event you won’t January 18: The Nutrition Therapy. Description: want to miss, so register today to reserve your seat! Limited space is available. • A.S.P.E.N. supports promising international Ms. Malone’s most notable attendees Ainsley Malone, MS, RD, LD, CNSC is AS.P.E.N’s 38th research and encourages international leadership contribution in both to showcase their work among distinguished colleagues. Join us Saturday, January 18 from A.S.P.E.N. President, representing nearly 6000 interdisciplinary our first-ever the Academy and Exchange. has involved malnutrition6:00 – 8:00PM in the Exhibit Hall for International Poster related activities. As Co-Chair of the A.S.P.E.N. 2009 healthcare professionals dedicated to nutrition support. • Don’t miss the CNW14 Poster Exchanges occurring in the Exhibit Hall Sunday, January 19 She is a Nutrition SupportMonday, January 20Nutrition Support Dietitian on the from 1:00 – 2:00 PM! Malnutrition Task Force and A.S.P.E.N.’s representative to and the Academy Malnutrition Workgroup, Ms. Malone assisted Team in the Pharmacy Department at Mt. Carmel West • Attend the Dudrick Symposium on Monday, January 20 to development on small intestine in the hear the latest Hospital in Columbus,regeneration. There’s still time to nominate yourself or a colleague for theof standardized characteristics to Ohio providing nutrition management define adult hospitalprestigious 2014She has subsequently malnutrition. and care to adult and Stanley J. Dudrick Research Scholar Award. Deadline is October 15. neonatal patients requiring led malnutrition education and dissemination efforts parenteral and enteral nutrition. Ms. Malone leads and speak at the Premier Paper Session on Monday • The Harry M. Vars Award Candidates will at the national and international level in addition to her manages nutrition support initiatives acrosshear these exceptional researchers talk about their work. January 20. Make sure to the Mt. participation in the Alliance to Advance Patient Nutrition as Carmel Health Care System, provides ongoing education For more information on CNW14 Research InitiativesA.S.P.E.N.’s clinician representative. visit, www.nutritioncare.org/research. of resident medical staff and ancillary health care team members, and assists to coordinate patient/family Ms. Malone’s address will re-emphasize the critical role education and transition for home nutrition support. Ms. adequate nutrition plays in quality patient care and what Malone is a Certified Nutrition Support Clinician® and has we as A.S.P.E.N. members need to do to provide leadership extensively practiced in the field for over thirty years. She within our own healthcare setting to address malnutrition has authored/edited over fifty peer-reviewed manuscripts and improve patient outcomes. and book chapters and has provided practice expertise to Faculty: countless clinicians via presentations and mentorship. Ainsley Malone, MS, RD, LD, CNSC, Nutrition Support Are member of multiple societies Ms. Malone is an activeyou an international attendee interested in attending CNW14? We have some tips to helpPharmacy Department, Dietitian, Nutrition Support Team, ensure you have and Dietetics, ESPEN, including the Academy of Nutritiona stress-free trip to CNW: Mt. Carmel West Hospital, Columbus, OH and the Society of Critical Care you begin your visa application early and well in advance of your travel dates. • Make sure Nutrition. She has provided extensive leadership withinfor your visa as early as possible. • Apply the Academy and has served UAN: 0216-0000-14-009-L04-P as Past Chair of the • Attaching Based Practiceprevious visits to Clinical Nutrition Week may help the application Evidence evidence of your Committee, Level: Intermediate a House of Delegates processingand is currently on the Director, time. Association Position• Attaching evidence of your intended return trip to your home country can shorten the Committee. application processing time. • You must first register to attend Clinical Nutrition Week prior to requesting an invitation letter. Requests for invitation letters will only be accepted by fax or online. INFORMATION: Symposium Lunch and Learn Central Stage Education A.S.P.E.N. Education SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Fresenius Kabi 6:00 – 7:45 AM Complimentary breakfast Corporate Symposium CE Credit Offered: No Baxter Healthcare Corporation 6:30 – 7:45 AM Complimentary breakfast Corporate Symposium CE Credit Offered: No B. Braun Medical, Inc. 6:00 – 7:45 AM Complimentary breakfast CE Credit Offered: No Nestlé Health Science 5:30 – 6:00 AM Complimentary breakfast Nestlé Health Science 6:00 – 7:30 AM Corporate Symposium CE Credit Offered:1.5 RDs and RNs Only Lunch and Learn Session: Covidien 12:00 – 1:00 PM Complimentary lunch Abbott Nutrition 9:30 – 10:30 AM Central Stage Education CE Credit Offered: 1.0 RDs and RNs Only Exhibit Hall Abbott Nutrition 7:00 – 9:00 PM Complimentary dinner Corporate Symposium CE Credit Offered: No Lunch and Learn Session: Covidien 12:00 – 1:00 PM Complimentary lunch Exhibit Hall Potomac Center for Medical Education (PCME) 7:15 – 8:45 PM Complimentary dinner Corporate Symposium CE Credit Offered: 1.5 (RD, RN, MD/DO, PharmD/RPh) Abbott Nutrition 9:30 – 10:30 AM Central Stage Education CE Credit Offered: No Exhibit Hall Supported by an educational grant from NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. This Industry schedule is preliminary. To learn more about these Industry supported events, visit www.nutritioncare.org/industry. Registration for these events will open late fall 2014. NEW & EXCITING: Live-in person translation offered at CNW14. We are excited to announce EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS TICKETED EVENTS that this year we are translating 12 sessions into Spanish onsite in Savannah, GA. Follow the headphone icons to see what sessions will have translation available. Nutrition Focused Physical Assessment Workshop—Part 1, Monday, 2:00 – 3:30 PM A.S.P.E.N. Educational Symposium CE Credit Offered: RD, RN, MD/DO, PharmD/RPh Nutrition Focused Physical Assessment Workshop—Part 2, Monday, 4:00 – 6:00 PM A.S.P.E.N. Educational Symposium For more information on the educational sessions that require a ticket, visit www.nutritioncare.org/education Registration for these events will open late fall 2014. Stay connected with A.S.P.E.N.’s CNW14 Mobile App. Manage your sessions, share messages with attendees, plan which events to attend, schedule appointments with exhibitors and more! Available for download December 2014. Sponsored by Fresenius Kabi. Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation 3 Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration 5 Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online *Pre-conference courses require a separate registration
  6. 6. sunday january 19, 2014 national efforts to deal with the crisis 3. Implement measures in health systems to best address national shortages of parenteral electrolyte solutions and other nutritionals Keynote Address: Drug Shortage Tales from the Front Line – Keeping Patients Safe during the Daily Scramble (S10) Faculty: 8:00 am – 9:30 am Michael R. Cohen, RPh, MS, ScD (hon), DPS (hon), FASHP, President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), Horsham, PA UAN: 0216-0000-14-010-L04-P Level: Intermediate A.S.P.E.N. is honored to welcome Michael Cohen as the Clinical Nutrition Week 2014 Keynote speaker. Michael R. Cohen, RPh, MS, ScD (hon.), DPS (hon.), is president of The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), a non-profit healthcare organization that specializes in understanding the causes of medication errors and providing errorreduction strategies to the healthcare community, policy makers, and the public. He is editor of the textbook, Medication Errors (2007 American Pharmaceutical Association) and serves as co-editor of the ISMP Medication Safety Alert! publications that reach over two million health professionals and consumers in the US, as well as regulatory authorities and others in over 30 foreign countries. He is editor for the ISMP consumer website, www. consumermedsafety.org and writes a guest column called Check-Up that appears weekly on the Philadelphia Inquirer website. Dr. Cohen currently serves as Vice Chair of the Patient Safety Advisory Group for the Joint Commission which creates the National Patient Safety Goals and serves as a consultant to FDA. In 2005 he was recognized as a MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. In 2008 The Joint Commission and National Quality Forum awarded Dr. Cohen the prestigious John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award in recognition of his life-long professional commitment to promoting safe medication use and a safe medication delivery system. As many of us know all too well, national drug shortages continue to have a profound effect on patient care and health system resources across the U.S. This presentation will characterize the causes and impact of shortages, discuss ongoing national efforts to prevent shortages or address them when they arise, and explore ideas for overall improvement. Industry, government, patient safety agencies, and the practitioner community must all face this serious safety issue together and work towards adaptable and safe solutions. Objectives: 1. Document how drug shortages continue to impact patient safety and health system resources in the US 2. Identify the causes of drug shortages and ongoing Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online Pediatric Content Virtual Content Clinical Trials (S20) 10:30 am – 12:30 pm Objectives: 1. Understand the most cutting edge data from late breaking clinical trials in clinical nutrition 2. Gain a perspective on how data from these trials can be applied back to bedside practice 3. Discuss the future direction of clinical nutrition and pharmaconutrition clinical trial research based on laboratory data and critical interpretation of these new trials Faculty and Topics: Role of Protein Delivery to Reduce Renal Injury in Critical Illness: The Nephro-Protective Trial Gordon Doig, PhD, Associate Professor, Northern Clinical School Intensive Care Research Unit, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Fiona Simpson, BSc (Nutrition), MND, Clinical Senior Lecturer, Intensive Care Medicine, Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Pro/Con Debate: Septic Patients Should be Fed Aggressively on the First Week of ICU Stay Pro – Gunnar Elke, MD, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany Con – Todd Rice, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN Pro/Con Debate: Should We Measure Gastric Residuals? Pro – Gunnar Elke, MD, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany Con – Stephen McClave, MD, FASPEN, Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY Spanish Translation Register online sun day Description:
  7. 7. Moderators: Gail Cresci, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Staff, Digestive Disease & Lerner Research Institutes; Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Departments of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Pathobiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH UAN: 0216-0000-14-011-L04-P Level: Advanced Basic Pediatric Skills Lab (S21) 10:30 am – 12:30 pm Objectives: 1. Describe the appropriate parameters to assess the nutrition status of a neonate, child, or developmentally delayed child 2. Develop an appropriate plan of care for a neonate or child requiring enteral nutrition support, including consideration of formula and access device 3. Discern the appropriate aspects of parenteral nutrition order writing for a neonate or child, including consideration of the vascular access device Faculty and Topics: Enteral Feeding Tubes and Enteral Delivery Issues Beth Lyman, RN, MSN, CNSC, Senior Program Coordinator for the Nutrition Support Team, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO Pediatric Nutrition Assessment Cindy Hensley, MS, RD, LD, CNSC, Sr. Clinical Nutrition Specialist, Nutrition Services, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO Pediatric PN Order Writing Fritz Schwenk, MD, FASPEN, Medical Director, Pediatric Nutrition Support Team, Pediatric Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Elaina Szeszycki, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical PharmacistNutrition Support and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN Neonatal PN Order Writing Steve Plogsted, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC, Clinical Pharmacist Nutrition Support Team, Clinical Pharmacy, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH Pediatric Content Virtual Content Nutrition Assessment of the Developmentally Delayed Child Gina Rempel, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Chief Medical Officer, Administration, Rehabilitation Center for Children, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Pediatric Vascular Access Devices Jane Anne Yaworski, RN, MSN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nutrition Support and Intestinal Care, Nutrition Support and Intestinal Care, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Pediatric Enteral Formulas Elizabeth Bobo, MS, RD, LDN, CNSC, Nutritionist, Nutrition Services, Nemours Children’s Clinic, Orlando, FL Neonatal Enteral Formulas Jackie Wessel, MEd, RD, CNSC, CSP, CLE, Neonatal Nutritionist, Nutrition Services, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Moderator: Beth Lyman, RN, MSN, CNSC UAN: 0216-0000-14-012-L04-P Level: Basic *Presented by the A.S.P.E.N. Pediatric Section Let’s Talk Tubes (S22) 10:30 am – 12:00 pm Objectives: Hands-On Stations: Current Approaches to NG Tube Placement and Verification in the Adult Patient Patricia A. Worthington, MSN, RN, CNSC, Nutrition Support Nurse, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA Central Venous Catheter Options for PN Antoinette Neal, RN, CRNI, CNSC, VA-BC, Senior Clinical Infusion Nurse, Cleveland Clinic Home Care Services, Independence, OH Nasoenteric Tube Securement Carol McGinnis, MS, RN, CNS, CNSN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nutrition Support, Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, SD Moderator: Renay Tyler, RN, ACNP, CNSC, DrNP, Director of Nursing, Ambulatory Services, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD UAN: 0216-0000-14-013-L04-P Level: Basic Product Shortages from Guidelines to Practice: Considerations and Strategies for Management (S23) 10:30 am – 12:00 pm Objectives: 1. Describe features of the new enteral connector standards and their safety implications 2. Demonstrate current approaches to nasogastric (NG) tube placement and verification in the adult patient 3. Identify current options for vascular access for the patient receiving PN across the continuum of care 4. Describe two methods of securing nasoenteric access tubes and care implications for each 1. Review drug shortages and describe A.S.P.E.N.’s response to parenteral nutrition product shortage alerts 2. Identify recommendations for managing parenteral nutrition product shortages 3. Identify unique strategies for management of the neonatal and pediatric patient during product shortages 4. Analyze factors to consider with product interchanges 5. Discuss proactive approaches to resource management for the home nutrition support patient Faculty and Topics: Faculty and Topics: Opening Lecture: A.S.P.E.N. and National Drug Shortage Activities Beverly Holcombe, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, Clinical Practice Consultant, A.S.P.E.N., Silver Spring, MD Enteral Connector Safety – New Standards and Designs Peggi Guenter, PhD, RN, Senior Director of Clinical Practice, Advocacy and Research Affairs, A.S.P.E.N., Silver Spring, MD Spanish Translation Register online Strategies for Management of the Pediatric Patient Allison Blackmer, PharmD, BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor/Clinical Pharmacist, Pediatric Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Pediatric Content Virtual Content Strategies for Management of the Home Parenteral Patient Carol Rollins, MS, RD, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC, Clinical Coordinator and Clinical Pharmacist, Pharmacy, University Medical Center, Tucson, AZ Effects of a Magnesium Sulfate Shortage on Serum Concentrations of Potassium and Magnesium in Adult PN Patients Michael Kraft, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Coordinator and Clinical Pharmacist, Department of Clinical, Social and Administrative Sciences, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, MI Moderator: Karrie Derenski, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC, Coordinator, Metabolic Support Service, CoxHealth, Springfield, MO UAN: 0216-0000-14-014-L05-P Level: Intermediate *Presented by the A.S.P.E.N. Pharmacy Practice Section Scientific Paper Sessions (S30 – 35) 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm Today’s medical environment demands evidence-based practice, replicable results, and improved patient outcomes. Our abstract authors conduct research to help meet these challenges and provide breakthroughs in our knowledge and in our patient care. These sessions are dedicated to presentations of highranking abstracts. The abstracts will be presented by topic so you can explore cutting-edge research on issues that interest you. The abstracts will be also published online in JPEN, making them a part of the body of evidence you have to guide your clinical patient care. Research Paper Session topics will be listed on www.nutritioncare.org/cnw later in 2013. UAN: (S30) 0216-0000-14-015-L04-P (S31) 0216-0000-14-016-L04-P (S32) 0216-0000-14-017-L04-P (S33) 0216-0000-14-018-L04-P (S34) 0216-0000-14-019-L04-P (S35) 0216-0000-14-020-L04-P Level: Advanced Spanish Translation Register online sun day sun day Paul Wischmeyer, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology, Associate-Chairman for Clinical and Translational Research, Director of Nutrition Therapy Services, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator - NICU, Clinical Pharmacy, Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, OH
  8. 8. In Search of Lean Body Mass (S40) 3.Identify two interventions to improve delivery of nutrition support to critically ill patients Objectives: The Impact of Malnutrition on Critically Ill Obese Patients Malcolm Robinson, MD, Assistant Professor, Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Faculty and Topics: ESPEN Guidelines for Nutritional Therapy During Anti-cancer Therapy Alessandro Laviano, MD, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy Moderator: Pierre Singer, MD UAN: 0216-0000-14-023-L01-P Level: Advanced *Contributed by the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) sun day Malnutrition and Infectious Complications Kris Mogensen, MS, RD, LDN, CNSC, Team Leader Dietitian, Department of Nutrition, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Faculty and Topics: Intro to Lean Body Mass Measures and Role in Outcomes Faculty TBA Malnutrition and Mortality Kenneth Christopher, MD, Assistant Director, Preliminary and Medicine Residency Programs, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Instructor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Top JPEN Papers of 2013 (S43) Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Carrie P. Earthman, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN Interventions for Malnourished Critically Ill Patients Edward Saltzman, MD, Chief, Division of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center/Tufts University, Boston, MA Neonatal Body Mass Assessment Melissa Rice, DO, Neonatology Fellow, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Moderator: 1. Review new clinical guidelines and evidence supporting practice recommendations 2. Discuss knowledge gained in topics of relevance to current nutrition support therapy 3. Articulate characteristics of a strong research study and its associated publication CT Scan and Ultrasound Analysis Marina Mourtzakis, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada UAN: 0216-0000-14-022-L01-P Level: Intermediate Malcolm Robinson, MD Nutrition Therapy: The New Frontier of Cancer Care (S42) DEXA Scanning Faculty TBA 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Moderator: Malnutrition Matters in the ICU: Impact of Pre-Existing Malnutrition and Intervention Strategies (S41) 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Objectives: 1. Identify three negative outcomes associated with preexisting malnutrition in critically ill patients 2.Explain why obesity is not protective in all critically ill patients Pediatric Content Virtual Content 1. Indicate whether the pH level indicates acidosis or alkalosis 2.State whether the cause of the pH imbalance is respiratory or metabolic Objectives: 3.Identify if there is any compensation for the acid-base imbalance Lorraine Franzi, MS/HSM, RD, LDN, CNSC, Consultant, Professional Nutrition Therapists, Pittsburgh, PA B. Skin Care for Patients With Gastrostomy Tubes Moderator: Kelly A. Tappenden, PhD, RD, FASPEN, Endowed Professor, Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL UAN: 0216-0000-14-024-L04-P 1. List common types of tubes used as feeding gastrostomies 2. Recognize potential complications of gastrostomy tubes 3.Describe interventions to prevent and manage complications of gastrostomy tubes Patricia Worthington, MSN, RN, CNSC, Nutritional Support Clinical Specialists, Nursing, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA C. Open Abdomen Level: Basic 1. Evaluate the results of nutritionDay Oncology and describe a snapshot in the real life of a cancer patient 2. Summarize body composition changes in cancer and its usefulness as a predictor of outcome 3. Integrate evidence into nutrition therapy during anticancer treatment 4. Describe adjuvant therapy for cancer patients via modulation of selective nutrients UAN: 0216-0000-14-021-L04-P Level: Intermediate Here’s your opportunity for an up close and personal experience with the experts. The CNW14 Focused Learning Sessions will promote discussion on specific nutrition support topics. Sessions will be organized by topic and you will have an opportunity to talk in small groups with the faculty and your peers. Each faculty presenter will meet with the group for 45 minutes before participants are asked to move to another table for discussion on a different topic. A. ABGs as Easy as 1-2-3 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Objectives: Faculty TBA 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm 1. Determine appropriate route of feeding in patients with an open abdomen 2. Identify macro and micronutrient requirements in patients with an open abdomen Amy J. Berry, MS, RD, CNSC, Nutrition Support Team – Surgery, Clinical Nutrition Services, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA Faculty and Topics: D. Child Who Refuses to Eat: It’s Not All Behavioral Nutrition Day Oncology: A Snapshot Pierre Singer, MD, Professor, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel 1. List causes of feeding refusal 2. Evaluate the various causes of feeding refusal 3. Manage various causes that contribute to feeding problems Body Composition Changes: Predictors for Outcome? Rocco Barazzoni, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Clinical Sciences, Department of Medical and Surgical Health, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy Spanish Translation Register online Shamaila Waseem, MD, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Riley Children’s Specialists, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online sun day More information coming soon! Sunday Focused Learning Sessions (FLS1)
  9. 9. • World Famous Pralines–Experience Savannah’s very own Pralines during the opening reception provided by River Street Sweets. • Get Moving Sessions–Join us Sunday and Monday for light stretching and moving to get your blood bumping after sitting in educational sessions all day. Donations are welcome to support the A.S.P.E.N. Rhoads Research Foundation. No advance registration is required. • Innovation Theatres–Learn more about the latest research and innovations from Abbott Nutrition, CORPAK Medsystems, GNF Technologies, and SustainTM, LLC: A.S.P.E.N.’s National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care. E. The Value of an Oley Foundation Membership 1. Summarize at least two studies that demonstrate the positive impact Oley has on patients 2. Refer patients to the Oley Foundation to enable a connection with resources and other patients Marion F. Winkler, PhD, RD, LDN, CNSC, FASPEN, Surgical Nutrition Specialist, Department of Surgery and Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital; Associate Professor of Surgery, Brown University Alpert Medical School, Providence, RI F. Indirect Calorimetry: Does It Matter? 1. Discuss how indirect calorimetry works, what sort of equipment is needed, and how energy expenditure is calculated from inspired and expired gas measurements 2. Apply indirect calorimetry to hospitalized patients in the intensive care unit and an ambulatory setting 3. Analyze the evidence that the use of indirect calorimetry can improve patient outcomes when compared with the use of calculated energy expenditure. Carol Ireton-Jones, RD, PhD, Nutrition Therapy Specialist/Consultant in Private Practice, Professional Nutrition Therapists, Dallas, TX Charles W. Van Way, III, MD, Professor of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Missouri- Kansas City, Kansas City, MO Dustin Neel, MD, General Surgery Resident, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY G. Influence of Circadian Rhythms and Nutrition Support on Metabolic Outcomes in the ICU 1. Describe normal circadian rhythms 2. Discuss alteration of normal circadian rhythms associated with ICU and continuous nutrition support delivery 3. Identify areas of future research to further explain the relationship between circadian rhythms and nutrition support Sarah Peterson, MS, RD, CNSC, ICU Dietitian, Department of Food and Nutrition, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL H. Vitamin D and Cancer: Controversies in Prevention and Survivorship 1. Identify the cancers most consistently correlated with serum vitamin D status 2. Discuss the major limitation of available data regarding vitamin D and cancer risk and cancer outcomes Pediatric Content Virtual Content Pankaj Vashi, MD, Gastroenterologist and Lead National Medical Director, National Director of Gastroenterology/ Nutrition and Metabolic Support, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Zion, IL Kristen Trukova, MS, RD, CSO, LDN, CNSC, Clinical Oncologist and Dietitian, Department of Nutrition, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Zion, IL I. Strategies for Effective Identification of Symptoms Caused by Psychotropic Medications and Their Physical and Nutrition Interactions in Pediatrics 1. Identify common examples of psychotropic medication side effects 2. Incorporate techniques of nutrition assessment into the treatment process 3. Define possible health/lifestyle changes for family/ patient Mary Turon- Findley, MS, RD, LS, Registered Dietitian, Nutrition Therapy, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Raymond Troy, MD, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, Psychiatry; Program Director, Child & Adolescent Partial Hospitalization, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH J. Innovative Strategies to Optimize Nutrition and Minimize Risk in Our Hyperemesis Gravidarum Patients Anne Tucker, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Associate 2. Describe the evidence behind mind-body approaches for Welcome Area Professor, Clinical Sciences and Administration, University of IBD Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, first stop at CNW14! Come and enjoy a cup of Make this your TX Ann Ming Yeh, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor, Pediatric conference activities Renee Walker, MS,coffee CNSC,learn about the key Gastroenterology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA RD, LD, and Nutrition Support Presented by the A.S.P.E.N. Pediatric Dietitian, Nutrition and Food Services, Nestlé Health Science. Adjacent to A.S.P.E.N.’s Section Michael E. DeBakey sponsored by Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX N. Competence and Compliance Validation of the Home membership booth. Care Patient on Parenteral Nutrition L. Micronutrient Deficiencies in Patients Receiving Enteral 1. Validate competence in the patient/lay caregiver Nutrition via Jejunal Feeding Tubes 2. Validate compliance in the patient/lay caregiver 1. Identify the micronutrients that are absorbed proximally 3. Provide tools to assess ongoing compliance and in the gastrointestinal tract that may be deficient in a patient competence being fed distally through a jejunal feeding tube 2. Identify clinical signs and symptoms associated with Antoinette (Toni) Neal, RN, CRNI, CNSC, VA-BC, various micronutrient deficiencies Cleveland Clinic Infusion Pharmacy at Home, Cleveland 3. Review general literature recommendations and Clinic, Independence, OH case-based interventions for patients with micronutrient There are multiple opportunities for attendees to connect and share best practices and deficiencies experiences with colleagues from across the globe.O. Prebiotics and Probiotics Brazil, Japan, Countries represented include 4. Discuss nutrients for consideration that may beprovides a forum for you to gain new ideas and skills to excessive and Saudi Arabia. Our conference 1. Review the evidence-based guidelines for the use of with long-term enteral feeding career. Don’t miss your opportunity to network with the experts in your field! advance your probiotics in preterm infants Amy Hapgood, RD, Home conference experience to the next level:2. Review the role of probiotics for the prevention and Care Clinician, Apria Healthcare, Take your treatment of antibiotic associated diarrhea Denver, CO 3. Discuss the role • Step inside the Exhibit Hall and meet with nearly 100 exhibitors. of prebiotics and probiotics on health issues Leanne Saxton, • Exchange Care Clinician, Apria in the Nestlé Welcome Area and enjoy a complimentary beverage. RD, Home ideas with colleagues Healthcare, Denver, CO • Attend a Central Stage or Corporate SymposiumTeresa D. Puthoff, exhibiting companies. event conducted by PharmD, Clinical Lead, Clinical Pharmacy nutrition at NICU, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, • Hear the the New CAM from the What is latest updates for IBD: top companies in clinical Specialist –our Lunch and M. Integrative Approaches, Columbus, OH Learn sessions. the Evidence? • Learn about the latest product innovations showcased at the Innovation Theatres. 1. Summarize the evidence-based approaches for nutritional • Engage, IBD and herbal supplements for connect, and network with colleagues at the Practice and Specialty Section meetings. • Participate in A.S.P.E.N.’s game board trivia and you could win valuable prizes! 1. Identify medication and nutriceutical management of hyperemesis gravidarum 2. Discuss enteral feeding tube access, complications, and options for feeding patients with hyperemesis gravidarum You’re invited to a networking lunch in the Exhibit Hall Sunday and Monday from 12:00 – 2:00 PM. Take time out to meet with your colleagues to share insights and solutions during the lunch break. Compliments of A.S.P.E.N. Merin Kinikini, RD, FNP, CNSC, Nurse Practitioner, Nutrition Support Service, Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake, UT Thomas White, MD, FACS, CNSC, Medical Director, Nutrition Support Service, Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake, UT To learn more visit, www.nutritioncare.org/experience K. Creating an Award-Winning Nutrition Support Team 1. Provide examples of methods to identify potential nutrition support team members 2. List roles for each discipline member of the nutrition support team 3. Define educational opportunities for the nutrition support team 4. Review the nutrition support team’s role in quality improvement Spanish Translation Register online 18 Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online sun day sun day Joan Bishop, Executive Director, The Oley Foundation, Albany, NY 3. Discuss optimal serum vitamin D concentrations and strategies for vitamin D repletion in patients undergoing treatment for cancer
  10. 10. monday january 20, 2014 Moderator: Peter F. Nichol, MD, PhD UAN: 0216-0000-14-025-L04-P Level: Advanced Dudrick Symposium: Exhibits and Posters Frontiers in Regenerating Intestine for Short Gut Syndrome (M10) 9:30 - 10:30 am 8:00 - 9:30 am Short bowel syndrome is a rare disease that is both costly and devastating. The main cause of short bowel syndrome is surgical removal of half or more of the small intestine to treat intestinal diseases, injuries, or a result of defects present at birth. With the exception of transplantation there are no therapies that can replace the small intestine. Thus, understanding the small intestine’s regeneration potential is essential to development of critically needed therapies that will increase intestinal function. This session will explore cutting edge research being performed by several young investigators on the frontier of intestinal regeneration. Objectives: 1. Define short bowel syndrome 2. List at least 2 causes of short bowel syndrome 3. Describe the current therapies for short bowel syndrome 4. Describe the limitations of current therapies for short bowel syndrome Faculty and Topics: Human Tissue-Engineered Intestine: Function and Future Tracy C. Grikscheit, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California; Saban Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA Regenerative Medicine to Repair or Re-Build the Intestine: What are the Options? Paolo De Coppi, MD, PhD, Clinical Senior Lecturer and Consultant, Surgery Unit, University College London Institute of Child Health; Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom Exploring the Regenerative Potential of the Embryonic Intestine Peter F. Nichol, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Director of Pediatric Nutrition Support, Director of the Pediatric Intestinal Failure Program, American Family Children’s Hospital; Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI Pediatric Content Virtual Content 10:30 am - 12:30 pm A.S.P.E.N. is dedicated to advancing the science and practice of clinical nutrition and metabolism. This session highlights the best peer-reviewed research abstracts submitted for CNW14. This is your opportunity to hear firsthand about the latest research that helps shape clinical practice for all disciplines involved in nutrition support. All the individuals who give presentations during this session are vying for the prestigious Harry M. Vars Award. This award serves as a tribute to Dr. Vars and his pioneering developments in parenteral nutrition and is given annually for the best original research presentation by an investigator at CNW. The award recipient will be selected on site by the A.S.P.E.N. Research Committee based upon a review of manuscripts submitted by qualified candidates and their presentations. The award recipient will be announced at the Rhoads Lecture and Research Award session Tuesday morning. Come cheer on the candidates and hear the best of the best research at CNW14! UAN: 0216-0000-14-026-L04-P Level: Advanced Exhibits and POsters 12:00 - 2:00 pm Pharmaconutrition (M30) 2:00 - 3:30 pm Objectives: Probiotics and the Microbiome: Facts and the Future? Paul Wischmeyer, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology, Associate-Chairman for Clinical and Translational Research, Director of Nutrition Therapy Services, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Optimal Protein Requirements in Surgery and Critical Illness: Can We Make an Educated Guess? Thomas Schricker, MD, PhD, Associate Professor and Clinical Director, Department of Anesthesia, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada REDOXs: A Secondary Analysis: What Did We Learn? Daren Heyland, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Full Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen’s University; Director of Research for the Critical Care Program and Director of the Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada Moderator: Daren Heyland, MD, FRCPC, MSc and Robert Martindale, MD, PhD, FACS, Chief, Division of General Surgery; Medical Director, Hospital Nutritional Services, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR UAN: 0216-0000-14-027-L04-P Level: Advanced A Marriage between Quality Improvement and the EHR with the IRB Standing in as Justice of the Peace! (M31) 2:00 - 3:30 pm Objectives: 1. Define human subject research activities and list activities that fall under IRB oversight jurisdiction 2. Identify potential local and online resources for clinicians and researchers involved in QI and research projects 3. Identify and utilize tools to successfully complete the IRB application process 4. Develop potential nutrition support QI projects and/or outcomes research at their own institution More information coming soon! Spanish Translation Register online Pediatric Content Virtual Content Faculty and Topics: Systematic, Data-Driven Clinical Improvements: QI, Research, and IRB oversight Lark-Aeryn Speyer, Junior Associate Regulatory Analyst, IRBMED, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI Demystifying the Institutional Review Process Sarah Peterson, MS, RD, CNSC, Clinical Dietitian, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL Using Quality Improvement Methods to Improve Nutritional Outcomes in the NICU Laura Placke Ward, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics; Neonatologist, Division of Neonatology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Moderator: Vincent W. Vanek, MD, FACS, FASPEN, CNSP, HMHP, Chief Medical Informatics Officer, Department of Surgical Education, St. Elizabeth Health Center; Professor of Surgery, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Youngstown, OH UAN: 0216-0000-14-028-L04-P Level: Intermediate Medical and Surgical Management of Childhood Obesity: Successes and Pitfalls (M32) 2:00 - 3:30 pm Objectives: 1. Define pediatric obesity and related complications with an emphasis on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) 2. Implement an interdisciplinary approach to management of obesity in children and adolescents and analyze the outcomes 3. Understand the algorithms, outcomes, and complications of childhood bariatric surgery Faculty and Topics: Childhood Obesity: Definitions, Complications and Outcomes of a Interdisciplinary Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program Miriam Vos, MD, MSPH, Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Nutrition Advice for Childhood Obesity: Focusing on Areas of Opportunity Wendy Palmer, MS, RD, LD, CHES, Manager, Child Wellness Department, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA Spanish Translation Register online m on day Mon day Description: Premier Paper Sessions and Live Vars Award Competition (M20) Faculty and Topics: Selenium: The Future Of Pharmaconutrition? Gunnar Elke, MD, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
  11. 11. Childhood and Adolescent Bariatrics: Where Are We Now and Where Do We Need to Go? Stavra A. Xanthakos, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati; Medical Director, Surgical Weight Loss Program for Teens, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Moderator: Timothy Sentongo, MD, ABPNS, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Director, Pediatric Nutrition Support, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL UAN: 0216-0000-14-029-L01-P Level: Intermediate Implementing A.S.P.E.N.’s Parenteral Nutrition Consensus Recommendations (M33) 2:00 - 3:30 pm Objectives: 2. Summarize best practices for PN prescribing, order review, and processing 3. Appraise the safety of current PN compounding practices 4. Apply safe PN administration recommendations to improve the safety of this process Faculty and Topics: Prescribing and Communicating the PN Order Michael Kraft, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy; Assistant Director, Education and Research, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI PN Order Review and Verification Process Jane Gervasio, PharmD, BCNSP, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN Compounding Parenteral Nutrition Gordon Sacks, PharmD, BCNSP, FCCP, Chair, Pharmacy Practice, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, AL Parenteral Nutrition Administration Patricia Worthington, RN, MSN, CNSC, Nutrition Support Nurse, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA Pediatric Content Virtual Content Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, Chief of Clinical Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy, Baptist Health Systems; Clinical Associate Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS UAN: 0216-0000-14-030-L05-P Level: Intermediate Nutrition Focused Physical Assessment: Skills You Need Today for Patient Assessment – Parts 1 & 2 (M34 & M40) Description: Space for these two sessions is limited to 75 participants each. There is no additional fee to participate in either of these sessions. Tickets are first come, first served and run out quickly! Notification will be sent out prior to the tickets/registration for these sessions becoming available. Objectives: 1. Describe the components of the nutrition-focused physical exam 2. Demonstrate novice skills in completing a nutritionfocused physical exam to include assessment of body fat, muscle, fluid accumulation, abdominal exam, functional performance, and micronutrient assessment 3. Use the information obtained in nutrition-focused physical assessment to develop a nutrition care plan including the diagnosis, nutrition intervention, and reassessment plan Part 1 (M34) 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm Faculty and Topics: Opening Didactic Presentation: Why and How to Perform NFPE, Developing Skills, and Working as an Interdisciplinary Team Omer Deen, MD, Staff Physician, Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, CA Hands-On Stations: Abdominal X-Ray Interpretation Gail Cresci, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Staff, Digestive Disease & Lerner Research Institutes; Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Departments of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Pathobiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Micronutrient Deficiencies Spanish Translation Register online Dema Esper, MS, RD, LD, Instructor, Department of Food and Nutrition, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH Abdominal Assessment Mary Marian, MS, RD, CSO, Clinical Dietitian and Instructor, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ The Challenge of Caring for the Critically Ill Obese Patient in the ICU (M41) Omer Deen, MD, Staff Physician, Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, CA 1. Recognize the effects of obesity and associated inflammatory changes on various organ systems in the critically ill patient 2. Identify which drugs may require special dosing in the obese patient and recognize those that may interfere with provision of nutrition 3. Review evidence-based methods for determining energy requirements in critically obese patients 4. Evaluate the evidence for providing permissive hypocaloric feeds to critically obese patients 4:30 - 6:00 pm Objectives: Tying It All Together: Case Presentation Omer Deen, MD, Staff Physician, Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, CA Part 2 (M40) 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Opening Didactic Presentation: Why and How to Perform NFPE, Developing Skills, and Working as an Interdisciplinary Team Omer Deen, MD, Staff Physician, Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Hands-On Stations: Functional Assessment Mary Russell, MS, RD, LDN, Senior Manager, Medical Affairs, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Chicago, IL Macronutrient Assessment Cindy Hamilton, MS, RD, LD, Director, Center for Human Nutrition, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Assessment of Fluid Accumulation Susan Roberts, MS, RD, CNSC, Assistant Director, Department of Nutrition, Baylor Medical Center, Dallas, TX Tying It All Together: Case Presentation Omer Deen, MD, Staff Physician, Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, CA UAN: M34 0216-0000-14-031-L04-P M40 0216-0000-14-032-L04-P Level: Intermediate *Contributed by Dietitians in Nutrition Support, a practice group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Faculty and Topics: The Critically Ill Obese Patient: A Review and Look Ahead Robert Winfield, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Section of Acute and Critical Care Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Do Megadoses Cause Mega Problems When Treating the ICU Obese Patient? Lingtak-Neander Chan, PharmD, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy, Interdisciplinary Faculty, Graduate Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Too Much, Too Little, or Just Right? The Challenges of Feeding the ICU Obese Patient Gail Cresci, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Staff, Digestive Disease & Lerner Research Institutes; Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Departments of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Pathobiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Moderator: Beth Taylor, MS, RD, CNSC, FCCM, Nutrition Support Specialist, Surgical ICU, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO UAN: 0216-0000-14-033-L01-P Level: Intermediate Exhibits and Posters 3:30 - 4:30 pm Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online m on day Mon day 1. Compare current parenteral nutrition processes with safe PN practice recommendations Moderator:
  12. 12. Enterocutaneous Fistulas, High Output Ostomies, and the Interdisciplinary Nutrition Support Team (M42) 4:30 - 6:00 pm Objectives: 1. Establish goals for interdisciplinary care of the patient 2. Resolve issues with transitions of care for these complex patients 3. Develop an interdisciplinary approach to nutrition care, including all disciplines necessary for achieving quality outcomes 4. Contrast care issues for enterocutaneous fistulas versus high output ostomies Faculty and Topics: 4:30 - 6:00 pm Objectives: 1. Provide new information to peers on the importance of nutrition intervention among malnourished or at-risk patients 2. Promote collaboration among colleagues as part of the solution to tackling hospital malnutrition 3. Bring an actionable plan back to hospitals for incorporating a nutrition care model to improve patient and hospital outcomes Faculty: Melissa Parkhurst, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine; Medical Director, Hospital Medicine Section, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Monday Focused Learning Sessions (FLS2) Jennifer Burgis, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA Description: Kaylie Nguyen, NP, Nurse Practitioner, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Palo Alto, CA *Presented by the A.S.P.E.N. Pediatric Section 4:30 – 6:00 pm Here’s your opportunity for an up close and personal experience with the experts. The CNW14 Focused Learning Sessions will promote discussion on specific nutrition support topics. Sessions will be organized by topic and you will have an opportunity to talk in small groups with the faculty and your peers. Each faculty presenter will meet with the group for 45 minutes before participants are asked to move to another table for discussion on a different topic. A. Acid-Base Disorders: Easy As 1, 2, 3 1. Identify and interpret acid-base disorders 2. Review treatment and prevention strategies for acid-base abnormalities 3. Evaluate patient cases to apply a stepwise approach to acid-base disorders Anne Tucker, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Associate Professor, Clinical Sciences and Administration, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX Determining Nutrition Requirements Jennifer Forristal, MS, RD, LD, CNSC, Clinical Dietitian, Clinical Nutrition Therapy, Truman Memorial Medical Center, Kelly A. Tappenden, PhD, RD, FASPEN, Endowed Professor, Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL Nicole Keller, PharmD, BCNSP, Critical Care/Nutrition Support Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Michael E. Debakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX Medical-Surgical Management Charles W. Van Way, III, MD, Professor of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Missouri- Kansas City, Kansas City, MO Beth Quatrara, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CMRSN, Alliance Representative from the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses; Clinical Nurse Specialist, Digestive Health Department; Director, Nursing Research Program, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA B. Clinical Measurement of Lean Tissue in Individuals With Cancer: Where Are We Now and Where Can We Go From Here?: Enterocutaneous Fistula and High Output Ostomy from the Pharmacist’s Perspective Eric H. Frankel, MSE, PharmD, BCNSP, Neonatal Clinical Lead & Metabolic Support Service Clinical Pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy, Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, MO Moderator: Moderator: Kelly A. Tappenden, PhD, RD, FASPEN UAN: 0216-0000-14-035-L01-P Level: Intermediate *Contributed by the Alliance to Advance Patient Nutrition Beth Lyman, RN, MSN, CNSC, Senior Program Coordinator for the Nutrition Support Team, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO 1. Describe the relationship between lean tissue and nutrition status within the context of the recent consensus definition of malnutrition established by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and A.S.P.E.N. 2. Differentiate between several techniques currently being used to assess lean tissue 3. Describe new techniques and new uses for existing technologies that may help the clinician to identify malnutrition and/or monitor individuals as they undergo nutrition interventions 4. Consider research needs and future directions with regard to the assessment of lean tissue as a key parameter for nutrition status D. Renal Failure: The Known and Unknown 1. Identify metabolic alterations of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that are related to the development of protein energy wasting (PEW) 2. Compare nutrition and non-nutrition causes of PEW in CKD patients 3. List contributing factors associated with comorbidities and lifestyle that can be managed to decrease the incidence of PEW in CKD Marcia Kalista-Richards, MPH, RD, CNSC, LDN, Renal Nutrition Support Dietitian, Department of Nutrition, Cedar Crest College, Allentown, PA E. Nutrition Support Product Shortages: Ethical Considerations for the Pediatric Healthcare Provider 1. Discuss the impact of national nutrition support product shortages on the quality and safety of providing nutrition support therapy 2. Describe strategies to ethically justify nutrition support product allocation during national shortages 3. Evaluate the option of utilizing compounding pharmacies to provide nutrition support products in short supply 4. Given a patient case, explain the ethical rationale for decisions of allocation of nutrition support products in parenteral nutrition–dependent patients with intestinal failure M. Luisa Partipilo, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Pharmacist, Intestinal Rehabilitation/Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Allison Blackmer, PharmD, BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor/Clinical Pharmacist, Pediatric Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Carrie P. Earthman, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN UAN: 0216-0000-14-034-L04-P Level: Intermediate C. Nutrition in Pediatric IBD: What is the Evidence? 1. Review the therapeutic theories of the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD) 2. Describe Stanford’s patient experience on the SCD and our ongoing research Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online m on day Mon day An Overview of Managing the Care Team Across the Spectrum of Care Vicki M. Ross, RN, PhD, Nutrition Support/Nurse Scientist, Truman Memorial Medical Center, Kansas City, MO Improve Patient Outcomes by Identifying and Addressing Malnutrition Through an Interdisciplinary Approach (M43)
  13. 13. F. Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency: Etiology, Prevention, Treatment, and Working Around the Shortages 1. List the risk factors for essential fatty acid deficiency 2. Interpret essential fatty acid profile and calculate patientspecific needs 3. Identify means to supplement essential fatty acids with intravenous, enteral, and topical fat sources while monitoring response Kris Mogensen, MS, RD, LDN, CNSC, Team Leader Dietitian, Department of Nutrition, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Deborah Pfister, MS, RD, LDN, CNSC, Director of Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, Thrive Rx, Littleton, MA G. Nutrition Therapy for Chronic Pancreatitis, Total Pancreatectomy, and Autologous Islet Cell Transplant Jodi Wolff, MS, RD, CNSC, Pediatric Clinical Dietitian, Clinical Nutrition, Center for Comprehensive Care, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, OH Erin Jenks, MS, RD, LD, Clinical Dietitian, Haslinger Family Pediatric Palliative Care Center, Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, OH J. Real Life Tales of Medicare Denials, Appeals, and Coverage for Home Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 1. Describe existing Medicare guidelines that qualify patients for parenteral and enteral nutrition 2. List three examples of frequently scrutinized areas of justification for nutrition support 3. Identify two tools to aid in successful Medicare qualification of parenteral and enteral nutrition Sara DiCecco, MS, RD, LD, Clinical Dietitian, William Von Liebig Transplant Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN M. Quality Practice: Improving Patient Care Through Nutrition Informatics 1. Apply knowledge in informatics to identify areas for clinical nutrition improvement 2. Implement strategies to use the EHR to bridge the gap from guideline to quantifiable, measurable data 3. Utilize informatics to showcase the contribution of clinical nutrition on quality and cost Cathy Montgomery, RD, LD, Director of Clinical Nutrition, Clinical Nutrition, Memorial Hermann Health System, Houston, TX Lynn Moore, RD, LD, CNSC, Clinical Nutrition Manager, Clinical Nutrition, Memorial Hermann Health System, Houston, TX N. Introduction to Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) 1. Navigate and create data entry forms in REDCap 2. Demonstrate a project that utilizes REDCap Timothy Sentongo, MD, ABPNS, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Director, Pediatric Nutrition Support, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL O. Approach to Patients on PN with Hyperglycemia 1. Develop PN programs for patients with hyperglycemia 2. Review desired glucose goal ranges 3. Discuss an approach to insulin management M. Molly McMahon, MD, Medical Director, Nutrition and Nutrition Support Services Team, Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, MN Maura O’Neill, MBA, RD, CNSC, Nutrition Services, Walgreens Infusion Services, Deerfield, IL Pamela Wagner, RD, CNSC, Nutrition Services, Walgreens Infusion Services, Deerfield, IL Summer Root, RD, Clinical Dietitian, Nutrition Support Services, University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ K. Managing Parenteral Nutrition Electrolyte Additions in Adult Patients Shannon Eshelman, RD, Clinical Dietitian, Nutrition Support Services, University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ 1. Assess electrolyte needs of the adult patient 2. Adjust parenteral nutrition additions based on select conditions 3. Calculate maintenance electrolyte needs in the adult patient H. Importance of Intestinal Microbioma in Health and Disease 1. Describe the intestinal microbiome components in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract 2. Summarize the different forms of interaction between genetics of germs and the host intestinal mucosa 3. Show the consequences of breaking the microbiomehost balance. Marthe Bricard, MD, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Angeles Lomas Hospital, Mexico City, Mexico *Contributed by the A.S.P.E.N. Ibero/Latin American Section (ILAS) I. Creating Interdisciplinary Teams for Children with Complex Medical and Nutrition Needs 1. Explain the role of an interdisciplinary team for pediatric patients with complex medical needs 2. Identify common gastrointestinal and nutrition issues that may lead to unnecessary hospital admissions or emergency room visits Pediatric Content Virtual Content m on day Mon day 1. Complete the nutrition assessment and preoperative intervention for patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgical intervention 2. Describe the immediate postoperative nutrition care and education needs for total pancreatectomy and autologous islet cell transplant recipients 3. Identify nutrition monitoring parameters in long term transplant recipients 3. Discuss interventions that may be implemented by an interdisciplinary team to prevent hospital admissions or emergency room visits Karrie Derenski, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC, Coordinator, Metabolic Support Service, CoxHealth, Springfield, MO Karen Dameron, RPh, CNSC, Metabolic Support Service, Department of Pharmacy, CoxHealth, Springfield, MO L. Nutrition Implications of Organ Transplantation: Donor, Candidate, and Recipient 1. Outline nutrition conditions affecting transplant donor candidacy as well as implications of donor nutrition on outcomes of the transplant donor and recipient 2. Evaluate pretransplant conditions or treatments that influence nutrition delivery or composition 3. Analyze transplant immunosuppressive drugs and effect on nutrition and implications of using specialized nutrients in transplant patients Jeanette Hasse, PhD, RD, LD, FADA, CNSC, Transplant Nutrition Manager, Annette C. and Charles C. Simmons Transplant Institute, Baylor university Medical Center, Dallas, TX Spanish Translation Register online Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online
  14. 14. tuesday january 21, 2014 Rhoads Lecture and Awards Ceremony (T10): Can’t make it to Savannah? Participate right from your home or workplace. We’ll deliver 12 sessions right to your computer! Malnutrition and Inflammation: Where Have We Been? Where Are We Now? Where Are We Going? Burning Down the House – Inflammation as an Adaptive Physiologic Response Versus Self Destruction? Our easy-to-use virtual platform can be accessed from anywhere around the world—no travel required! All you need is access to a computer. The CNW14 virtual conference is a flexible, affordable, user-friendly, and convenient way to participate. Register today at www.nutritioncare.org/cnw14virtual. VIRTUAL SESSIONS 8:00 - 9:30 am Biography: TUESDAY, JANUARY 21 SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 4:30 – 6:00 PM President’s Address: Addressing Hospital Malnutrition—Our Time Is Now! (R10) SUNDAY, JANUARY 19 8:00 – 9:30 AM Keynote Address: Drug Shortage Tales from the Front Line—Keeping Patients Safe during the Daily Scramble (S10) 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM Clinical Trials Symposium: The Future of Clinical Nutrition (S20) 8:00 – 9:30 AM Rhoads Lecture and Awards Ceremony: Malnutrition and Inflammation—Where Have We Been? Where Are We Now? Where Are We Going? (T10) 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM Update on Special Topics in Vitamin D (T20) 1:00 – 2:30 PM Nutrition in the Microbiome Across the Lifecycle (T30) 3:00 – 5:00 PM Importance of Micronutrients in Disease (T40) JOIN US VIRTUALLY AND... 4:30 – 6:30 PM In Search of Lean Body Mass (S40) • Attend 12 real-time education sessions via an online platform. MONDAY, JANUARY 20 • Interact with leading researchers and clinicians. 8:00 – 9:30 AM Dudrick Symposium: Frontiers in Regenerating Intestine for Short Gut Syndrome (M10) • Earn continuing education credits (see page 20 for details). 2:00 – 3:30 PM Pharmaconutrition (M30) 4:30 – 6:00 PM Improve Patient Outcomes by Identifying and Addressing Malnutrition through an Interdisciplinary Approach (M43) A.S.P.E.N. Welcomes Groups For every 3 people you register for a full-conference registration, you will receive a 4th full-conference registration for FREE! This offer is only valid until November 13, 2013. To qualify, all registrants in the group must be employed at the same institution. Group discounts are available only by phone. Call 301-587-6315. Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online Dr. Gordon Jensen was appointed Professor and Head of Nutritional Sciences at the Pennsylvania State University in 2007. He also serves as Professor of Medicine at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and is a specialist in nutrition with Mt. Nittany Physician Group. He previously worked with the Vanderbilt Medical group from 19982007 and served as Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Human Nutrition from 1999-2007. He received his medical degree from Cornell University Medical College and his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from Cornell University. He completed residency training in Internal Medicine and fellowship training in Clinical Nutrition at New England Deaconess Hospital, Harvard Medical School. From 19881998, he served as Director of the Section of Nutrition at Geisinger Medical Center. Dr. Jensen is a Past President of A.S.P.E.N. and a Past Chair of the Association of Nutrition Programs and Departments. He is current President of the American Society for Nutrition. He has made numerous presentations at national and international meetings. He has served on advisory panels, study sections, or work groups for NIH, The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and The Food and Nutrition Board. He also has served on several editorial boards for leading nutrition journals and as ad hoc reviewer for many other journals. He has authored more than 160 journal articles, reviews, and book chapters. Teaching activities have included nutrition lectures and research training for house staff, and, undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. He has also served as Director of a successful nutrition support fellowship program. He has been active in teaching a wide variety of nutrition courses for health professionals throughout the world. He developed a required curriculum in clinical nutrition for medical students at Vanderbilt. At Penn State he is currently co-director of the Childhood Obesity Prevention Training Program as well as co-director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute KL2 Training Program. Dr. Jensen is board certified in Nutrition and Internal Medicine. Clinical activities include supervision of adult Pediatric Content Virtual Content Dr. Jensen’s research interests have focused largely on geriatric nutrition concerns. A major limitation in the identification of elders at nutrition risk has been the lack of valid methodologies that have been tested in rigorous research studies with well-defined outcome measures. His team has therefore emphasized the development and testing of nutrition screening and assessment tools in relation to specific functional and healthcare resource outcomes for older persons. In particular he has focused upon the impact of obesity on these outcomes. He has also promoted understanding of the central roles of inflammatory response in malnutrition and obesity. Description: Growing evidence suggests that varying degrees of acute or chronic inflammation are key contributing factors in the pathophysiology of malnutrition that is associated with disease or injury. Historic nutrition assessment parameters have been revealed to be impacted by inflammatory response. The presence of inflammation can also blunt favorable responses to nutrition therapies. We have proposed a new etiology-driven approach to nutrition diagnosis for adults in the clinical practice setting that has been adopted by A.S.P.E.N. and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. These malnutrition syndromes include starvation-related malnutrition, in which there is chronic starvation without inflammation, chronic disease-related malnutrition, in which inflammation is chronic and of mild to moderate degree, and acute disease- or injury-related malnutrition, in which inflammation is acute and of severe degree. A systematic approach to nutrition assessment will be shared for the diagnosis of malnutrition with practical indicators of malnutrition and inflammation that include medical/surgical history and clinical diagnosis, clinical signs, and physical examination, anthropometric data, laboratories, dietary assessment, and functional outcomes. Feasibility and validity testing of malnutrition markers and characteristics will be discussed. Opportunities for modulation of inflammation to promote improved outcomes will be explored. Inflammation can be a good thing… let’s try to keep it that way. Faculty: Gordon L. Jensen, MD, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA UAN: 0216-0000-14-036-L01-P Level: Advanced Spanish Translation Register online t uesday 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM Premier Paper Session and Live Vars Award Competition (M20) Pediatric Content nutrition support interventions at the Mt. Nittany Medical Center. These interventions entail the provision of specialized intravenous or tube feedings for malnourished patients who are unable to eat. Dr. Jensen also conducts outpatient clinics for malnourished patients and high-risk obesity management. He has been nationally recognized by America’s Top Doctors.
  15. 15. Update on Special Topics in Vitamin D (T20) 3. Provide a practical tool to improve nutrition practices at the bedside by adopting “The Right Approach” in the ICU Faculty and Topics: Guidelines and Current Practices in the ICU in 2013: Are There Still Gaps? 10:00 am - 12:00 pm Objectives: 1. Describe the appropriate vitamin D intake level for pregnancy and the associated neonatal outcomes 2. Recognize the gaps in our understanding of vitamin D status in bariatric surgery patients and identify areas for future research 3. Articulate the potential benefit of vitamin D supplementation on infectious outcomes in critically ill patients Faculty and Topics: Vitamin D in Optimal Maternal and Fetal Health Carol L. Wagner, MD, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina Children’s Hospital, Charleston, SC Vitamin D in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery Carrie P. Earthman, PhD, RD, LD, Associate Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN Vitamin D in Critically Ill and Infected Patients Thomas R. Ziegler, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipids; Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Moderator: UAN: 0216-0000-14-037-L04-P Level: Advanced Innovative Approaches to Improving Nutrition Practices in Intensive Care Units (T21) 10:00 am – 11:30 am Objectives: 1. Identify opportunities in current nutrition practices in ICUs from the International Nutrition Survey 2013 to align with the 2013 recommendations of the Canadian Critical Care Nutrition Clinical Practice Guidelines 2. Identify key barriers to implementing the recommendations from these guidelines and describe current US-Canadian initiatives aimed at overcoming barriers as evaluated in the PEP uP and OPTICS studies Pediatric Content Virtual Content Innovative Approaches to Overcoming Barriers to Changing Nutrition Practices Daren Heyland, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Full Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen’s University; Director of Research for the Critical Care Program and Director of the Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada The “Right Approach” to Nutrition in the ICU Judy King, RD, Dietitian, ICU and Surgery, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, ON, Canada Moderator: Todd W. Rice, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN UAN: 0216-0000-14-038-L05-P Level: Intermediate Treating the Greatest Threat to Global Health: Obesity (T22) 10:00 am – 11:30 am Objectives: 1. Describe the role of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of obesity 2. Describe the risks and rewards of medical therapies for obesity 3. Evaluate the evidence supporting or refuting popular weight loss diet programs Faculty and Topics: The Role of the Microbiome in Obesity Pathogenesis Gerard E. Mullin, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Director of Integrative GI Nutrition Services, Director of Capsule Endoscopy, Division of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Medical Therapies for Obesity: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly Lawrence Cheskin, MD, FACP, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Director, Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, Baltimore, MD Spanish Translation Register online Moderator: Laura Matarese, PhD, RD, LDN, CNSC, FADA, FASPEN UAN: 0216-0000-14-039-L01-P Level: Intermediate *Presented by the A.S.P.E.N. Medical Practice Section Pediatric Malnutrition (T24) 10:00 am – 11:30 am Objectives: 1. Describe the impact of malnutrition on clinical outcomes global perspective 2. Identify the next steps in defining clinical characteristics of pediatric malnutrition 3. Apply the pediatric malnutrition definition in a practical setting Faculty and Topics: Novel Approaches to Home Nutrition Support (T23) Pediatric Malnutrition - Global Perspectives and Future Directions Jatinder Bhatia, MD, Chair, Committee on Nutrition, American Academy of Pediatrics; Professor of Pediatrics, Chief of Neonatology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 10:00 am – 11:30 am Objectives: 1. Identify 3 strategies for utilizing mobile technologies in the care of the home nutrition support patient 2. Describe the impact of an iPad based telehealth approach to the care of the patient dependent on HPN 3. Discuss an alternative model of care for improving transition and follow up for the adult patient on HEN Faculty and Topics: The Use of Mobile Technologies in Assisting Patients and Family Caregivers in Complex Home Care – Focus On Home PEN Carol E Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, School of Nursing & School of Preventative Medicine and Public Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS iPad Telehealth Approach to the Clinic Care of the HPN Patient Population Richard Gilroy, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Medical Director of Liver Transplantation, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Motility, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Outcomes of a New Piloted Model of Care to Improve Transition and Follow-up for the Adult HEN Patient Lisa Epp, RD, LD, CNSC, Home Enteral Nutrition Coordinator, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Characteristics and Thresholds for Defining Pediatric Malnutrition - Report from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Jane V. White, PhD, RD, FADA, LDN, Chair, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Work Group; Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Practical Application of the New Definition of Pediatric Malnutrition Elizabeth Wallace Smith, RD, Registered Dietitian, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Moderator: Mark R. Corkins, MD, CNSC, SPR, FAAP, Division Chief, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital; Professor, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN UAN: 0216-0000-14-041-L01-P Level: Intermediate *Contributed by the A.S.P.E.N. Malnutrition Committee Break 11:30 am - 1:00 pm Moderator: Marion F. Winkler, PhD, RD, LDN, CNSC, FASPEN, Surgical Nutrition Specialist, Department of Surgery and Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital; Associate Professor of Surgery, Brown University Alpert Medical School, Providence, RI UAN: 0216-0000-14-040-L04-P Level: Intermediate Pediatric Content Virtual Content Spanish Translation Register online t uesday t u esday Charlene Compher, PhD, RD, CNSC, LDN, FADA, Associate Professor of Nutrition Science, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Rupinder Dhaliwal, RD, Executive Director, NUTRIC, Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Queens University, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada Weight Loss Diets: Weighing the Evidence Laura Matarese, PhD, RD, LDN, CNSC, FADA, FASPEN, Associate Professor, Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

×