CAPC National Seminar: Transforming Ideas. Achieving Excellence.

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  • 1. CAPC NATIONAL SEMINARTransforming Ideas.Achieving Excellence.NOVEMBER 1–3, 2012MIAMI, FLORIDASPONSORED BYCenter to Advance Palliative CareMount Sinai School of Medicine designates this liveactivity for a maximum of 15.5 AMA PRA Category1 Credits . Physicians should claim only the credit TMcommensurate with the extent of their participationin the activity.This activity has been submitted for approval toaward contact hours. New Jersey State NursesAssociation (NJSNA) is accredited as an approverof continuing nursing education by the AmericanNurses Credentialing Center’s COA.This program is approved by the NationalAssociation of Social Workers (NASW) for 13.5continuing education contact hours.IN COOPERATION WITHAmerican Cancer SocietyAmerican Hospital AssociationUHC
  • 2. The Nation’s Leading Resource forPalliative Care Development and GrowthThe Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) is a nationalorganization dedicated to increasing the availability of qualitypalliative care services for people facing serious, complexillness. Located in New York City, CAPC provides health careprofessionals with the tools, training and technical assistancenecessary to start and sustain successful palliative care teams inhospitals and other health care settings.CAPC is supported by a consortium of foundations, includingAetna Foundation, Brookdale Foundation, the John A. HartfordFoundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Directionand technical assistance are provided by Mount Sinai School ofMedicine, New York City.Get the knowledge and networking experience you need to makeyour palliative care service succeed. Visit www.capc.org for moreinformation about all of our professional resources.This educational activity has received no commercial support.www.capc.orgwww.getpalliativecare.org
  • 3. • CAPC National Seminar •The CAPC National Seminar offers in-depthcontent, rich networking opportunities andone-on-one access to expert faculty.Choose from a host of new topics and attend focused intensive,concurrent and plenary sessions that address your particular needs,including: Joint Commission certification; financial analysis techniques;adult and pediatric care across the continuum; mental health–palliativecare interface; inpatient units; outpatient palliative care; teamsustainability; hospice-hospital issues; integration of palliative care intorural communities; skills for program managers; palliative care in the EDand ICU; working with oncologists; and more! Who should attend? • Hospital and hospice physicians, nurses, social workers, financial managers and administrators involved in starting or running an adult or pediatric palliative care program • ICU, ED and outpatient clinic staff • PCLC–trained team members • Palliative care managers • Those wanting to restart a program • Past CAPC seminar attendeesSelected abstracts will be chosen for presentation inmany of this year’s intensives and concurrent sessions.You will hear directly from peers who are developing newmodels and methods to ensure sustainability and growth.Submit an abstract online and share your experience!
  • 4. SEMINAR OVERVIEW TRANSFORMING IDEAS. ACHIEVING EXCELLENCE. Take advantage of highly interactive, personalized training. The CAPC National Seminar is designed to help you develop solutions to your specific issues and challenges. In addition to focusing on core operational elements that are integral to program success and sustainability, every seminar offers new cutting-edge content and topics. The seminar’s highly interactive format gives you multiple opportunities to garner the expertise of faculty and peers. Plenary sessions offer powerful presentations by leading experts. Intensives offer in-depth exploration of special topics. Concurrent sessions offer solutions for real-world, mission-critical issues. Office hours offer small-group discussion time with expert faculty. Special events include a lively Poster Session and Reception. Networking opportunities abound throughout the seminar. Peer presentations offer the opportunity to hear from team leaders. Joint Commission sessions allow you to hear from hospitals that have successfully completed certification. Learn to:• Apply family systems concepts • Interface with your finance staff to calculate• Develop a plan for Joint Commission Palliative program impact Care certification • Consider team and hospital needs when• Measure staff productivity designing an inpatient unit• Develop a productive interface with mental • Develop a plan for team sustainability health professionals • Develop a plan for generalist nursing palliative• Integrate palliative care with oncologists care education• Develop a successful outpatient service • Work with administrators on new financing models• Integrate palliative care into pediatric practice• Overcome barriers to integrating palliative care in the ICU/ED
  • 5. • Schedule at-a-Glance •Day 1 - Thursday November 17:30 AM – 8:30 AM Registration and Breakfast8:30 AM – 9:30 AM Plenary9:30 AM – 10:15 AM Coffee Break10:15 AM – 12:15 PM Intensives12:15 PM – 1:30 PM Networking Lunch1:30 PM – 3:30 PM Intensives3:30 PM – 3:45 PM Stretch Break3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Office Hours5:00 PM – 7:00 PM Poster Session and ReceptionDay 2 - Friday November 27:30 AM – 8:30 AM Registration and Breakfast8:30 AM – 9:00 AM Plenary9:00 AM – 10:00 AM Plenary10:00 AM – 10:30 AM Coffee Break10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Plenary11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Office Hours12:30 PM – 2:00 PM Lunch on Your Own2:00 PM – 3:15 PM Concurrent Sessions3:15 PM – 3:45 PM Coffee Break3:45 PM – 5:00 PM Concurrent SessionsDay 3 - Saturday November 37:30 AM – 8:30 AM Registration and Breakfast8:30 AM – 9:30 AM Plenary9:30 AM – 10:15 AM Coffee Break10:15 AM – 11:30 AM Concurrent Sessions11:30 AM – 11:45 AM Stretch Break11:45 AM – 1:00 PM Concurrent Sessions
  • 6. PLENARY SESSIONS NOVEMBER 1–3, 2012DAY 1 1 Thursday, November 1 | 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM Welcome: Palliative Care 2013 Faculty: Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP The growth and sustainability of palliative care programs is essential for improving the care of seriously ill patients. Dr. Meier will discuss the role of palliative care in the era of health reform and how palliative care clinicians can spread palliative care concepts throughout the entire fabric of American medicine. • Identify the status of palliative medicine within current health care legal, regulatory and policy initiatives. • Describe three key features necessary for growth and sustainability. • Define two action steps that can jump-start the spread of core palliative care concepts.DAY 2 2 Friday, November 2 | 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM Findings from the National Palliative Care Registry™: An Update Faculty: R. Sean Morrison, MD The National Palliative Care Registry™ has been collecting hospital palliative care data since 2008. Dr. Morrison will discuss national findings from the Registry along with strategies for data collection and utilization at the local level. • Describe data from the first three years of Registry data collection. • List two methods of using data to support team sustainability and growth. • Identify two strategies to simplify data collection. 3 Friday, November 2 | 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM Successful Strategies for Outpatient Palliative Care: Introducing IPAL-OP Faculty: Michael W. Rabow, MD, and Lynn Hill Spragens, MBA Changes in payment rules are creating innovation opportunities for designing and planning a sustainable outpatient service. This session launches IPAL-OP and provides an overview of outpatient models. • List key elements of a needs assessment to identify gaps and resources. • Describe three outpatient models and how each aligns with health system priorities. • Identify four challenges to sustainability.
  • 7. 4 Friday, November 2 | 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Honoring the Horizontal and Vertical Planes of the Patient Experience: Maximizing the Power of Our Interventions Faculty: Terry Altilio, LCSW, ACSW This session will challenge you to honor both the horizontal and vertical aspects of the patient and family illness experience. As palliative care enters the lives of patients and families, there is an opportunity to enhance continuity through transitions and minimize unintended abandonment by inviting participation of the “extended family” of providers. • Examine the continuity of relationships through transitions in goals and systems of care. • Apply family systems concepts to assessment, advocacy and consultation. • Describe the risks and rewards of integrating palliative care into new settings and specialties.DAY 3 5 Saturday, November 3 | 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM Working with Referring Clinicians Faculty: Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD, FACP, FAAHPM Consultant etiquette is an important skill for hospital-based palliative medicine. The rules of etiquette will be explored, along with common breaches by consulting clinicians. Different personality styles will be described, with advice for improving referring clinician–consultant interactions. • Identify five rules of hospital consultation etiquette. • Explore the consequences of two common breaches of consultation etiquette. • Describe the impact of two common clinician personality styles. “I attend numerous seminars and conferences, and this was my first CAPC conference and the most outstanding of any I’ve attended. All I can say is, ‘WOW.’ Thank you.” —Seminar 2011 Attendee
  • 8. • DAY 1 - Thursday10:15 AM – 12:15 PMChoose one of the following.Starting a Palliative Care Service Meeting the Challenges of ICU and Emergency(Session will continue at 1:30 PM) Department IntegrationFaculty: Lyn Ceronsky, DNP, GNP, CHPCA, FPCN, and Faculty: Judith E. Nelson, MD, JD, and Tammie E. Quest, MDDavid E. Weissman, MD, FACP The intensive care unit and the emergency department are careKey components of a successful palliative care service, delivery sites for acute and chronic exacerbations of seriousincluding a range of clinical models, staffing and program illness. In both settings palliative care team integration can befinances, will be described. Attendees will leave the session challenging. This workshop will focus on presentations and ideawith a customized action plan for starting their own team. sharing from attendees who have been actively integrating palliative care into the ICU and ED.• List three components of a needs assessment process to best align your mission with the needs of your clinical setting. • Describe how the needs assessment process can facilitate palliative care integration in the ICU and ED.• Identify three different models of clinical service delivery. • Analyze three examples of project features that enhanced• Evaluate two approaches to integrating care between or inhibited successful integration. hospitals and hospices. • Develop an action plan for starting or improving an existing ICU or ED integration project.Overcoming the Challenges of Pediatric PalliativeCare Services during Launch or Relaunch Creating a Continuum: Collaborative Models(Session will continue at 1:30 PM) Faculty: Todd R. Coté, MD, FAAFP, FAAHPM; Amber B. Jones, MEd;Faculty: Margaret Farrar-Laco, RN, MSN, CPNP-AC/PC; and Lori Yosick, LCSWSarah Friebert, MD, FAAP; Kaci Osenga, MD; andStacy S. Remke, LICSW, ACHP-SW Several successful cross-organizational models of palliative care integration, including best practices and commonThis interactive intensive will address needs and questions pitfalls, will be examined. You will be challenged to designunique to pediatric palliative care teams during key strategies to establish, extend and/or sustain local palliativedevelopment phases. Intrateam collaboration and opportunities care partnerships.for growth with community partners will be examined. • Create a list of current and future palliative care partners• Explain the roles of individual specialties and how they can across the continuum. function together. • Identify two methods to strengthen existing partnerships• Describe strategies for effective planning during key and start new ones. development phases. • Specify how new and existing partnerships will be expected• Explore expansion through the outpatient clinic, hospice to contribute their resources. and community agency partnership. Data Dashboards and Measurement PrinciplesOffice Hours 3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Faculty: R. Sean Morrison, MD, and Lynn Hill Spragens, MBAOffice hours offer one-on-one discussion time This interactive workshop will use the CAPC consensuswith expert faculty. guidelines for operational, clinical and customer metrics; demonstrate data use that can drive quality improvement; and help you use local data to successfully participate in the National Palliative Care Registry™. • Complete a self-assessment of data collection strengths and obstacles. • List three methods to improve your use of data to obtain resources. • Develop the first steps in a data management work plan.
  • 9. Intensives • 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM Choose one of the following.Starting a Palliative Care Service Creating a Continuum: Collaborative Models(Continued from 10:15 AM session) Faculty: Todd R. Coté, MD, FAAFP, FAAHPM; Amber B. Jones, MEd;Faculty: Lyn Ceronsky, DNP, GNP, CHPCA, FPCN, and and Lori Yosick, LCSWDavid E. Weissman, MD, FACP Several successful cross-organizational models of palliativeKey components of a successful palliative care service, care integration, including best practices and commonincluding a range of clinical models, staffing and program pitfalls, will be examined. You will be challenged to designfinances, will be described. Attendees will leave the session strategies to establish, extend and/or sustain local palliativewith a customized action plan for starting their own team. care partnerships.(For full information, see Intensives 10:15 AM–12:15 PM session.) • Create a list of current and future palliative care partners across the continuum. • Identify two methods to strengthen existing partnerships and start new ones.Overcoming the Challenges of Pediatric PalliativeCare Services during Launch or Relaunch • Specify how new and existing partnerships will be expected to contribute their resources.(Continued from 10:15 AM session)Faculty: Margaret Farrar-Laco, RN, MSN, CPNP-AC/PC;Sarah Friebert, MD, FAAP; Kaci Osenga, MD; and Data Dashboards and Measurement PrinciplesStacy S. Remke, LICSW, ACHP-SW Faculty: R. Sean Morrison, MD, and Lynn Hill Spragens, MBAThis interactive intensive will address needs and questionsunique to pediatric palliative care teams during key This interactive workshop will use the CAPC consensusdevelopment phases. Intrateam collaboration and opportunities guidelines for operational, clinical and customer metrics;for growth with community partners will be examined. demonstrate data use that can drive quality improvement; and help you use local data to successfully participate in(For full information, see Intensives 10:15 AM–12:15 PM session.) the National Palliative Care Registry™. • Complete a self-assessment of data collection strengths and obstacles.Meeting the Challenges of ICU and Emergency • List three methods to improve your use of data to obtainDepartment Integration resources.Faculty: Judith E. Nelson, MD, JD, and Tammie E. Quest, MD • Develop the first steps in a data management work plan.The intensive care unit and the emergency department are SPECIALcare delivery sites for acute and chronic exacerbations ofserious illness. In both settings palliative care team integrationcan be challenging. This workshop will focus on presentationsand idea sharing from attendees who have been activelyintegrating palliative care into the ICU and ED.• Describe how the needs assessment process can facilitate palliative care integration in the ICU and ED. EVENT• Analyze three examples of project features that enhanced or inhibited successful integration. Thursday, November 1 | 5:00 PM–7:00 PM• Develop an action plan for starting or improving an existing ICU or ED integration project. Poster Session and Reception Stroll from poster to poster while enjoying a catered reception—a great way to share your accomplishments and learn from your peers. Submit an abstract at www.capc.org by July 30!
  • 10. • DAY 2 - Friday2:00 PM – 3:15 PMChoose one of the following.Quality Improvement: You Can Do It!* Palliative Care–Emergency Department Integration:Faculty: Colleen M. Mulkerin, MSW, LCSW, One Size Doesn’t Fit All . . .Find Your Size*and Judith E. Nelson, MD, JD Faculty: Tammie E. Quest, MDThe success of a quality-improvement initiative depends on Palliative care interventions are increasingly being integratedcareful planning, organization and attention to facilitators into ED culture/practice. Integration can occur with orand barriers. Examples from the field will highlight a without a palliative care consultation service. In thisstructured approach to palliative care quality improvement. interactive session, participants will examine common models and learn new strategies for optimizing partnerships.• Identify four key elements necessary for success.• Analyze quality-improvement projects that enhanced • Identify two common models and learn the perils and pitfalls of each. or inhibited project outcome.• Prepare a preliminary action plan for a quality- • Describe three strategies to initiate or optimize an ED–palliative care partnership. improvement project. • Identify two important operational, clinical and customer service metrics.Choosing the Next Team Project: The Art ofStrategic Planning* Getting Your Team Joint Commission Certified:Faculty: David E. Weissman, MD, FACP The Inside StoryDeciding how to prioritize new project opportunities, often (Session is repeated at 3:45 PM–5:00 PM)with limited staff, is a vexing problem for team leaders. This Faculty: Jay R. Horton, ACHPN, FNP-BC, MPHworkshop will provide an organized approach to the art ofstrategic planning. Joint Commission certification helps validate and improve• Describe a three-step approach to the strategic planning process. the quality of care you provide. You will hear inside stories of how several institutions achieved certification. You will• List criteria for making choices among different project priorities. also learn how to assess your readiness.• Identify three best practices for monitoring progress • Describe the purpose and process of The Joint toward strategic planning implementation. Commission Advanced Certification for Palliative Care. • Complete a team self-assessment to determine yourAnalyzing the Financial Impact of Consultative level of readiness.Services* • Identify three proven success strategies.Faculty: Kathleen Kerr, BA, and J. Brian Cassel, PhDAn overview of five analyses, and step-by-step instructions Playing in Both Ends of the Pool: Palliative Carefor conducting two “must-do” analyses, will be described. Teams for Peds and Adults*Discussion will also include identification of common errors Faculty: Margaret Farrar-Laco, RN, MSN, CPNP-AC/PC, andin data collection and interpretation. Rodney O. Tucker, MD, MMM• Develop a work plan to collaborate with hospital fiscal analysts. There is a growing need for palliative care programs that can• Describe common errors in understanding and conducting meet the needs of both adult and pediatric patients. This financial analyses. session will explore the common goals and unique needs of• Describe how hospital financial metrics fit within an array each population. of processes and outcome metrics. • Describe two models of resource sharing among adult and pediatric teams within a single institution. • List opportunities to provide efficient transitions from pediatric to adult providers. • Compare and contrast billing issues between pediatric and adult teams.*Session is repeated on Saturday, Day 3, from 10:15 AM – 11:30 AM.
  • 11. Concurrent Sessions •Integrating Psychosocial Services into To Burnout and Back: Strategies for Long-TermPalliative Care Teams* Survival in Palliative Care*Faculty: Scott Irwin, MD, PhD Faculty: Stacy S. Remke, LICSW, ACHP-SW, and Constance Dahlin, APRN, BC, FAANThe need for psychosocial services is a core function ofpalliative care in all settings. This session will examine Palliative care places enormous demands on practitioners.successful strategies for incorporating psychosocial services The development stage and team size influence the impact.into palliative care teams. This session will describe challenges and explore strategies• Describe the need for psychosocial services within the for promoting resiliency and sustainability. palliative care service model. • Describe the daily challenges that require proactive strategies.• Describe two different strategies for incorporating • List three opportunities to promote team sustainability. psychosocial services into palliative care teams. • Develop a multidimensional plan to promote ongoing• Develop a plan for improving palliative care psychosocial services. resourcefulness and resiliency.3:45 PM – 5:00 PMChoose one of the following.A Golden Opportunity: Health Care Reform and Integrating Outpatient Palliative Care**Palliative Care Faculty: Constance Dahlin, APRN, BC, FAAN, andFaculty: Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP Michael W. Rabow, MDNational health care reform is providing opportunities that This session will include presentations from leaders across thecan lead to improved care of patients throughout the country. The workshop will demonstrate how outpatient servicescontinuum. This workshop will provide an overview of these integrate with their larger institutional culture, mission andopportunities for palliative care teams. financial models.• Describe three health reform initiatives that can engage • Describe methods to align outpatient services with the hospital leadership. needs of the organization.• Describe local and national data that help make the case for • Identify three different models for providing outpatient services. integrating palliative care into local health reform initiatives. • List three opportunities and three challenges in starting• Develop an action plan for making palliative care a health an outpatient program. reform–related hospital priority.Integrating Palliative Care and Oncology Practice** Office Hours 11:30 AM – 12:30 PMFaculty: Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD, FACP, FAAHPM Office hours offer one-on-one discussion timeMedicine is tribal, thus the integration of palliative care with with expert faculty.oncology requires cultural competency. Characteristics of boththe oncology and palliative care tribes will be explored andskills to prevent or resolve conflict will be demonstrated.• Compare and contrast the cultures of oncology and palliative care.• Identify two different oncology practice styles and learn communication skills.• Describe two different models of inpatient and outpatient collaborative relationships. **Session is repeated on Saturday, Day 3, from 11:45 AM – 1:00 PM.
  • 12. • DAY 2 - Friday3:45 PM – 5:00 PMChoose one of the following.Measuring Workforce Productivity: Walking Palliative Care Patient Transitions: Implicationsa Fine Line between the Art and Industry of of New Hospice RequirementsMedicine** Faculty: Amber B. Jones, MEd, andFaculty: Lynn Hill Spragens, MBA Todd R. Coté, MD, FAAFP, FAAHPMStaff productivity is a routine health care metric. This This session will describe recent federal policy changessession will provide an overview of productivity measures that may facilitate or impede hospice-hospital partnerships.that can best support healthy team function and value. Case studies will identify strategies for expediting transfers between palliative care and hospice providers. Implications• Identify three ways volume-based models can help you of the growth of palliative care services offered by meet current challenges. community-based providers will be explored.• List the pros and cons of volume-based models in • Describe new federal hospice policies that impact palliative care along with one alternative metric. hospice referrals and continuing care.• Develop a personalized action plan to apply at home. • Identify three patient populations that would benefit from enhanced inpatient palliative care service/hospiceWhat I Wish I Knew about Running a collaboration.Palliative Care Service • Specify three strategies to improve collaborativeFaculty: Lori Yosick, LCSW, and hospice–palliative care practice.Lyn Ceronsky, DNP, GNP, CHPCA, FPCN “I Think, Therefore I Am”: Maximizing theThis session will offer a framework for blending leadership Influence of Cognitive Processes in the Care ofand management principles. Unique aspects of palliativecare team management, practical tools and resources for Patients, Families and Selfpersonal skill development will be discussed. Faculty: Colleen M. Mulkerin, MSW, LCSW, and• Identify manager functions that support successful Terry Altilio, LCSW, ACSW implementation and growth. This workshop will ask participants to appraise the impact• Describe two methods to leverage changes in health of unexamined cognitive processes. Clinicians will learn to care that strengthen your service. maximize their ability to enhance care of patients, families• Identify three opportunities for enhancing the team and themselves by identifying and altering ineffective manager role. cognitive frameworks. • Examine cognitive patterns and communication styles.Getting Your Team Joint Commission Certified: • Describe how clinicians and teams utilize languageThe Inside Story that can either enhance or diminish care.(Session is repeated from 2:00 PM–3:15 PM) • Practice using a cognitive-process screening toolFaculty: Jay R. Horton, ACHPN, FNP-BC, MPH for self-assessment.Joint Commission certification helps validate and improvethe quality of care you provide. You will hear inside storiesof how several institutions achieved certification. You willalso learn how to assess your readiness.(For full information, see Day 2, Concurrent Sessions 2:00–3:15 PM)**For full description of this repeat session, see Day 2, 3:45 PM – 5:00 PM.
  • 13. DAY 3 - Saturday Concurrent Sessions • 10:15 AM – 11:30 AM Choose one of the following.Quality Improvement: You Can Do It!* Community-Based Palliative CareFaculty: Colleen M. Mulkerin, MSW, LCSW, and Judith E. Nelson, MD, JD Faculty: Lyn Ceronsky, DNP, GNP, CHPCA, FPCN, and Amber B. Jones, MEdThe success of a quality-improvement initiative depends oncareful planning, organization and attention to facilitators Quality health care requires clinicians to design models thatand barriers. Examples from the field will highlight a create access to palliative care in hospitals, nursing facilitiesstructured approach to palliative care quality improvement. and at home. This session will describe community approaches to meet patient and family needs while achieving qualityChoosing the Next Team Project: The Art of palliative care.Strategic Planning* • Discuss assets that can be considered in building a community-based approach.Faculty: David E. Weissman, MD, FACP • Describe competencies for nurses, social workers andDeciding how to prioritize new project opportunities, often spiritual-care professionals.with limited staff, is a vexing problem for team leaders. • Identify goals and strategies for developing palliative careThis workshop will provide an organized approach to the art in your communityof strategic planning. To Burnout and Back: Strategies for Long-TermAnalyzing the Financial Impact of Consultative Survival in Palliative Care*Services* Faculty: Stacy S. Remke, LICSW, ACHP-SW, andFaculty: Kathleen Kerr, BA, and J. Brian Cassel, PhD Constance Dahlin, APRN, BC, FAANAn overview of five analyses, and step-by-step instructions Palliative care places enormous demands on practitioners.for conducting two “must-do” analyses, will be described. The development stage and team size influence the impact.Discussion will also include identification of common errors This session will describe challenges and explore strategiesin data collection and interpretation. for promoting resiliency and sustainability.Palliative Care–Emergency Department Integrating Psychosocial Services intoIntegration: One Size Doesn’t Fit All . . . Palliative Care Teams*Find Your Size* Faculty: Scott Irwin, MD, PhDFaculty: Tammie E. Quest, MD The need for psychosocial services is a core function ofPalliative care interventions are increasingly being integrated palliative care in all settings. This session will examineinto ED culture/practice. Integration can occur with or successful strategies for incorporating psychosocial serviceswithout a palliative care consultation service. In this into palliative care teams.interactive session, participants will examine commonmodels and learn new strategies for optimizing partnerships.Playing in Both Ends of the Pool: Palliative CareTeams for Peds and Adults*Faculty: Margaret Farrar-Laco, RN, MSN, CPNP-AC/PC, andRodney O. Tucker, MD, MMMThere is a growing need for palliative care programs that canmeet the needs of both adult and pediatric patients.This session will explore the common goals and uniqueneeds of each population. *For full description of this repeat session, see Day 2, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM.
  • 14. • DAY 3 - Saturday Concurrent Sessions •11:45 AM – 1:00 PMChoose one of the following.So You Want to Work in the ICU: Tips and Integrating Palliative Care into PediatricTechniques for Getting Started Subspecialty PracticeFaculty: Judith E. Nelson, MD, JD Faculty: Kaci Osenga, MD, and Sarah Friebert, MD, FAAPICU patients, families and professionals favor delivery of This session will guide learners through common barriers,palliative care as an integral component of comprehensive reflecting on barriers within your own institution andcritical care. In this workshop we will focus on key strategies developing strategies for successful integration.and resources for successful integration. • Identify three common barriers.• Review the spectrum of models for creating/enhancing • Complete a needs assessment of local barriers to capacity in the ICU. subspecialty integration.• Analyze examples from the field to highlight strategies • Develop a one-year action plan to guide and resources. integration strategies.• Develop an initial work plan for an integration project in your setting. Improving the Palliative Care Knowledge and Skills of Bedside Nurses in Hospitals andIntegrating Palliative Care and Oncology Practice** Long-Term-Care SettingsFaculty: Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD, FACP, FAAHPM Faculty: Jay R. Horton, ACHPN, FNP-BC, MPHMedicine is tribal, thus the integration of palliative care with Improving bedside palliative care skills of all nursesoncology requires cultural competency. Characteristics of both (i.e., generalist palliative care) in hospitals and long-term-carethe oncology and palliative care tribes will be explored and settings is essential to reaching all people with serious illness.skills to prevent or resolve conflict will be demonstrated. In this session we will explore the pros and cons of different models for meeting this challenge.Integrating Outpatient Palliative Care** • Describe the roles and responsibilities of the bedside nurse.Faculty: Constance Dahlin, APRN, BC, FAAN, and Michael W. Rabow, MD • Develop a needs assessment that identifies gaps in knowledge and skills.This session will include presentations from leaders across thecountry. The workshop will demonstrate how outpatient services • Learn education and mentoring intervention models.integrate with their larger institutional culture, mission andfinancial models. Inpatient Palliative Care Units: What Are the Options? Faculty: Rodney O. Tucker, MD, MMMMeasuring Workforce Productivity: Walking a FineLine between the Art and Industry of Medicine** This session will offer a framework for blending leadership and management principles. Unique aspects of palliative care teamFaculty: Lynn Hill Spragens, MBA management, practical tools and resources for personal skillStaff productivity is a routine health care metric. This session development will be discussed.will provide an overview of productivity measures that can best • Identify manager functions that support successfulsupport healthy team function and value. implementation and growth. • Describe two methods to leverage changes in health careWhat I Wish I Knew about Running a that strengthen your service.Palliative Care Service** • Identify three opportunities for enhancing the teamFaculty: Lori Yosick, LCSW, and manager role.Lyn Ceronsky, DNP, GNP, CHPCA, FPCNThis session will offer a framework for blending leadership andmanagement principles. Unique aspects of palliative careteam management, practical tools and resources for personalskill development will be discussed.**For full description of this repeat session, see Day 2, 3:45 PM – 5:00 PM.
  • 15. PLENARY SESSION SPEAKER BIOSTerry Altilio, LCSW, ACSW, is Coordinator of Social Work for the Department of PainMedicine and Palliative Care at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. She is a recipientof a Mayday Pain and Society Fellowship Award (2006) and a Social Work Leadership Awardfrom the Open Society Institute’s Project on Death in America. In 2003 she received the SocialWorker of the Year Award from the Association of Oncology Social Work and a ProfessionalVolunteer Recognition Award from the American Cancer Society. In 2009 she was elected tothe National Academies of Practice. Terry has coauthored publications on pain and symptommanagement, psychosocial issues and caregiver advocacy and is coeditor of the OxfordTextbook of Palliative Social Work (2011).Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP, is director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC),a national organization devoted to increasing the number and quality of palliative careprograms in the United States. She is also a professor of Geriatrics and Internal Medicine andCatherine Gaisman Professor of Medical Ethics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New YorkCity. Dr. Meier is the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Institute on AgingAcademic Career Leadership Award, the Open Society Institute Faculty Scholar’s Award of theProject on Death in America and the Alexander Richman Commemorative Award forHumanism in Medicine. She is the recipient of a five-year NIA Academic Career LeadershipAward and is principal investigator of an NCI-funded five-year multisite study on theoutcomes of hospital palliative care services in cancer patients. She was honored with aMacArthur Fellowship in 2008. As a 2009–10 Health and Aging Policy Fellow, Dr. Meier workedwith the Senate HELP committee and the Department of Health and Human Services.R. Sean Morrison, MD, is director of the Lilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Palliative CareInstitute and director of the National Palliative Care Research Center (NPCRC) at Mount SinaiSchool of Medicine in New York City. Dr. Morrison chaired the NIA-C Study Section of theNational Institutes of Health (2007–9) and is the scientific officer of the Palliative andEnd-of-Life Care Review Panel of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).He is the immediate past president of the American Academy of Hospice and PalliativeMedicine. In addition to his research and administrative activities, Dr. Morrison maintainsan active clinical practice. Dr. Morrison has received numerous awards for his research ingeriatrics and palliative care, edited the first textbook on geriatric palliative care, and haspublished more than one hundred research articles. He is a frequent commentator on issuesrelated to palliative care and geriatrics.
  • 16. PLENARY SESSIONSPEAKER BIOS Michael W. Rabow, MD, is a professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Board-certified in internal medicine and hospice and palliative care, he founded and directs the Symptom Management Service at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. He is also associate director of the UCSF Palliative Care Leadership Center (PCLC) and a member of the curriculum development committee for the PCLC initiative nationally. In addition to his clinical palliative care work, Dr. Rabow has an active outpatient primary care medicine practice. Dr. Rabow was assistant editor for the bimonthly section in the Journal of the American Medical Association titled “Perspectives on Care at the Close of Life.” He serves as director of the Center for the Study of the Healer’s Art at the Institute for the Study of Health and Illness at Commonwealth in California. Lynn Hill Spragens, MBA, is president/CEO of Spragens & Associates, LLC, based in Durham, North Carolina. She is a health care business consultant who, prior to founding her firm, spent ten years as an executive within an integrated health system. Since 1998 Ms. Spragens has provided business and operations consultation to nonprofit and health care organizations across the nation. For the past eight years she has devoted a considerable amount of her consulting efforts to the support of palliative care initiatives through the Center to Advance Palliative Care, and works individually with palliative care programs at various stages of implementation and development. Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD, FACP, FAAHPM, is provost, Institute for Palliative Medicine, San Diego Hospice; chairman of the Test Committee, Hospice & Palliative Medicine, American Board of Medical Specialties; co-principal of the Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care (EPEC) Project and its revision for oncology, EPEC-O; medical director of the Doris A. Howell Service, a palliative care consultation service at the UCSD Medical Center; and a past president of the American Association for Cancer Education. Dr. von Gunten received a lifetime achievement award from the American Academy for Hospice and Palliative Medicine in 2011, and that same year was named a “top doctor” by US News & World Report. He has published and spoken widely on the subjects of hospice, palliative medicine and pain and symptom control and is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Palliative Medicine. Currently Dr. von Gunten is Clinical Professor of Medicine, UC San Diego, where he is a member of the NIH-designated Moores Cancer Center.
  • 17. • Seminar Faculty •Terry Altilio, LCSW, ACSW Scott Irwin, MD, PhD Tammie E. Quest, MDSocial Work Coordinator Chief of Psychiatry & Psychosocial Services Associate ProfessorDepartment of Pain Medicine and Institute for Palliative Medicine at Department of Emergency MedicinePalliative Care San Diego Hospice Emory University School of MedicineBeth Israel Medical Center Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry Chief, Section of Palliative Medicine University of California, San Diego, Atlanta VAMCJ. Brian Cassel, PhD School of Medicine Interim Director, Emory Palliative Care CenterSenior Analyst, Massey Cancer CenterAssistant Professor, Quality Health Care, Amber B. Jones, MEd Michael W. Rabow, MDSchool of Medicine Health Care Liaison Consultant Professor of Clinical MedicinePalliative Care Leadership Centers™ Center to Advance Palliative Care Attending Physician, General Medicine PracticeVirginia Commonwealth University Palliative Care Leadership Centers™ Kathleen Kerr, BA UCSF/Mount ZionLyn Ceronsky, DNP, GNP, Senior Research Analyst, Faculty, Director, Symptom Management Service, Helen Diller Family ComprehensiveCHPCA, FPCN Palliative Care Leadership Centers™ Cancer CenterSystem Director, Palliative Care University of California, San FranciscoPalliative Care Leadership Centers™Fairview Health Services Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP Stacy S. Remke, LICSW, ACHP-SW Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care Coordinator, Children’s Institute for Pain and Palliative CareTodd R. Coté, MD, FAAFP, FAAHPM Vice Chair for Public Policy and Professor, Palliative Care Leadership Centers™Chief Medical Officer Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Children’s Hospitals & Clinics of MinnesotaHospice of the Bluegrass Catherine Gaisman Professor of Medical Ethics Mount Sinai School of Medicine Lynn Hill Spragens, MBAConstance Dahlin, APRN, BC, FAAN President and Chief Executive OfficerClinical Associate Professor R. Sean Morrison, MD Spragens & Associates, LLCMGH Institute of Health ProfessionsFaculty, HMS Ctr. for Palliative Care Director, National Palliative Care Research CenterAdvanced Practice Nurse Director, Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute Rodney O. Tucker, MD, MMMPalliative Care Service Hermann Merkin Professor of Palliative Care Director, Inpatient Palliative Care ProgramsNorth Shore Medical Center Professor of Geriatrics and Medicine Associate Professor Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Center for Palliative and Supportive Care Palliative Medicine Palliative Care Leadership Centers™Margaret Farrar-Laco, Mount Sinai School of Medicine University of Alabama at BirminghamRN, MSN, CPNP-AC/PCCertified Pediatric Nurse PractitionerA Palette of Care Program Colleen M. Mulkerin, MSW, LCSW Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD,Haslinger Division of Pediatric Director, Palliative Medicine Consult Service FACP, FAAHPMPalliative Care Hartford Hospital Provost, Institute for Palliative Medicine atAkron Children’s Hospital Advisory Board Member San Diego Hospice The IPAL-ICU Project™ Clinical Professor of Medicine, UCSDSarah Friebert, MD, FAAPDirector, A Palette of Care Program Judith E. Nelson, MD, JD David E. Weissman, MD, FACPHaslinger Division of Pediatric Palliative Care Associate Director, Medical Intensive Care Unit Professor Emeritus, Palliative Care CenterAssociate Professor of Pediatrics Professor of Medicine Medical College of WisconsinPediatric Hematology/Oncology Mount Sinai School of Medicine Palliative Care Education, LLCPalliative Care Leadership Centers™Akron Children’s Hospital Kaci Osenga, MD Lori Yosick, LCSW Associate Medical Director Executive DirectorJay R. Horton, ACHPN, FNP-BC, MPH Pain and Palliative Care Hospice and Palliative Care ServicesDirector, Palliative Care Consult Service Palliative Care Leadership Centers™ Mount Carmel Hospice and Palliative CareLilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Children’s Hospitals & Clinics of MinnesotaPalliative Care InstituteThe Brookdale Department of Geriatrics andPalliative MedicineMount Sinai School of Medicine
  • 18. • Seminar Information •Location ClimateDoral Golf Resort & Spa Average temperatures in Miami this time of year range4400 NW 87th Avenue between 70˚F and 79˚F. Casual business attire isMiami, FL 33178 encouraged for the entire conference.Phone: 305.592.2000 Fax: 305.591.6653 Registrationwww.doralresort.com Register online at www.capc.org/miamiRetreat to a tranquil Florida spa and golf resort designed to Two ways to pay: Payment is by credit card or check.offer peaceful rest and relaxation in a tropical atmosphere.Situated on 650 lush acres, the world-renowned Doral Golf Registration deadline: Monday, October 1, 2012.Resort & Spa provides guests with premier Miami resortamenities and golf-course views. This scenic venue “Early Bird” rate of $950 (individual) or $875 (specialshowcases five championship eighteen-hole courses, rate*) will be available through Monday, September 17.including the prestigious TPC Blue Monster, which hashosted the PGA tour for more than forty-five years. Fee after Monday, September 17, is $1,100 (individual) or $950 (special rate*).Dive into a world of fun at the Blue Lagoon, an outdoorwater complex for the whole family to enjoy. Discover the Program registration fee includes Thursday evening Posterultimate Miami spa resort experience at the Spa, boasting Session and Reception, breakfast and coffee breaks each day,decadent European-designed treatments in a classic Italian lunch on day one only and educational materials.villa setting. Savor delectable cuisine at Mesazul, a *Special rates apply to the following:Latin-American steakhouse, or enjoy a drink outside withfriends at Champions Sports Bar & Grill. • Attendees with membership in American Cancer Society; American Hospital Association; UHCHotel Reservations • Two or more attendees from UHC.A room block has been reserved at the Doral Golf Resort & Spafor Wednesday, October 31, through Saturday, November 3. Note: Confirmation of program enrollment will be emailed toThe rate is $175 per night, single or double occupancy, plus you within 24 hours of registration receipt. If you do not13% occupancy taxes. Hotel reservations must be made by receive registration confirmation, please call our Events LineTuesday, October 5. The discount rate is guaranteed only at 212.201.2680.until the group room block is sold or expires.For reservations, a dedicated booking website, Passkey, Cancellation Policyhas been created: A $150 administration fee will apply to all cancellations. A full refund, less the administration fee, will be made forhttps://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb. cancellations submitted on or before October 1.do?mode=welcome_ei_new&eventID=8441473 No refunds will be made on cancellations received after thisThe site allows you to make, modify and cancel your hotel date. All cancellations or substitution requests must bereservations online, as well as take advantage of any room submitted in writing, via fax (212.426.1369) or emailupgrades, amenities or other services offered by the hotel. (capcevents@mssm.edu). Substitutions are welcome. PleaseAlternatively, you may phone in your reservation at allow 30–60 days for processing refunds. Refund requests for888.789.3090; ask for the program “CAPC Seminar” to registrations paid by check must be accompanied by the W-9receive the group rate. of the institution from which the check was drawn. Cancellation of hotel reservation is the registrant’s responsibility.TransportationThe Doral Golf Resort & Spa is located seven miles fromthe Miami International Airport. Taxi service and scheduledvans, such as Super Shuttle, are available.
  • 19. Accreditation Faculty DisclosureMount Sinai School of Medicine is accredited by the It is the policy of Mount Sinai School of Medicine to ensureAccreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to objectivity, balance, independence, transparency andprovide continuing medical education for physicians. scientific rigor in all CME-sponsored educational activities. All faculty members participating in the planning or imple- mentation of a sponsored activity are expected to disclose toCredit Designation the audience any relevant financial relationships and to assistMount Sinai School of Medicine designates this live activity in resolving any conflict of interest that might arise from thefor a maximum of 15.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. relationship. Presenters must also make a meaningfulPhysicians should claim only the credit commensurate with disclosure to the audience of their discussions of unlabeledthe extent of their participation in the activity. or unapproved drugs or devices. This information will be available as part of the course material.Verification of attendance will be provided to all professionals.Special NeedsMount Sinai School of Medicine fully complies with the legalrequirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and therules and regulations thereof. Participants with special needsare requested to contact CAPC at 212.201.2680 orcapcevents@mssm.edu. www.capc.org/miami Technical assistance provided by Mount Sinai School of Medicine. REGISTER TODAY!
  • 20. NON-PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE1255 Fifth Avenue, Suite C-2, New York, NY 10029 PAIDA national organization with direction and technical LIC,  NY 11101assistance provided by Mount Sinai School of Medicine PERMIT NO. 159 REGISTER NOW! CAPC National Seminar ™ Customized training and yearlong mentoring for teams at every stage. Learn more and enroll at www.capc.org/pclc