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  • PRESENTSThe Artand Scienceof DentistryPreliminaryProgramAnaheimCaliforniaThursday –SaturdayApril 11–132 013
  • Bundle more, save more.TDIC Optimum Bundle GoodIncludes: 10% discountProfessional Liability on Professional Liability when combinedOffice Property with Workers’ CompensationWorkers’ Compensation BetterTDIC Optimum is a professional bundle 10% discount on eachof products and competitive multipolicy Professional Liability + Office Property when combineddiscounts from a company with itsheart, soul and history in dentistry. OptimumTo learn more, speak to one Or, when you bundle three:of our licensed insurance agents at 20% discount on Professional Liability800.733.0633.*To obtain the Professional Liability premium five (5) percent, two-year 10% discountdiscount, California dentists must complete the current TDIC Risk Management on Office Propertyseminar. Call 800.733.0634 for current deadlines and seminar details. 5% discount on Workers’ CompensationProtecting dentists. Discounts apply to individual policies and are not cumulative.It’ all we do. s ® Bonus: Additional 5% discount800.733.0633 | tdicsolutions.com on Professional Liability when you take theCA Insurance Lic. #0652783 current TDIC Risk Management seminar.*
  • Table of Contents Meeting Highlights Register online by Feb. 14, Pages 8–9 Save time and money • Join in the fun — Party in the Plaza, Page 3 • Download the CDA Presents app, Page 6 • Reserved seating options, Page 12 • Quickly earn quality C.E. with the Express Lecture Series, Pages 26–28 • International Symposia of Dental Learning Pages 29 and 61Special Programs and EventsHeadlining Speakers......................................................................................................... 2Party in the Plaza......................................................................................................... 3Disney Tickets................................................................................................................... 4The Spot Schedule and Wine Seminar................................................................................. 5Exhibit Hall and CDA Presents App................................................................................. 6Parents’ Page................................................................................................................7FAQs, Prepaid Parking and Lunch..................................................................................... 10Continuing Education and RegistrationRegistration Information..................................................................................................... 8Registration Fees............................................................................................................... 9C.E. Information.............................................................................................................. 11Reserved Seating............................................................................................................ 12Ticketed Event Summary................................................................................................... 71Registration Form............................................................................................................ 72Workshops, Lectures and ProgramsRequired Courses............................................................................................................ 13Speaker Biographies................................................................................................. 14–22Thursday Courses...................................................................................................... 23–38Friday Courses.......................................................................................................... 39–54Saturday Courses...................................................................................................... 55–70HotelsHotel Information............................................................................................................ 73Hotel Reservation Form.................................................................................................... 74Hotel Rates and Map....................................................................................................... 75Hotel Descriptions........................................................................................................... 76Cover Image: This image was captured with the MuCAT 3-D microtomography scanner, designed andbuilt in the Institute for Dentistry at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Healthyenamel and dentine are rendered transparent while areas with caries have been rendered in solid color. 1
  • Headlining Speakers Speakers who don’t just inform, they inspire. The opportunity to learn from the most successful names in dentistry is just one of the many highlights of CDA Presents. We search across the globe to bring you speakers who will help you excel in every aspect of dentistry. Programs for Dentists International Symposia Kiyokazu Minami, DDS Restorative Dentistry Thursday lecture, Page 29 Frank T. Curry, DDS (moderator) Takashi Watanabe, DDS Stephen J. Chu, DMD, MSD, CDT Restorative Dentistry Kenneth A. Malament, DDS Saturday lecture, Page 61 Terry T. Tanaka, DDS Dennis P. Tarnow, DDS Decisions Panel Programs for Office Staff Friday afternoon lecture, Page 47 Joseph A. Blaes, DDS Kenneth A. Malament, DDS Dental Assistants Program Dental Materials and Application Friday lecture, Page 44 Saturday lecture, Page 68 Charles Blair, DDS M. Nader Sharifi, DDS, MS Finance Prosthodontics/Removable Saturday lecture, Page 63 Thursday morning lecture, Page 36 Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, Thursday afternoon workshop, Page 24 MPH, RD, LD Friday morning lecture, Page 52 Friday afternoon workshop, Page 42 Nutrition Thursday lecture, Page 33 Dennis P. Tarnow, DDS Friday lecture, Page 49 Implant Dentistry Kelli S. Vrla, CSP, bba, ba Friday morning lecture, Page 53 Leadership and Staff Engagement DeWitt C. Wilkerson, DMD Thursday lecture, Page 37 Occlusion Friday lecture, Page 54 Thursday lecture, Page 38 Victoria L. Wallace, CDA, RDA, LDA Friday workshop, Page 42 Dental Assistants Program Corky Willhite, DDS, FAGD Thursday lecture, Page 38 Esthetic Dentistry Friday workshop, Page 42 Saturday workshop, Page 59 Thursday workshop, Page 25 Friday lecture, Page 54 David A. Garber, DMD Crowns and Bridges Saturday morning lecture, Page 672
  • Party in the PlazaThe beautiful new Grand Plaza serves as CDA’s Party in the Plazathe backdrop for CDA’s Party in the Plaza. Friday, April 12th, 7-10 p.m.California casual yet outside the ordinary, you’ll Event # 045 in the new Anaheim Grand Plazadine on mouth-watering delicacies, mingle withfellow attendees and boogie down with LA’s $65 – Open to all registration typeshottest cover band, Shaken Not Stirred. Purchase tickets at cdapresents.comCDA’s Party in the Plaza. It’s the hottest ticket in town.
  • Disney Tickets Significantly discounted Disneyland® Resort theme park tickets are available to attendees during CDA Presents. These tickets will only be available for purchase online. These tickets are created just for you, and not all are available at the front gates of theme parks. Buy in advance and save! To purchase these tickets and for more information, please visit cdapresents.com. Please note that purchase of theme park tickets is separate from CDA Presents registration. Ticket store closes at 9 p.m. Pacific Time on Wednesday, April 10, 2013. All tickets valid April 9–22, 2013. one day/one park Admission to either Disneyland® Park or Disney’s California Adult: $79 Adventure® Park for one day. Child (3–9 years): $73 one-day park hopper® Admission and ability to visit both Disneyland® Park and Adult: $111 Disney’s California Adventure® Park on the same day for Child (3–9 years): $105 one day. two-day park hopper® Admission and ability to visit both Disneyland® Park and Adult: $174 Disney’s California Adventure® Park on the same day for Child (3–9 years): $161 two days. three-day park hopper® Admission and ability to visit both Disneyland® Park and Adult: $200 Disney’s California Adventure® Park on the same day for Child (3–9 years): $185 three days. four-day park hopper® Admission and ability to visit both Disneyland® Park and Adult: $209 Disney’s California Adventure® Park on the same day for Child (3–9 years): $193 four days. five-day park hopper® Admission and ability to visit both Disneyland® Park and Adult: $210 Disney’s California Adventure  Park on the same day for ® Child (3–9 years): $194 five days. Enjoy two free days of magic when you visit both Disney’s California Adventure  Park and Disneyland® Park ® for five days for the price of three! twilight convention An ideal admission option for after meetings or events! All ages: $76 ticket Admission is valid for one visit to either Disneyland® Park or Disney’s California Adventure® Park after 4 p.m., or four hours before park closing, whichever is earlier, since park hours are subject to change. “Back and forth” privileges are not included. Tickets are printed on demand from your home computer. Purchase is separate from meeting registration. NOTE: The special pricing on this page is available only with your advance, pre-arrival purchase. Box office tickets will be available at the Disneyland® Resort Main Gate Ticket Booths at regular prices. Prices subject to change.4
  • The Spot Saturday 10–11 a.m. Office Policies and Procedures/Do You Have Them? (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Robyn Thomason 11 a.m.–noon. Handling Refund Requests From Insurance Plans (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Patti Cheesebrough Noon–1 p.m. Patient Records — Access and Rules (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Teresa PichayThe Spot Educational Theater ScheduleIt’s the spot for free Wi-Fi as well as a charging station. Reference On-Site Show Guide for updated programIt’s the spot for C.E. and the Smart Dentist Series of free information.one-hour lectures. And, it’s a spot to relax and catchyour breath after a hectic day on the exhibit hall floor.It’s The Spot, where something’s happening every day.Thursday Wine Seminar10–11 a.m. Office Policies and Procedures — Do You Have Them? (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Robyn Thomason Wine FUNdamentals Join us for an interactive wine experience and learn11 a.m.–noon Handling Refund Requests From while you taste! Do you prefer fruity and juicy wines Insurance Plans (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Patti Cheesebrough or earthy and subtle? Wines with big tannins or tan- nins that are more velvety? Come join us as we tasteNoon–1 p.m. Dealing With Patients Who Won’t Pay Their Bill? (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) through wines from both the Old World (more earthy) Katie Fornelli and the New (more fruity). Learn what your palate preference is by tasting wines from France, Italy,1–2 p.m. Dental Insurance Coding for Success: What Every Office Should Know About Spain, Australia, New Zealand and California! the NEW CDT Codes (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Gary L. Dougan, DDS, MPH Date/Time: Friday, April 12, 4–5:30 p.m.2–3 p.m. Characteristics of Ethical Dental Location: The Spot Professionals (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Fee: $30 Brooke Kozak Event #: 046Friday10–11 a.m. Dental Insurance Coding for Success: What Every Office Should Know About the NEW CDT Codes (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Gary L. Dougan, DDS, MPH11 a.m.–noon Addressing Negative Online Reviews (C.E: non-eligible) Carla ChristensenNoon–1 p.m. Managing Patient Conflicts (C.E.: 20% – 1.0) Brooke Kozak1–2 p.m. Preparing Your Office Emergency Kit (C.E.: Core – 1.0) Steven I. Ganzberg, DMD4–5:30 p.m. Wine Seminar (Ticket Required) 5
  • Exhibit Hall 135,000 square feet of dental innovation With more than a hundred new product launches and nearly 600 exhibitors filling the vibrant exhibit hall, CDA Presents is one of the most anticipated dental tradeshows in the U.S. It’s the place to discover the latest innovations in dentistry. Grand Opening Thursday, April 11, 9:30 a.m. Exhibit Hall Hours Thursday, April 11, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Friday, April 12, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 13, 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Family Hours Daily: 9:30 a.m.–noon This app makes This app makes the show a snap. the show a snap. Search courses by day, topic or speaker and then link to the class location on Search courses the conference map. by day, topic or speaker and then link to the class location on the Find exhibitors by name and product conference map. categories and locate them directly on the exhibit hall map. Find exhibitors by name and product categories and locatethe C.E. website Link straight to them directly on the exhibit avoidmap. at the C.E. Pavilion. and hall lines Link straightmore.thehandouts, Download course C.E. website take notes and to and avoid lines at the C.E. Pavilion. Available for download approximately one month Download course handouts, or before the show at the App Store for iPhones take notes and more. for Android users. Visit the Google Play Store cdapresents.com for updates. Available for download approximately one month before the show at the App Store for iPhones or the Google Play Store for Android users. Visit cdapresents.com for updates.6
  • Parents’ Page KiddieCorp registration and cancellation Register online at kiddiecorp.com/cdaspringkids.htm • Advance registration deadline is Feb. 13, 2013. • Cancellations must be received within four weeks of the start date for refunds • Late arrivals, 15 minutes after your reserved time, will forfeit reservations and refunds Questions? Contact KiddieCorp at 858.455.1718 or info@kiddiecorp.com. Exhibit floor visitation Children age 10 and younger may be on the exhibit floor during family hours, 9:30 a.m. to noon daily. No cost, just stop by registration for a sticker. Children age 11 and older may be on the exhibit floor at any time with the purchase of a $25 guest badge.Children at CDA PresentsChildren are allowed on the exhibit floor from 9:30 a.m. to No Strollers on the Exhibit Floornoon each day. But don’t worry, we have options for everyage the entire day through. Strollers are not allowed on theChild Care exhibit floor atThe licensed and bonded child care professionals at any time, but aKiddieCorp will entertain your little ones with fun, fantastic stroller check isand age-appropriate activities. available for $2.6 months    years –6For infants, please provide diapers, changing supplies, milk,formula, baby food, etc. Label all items including lunches.Nutritious snacks and beverages are provided; meals can besupplied by parents or purchased at the children’s programregistration area.Cost: Full day: $40 Half day: $20 (7 a.m.–1 p.m. or 1–6 p.m.)7–12 yearsA fun program especially designed for older kids withactivities, games and movies.Cost: Full day: $30 Half day: $15 (7 a.m.–1 p.m. or 1–6 p.m.) 7
  • Registration Information Register online today: cdapresents.com One-time $75 California nonmember rate* Nonmembers can save $815 with the $75 one-time meeting Here is some information you will be asked for when registering: registration fee.* If you were a CDA member in 2011 or 2012, • Name you are not eligible for the one-time nonmember $75 • Address registration fee for 2013. Materials cannot be mailed in • Phone number advance, but can be picked up at a required 20-minute • Registration type membership presentation held in the registration area. You • License number (if applicable) will receive an email approximately one month prior to the • Emergency contact person show with presentation time options for your convenience. • Ticketed courses/events to purchase If you are not able to attend one of the membership • Password presentations, your registration cost will be $890. • Email address (used for username and instant confirmation) *Any nonmember who has taken advantage of this offer in the past is not eligible. The rate is for one-time promotional use only. Leave your worries at home and choose to pick up your materials on site at eBadge Exchange! This option gives you the ability to make any necessary changes to your registration Registration deadlines from your personal online dashboard at any time until March Feb. 13, 2013: To have materials mailed prior to the show. 13. Otherwise, register by February 13 to have materials Feb. 14 – April 14, 2013: Online registration remains open mailed to you at least two weeks prior to the meeting. and materials will be available at the eBadge Exchange booth at Remember, CDA dues must be current for 2013 to complete the Anaheim Convention Center. your registration as a member. CDA mails registration materials at least two weeks prior to the Please note: Registrations are not accepted over the phone. meeting. If you do not receive materials within this time frame, call CDA at 800.232.7645. On-site registration/bag and lanyard pickup Anaheim Convention Center Cancellations and/or course changes can be made from your Thursday 6:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. online registration dashboard or requested in writing until Friday 6:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. March 13, 2013. After this date, refunds will not be given. If Saturday 6:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. badges and/or tickets have already been mailed, the appropriate materials must be returned with your refund request and Bags and lanyards will also be available at the Hilton postmarked by March 13 in order to be processed. Anaheim Hotel Thursday 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. Mail refund requests to: Friday 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. CDA Presents Saturday 8 a.m. – noon 1201 K Street, 16th Floor Sacramento, CA 95814 What is the cost for CDA dentists? Zero. As a benefit of membership, the $890 registration fee is waived for CDA dentists. Staff and guests Dentists may register staff and guests, but not other dentists. All dentists, including nonmembers must register as dentists. Staff and guest fees are on the following page. If you register an employee who is no longer attending, you can exchange the badge on site for a new one at no charge.8
  • Registration FeesDentist registration categories Registration Type Advance Reg. Fee On-Site Fee CDA member dentist (2013 dues must be current) Free Free ADA lifetime member Free Free Out-of-state ADA member dentist $200 $225 International dentist $200 $225 Active military dentist (VA, federal, state dentist) $75 $100 CA nonmember dentist (one-time rate) $75 $75 CA nonmember dentist $800 $890 Inactive dental license $250 $275 Dental student/CDA member Free Free Dental student/graduate non-CDA member $25 $50 Guest of dentist (includes ADHP nonmember) $5 $25Please note: Dentists may register staff and guests, but not other dentists. Dentists may not register under any category except dentist,and nonmembers must be identified. Allied Dental Health Professional categories (ADHP)ADHP includes RDA, RDH, RDA(EF), RDH(EF), RDHAP, DA, business administrative staff (AS), and dental laboratorytechnician (LT). Registration Type Advance Reg. Fee On-Site Fee ADHP CDA member* (2013 dues must be current) Free Free ADHP Non-CDA member registering with a dentist $5 $25 ADHP Non-CDA member registering without a dentist $20 $25 Guest of ADHP $20 $25*An ADHP member is a dental professional who is not a dentist but has an independent, paid 2013 membership with CDA.Other registration categories Registration Tyoe Advance Reg. Fee On-Site Fee Non-exhibiting dental dealer, manufacturer, consultant $150 $175 Non-dental professional (MD, DVM, RN, etc.) $150 $175Saturday exhibits-only passNonmember dentists who want to explore the exhibit hall can register on site for a one-day pass on Saturday, April 13. The cost is$175 and is for Saturday exhibit hall hours only. It is not valid for continuing education courses. To register, please visit the membershipcounter during on-site registration hours on Saturday, April 13. Then experience all that the CDA Presents exhibit hall has to offer. 9
  • FAQs, Prepaid Parking and Lunch How do I correct a misspelled badge? Fax a corrected copy to 877.714.3184 by March 13, 2013, or Save time with go to the Badge Correction counter at on-site registration. prepaid parking What if I lose my badge? Simply visit the Badge Correction counter at on-site and food vouchers registration. There is a $10 badge replacement fee. Early bird parking, no cash necessary What if I have questions about registration? Arrive by 8:30 a.m. and get a guaranteed parking space with Anaheim Convention Center parking vouchers. Purchase Call the CDA Contact Center at 800.232.7645 or visit with your registration by February 13 and never worry about cdapresents.com. having cash on hand. Simply enter the event number below when you submit your order. What is CDA’s cancellation policy? • Prepaid vouchers will not be honored after 8:30 a.m. Cancellations and/or course changes can be made from • Only valid at the Anaheim Convention Center your online registration dashboard or requested in writing • Nonrefundable if lost, forgotten or unused until March 13, 2013. After this date, refunds will not be • Surrender passes upon lot entry given. If badges and/or tickets have already been mailed, • Passes must be original; no copies the appropriate materials must be returned with your refund Peak traffic and parking time is usually from 8 to 11 a.m. request in order to be processed. Mail all refund requests to: Thursday and Friday. Early arrival is strongly recommended. CDA Presents For details, watch for electronic attendee news blasts or visit 1201 K Street, 16th Floor cdapresents.com. Sacramento, CA 95814 Fee: $12 What do I need to bring to register on site? Event #: 047 Thursday A photo ID and, if applicable, your ADA card, student ID, or 048 Friday Dental Board auxiliary license. See Page 9 for appropriate fees. 049 Saturday Can allied dental health professionals register without a dentist? We can vouch for the simplicity of Yes. See Page 9 for appropriate fees. prepaid food vouchers Treat your staff to lunch with $10 prepaid vouchers for How do I receive C.E. credit for attending a course? the Anaheim Convention Center Concession areas. See Page 11 for details. Menu options include specialty coffee and breakfast items, Mexican taqueria, made-to-order sandwiches and more. How do I request special assistance to attend Vouchers are nonrefundable and must be used for amount shown; no change is given. See your registration packet or the show? cdapresents.com for details. Please call CDA at 916.554.4949. Fee: $10 Will there be a coat/baggage/stroller check? Event #: 050 Yes. It’s near the registration area; cost is $2 per item. Please note, strollers are not allowed on the exhibit floor at any time. Are children permitted in the exhibit hall and lectures? For their safety and the convenience of all attendees, children are not permitted in the lectures or workshops. Children age 10 or younger are permitted in the exhibit hall during family hours from 9:30 a.m. to noon. For child care options at CDA Presents, see Page 7.10
  • — C.E. InformationPlease remember • There are three ways to verify your C.E. units: Visit the on-site C.E. Pavilion after attending your courses or verify them at• Courses must be attended in full and are verified by scan- cdapresents.com or via the CDA Presents app up to five in and scan-out times. Unverified attendance will not be days after the meeting. eligible for credit. • Print certificates online – C.E. certificates will be available• All courses have limited seating and some do fill up and sell approximately three weeks after the meeting. Licensed out quickly. attendees will receive an email notification with a• Videotaping, photography and audio recording with personal link to C.E. certificates. They can also be accessed via equipment are not allowed. cdapresents.com or mailed upon request by calling CDA• Some courses do not provide C.E. units. Please check each at 800.232.7645 three weeks post show. course description for C.E. details.• Speakers and products are not endorsed, officially or C.E. regulations otherwise, by CDA, except CDA Endorsed Programs. To help you comply with the Dental Board of California• Course handouts are available for download two weeks regulations for C.E., CDA identifies each course as “Core,” prior to the show at cdapresents.com or via the “20%” or “non-eligible.” CDA Presents app, downloadable at the App Store for iPhones or the Google Play Store for Android users. Core — Courses that directly enhance the licensee’s• Some workshops have required prerequisites and/or supplies. knowledge, skill and competence in the provision of service If a course has requirements, they will be highlighted in an to patients or the community. Core courses must comprise at orange bar above the course description. least 80 percent of the credits in a renewal cycle. 20% — Courses considered to be of direct benefit to the licenseeTypes of courses or outside the scope of dental practice in California. These coursesLectures must comprise only 20 percent of the credits in a renewal cycle.Free, nonticketed courses are available on a first-come, first- Non-eligible — Courses that are considered to be of primaryserved basis. Preregistration is not required, but early arrival is benefit to the licensee.recommended.Workshops Table ClinicsThese ticketed courses are available for purchase during Anaheim Convention Centerpreregistration or on site if space is still available. Dental Student and Assisting StudentExpress Lectures Public viewing, Friday, noon – 2 p.m.These free, nonticketed lectures feature up-and-coming Military Residentspeakers new to CDA Presents. Public viewing, Saturday, noon – 2 p.m.Corporate ForumsCorporate-sponsored courses that may or may not be ticketed. Sheraton Anaheim CDA is collaborating with the California Dental Hygienists’Helpful tips to receive your C.E. Association for the RDH portion of our Table Clinics. The• License numbers matter – Include the license numbers and CDHA competition will be held at the Sheraton Anaheim, formal names of all licensed attendees when you register. Friday, April 12. For more information, please visit cdha.org -• Plan ahead – Arrive at least 15 minutes early to all courses Student Membership. and plan an alternative in the event your preferred course is full. Late arrivals will not receive C.E. credit. Please take traffic into consideration.• Scan in and out of each course – Arrival and departure times are used to issue C.E. credits. Scan upon entry and exit CDA is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service and remain in the course the entire time. Partial credit will of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in not be granted and credit will not be given for overlapping identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve nor endorse individual courses or instructors, course times or incomplete course attendance. nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.• Write down course codes – During a course, the host will CDA designates each activity for a specified number of C.E. units. provide attendees a three-digit code, an additional way to assist in verifying your attendance. Write it down and keep it safe These courses meet the Dental Board of California requirements for continuing education units. until you’ve received your official C.E. certificate post show. 11
  • Reserved Seating $10 reserves your seat Thursday, April 11 in these popular lectures Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD Healthy Mouth, Healthy Body — Healthy Practice! (a.m.) Page 33, Event # 051 Have you ever shown up on time or even early to a popular lecture only to find that it was already full? To alleviate Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD that frustration, the following courses have been selected to designate a portion of the capacity as reserved seating. This Probiotics, Supplements and Food Fads: Considerations opportunity is optional and only available in advance for for the Dental Professional (p.m.) the following lectures at cdapresents.com. Beyond these Page 33, Event # 052 reserved seating options, all lectures remain free on a first- come, first-served basis. DeWitt C. Wilkerson, DMD The ABCs of Dental Occlusion and Details Occlusal Equilibration (full day) • Seats will be held up to 15 minutes after the program Page 38, Event # 053 begins, after which time seats will be released if the room is full. • A separate entrance will be available for reserved seating Friday, April 12 ticket holders. Dennis P. Tarnow, DDS • Ticket must be presented and is nonrefundable if lost, stolen or forgotten. Immediate vs. Delayed Socket Placement: • Reserved seating is grouped together in a designated section What We Know, What We Think We Know so we can provide better service. and What We Don’t Know (a.m.) Page 53, Event # 054 Gregory L. Psaltis, DDS Baby Steps — Infant and Preschool Dental Care for the General Practitioner (p.m.) Page 50, Event # 055 Saturday, April 13 Kenneth A. Malament, DDS Integration of Esthetic Dentistry in Routine and Complex Prosthodontics Page 68, Event # 056 (a.m.) or # 057 (p.m.) (Repeat lecture) Raymond L. Bertolotti, DDS Adhesion, Not Tooth Destruction (full day) Page 62, Event # 05812
  • Required CoursesCalifornia Dental Practice Act Thursday, April 11and Infection Control California Dental Practice ActThe Dental Board of California mandates continuingeducation in infection control and the California Dental Time: 7–9 a.m.Practice Act for license and permit renewal. Course #: 001Please note: Robyn Fee: $20 Thomason• Admission by ticket only.• Purchase tickets online at cdapresents.com. Infection Control• Tickets are sold on site, if available, in the registration area. Time: 5–7 p.m.• Arrive 15 minutes prior to class. Late entries will not Course #: 002 receive C.E. credit. Leslie D. Fee: $20• Seating is limited and tickets are sold on a first-come, Canham, first-served basis. CDA, RDARequired units for license renewal Friday, April 12For every renewal cycle, California state law requires licenseddentists and allied dental health professionals to complete California Dental Practice Act2 units in infection control and 2 units in the California Time: 5–7 p.m.Dental Practice Act. Course #: 003Infection Control for California Arthur W. Fee: $20Dental Board requirement for 2 units: This program provides Curley, JDyou with the latest educational requirements specific toCCR section 1005, the Dental Board of California Infection Infection ControlControl Regulations. Time: 7–9 a.m.Note: This 2-hour course does not meet the new infection Course #: 004control education requirement for unlicensed dental assistants.They must take the specific 8-hour course for that purpose. Leslie D. Fee: $20 Canham,California Dental Practice Act CDA, RDADental Board requirement for 2 units: This course meets thenew C.E. requirement for California Dental Practice Act Saturday, April 13education, including the new one-time course requirementfor unlicensed dental assistants. California Dental Practice Act Time: 7–9 a.m. Course #: 005 Arthur W. Fee: $20 Curley, JD Infection Control Time: 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Course #: 006 Nancy L. Fee: $20 Andrews, RDH, BS UDIO A Required courses will be audio recorded and available for purchase. 13
  • Speaker Biographies John L. Alonge, MS, DDS Joseph A. Blaes, DDS Dr. Alonge is an oral and maxillofacial surgeon Dr. Blaes’ general practice in St. Louis, Mo., in private practice in Erie, Pa. He is a magna cum emphasizes preventive, esthetic, reconstructive laude graduate of the University of Maryland. and implant dentistry. Dr. Blaes is the chief (Pages 30, 39, 62) editor of Dental Economics magazine. (Page 44) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Chad J. Anderson, MS, DMD Charles Blair, DDS Dr. Anderson is a research instructor with a focus Dr. Blair is CEO of Dr. Charles Blair & on clinical materials research in the Department Associates Inc. located in North Carolina. Dr. of Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry at Blair holds degrees in accounting, business Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. administration and mathematics. (Page 63) (Page 26) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Blair has Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. financial or other interests of some nature in Dr. Charles Blair & Associates Inc. Nancy L. Andrews, RDH, BS Ms. Andrews is a professor at West Coast Chris Brubaker University, Dental Hygiene. She is one of the Mr. Brubaker has nearly 15 years of experience top 100 national speakers and a widely published in customer acquisition and online marketing author. (Pages 13, 69) for such firms as YouSendIt, MerchantCircle Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Ms. Andrews has and Siemens. He focuses heavily on modern financial or other interests of some nature in Dux marketing techniques. (Page 37) Dental, Crosstex, DentaPure, Hu-Friedy, Kerr/ Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Brubaker TotalCare and Philips. has financial or other interests of some nature in Demandforce. Payam C. Ataii, DMD Dr. Ataii reached the level of Invisalign® Elite Ellen Byrne, DDS, PhD Advantage Provider in 2007 and has been Dr. Byrne is currently a professor of endodontics treating Invisalign patients since 2003 at his and senior associate dean of the Virginia private practice in Laguna Hills, Calif. (Page 57) Commonwealth University School of Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Ataii has Dentistry. Dr. Byrne is also an established author. financial or other interests of some nature in (Pages 45, 63) Align Technology. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David A. Beach, DMD, MS Cari Callaway-Nelson, DDS Dr. Beach maintains a private practice Dr. Callaway-Nelson has been affiliated with specializing in endodontics in Wesley Chapel, Pacific Dental Services since 2006. She became Fla. He is a courtesy clinical professor of an owner doctor in 2007 and multiple office endodontics at the University of Florida College owner in 2010. (Page 46) of Dentistry. (Pages 44, 55) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Beach has financial or other interests of some nature in Leslie D. Canham, CDA, RDA Dentsply. In dentistry since 1972, Ms. Canham is an international speaker, consultant and trainer Raymond L. Bertolotti, DDS specializing in infection control, OSHA Dr. Bertolotti was first in America to introduce Compliance, Dental Practice Act, HIPAA and many revolutionary advancements and is in accommodating disabled patients. (Page 13) private practice in San Leandro, Calif. (Page 62) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Bertolotti has financial or other interests of some nature in Danville Materials Inc. and 3M ESPE.14
  • Speaker BiographiesPatti Cheesebrough Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, FACD, MALDMs. Cheesebrough is a dental benefit plan Dr. Coluzzi recently retired from general practicespecialist in the CDA Practice Support Center. after 35 years. He is a health sciences clinicalShe assists members with questions related to professor at the UCSF School of Dentistry.insurance billing and appeals. (Pages 5, 45) (Pages 23, 39, 59)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Sudhakar R. Chokka, DDS Pam ConwayDr. Chokka is a partner in four large group An agent with TDIC Insurance Solutions sincepractices in Southern California and is a 2009, Ms. Conway is committed to protectinggraduate of Sirona Speakers Academy. He is a dentists. Ms. Conway has nearly 20 years oflecturer, speaker, advisory board member and experience in the insurance industry and hasconsultant. (Page 46) been a licensed life/health agent since 1996.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Chokka has (Pages 33, 43)financial or other interests of some nature in Pacific Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Dental Services. Arthur W. Curley, JDCarla Christensen Mr. Curley is a senior trial attorney in theA senior risk management analyst with San Francisco based health care defense firmTDIC, Ms. Christensen speaks nationally at of Bradley, Curley, Asiano, Barrabee, Abel &seminars and dental schools and assists in the Kowalski, P.C. and professor at the Dugonidevelopment of risk management resources. School of Dentistry. (Pages 13, 58)(Pages 5, 37) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Frank T. Curry, DDSMatthew Christie Dr. Curry maintains a restorative dentalMr. Christie is the Southern California specialist practice in Newport Beach, Calif. He is anin dental transition financing at Bank of active member of the American AcademyAmerica. His experience in practice finance of Restorative Dentistry, Newport Harborallows him to understand the unique needs of Academy of Dentistry and the Academy ofdentists. (Page 58) Osseointegration. (Page 47)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Christie has Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.financial or other interests of some nature in Bank ofAmerica. Michael C. DiTolla, DDS Dr. DiTolla is the director of clinical educationStephen J. Chu, DMD, MSD, CDT and research at Glidewell Laboratories. He hasDr. Chu is a clinical associate professor and an intimate knowledge of the restorative habitsdirector of esthetic education at Columbia of American dentists. (Page 64)University College of Dental Medicine, Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Department of Prosthodontics. He maintains aprivate practice in fixed prosthodontics in New Gary L. Dougan, DDS, MPHYork City. (Pages 46, 47) Dr. Dougan is the national dental directorConflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. for MetLife. He has more than 20 years in private practice and 18 years providing qualityP.K. Clark, DMD management and clinical direction to dentalDr. Clark is a practicing dentist, lecturer and plans. (Pages 5, 65)surgical mentor. He is the founder and director of Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.WhiteCap Institute, Center for Dental ImplantTraining. (Page 30)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. 15
  • Speaker Biographies Steven A. Dugoni, DMD David A. Garber, DMD Dr. Dugoni is a clinical professor of orthodontics Dr. Garber is one of the internationally at Dugoni School of Dentistry where he is also recognized multidisciplinary educators well the director of the mixed dentition clinic. Dr. known as “Team Atlanta.” (Page 67) Dugoni is in private practice in South San Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Francisco, Calif. (Page 65) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. David Gates, DDS Dr. Gates has been treating Invisalign® patients Bruce A. Edelstein, DDS at his private practice in Las Vegas since 2001. Dr. Edelstein has practiced clinical, regenerative He maintains a private practice focusing on and cosmetic periodontics in Atlanta and cosmetic, reconstructive and implant dentistry received his dental degrees from Emory as well as Invisalign treatment. (Page 57) University and the University of Pennsylvania. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Gates has (Pages 47, 66) financial or other interests of some nature in Align Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Technology. John (Jack) E. Edwards Jr., BA, CDT, MDT, TF Charles Gerba, BS, PhD Mr. Edwards has more than 35 years of practical Dr. Gerba is a professor of environmental experience in all phases of dental technology. He microbiology at the University of Arizona. He currently owns a dental studio in Anaheim, Calif. obtained his PhD in microbiology from the specializing in fixed and removable prosthetics University of Miami, Fla. (Pages 48, 67) and implants. (Page 64) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Howard S. Glazer, DDS, FAGD Dennis J. Fasbinder, DDS, MAGD, ABGD Dr. Glazer is a fellow and past president of the Dr. Fasbinder is a clinical professor and director Academy of General Dentistry and a former of Advanced Education in General Dentistry at assistant clinical professor in dentistry at the the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New (Pages 31, 40, 46, 55) York City. (Pages 48, 69) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Fasbinder has Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. financial or other interests of some nature in 3M ESPE and Sirona. Michael Glick, DMD Dr. Glick is professor and dean for the University Katie Fornelli at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine and serves Ms. Fornelli is a practice analyst with the as editor of the Journal of the American Dental CDA Practice Support Center. Her previous Association. (Pages 32, 48) experience as a senior consultant with a practice Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Glick has management firm specialized in the development financial or other interests of some nature in and enhancement of dental practices. (Page 5) Advance Dental Education Concepts. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Jim Grisdale, BA, DDS Steven I. Ganzberg, DMD, MS Dr. Grisdale is a board certified specialist in Dr. Ganzberg is clinical professor and chair of periodontics and prosthodontics with a private dental anesthesiology at UCLA where he teaches practice in Vancouver, B.C. (Pages 32, 40, 41) pharmacology, sedation and anesthesiology. He Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. engages in private dental anesthesiology practice. (Pages 5, 31, 66) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.16
  • Speaker BiographiesHenrik E. Hansen, DDS Robert L. Ibsen, DDSDr. Hansen is currently the chair of the CDA Dr. Ibsen invented Rembrandt®, Lumineers®,Council on Peer Review. He is a past CDA and other groundbreaking products in adhesivetrustee and ADA Council on Dental Benefits dentistry. He now practices and teachesmember. He received his dental degree from noninvasive veneer techniques. (Page 26)UCSF School of Dentistry and maintains a Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.private practice in Fairfield, Calif. (Page 49)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Allan C. Jones, DDS Dr. Jones maintains a private general practiceJohn W. Harden Jr., BSIM, BS, MS, DMD in Torrance, Calif. He is an NSCA certifiedDr. Harden maintains a private practice in personal trainer and a professor with more thanAtlanta, Ga., at Emory University Hospital 20 years experience at USC. (Page 53)Midtown and is a clinical professor at Georgia Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Health Sciences University. (Page 26)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Beverly A. Kodama, DDS Dr. Kodama received her DDS degree fromLisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD UCSF School of Dentistry. She serves asMs. Harper-Mallonee is an associate professor an expert witness for the Dental Board ofspecializing in nutrition at the Caruth School of California and lectures regularly for The DentistsDental Hygiene, Texas A&M University System Insurance Company on professional liability riskHealth Science Center and Baylor College of management. (Pages 43, 60)Dentistry. (Pages 33, 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Brooke KozakFrank L. Higginbottom, DDS Ms. Kozak is the CDA Peer Review and JudicialDr. Higginbottom maintains a private practice Council manager. She assists members withof restorative, esthetic and implant dentistry questions related to dental ethics or resolvingin Dallas, Texas. He is also a professor in disputes that may arise in the delivery of dentalthe Department of Restorative Sciences and services to the public by CDA member dentists.Graduate Prosthodontics at Baylor College of (Page 5)Dentistry. (Pages 50, 56) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Philip J. Kroll, DDS, MAGDAllen S. Honigman, DDS, MS Dr. Kroll is in private practice focused onDr. Honigman has specialized in periodontics esthetics, implantology and occlusion. Dr.and implant dentistry in Phoenix, Ariz., since Kroll serves as director of occlusion for UCLA’s2001. He is a certified LANAP™ instructor and Graduate Center for Esthetic Dentistry.lecturer for Millennium Dental Technologies. (Pages 23, 24)(Page 26) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Honigmanhas financial or other interests of some nature in V. Kim Kutsch, DMDMillennium Dental Technologies. Dr. Kutsch maintains a private practice in Albany, Ore., and is an internationallyTerry E. Hoover, DDS recognized expert in dental caries and riskDr. Hoover is a full-time associate professor and assessment. (Page 67)vice chair of the Department of Dental Practice Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Kutsch hasat the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San financial or other interests of some nature in OralFrancisco. (Page 58) BioTech.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. 17
  • Speaker Biographies Samson Landeros Conor McNulty Mr. Landeros is a local TDIC commercial Mr. McNulty is the director of member programs insurance resource. He is an industry expert and for the California Dental Association. He has can help with your professional liability, property been with CDA since 2005, overseeing various and workers’ compensation insurance. (Page 43) membership initiatives and collaborations Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. throughout the organization. (Page 37) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Samuel B. Low, DDS, MS, MEd Dr. Low is professor emeritus at the University Anne Milar of Florida and is associate faculty of Pankey Ms. Milar is the dental benefits analyst for CDA. Institute. He is past president of the American She monitors and evaluates dental insurance Academy of Periodontology. (Page 34) industry developments on behalf of CDA Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Low has members. (Page 45) financial or other interests as a stockholder in Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Florida Probe. Diane Millar, RDH, MA Kenneth A. Malament, DDS Ms. Millar is an instructor at West Coast Dr. Malament has a practice limited to University and works in private practice in prosthodontics in Boston. A past president of the Newport Beach, Calif. She is a speaker and American Board of Prosthodontics, he is a clinical author and provides in-office, hands-on seminars. professor at Tufts University. (Pages 47, 68) (Pages 34, 70) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. G. Kent Mangelson Kiyokazu Minami, DDS Mr. Mangelson is an expert and has spent more Dr. Minami has maintained a private practice than 30 years helping professionals properly in Osaka, Japan, since 1990. He is the former structure lawsuit protection and tax reduction chair of the Academy of Clinical Dentistry and strategies. (Page 27) lectures for continuing education programs at Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Mangelson Meikai University and Asahi University in has financial or other interests of some nature in The Japan. (Page 29) American Society for Asset Protection. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Paul A. Manos, DDS K. William Mopper, DDS, MS Dr. Manos is the dental director for United Dr. Mopper is in private practice and is Concordia Dental Plans of California Inc. Dr. recognized as a pioneer in direct resin bonding. Manos is a licensed dentist in California and He is an adjunct professor at the University of graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry. Illinois and co-founder of Cosmedent Inc. (Page 49) (Pages 41, 56, 68) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Mopper has financial or other interests of some nature in Lance V. McCollough Cosmedent Inc. Mr. McCollough developed the first turnkey website solution for the professional marketplace Sherry Mostofi, Esq. at the beginning of the dot-com era and has Ms. Mostofi is a graduate of Yale Law School helped thousands of professionals with Internet and serves as legal counsel throughout marketing. (Page 33) California specializing in the formation of dental Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. McCollough corporations, dental practice leases and dental has financial or other interests of some nature in practice purchase and sales agreements. (Page 43) ProSites. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Ms. Mostofi has financial or other interests of some nature in Mostofi Law Group.18
  • Speaker BiographiesBob Mothershead Peter K. Pang, DDS, MAGDMr. Mothershead and his partner specialize Dr. Pang is an international speaker within finding dental practice locations, designing publications in several peer-reviewed journals.space, helping choose contractors, overseeing A leading expert in laser dentistry, he usesprojects and making sure the installation goes multiple wavelengths in his general practice insmoothly and on time. (Page 43) Sonoma, Calif. (Page 27)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Mothershead Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.has financial or other interests of some nature inPatterson Dental. Michael W. Perry, DDS Dr. Perry is the founder and president ofRamiro Murata, DDS, PhD Momentum Dental Business Consulting and aDr. Murata is an assistant professor at Ostrow national speaker. He practices general dentistrySchool of Dentistry of USC. His laboratory in Santa Rosa, Calif. (Page 50)evaluates the use of natural compounds to Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.prevent/treat infectious diseases. (Page 53)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Teresa Pichay Ms. Pichay is a practice analyst for CDA. ShePatrick Nelle works on managing the association’s wastewater,Mr. Nelle is a local TDIC Insurance Solutions environmental, and occupational health andlife/health agent. He is committed to finding the safety issues. She currently develops regulatoryright insurance to protect you, your family and compliance resources. (Page 5)your practice. (Page 33) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Dan J. Poticny, DDSBrad Newman Dr. Poticny is an adjunct clinical associateMr. Newman is a leader in marketing and professor at the University of Michigan Schoolbusiness development for dental offices. His of Dentistry. He is currently in a private practicefocus is on social media campaigns, Internet in Dallas, Texas. (Pages 40, 55)commercials and organic search engine Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Poticny hasoptimization. (Page 68) financial or other interests of some nature in researchConflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Newman is grants in 3M ESPE and Sirona Dental.the founder and chief officer of Dentainment. Janet A. Press, RDHJohn S. Olmsted, DDS, MS Ms. Press has been in specialty and generalDr. Olmsted has 35 years of clinical endodontic practice for 36 years, with 16 years clinicalpractice and is an adjunct professor at University experience in soft-tissue lasers and lecturesof Iowa and University of North Carolina at internationally. (Page 68)Chapel Hill. He served as AAE president and Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.ADA general chairperson. (Pages 34, 41)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. R.J. Przebinda Mr. Przebinda is co-founder and principal withBradford O’Neill, DDS Gold Leaf Group, a real estate corporation.Dr. O’Neill has a private practice in Aurora, He is recognized as a foremost expert in dentalColo., focusing on full mouth restorative using practice real estate. (Page 43)bonded porcelain. He has been using CEREC Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Przebinda hassince 1997 and joined Pacific Dental Services. financial or other interests of some nature in Gold(Page 46) Leaf Group.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Gregory L. Psaltis, DDS Dr. Psaltis has been in pediatric private practice for 33 years in Olympia, Wash. He is well published and lectures frequently on various dental topics. (Pages 24, 50, 70) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. 19
  • Speaker Biographies Steven L. Rasner, DMD David M. Roshkind, DMD, MBA, FAGD, Dr. Rasner is a well-known, award-winning MALD speaker in the U.S. and abroad and has Dr. Roshkind is past president of the Academy maintained an internationally recognized practice of Laser Dentistry and a certified laser educator. for 32 years. (Page 27) He is an assistant professor at the University Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. of Florida and Nova Southeastern University. (Pages 51, 59) Michael P. Rethman, DDS Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Dr. Rethman is a periodontist, scientist and past director of the U.S. Army Institute of Dental Ruchi K. Sahota, DDS Research. He is vice president of the ADA Dr. Sahota is a general dentist in Fremont, Calif., Foundation and an adjunct faculty member at the and is on staff at Washington Hospital. She is University of Maryland and Ohio State. (Page 35) also a clinical instructor at Dugoni School of Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Rethman has Dentistry. (Page 25) financial or other interests of some nature in Colgate. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Amber D. Riley-Burns, RDH, MS Abdi Sameni, DDS Ms. Riley-Burns lives and practices in Southern Dr. Sameni maintains a private practice in West California and is a clinical dental hygiene board Los Angeles, Calif., and is a clinical associate examiner for 18 states. (Page 27) professor of dentistry at the Ostrow School of Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Dentistry of USC. (Page 35) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Richard D. Roblee, DDS Dr. Roblee is internationally renowned for his Parish P. Sedghizadeh, DDS, MS work in interdisciplinary esthetic dentistry. He is Dr. Sedghizadeh is a tenure-track assistant a diplomat of the ABO, lectures worldwide and professor at the Ostrow School of Dentistry practices in Fayetteville, Ark. (Page 51) of USC and director of the USC Center for Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Roblee has Biofilms. (Page 53) financial or other interests of some nature in U.S. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. HealthRecord/TeamLINKS. Eric Z. Shapira, DDS, MAGD, MA, MHA Charles F. Rodgers, DDS Dr. Shapira practices and teaches dentistry. He is Dr. Rodgers is currently vice president of a professor of geriatric medicine and dentistry in Clinicians as well as regional partner for the Taiyuan and Zhangzhou, China. (Pages 36, 52) Colorado Utah region at Pacific Dental Services. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. He oversees Pacific Dental Services’ clinical direction as chair for its National Dental M. Nader Sharifi, DDS, MS Advisory Board. (Page 46) Dr. Sharifi is a recipient of the Gordon L. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Christensen Distinguished Lecturer Award, a fellow of the American College of Dentists and a Victor Rodriguez, AA, CDT, MAAIP member of the American Academy of Restorative Mr. Rodriguez maintains a private dental Dentistry. (Pages 24, 36, 42, 52) laboratory specializing in implant removable Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. prosthetics and All On-4 implants in Huntington Beach, Calif. He is a member of Pacific Coast Nicette Short Society for Prosthodontics. (Page 64) Ms. Short is a legislative advocate for CDA, Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. where she is responsible for the association’s health care reform policy analysis and legislative activity. (Page 30) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.20
  • Speaker BiographiesJohn Sillis, Esq. Robyn ThomasonMr. Sillis earned a master’s in nursing with a Ms. Thomason is the director of CDA’s Practiceminor in nursing administration. Based out of Support Center. She is also a content expert inSacramento, Calif., he practices law focused in the area of human resources. (Pages 13, 43)medical and dental malpractice defense. (Page 25) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Beth Thompson, RDH, BS, OMMichael S. Sparer, JD, PhD Ms. Thompson celebrates more than 30 yearsDr. Sparer is a professor and chair in the as an RDH. She is a principal in HygieneFusionDepartment of Health Policy and Management clinical dental hygiene consulting services andat the Mailman School of Public Health at founder of CareerFusion. (Page 27)Columbia University. (Page 49) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Lloyd V. Tilt, DDS, MSDwayne Story Dr. Tilt is a periodontist with 13 years experienceMr. Story is a local TDIC commercial insurance with the LANAP™ technique and is a clinicalresource. He is an industry expert and can help instructor for the Institute for Advanced Laserwith your professional liability, property and Dentistry. He has lectured widely and publishedworkers’ compensation insurance. (Page 58) on LANAP™ results. (Page 27)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Kerry K. Straine Jason TysonMr. Straine is a certified professional behavioral Mr. Tyson is a local vice president for Bankand values analyst. He was voted the No. 1 of America’s Practice Solutions group. Sincepractice management consultant in the U.S. joining the bank, he has established anin 2012. He has 25 years of dental industry outstanding track record of assisting dentistsconsultant experience. (Page 52) with their financing needs. (Page 43)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Straine is Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Mr. Tyson haspresident and CEO of Straine Consulting. financial or other interests of some nature in Bank of America.Terry T. Tanaka, DDSDr. Tanaka is a clinical professor in graduate William A. van Dyk, DDSprosthodontics at USC and maintains a practice Dr. van Dyk practices general dentistry in Sanlimited to prosthodontics and orofacial pain in Pablo, Calif., and serves as an associate professorChula Vista, Calif. (Pages 47, 52, 69) at Dugoni School of Dentistry. (Page 58)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Dennis P. Tarnow, DDS Kelli S. Vrla, CSP, BBA, BADr. Tarnow is currently a clinical professor of Ms. Vrla enlightens and “entertrains” worldwideperiodontology and director of implant education with her powerful topics. She makes “houseat Columbia University College of Dental calls” to help engage your team with leadershipMedicine. (Pages 47, 52) and excellence. (Pages 37, 54)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Tarnow has Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.financial or other interests of some nature in doingresearch for multiple companies. Victoria L. Wallace, CDA, RDA, LDAGeza T. Terezhalmy, DDS, MA Ms. Wallace has been a CDA, RDA since 1976Dr. Terezhalmy is professor and dean emeritus at with a designation of LDA in 2009. She lecturesthe School of Dental Medicine, Case Western on clinical procedures and dental team success.Reserve University. (Pages 36, 53) (Pages 38, 42, 59)Conflict of Interest Disclosure: Dr. Terezhalmy Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.has financial or other interests of some nature inDentsply. 21
  • Takashi Watanabe, DDS Dr. Watanabe currently maintains a private practice in Iwaki, Fukushima in Japan, and is a clinical professor and assistant director of continuing dental education at Meikai University School of Dentistry. He is president of the Japan Academy of Clinical Dentistry, and a member of the American Academy of Esthetic Dentistry and the American Academy of Periodontology. (Page 61) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Daniel R. Watkins, Esq. Mr. Watkins handles employment liability, property subrogation, complex toxic tort claims and medical and dental malpractice actions. He is licensed in California and Nevada and serves on TDIC’s defense panel. (Pages 43, 60) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. Arthur Wiederman, CPA, CFP Mr. Wiederman has been a dental CPA and financial planner for more than 25 years. He works with dentists to help them meet their personal and business financial goals. (Page 58) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported. DeWitt C. Wilkerson, DMDThis is why you Dr. Wilkerson is the director of dental medicine and a senior lecturer at the Dawson Academy. He is past president of the American Equilibrationdo what you do. Society. (Pages 38, 42) Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Whether you’re easing their pain or Corky Willhite, DDS, FAGD, FAACD Dr. Willhite is a fellow of the AGD and themaking them smile with more confidence, American College of Dentists. He is an accreditedtaking care of patients is why you became fellow of the AACD and spent years as an examiner for accreditation. His private practice isa dentist. And behind you all the way limited to cosmetic dentistry. (Pages 25, 54)is the California Dental Association. Conflict of Interest Disclosure: None reported.Giving you a forum to learn and beinspired so that you can continue to dowhat you love—care for your patients.Renew at cda.orgto experience one of thetop member benefits—CDA Presents.
  • Thursday WorkshopsThe Wonderful World of Lasers in Basic Occlusion Workshop for theDentistry Workshop Expanded Function Dental Assistant Supplies Recommended Supplies Recommended Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, FACD, MALD Philip J. Kroll, DDS, MAGD This workshop will include short demonstration This hands-on course will discuss the methods and extensive hands-on procedures fundamental principles of occlusion taught using several different laser instruments. Dr. at the UCLA Center for Esthetic DentistryColuzzi will guide participants in performing a variety of with direct application to everyday restorative and estheticdental laser applications on pig jaws. These will include: dentistry. The workshop will teach equilibration principlessoft-tissue surgery, soft- and hard-tissue crown lengthening to correct a restoration with poor occlusion into idealand tissue management for final impressions. A wide variety stability and occlusal design. It is recommended thatof lasers will be utilized. A short lecture at the beginning will attendees bring magnification loupes, composite placementdescribe the workshop and a short lecture at the end will instruments and Miller articulating paper holders.summarize how lasers can be used successfully in the practice.It is recommended that attendees bring magnifcation loupes. Time: 9 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, dental student,Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. lab tech, office staff, RDAEF and repeats 2:30–5 p.m. C.E. units: Core – 3.0Audience: dentist, dental student Course #/Fee: 009/$75C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per sessionCourse #/Fee: 007 (a.m.)/$125 Learning Outcomes 008 (p.m.)/$125 1. Correct a poor occlusion on an ill-fitting crown prior to cementation.Learning Outcomes 2. Understand what a healthy occlusion versus an unhealthy1. Perform simulations of some of the most common dental occlusion looks like. procedures with a variety of lasers. 3. Make intelligent decisions to improve overall comfort,2. Understand fundamentals of dental lasers, including longevity and function in restorative dentistry. emission modes, delivery systems and tissue interaction.3. Analyze dental practice to assess the need for a dental laser and then integrate it into the armamentarium for patient care.CDA Presents wishes to thank and recognize the following Things to know about the showsponsors for their contribution and participation in this program: Exhibit Hall hours Thursday and Friday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Room assignments Look for room assignments at cdapresents.com or in the On-Site Show Guide. Audio recordings A UDIO Recordings of identified programs will be available on site on the 2nd or 3rd levels of the convention center or following CDA Presents at prolibraries.com/cda. 23
  • Thursday Workshops Essential Occlusion Concepts Workshop Improve Your Partials: Simple Materials, for the Contemporary Practice and Techniques and Design Principles Expanded Function RDA Required Prerequisite, Page 36 Philip J. Kroll, DDS, MAGD This hands-on course will teach advanced M. Nader Sharifi, DDS, MS occlusion principles as taught at the UCLA Use actual patient models to design three different Center for Esthetic Dentistry. Applying additive partial cases of varying difficulty. By incorporating and subtractive equilibration techniques on models will basic removable partial denture design principles, reinforce these principles. Dentists and expanded function participants will learn the most prevalent clinical variations. assistants will benefit from these exercises as the knowledge Learn to review cases individually and identify the red flags gained will increase skills for both in the diagnosis and that result in compromises to clinical success. Clinical use delivery of restorative and esthetic dentistry. of the altered cast is no longer necessary; here an improved Time: 1:30–4:30 p.m. method of recording the free-end saddle is offered, improving confidence and patient satisfaction. No supplies needed. Audience: dentist, RDA, lab tech, RDAEF C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Time: 1:30–4:30 p.m. Course #/Fee: 010/$75 Audience: dentist, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Learning Outcomes Course #/Fee: 013/$195 1. Complete a full mouth model bite-balancing equilibration. 2. Understand the foundational principles and benefits of Learning Outcomes healthy occlusions. 1. Improve knowledge of basic framework design principles. 3. Identify and correct several common wear related occlusal 2. Clarify the clinical steps associated with alternatives to the problems. altered cast impression technique. 3. Review cases clinically to identify red flags that may compromise clinical success. Stainless Steel Crowns Are a Snap! Gregory L. Psaltis, DDS Do primary tooth crowns mystify you? They always sound so simple until you try them on a live pediatric patient. In this hands-on workshop, Check out the C.E. courses in you will learn how to diagnose properly for stainless steel and anterior composite crowns. See the proper preparation and placement techniques for both, including a live demonstration, then perform them yourself on a typodont. Complete this workshop and agree that these restorations are a snap. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and repeats 2–5 p.m. See page 5 Audience: dentist, RDH C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #/Fee: 011 (a.m.)/$195 012 (p.m.)/$195 Learning Outcomes 1. Diagnose and correctly plan treatment for crowning primary teeth. 2. Understand the preparation for anterior and posterior crowns. 3. Complete adaptation and placement of anterior and posterior crowns on dentoform.24
  • Thursday WorkshopsHands-on Workshop: Undetectable Class TDIC Risk Management: The High CostIV Restorations of Shortcuts Sponsored by The Dentists Insurance Company Supplies Recommended Ruchi K. Sahota, DDS Corky Willhite, DDS, FAGD, FAACD John Sillis, Esq. Using realistic models, you will restore a significant Shortcuts have their place, but not in fracture on a central using a predictable technique dentistry. Incomplete documentation, to achieve an “undetectable” restoration. Step-by- the omission of necessary procedures and failure to fullystep instruction will include how to prep conservatively, avoid inform patients are why even the best dentist will likelytooth show-through, and provide the patient with a long- experience a lawsuit at least once throughout a career. Withlasting restoration that can function as a natural tooth. It is real TDIC cases, this course will illustrate why effective patientrecommended that attendees bring magnification loupes. communication and continuity of care are imperative in delivering excellent dentistry.Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.Audience: dentist and repeats 2–5 p.m. C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Audience: generalCourse #/Fee: 014/$250 C.E. units: 20% – 3.0Learning Outcomes Course #: 818/8191. Layer the resins, tints and opaquers to achieve natural Fee: $50—dentist and staff translucency and color blending. $25—part-time TDIC policyholder 2. Control opacity and translucency to match any natural situation. (Must have a TDIC part-time Professional Liability policy to be eligible for this discount.)3. Create invisible margins predictably even when in the mid- Free—new TDIC policyholder within facial of a tooth. first year TDIC policyholders are eligible for a 5 percent professional liability discount upon completion ofAre Teeth Sexy? Only if They Have this course.Great Shape! Learning Outcomes Supplies Recommended 1. Establish office procedures to respond when patients complain of pain. Corky Willhite, DDS, FAGD, FAACD 2. Develop strategies to educate patients on treatment Shape is key and contouring is critical to making recommendations. restorations look great. This hands-on course will 3. Deploy effective protocols for medical emergencies. cover a systematic approach to contouring andpolishing to achieve better restorations each and every time This workshop is approved by:you restore a tooth with composite. A proper finish will alsoreduce recurring stains, white lines and visible margins. It isrecommended that attendees bring magnification loupes.Time: 1–4 p.m.Audience: dentistC.E. units: Core – 3.0Course #/Fee: 015/$250Learning Outcomes1. Use an effective combination of burs and discs to quickly achieve primary and secondary anatomy.2. Understand why polishing should take less than 5 minutes.3. Use contouring strips so proximal contact is maintained. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 25
  • N B e t h e fir to the Thursday Express Lectures EW od p st ium. he to ar the m ! Shade Matching and Color Science for The LANAP™ /LAPIP Protocols: Redefining the General Dentist the Treatment of Periodontal Disease Chad J. Anderson, MS, DMD and Peri-implantitis With the advent of stronger all-ceramic Allen S. Honigman, DDS, MS restorations, CAD/CAM technology and Traditional periodontal surgical procedures biomimetic composite resins, we have never had are perceived as painful, making patients very so many esthetic choices to achieve an ideal outcome. The reluctant to have any therapy performed. This clinical dentist needs to have a basic background in color usually leads to a downhill spiral toward bone and eventual science education along with an understanding of the specific tooth or implant loss. The LANAP™/LAPIP protocols make issues they face when trying to evaluate and communicate color it possible to definitively treat mild to severe periodontitis to in the clinical setting. Concepts such as the physiology of color decrease pocket depths, treat peri-implantitis cases and, where vision, drug-induced ocular side effects, saccadic movement possible, regenerate lost bone support around the teeth and processing and clinical optical effects will be discussed. ailing implants, without the use of additional materials. Time: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Time: 8:30–10 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, lab tech Audience: dentist, RDH, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 1.5 UDIO C.E. units: Core – 1.5 A UDIO A Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Learn valuable, simple alterations to improve your 1. Understand the basic differences of various lasers used in dentistry. shade-taking protocol. 2. Compare the LANAP™/LAPIP protocols to traditional 2. Review color science, shade matching and laboratory periodontitis and peri-implantitis treatment modalities. communication for the general dental practice. 3. Understand the scientific principles behind LANAP /LAPIP ™ 3. Learn how we see and interpret color that will make a and their outcomes. difference in esthetic restorative outcomes. What Patients Want: Simplified Veneer 29 Years of Dental Anesthesiology and Methods for Enhancing Healthy but Hospital Dentistry (Special Patient Care), Neglected Smiles While Preserving 1984–2013 Tooth Structure John W. Harden Jr., BSIM, BS, MS, DMD Robert L. Ibsen, DDS This course describes how fearful and medically Every practice has patients with healthy but compromised patients are cared for in the office neglected smiles. Most do not want to improve and in the hospital. It is based on training in their smiles, as they believe it requires the a medical anesthesiology residency in Chicago. It covers painful cut down of teeth. However, with noninvasive veneer administration of anesthesia for other dentists, administration solutions, more patients would elect to get treatment. This of anesthesia and hospital dentistry in a teaching hospital. lecture will demonstrate proven additive, adhesive and Time: 8–9:30 a.m. shoulder-free veneer techniques to service those patients. Instruction includes case selection, presentation and marketing. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 1.5 UDIO Time: 9–10:30 a.m. A Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, Learning Outcomes lab tech, office staff 1. Recognize patients who need sedation in the office and those C.E. units: Core – 1.5 UDIO who need treatment in the operating room. A 2. Understand the armamentarium necessary for safe sedation in Learning Outcomes the office and required for comprehensive hospital dentistry. 1. Use adhesive methods to perform esthetic procedures on 3. Identify effective treatment of special patients and when to patients with healthy dentition and achieve reliable esthetic refer to experienced practitioners. results without removing sensitive tooth structure. 2. Discover the neglected smiles in your practice. 3. Increase the complexity of cases you nevet realized you could26 treat with noninvasive, shoulder-free veneer methods.
  • Lectures that feature up-and-coming speakerswho are new to CDA Presents. Thursday Express LecturesWhat Every Dentist Needs to Know Achieving Extraordinary ProfessionalAbout Lawsuit Protection, Tax Reduction and Personal Success Starting Nowand Estate Planning Steven L. Rasner, DMD G. Kent Mangelson This course will provide participants with four This course teaches proven and effective needs to achieve extraordinary success. Learn real strategies to achieve financial peace of mind. protocols that minimize stress, skyrocket moral, Learn how to properly structure your assets to maximize care to patient and secure a legendary reputation.become invincible to lawsuits, save thousands in taxes andeliminate all estate taxes. You will learn techniques most Time: 10:30 a.m.–noonadvisors are unaware of. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff, spouseTime: 3:30–5 p.m. C.E. units: 20% – 1.5 UDIO AAudience: dentist, spouse Learning OutcomesC.E. units: non-eligible UDIO A 1. Implement worthwhile meeting protocols that result in realLearning Outcomes and lasting change.1. Maintain focus on improved patient care rather than 2. Learn the step-by-step process to maximize case acceptance, lawsuit defense. even in this economy.2. Minimize taxes. 3. Create a “brand” for legendary excellence within a community.3. Create a successful estate plan and practice succession strategy. Forensic Dentistry and the Role of DentalGetting Good Results With Lasers in AuxiliariesDentistry Amber D. Riley-Burns, RDH, MS Peter K. Pang, DDS, MAGD Participants will gain an introductory knowledge Confused about which laser works? Need an of the science of forensic odontology, its history update on laser technology? Recent technological and how the law dictates a forensic identification. updates have improved efficiency, bond strength A step-by-step exploration of a comprehensive dental autopsyand minimally invasive procedures. Learn how to improve your will be presented, including physical examination, forensicclinical results with information based in scientific articles. photography, forensic radiography and evidence management needs of varying postmortem states including skeletonized,Time: 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. fragmented, decomposed and burned.Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff Time: 2–3:30 p.m.C.E. units: Core – 1.5 Audience: general C.E. units: Core – 1.5Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes1. Learn techniques to avoid complications from dental lasers on roots and implants. 1. Understand the role of a forensic allied dental professional in scientific human identification and in multiple fatality2. Identify different types of dental lasers and what they can incidents. be used for. 2. Improve appreciation for the forensic value of accurate3. Learn how peak power settings can enhance results and dental records. efficiency. 3. Recognize how to cooperate with the legal system as a dental professional. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 27
  • N B e t h e fir to the Thursday Express Lectures EW od p st ium. he to ar the m ! Wake Up Your Team — Dental Sleep LANAP™ Surgical Treatment for Medicine in Your Practice Periodontitis: Clinical, Histologic Beth Thompson, RDH, BS, OM Outcomes and Long-Term Success Learn about the prevalence of sleep apnea, its Lloyd V. Tilt, DDS, MS impact on our health, sleep-wake cycles, the This course will explore the Laser Assisted New stages of sleep and the many disorders of sleep, Attachment Procedure protocol. Included will be including the epidemiology of sleep victims and the sequelae discussions of the importance of laser wavelength, of obstructive sleep apnea. Participants will learn to identify the specific LANAP™ protocol, clinical and histologic patients “at risk” in your practice and review the available oral treatment outcomes and long-term results for helping patients appliances for treating the sleep disordered breathing (SDB) keep their natural teeth. patient. How to incorporate treatment, measure successful therapy of SDB and the prevention of airway issues will be Time: 1:30–3 p.m. explored. Audience: dentist, RDH C.E. units: Core – 1.5 Time: 1–2:30 p.m. A UDIO Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student Learning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 1.5 1. Identify the benefits of LANAP™ surgical therapy for the treatment of moderate to advanced periodontitis. Learning Outcomes 2. Understand the importance of laser wavelength, the 1. Identify items to include on a health history form. supporting evidence for pocket reduction, regeneration 2. Understand the evaluation of patients for sleep apnea and of attachment and tooth retention using the LANAP™ integrate it into health assessment protocol. treatment protocol. 3. Comprehend the impact of sleep apnea on health, safety, 3. Understand the critical importance of laser wavelength when productivity and overall health. considering a laser purchase.28 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • International Symposia of Dental LearningTreating Cases of Occlusal DestructionWith Full Mouth Reconstruction Kiyokazu Minami, DDS Dentistry encounters many diverse medical conditions that can influence esthetic demands and overall prognosis. Overall success is greatlyinfluenced by periodontal disease. Whether in Japan or theU.S., the progression of periodontal disease can worsen withage; thus the correct periodontal diagnosis and managementare critical.Time: 9:30 a.m.–noonAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab techC.E. units: Core – 2.5Learning Outcomes1. Learn about force control and inflammation as well as the importance of case mounting with reference to intraoral photographs.2. Importance of diagnostic wax-ups for provisional restorations.3. Understand the importance of correct horizontal and vertical maxillo-mandibular relationship in reconstruction.Considerations for Natural Teeth andAnterior Implant Aesthetic Restoration Kiyokazu Minami, DDS The best of dentistry in the U.S., For a good prognosis and esthetic restorations, you and now a worldwide must ensure the proper function of natural teeth and implants together. Diagnostic examination perspective on dentistry.should integrate facial expression, the appearance of the teethwhen the patient is at rest, smiling and the gingival contours. While dentistry in the U.S.Success includes complete communication of protocolsbetween the dentist and dental technician. is breaking newground, theTime: 1:30–4 p.m. same can be said for alternativeAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, philosophies and treatment lab tech modalities the world over. JoinC.E. units: Core – 2.5 us in a spirit of internationalLearning Outcomes camaraderie as we delve into1. Understand the appearance of the cuspids while the patient is resting or smiling. new techniques and materials2. Learn how correct esthetic outcomes can be maximized by used by dentists across the globe. provisional restoration mounting.3. Understand materials and techniques of all-ceramic crowns. 29
  • Thursday Lectures Corporate Forum Practical Oral Surgery for General Dentists The following corporate forum is sponsored and presented Recommended Prerequisite for Workshop on Page 39 by Carestream Dental LLC: John L. Alonge, MS, DDS This presentation is designed to share practical guidelines on patient assessment, anxiety and pain control, degree of difficulty assessment, Cone Beam Shift and routine and surgical exodontia techniques and tips. Management of complications is covered. This lecture is P.K. Clark, DMD recommended for the Friday workshop. Before the innovation of cone beam technology, Time: 8–10:30 a.m. we were unable to provide the highest level of and repeats noon–2:30 p.m. care for our patients. We now have the ability Audience: dentist to see the bigger picture. The paradigm shift from traditional C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session implantology into 3-D case planning and surgery allows us to provide the highest level of care. This presentation is for Learning Outcomes anyone actively placing and/or restoring implants. 1. Comprehend practical surgical approaches and techniques. Time: 11 a.m.–1 p.m. 2. Understand contemporary surgical armamentarium. Audience: general 3. Learn how to prevent and manage complications. C.E. units: Core – 2.0 Learning Outcomes National Health Care Reform: How Will 1. Demystify implant placement. It Affect Your Practice? 2. Learn the benefits of cone beam technology for case planning Sponsored by CDA and implant placement. Nicette Short, MPA 3. Implement cone beam technology into your practice. The Affordable Care Act, signed into law in 2010, contains numerous provisions that will have implications for dentists as individuals, health care professionals and employers. California is at the national forefront in the implementation of these provisions. Attendees will learn what the Affordable Care Act requires of dentists as individuals and employers, and what changes may occur in the delivery of oral health care as a result of health care reform at the national and state levels. Time: 3:30–4:30 p.m. Audience: general C.E. units: 20% – 1.0 Learning Outcomes 1. Learn the impact of health care reform on dentists, the oral health care delivery system and the dental benefits market. 2. Gain greater knowledge of the specifics of the Affordable Care Act and its potential to affect the practice of dentistry. 3. Understand the implementation timeline for the various provisions in the bill.30 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Thursday LecturesDentistry in a Digital World Postoperative Pain Control: What Should Dennis J. Fasbinder, DDS, MAGD, ABGD I Prescribe? Digital technology for dental treatment Steven I. Ganzberg, DMD, MS applications has been growing at a rapid rate What is the best analgesic for patients who will with the proliferation of many new systems. This experience some pain at home following dental orprogram will focus on the comparison of the key elements and oral surgery? This course will review drug choicestheir functions and applications for the main categories of and strategies for prescribing opioid and non-opioid analgesicsdigital impression systems and chairside CAD/CAM systems. based upon the procedure and the patient’s medical history.Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Time: 9:30 a.m.–noonAudience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental studentC.E. units: Core – 2.5 C.E. units: Core – 2.5Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes1. Understand the differences in digital impression and chairside 1. Understand which analgesics are best prescribed for which CAD/CAM systems and their clinical applications. patients.2. Study digital treatment systems, their components and key 2. Evaluate the pharmacology of opioid and non-opioid elements for successful clinical patient care. analgesics including important drug interactions.3. Understand the elements for integrating digital impression 3. Comprehend effective prescription of opioid and non-opioid and chairside CAD/CAM systems into a practice. analgesics to patients with varied medical histories.Clinical Treatment Applications With Medicine for Dentistry: ManagingDigital Technology Patients With Common Medical Dennis J. Fasbinder, DDS, MAGD, ABGD Conditions Digital technology has increasing clinical Steven I. Ganzberg, DMD, MS applications of digital impression systems and How do I manage a patient with high blood chairside CAD/CAM systems. This program will pressure? Do I need to be concerned if my diabeticreview and discuss the clinical applications of the systems and patient forgot to take their oral hypoglycemicthe current research evidence of their accuracy. Restoration drug this morning? Can I give my Parkinson’s disease patientlongevity for newly introduced restorative techniques and epinephrine in local anesthesia? Do I really have to worrymaterials and the impact on patient care will be discussed. about the antidepressants my patients are taking? This courseTime: 1:30–4 p.m. will answer all of these questions and more. Feel confident managing these challenging patients.Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab techC.E. units: Core – 2.5 Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: generalLearning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 2.51. Understand the clinical applications of digital impression and chairside CAD/CAM systems. Learning Outcomes2. Review diagnostic and restorative treatment outcomes with 1. Understand medical problems common in patients. digital impression and chairside CAD/CAM systems. 2. Improve knowledge of typically prescribed medications.3. Evaluate the current evidence on accuracy, restorative 3. Learn effective management of the medically compromised options and clinical longevity for digital treatment. patient in the dental office. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 31
  • Thursday Lectures Treatment of the Medically Complex Emerging Trends in Periodontics: Dental Patient — Assessment and New Dimensions in the Etiology and Protocols Treatment of Periodontal Disease Michael Glick, DMD Jim Grisdale, BA, DDS Dentists play an important role as primary Periodontal therapies are being introduced to health care professionals. They need to screen dental professionals at a rapid pace. This course and monitor patients for underlying medical will provide a comprehensive, in depth, view of conditions and are required to render dental care to an array the past, current and future concepts of periodontal treatment. of medically complex patients. Medical assessment of patients Information will include treatment philosophies of historical has become an essential part of dentistry, as even the most to the most current trends, including the link between common medical problems may require modifications to systemic disease and oral disease. Attendees will receive routine dental care. This course will help simplify this task information allowing them to discuss non-surgical, supportive by reviewing common medical conditions and providing and surgical therapies with their patients. protocols for dental care of patients with complex medical conditions. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, Time: 8:30–11 a.m. office staff Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Contrast and compare the differences between past and 1. Understand the role of dentists in overall health and well- contemporary etiologic factors in periodontal disease and therapy. being of patients. 2. Incorporate new technologies into every practice, including 2. Interpret information suggesting underlying medical problems. the use of instruments and equipment, local delivery products, and host modulation drugs. 3. Modify dental treatment based on patients’ medical conditions. 3. Understand and describe periodontal-medical interrelationships. The Oral-Systemic Connection — Where Are We? Novel Management of the Periodontal Patient: New Horizons and Beyond Michael Glick, DMD Periodontics During the past couple of decades, there has Jim Grisdale, BA, DDS been a renewed interest in the association This course is designed for the dental team and between oral infections and systemic diseases. focuses on the latest techniques and procedures As these associations are discussed in the nonprofessional for the management of periodontal patients literature, patients are becoming aware of these associations who do not respond to routine periodontal treatment. New and will sometimes ask their oral health care provider for developments are now available, or on the horizon, that will more information. This presentation will help oral health alter what we now accept as routine therapy, meaning more care professionals evaluate studies discussing the presumed patients will respond to treatment that might be less invasive association between oral and non-oral conditions and provide or more predictable, or both. guidance on how to address these associations with patients. Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Time: 12:30–3 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student office staff C.E. units: Core – 2.5 C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Evaluate studies reporting on the association between oral 1. Learn how to educate the dental team to recognize patients and systemic conditions. who present treatment challenges. 2. Review the role of oral infections and general health. 2. Review what to do about patients who do not respond to 3. Inform patients about the association between oral infections routine periodontal management.32 and their health. 3. Understand how to implement novel procedures and techniques.
  • Thursday LecturesHealthy Mouth, Healthy Body — Healthy Paycheck Protection: How DisabilityPractice! Insurance Keeps Your Paycheck and Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, Retirement Secure RD, LD Sponsored by The Dentists Insurance Company As dental professionals, we are in a unique position Pam Conway to provide our patients with the highest degree Patrick Nelleof comprehensive care. The basic constructs of cariology andperiodontal disease progression, coupled with ongoing research The course will demonstrate howand emerging information regarding diet, systemic health and disability insurance policies protectoral health, can be practically applied during patient care. personal income in both the short and long term. TheIdentifying risk factors and encouraging lifestyle modifications participants will be exposed to the concept that injury andis a win-win for both patients and dental practices. illness can impose financial hardship on both the dentist’s business and personal life. The course will also dispel theTime: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. misconception that all “own-occupation” policies are theAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, same. office staff Time: 12:30–1:30 p.m.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Audience: dentistLearning Outcomes C.E. units: non-eligible1. Discuss scientific evidence presented in the literature Learning Outcomes regarding nutrition and oral health. 1. Learn the nature and scope of disability insurance.2. Analyze diet and nutrition as it relates to proper maintenance of oral health and overall health. 2. Discuss how “own-occupation” and “partial disability” options vary among carriers and the impact on benefits.3. Manage nutritional issues either by direct patient guidance or appropriate referral. 3. Evaluate whether disability insurance makes sense.Probiotics, Supplements and Food Fads: Internet Marketing for Dental PracticesConsiderations for the Dental Professional (Reaching the Local-Mobile-Social Audience) Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD Sponsored by CDA Endorsed Programs Our bodies need vitamins and minerals to Lance V. McCollough function efficiently, but which ones and how Learn how to maximize your online visibilitymuch? Probiotic use is a fast-growing market. What are the and attract new patients through powerful local-implications for use in dentistry? How can we be certain mobile-social media marketing strategies andsupplement claims are true? Do food trends have a potential search engine optimization. This user-friendly course reveals theimpact on oral health? As dental professionals, we need to keys to mastering the latest Internet marketing opportunitiesbe aware of the changing landscape of probiotic use, dietary to reach new patients online. Topics include: social mediasupplements, food fads and how these trends could potentially strategies, smartphone marketing trends and mobile websites,affect patient care. patient reviews and reputation management, SEO techniques,Time: 1:30–4 p.m. video marketing and other late-breaking topics.Audience: dentist, RDH, dental student, office staff Time: 1:30–3:30 p.m.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Audience: dentist, office staffLearning Outcomes C.E. units: non-eligible1. Define probiotics and identify common probiotics implicated Learning Outcomes for use in dentistry. 1. Learn the key techniques to maximize online visibility.2. Evaluate vitamin and mineral supplementation specific to the 2. Utilize free online tools and services to generate more positive needs of various patient populations. patient reviews.3. Discuss varying food trends and the indications for patient care. 3. Understand what the convergence of local-mobile-social web marketing means to dental practices. 33
  • Thursday Lectures Corporate Forum State-of-the-Art Hygiene — A Virtual Reality Trip Through Cutting Edge Scaling The following corporate forum is sponsored and presented Techniques by Philips: Diane Millar, RDH, MA This course will provide participants with a virtual reality, hands-on scaling experience in order to learn reinforced periodontal Managing the “Difficult” Periodontal instrumentation techniques. Ideal biomechanical ergonomic Patient postures will be demonstrated and then applied through audience participation during the seminar. The importance of Samuel B. Low, DDS, MS, Med incorporating larger muscle groups and ideal fulcrum rests to While many patients respond to conventional enhance lateral pressure, improve scaling efficacy and ensure periodontal therapy, a significant number injury prevention will also be emphasized. still provide challenges to clinicians. These Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. individuals continue to worsen, thus creating an unstable Audience: dentist, RDH, dental student, environment for eventual restorative care. This fast-paced periodontists seminar will provide clinicians with the tools to manage complex periodontal patients presenting in today’s practice C.E. units: Core – 2.5 of dentistry. Learning Outcomes Time: 1–4 p.m. 1. Demonstrate reinforced periodontal instrumentation Audience: dentists, RDH, RDA, dental students, techniques and ideal fulcrum rests by utilizing both hands. office staff, periodontist 2. Discover the importance of utilizing the larger muscle groups C.E. units: Core – 3.0 in the arms while scaling to enhance lateral pressure. Learning Outcomes 3. Identify new strategies to prevent harmful posture and repetitive motion injuries. 1. Determine the difference between recurrent and refractory periodontal patients. 2. Differentiate between the use of systemic and locally 35 Tips From 35 Years of Endo Practice delivered antibiotics. John S. Olmsted, DDS, MS 3. Develop treatment protocols including unique mechanical interventions for non-surgical modalities. Endodontic therapy requires a high level of technical skills and biological understanding. Dr. Olmsted will share his 35 tips for diagnosis, local anesthesia, isolation and access, rotary instrumentation and irrigation, resin bonded obturation, restoration with fiber posts, and postoperative management. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon and repeats 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, endodontists, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session UDIO A Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the various steps of diagnosis and utilization of local anesthetics. 2. Outline the latest in isolation, access, irrigation and new rotary instrumentation. 3. Demonstrate the new resin bonded obturation and restoration with fiber posts.34 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Thursday LecturesCorporate Forum Minimally Invasive Adhesive andThe following corporate forum is sponsored and presented Esthetic Dentistry: Diagnosis, Treatmentby Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals: Planning and Direct Bonded Restorations Abdi Sameni, DDS This course will provide participants with creative solutions to enhance patients’ esthetics through the use of minimally invasive dentalEthical Considerations Based on Current products and procedures. The participants will learn how toScience in the Oral Systemic Link obtain outstanding functional and esthetic results while being biologically respectful to the hard and soft tissues. Direct Michael P. Rethman, DDS, MS bonded restorations will be discussed in detail from both the Dr. Rethman will discuss the pathological and clinician’s viewpoint and the patient’s. clinically relevant aspects of the links between Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. chronic periodontitis and a number of serioussystemic diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab techmellitus, pulmonary maladies, cancers and low-birth weight, C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO Apremature babies. The quality of the biomedical evidence Learning Outcomeswill be discussed in the context of how ethical practitionerscan use this information to assist patients in making informed 1. Combine different treatment options to achieve outstandingdecisions. esthetic and functional results. 2. Learn smile design principles that mimic nature.Time: 8:30–10:30 a.m. 3. Select shade, layer and polish direct composite restorations.Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental studentC.E. units: Core – 2.0Learning Outcomes Minimally Invasive Adhesive and1. List systemic diseases that have been epidemiologically linked Esthetic Dentistry: Indirect Bonded to chronic periodontitis. Restorations2. Compare the relative strengths of the biomedical evidence for Abdi Sameni, DDS each link. The objective of this course is to present3. Develop responsible clinical messaging based on the science. different treatment options available to restore the damaged tooth with minimal or no further reduction of the remaining healthy tooth structure. Adhesive concepts and materials will be reviewed. At the conclusion of this presentation, the participants will be familiar with concepts that will challenge traditional concepts for restorative care. Time: 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the benefits of adhesively bonded restorations to mechanically retained restorations. 2. Evaluate precise preparation design and philosophy. 3. Understand the “Biomimetic Principle.” Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 35
  • Thursday Lectures Aging and Oral Systemic Disease in The Patient With Cardiovascular Diseases Dental Practice Geza T. Terezhalmy, DDS, MA Eric Z. Shapira, DDS, MAGD, MA, MHA Participants in this course will be introduced This course will cover the treatment of older, to evidence-based knowledge essential for the sometimes medically compromised individuals. We risk stratification of patients with cardiovascular will discuss how oral disease and inflammation can diseases, including: hypertension, ischemic heart disease, be a direct cause and source of systemic disease. Various treatment cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure and thromboembolic modalities and alternative plans will be discussed as well as complications. Discussion explores the development of methods of educating patients about improving their own care. appropriate diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies commensurate with a patient’s ability to undergo and respond Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon to dental care. and repeats 2–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, Time: 9–11:30 a.m. office staff Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Learn how to recognize what may not be visible to your 1. Discuss the etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and current educated eyes. and accepted medical management of patients. 2. Understand the pathways of oral systemic disease. 2. Review disease-related, patient-related and procedure-related factors that impact the dental management of patients. 3. Learn what diseases are prevalent in the aging patient. 3. Develop and implement appropriate therapeutic and preceptive strategies for the management of patients. A Partial Course on Partial Dentures Required Prerequisite for Workshop on Page 24 The Patient With Endocrine Disorders Geza T. Terezhalmy, DDS, MA M. Nader Sharifi, DDS, MS Participants in this course will be introduced to We’ll hit the high points on how to fabricate high- evidence-based knowledge essential for the risk quality removable partial dentures. This program stratification of patients with diabetes mellitus, is entirely based upon clinical materials and thyroid dysfunction, adrenal dysfunction and osteoporosis and techniques to deliver esthetic, comfortable RPDs. Review state- the development of appropriate diagnostic, preventive and of-the-art procedures for impression making in a private practice therapeutic strategies commensurate with a patient’s ability to setting yielding outstanding results. Improve your partial undergo and respond to dental care. denture confidence and success with a complete understanding of clasp design. Simplify your partial denture framework designs Time: 1:30–4 p.m. with basic rules that always apply. This is a required prerequisite Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student lecture for the Thursday afternoon workshop. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Time: 8:30–11 a.m. Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist, lab tech 1. Discuss the etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and current C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO and accepted medical management of patients with diabetes A mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, adrenal dysfunction and Learning Outcomes osteoporosis. 1. Understand the critical treatment issues for partial 2. Learn disease-related, patient-related and procedure-related denture success. factors that will impact the dental management of patients 2. Comprehend impression-making procedures yielding with endocrine disorders. outstanding results in a private practice setting. 3. Develop and implement appropriate therapeutic and 3. Design partial denture frameworks with basic rules that preventive strategies. always apply.36 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Thursday LecturesMaximizing Social Media — Stress Busting With Humor: Work-LifeMinimize Risks Balance: Cool Amidst the Chaos!Sponsored by the CDA’s Practice Support Center Kelli S. Vrla, CSP, BBA, BA Spinning plates? Dropping a few? About to pull your hair out? On your own last nerve? Stress diminishes effectiveness. Most of us have reached a breaking point and we’ve had enough. Kelli’s “Stress Busting With Humor” can help find balance and increase focus on moving over, under, around and through daily challenges. ThisConor McNulty festive delivery of do-it-now skills will help dental teams “haveCarla Christensen more fun and get more done.”Sherry Mostofi, Esq.Chris Brubaker Time: 9–11:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student,Social media can help dental professionals reach new lab tech, office staff, spousecustomers and grow business, but angry patients and bad C.E. units: non-eligiblereviews can do much harm, valid or not. How do you A UDIOmanage? Dentists reject or adopt social media for myriad Learning Outcomesreasons. The key is to understand the benefits and weigh themagainst potential risks. This all-day seminar will help dental 1. Work more efficiently with your team as a result of optimizedprofessionals understand the risks and remedy the issues. productivity from overcoming everyday work and life challenges.Time: 9 a.m.–noon 2. Learn how to quickly use easy coping techniques to handle and continues 1–4 p.m. pressing challenges.Audience: dentist, dental student, office staff, spouse 3. Assess current work and life balance.C.E. units: non-eligibleLearning Outcomes1. Understand the major social media tools, including the Beyond Stress: The 1 Percent Quest to benefits, barriers and risks associated with using social media Better Your Best: Your Personal and in the dental environment. Professional Path to Excellence2. Recognize the changing landscape of patient marketing and Kelli S. Vrla, CSP, BBA, BA develop steps to leverage social media. Bring it. What got us here won’t get us to the3. Identify what constitutes defamation and how to minimize next level. “Good enough” won’t do it. Think of the impact of a negative review. this as your personal and professional “extreme makeover.” We’re all being asked to do more with less. Quantum leaps happen when we apply action to our beliefs. Don’t miss this festive delivery of relevant, useful and hit-the- ground-running tools to help you celebrate and accelerate in your quest to better your best. Time: 1–3:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech, office staff, spouse C.E. units: non-eligible UDIO A Learning Outcomes 1. Focus on full-throttle, high “return on investment” activities to catapult your progress in any economy. 2. Learn how to focus on moving transactions forward. 3. Eliminate time-wasting and worry with a personal action plan to engage, enhance and explode. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 37
  • Thursday Lectures Totally Bonding! Simple and Easy Tips The ABCs of Dental Occlusion and for a Great Adhesive Restoration Occlusal Equilibration Victoria L. Wallace, CDA, RDA, LDA Recommended Prerequisite for Workshop on Page 42 This fast-paced program will help the dental professional better understand the chemistry DeWitt C. Wilkerson, DMD behind adhesive dentistry. Sitting chairside means the dental assistant plays a significant role in creating Dental occlusion is the most important factor beautiful and long-lasting bonded restorations, ideally with of comprehensive dental therapy, yet it can minimal post-op discomfort. More and more RDHs are also be a subject many dentists are uncomfortable performing adhesive procedures. This course will help expand evaluating and treating. This presentation will review their adhesive knowledge from placement of the hybrid layer the three major factors of functional occlusion, as well as to final polishing. evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of “occlusal disease.” A thorough discussion of occlusal equilibration will include a Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon live patient video. Dr. Wilkerson will present several clinical Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, cases representing both occlusal solutions as well as failures. office staff Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO and continues 1–3:30 p.m. A Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech 1. Learn proper placement of the hybrid layer utilizing all the C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session UDIO A generations of adhesive systems. Learning Outcomes 2. Understand the use of enamel and dentin shades of composite 1. Understand the principles of occlusion. to create a natural-looking restoration. 2. Evaluate the role of occlusion in masticatory system problems. 3. Review polymerization techniques to ensure a completely cured restoration, along with polishing techniques for a 3. Discuss the principles of occlusal equilibration. flawless finish. Doing Whitening Right...Happy Patients and With Great Results Victoria L. Wallace, CDA, RDA, LDA Check out the C.E. courses in Whitening is still very popular in our society. It can be a big practice builder and a fun responsiblity for the dental team. This course will educate attendees on all the different types of whitening available, along with dozens of troubleshooting techniques and marketing ideas. After attending this course, the dental professional will feel more confident to promote this successful and rewarding procedure to the dental patient, which makes for a winning combination for See page 5 both the dental practice and the patient. Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A Learning Outcomes 1. Review all the whitening options available. 2. Troubleshoot common concerns about tooth whitening. 3. Review new products on the market and understand which will work best for the patient.38
  • Friday WorkshopsExodontia Techniques Workshop The Wonderful World of Lasers in Dentistry Workshop Recommended Prerequisite, Page 30, Supplies Recommended Supplies Recommended John L. Alonge, MS, DDS Perform procedures on life-like models and learn Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, FACD, MALD advanced exodontia techniques including socket This workshop will include short demonstration preservation grafting. Participants will become methods and extensive hands-on proceduresmore comfortable and incorporate lessons in their practice. using several different laser instruments. Dr.Attendees are asked to bring personal safety glasses. Coluzzi will guide participants in performing a variety of dental laser applications on pig jaws. These will includeTime: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. soft-tissue surgery, soft- and hard-tissue crown lengthening, and repeats 2–5 p.m. and tissue management for final impressions. A wide varietyAudience: dentist of lasers will be utilized. A short lecture at the beginning willC.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session describe the workshop and a short lecture at the end willCourse #/Fee: 016 (a.m.)/$325 summarize how lasers can be used successfully in the practice. 017 (p.m.)/$325 It is recommended that attendees bring magnifcation loupes.Learning Outcomes Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and repeats 2:30–5 p.m. 1. Perform surgical procedures with confidence. Audience: dentist, dental student2. Prevent complications and manage them when they occur. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session3. Select and use the appropriate armamentarium to perform Course #/Fee: 018 (a.m.)/$125 surgery more quickly and predictably. 019 (p.m.)/$125 Learning Outcomes 1. Perform simulations of some of the most common dental procedures with a variety of lasers. Things to know about the show 2. Understand the fundamentals of dental lasers, including emission modes, delivery systems and tissue interaction. Exhibit Hall hours 3. Analyze a practice to assess the need for a dental laser and Thursday and Friday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. then integrate it into the armamentarium for patient care. Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. CDA Presents wishes to thank and recognize the following Room assignments sponsors for their contribution and participation in this program: Look for room assignments at cdapresents.com or in the On-Site Show Guide. Audio recordings A UDIO Recordings of identified programs will be available on site on the 2nd or 3rd levels of the convention center or following CDA Presents at prolibraries.com/cda. 39
  • Friday Workshops Digital Dentistry Systems Crown Lengthening Workshop  Dennis J. Fasbinder, DDS, Supplies Recommended MAGD, ABGD Dan J. Poticny, DDS  Jim Grisdale, BA, DDS The course will challenge current concepts of restorative dental treatment by providing an This hands-on course will focus on the different introduction to computerized dental treatment. Chairside techniques utilized in crown extension. Indications CAD/CAM systems create esthetic restorations in a single and contraindications for crown lengthening will appointment and digital impression systems transmit digital be addressed. The concept of biologic width as it applies to files, instead of conventional impressions, to provide an array crown extension will be covered. Soft- and hard-tissue surgical of dental procedures. The workshop will break into small approaches will be emphasized. Proper case selection, flap types groups to offer an opportunity to explore in-depth, currently and management from incisions, flap elevation and positioning marketed digital systems. No supplies required. and suturing techniques will also be covered. Participants will benefit from this hands-on program and will learn to improve Time: 9 a.m.–noon care for the restorative patient and broaden procedures in their (Presented by Dr. Fasbinder) practices. Attendees may bring protective eyewear, loupes and and repeats 2–5 p.m. non-allergenic gloves at their discretion. (Presented by Dr. Poticny) Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Course #/Fee: 020 (a.m.)/$45 Course #/Fee: 022/$295 021 (p.m.)/$45 Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Recognize the indications and contraindications for crown 1. Compare computerized systems, the hardware-software lengthening. capability, system functions and treatment alternatives. 2. Understand the principles of biologic width and ferrule effect. 2. Integrate digital impression and chairside CAD/CAM systems into a private practice. 3. Design appropriate flaps for surgical crown lengthening procedures. 3. Determine clinical treatment options for digital impression systems and chairside CAD/CAM systems for patients. CDA Presents wishes to thank and recognize the following sponsors for their contribution and participation in this program:40 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Friday WorkshopsEsthetic and Functional Periodontal Mission Possible — How to CreatePlastic Surgery Workshop Beautiful Direct Resin Restorations Supplies Recommended Supplies Recommended Jim Grisdale, BA, DDS K. William Mopper, DDS, MS This workshop is designed to address the key factors This workshop is for dentists who want to achieve that determine successful gingival grafting. The the ultimate in lifelike direct resin restorations. indications and techniques for surgical treatment Participants will complete a direct resin veneer withto address esthetics and a functional attachment will be covered. color change, masking a very dark tooth and making it lifelikeDiscussion will include free gingival grafts and connective without increasing its value, and create highly characterizedtissue grafts. Each participant will perform the surgery for a free polished surfaces that rival the refraction and reflection of naturalgingival graft and a connective tissue graft. Attendees may bring teeth. It is recommended that attendees bring optical lenses.protective eyewear loupes. Time: 8–11 a.m.Time: 1–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental studentAudience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 3.0C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Course #/Fee: 024/$250Course #/Fee: 023/$295 Learning OutcomesLearning Outcomes 1. Methods of material application of microfills, microhybrids1. Understand the differences between free gingival grafts and and nanofills. connective tissue grafts. 2. Learn to achieve proper finishing, polishing and long-term2. Know the indications and contraindications for free gingival maintenance. grafts and connective tissue grafts. 3. Understand necessity of opaquing and tinting.3. Become familiar with the surgical protocols and techniques for successful mucogingival surgery. “R U Ready 4 the 2 Nu R’s N Endo? Rotary and Resilon” Supplies Required John S. Olmsted, DDS, MS Check out the C.E. courses in Dr. John Olmsted will introduce continuing improvements with new endodontic rotary files and the new resin bonding 3-D obturation material. These materials have all the properties of gutta-percha in addition to superior sealing abilities as a root canal filling material. Attendees are required to bring two or three single- and multi-rooted teeth not mounted with access cavities prepared. See page 5 Time: 9 a.m.–noon and repeats 1:30–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, endodontists C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #/Fee: 025 (a.m.)/$295 026 (p.m.)/$295 Learning Outcomes 1. Demonstrate the various steps of instrumentation with new rotary files. 2. Outline the new resin bonding 3-D obturation materials. 3. Demonstrate the various delivery formats and resin bonded 41 techniques.
  • Friday Workshops Anything but the Denture: Overdenture Team FABULOUS! Solutions for the Edentulous Mandible Victoria L. Wallace, CDA, RDA, LDA Supplies Required This all-day workshop is exclusive to CDA. It is work and fun combined ... just like it should M. Nader Sharifi, DDS, MS be in a dental office. Is your team at the top of its game? Do all employees work as a team to provide the Learn the differences between implant retained most fabulous dental experience ever? Patients’ frequently and implant supported overdentures and how asked questions will be discussed. This is a relaxed and they impact patient success. Participants will also conversational atmosphere with swag bags and prizes for learn how many implants are necessary and where they should participation. Bring your entire team for the best results. It is be placed for clinical success. We’ll discuss many attachment recommended that all team members participate. options, creating clear guidelines for selecting one attachment over another. We will also complete a pick-up of an attachment Time: 8:30–11 a.m. under a complete denture, taking home the denture and model and continues 12:30–3 p.m. for patient education. Participants are asked to bring a full Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, syringe of PVS impression material, a mixing gun and four office staff, spouse, other mixing tips, loupes and lab coat. C.E. units: 20% – 5.0 per session Time: 1:30–4:30 p.m. Course #/Fee: 028/$45 Audience: dentist, lab tech Learning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 3.0 1. Know how important it is to patients that we all work as Course #/Fee: 027/$275 a team. Learning Outcomes 2. Improve communication skills with patients and team members. 1. Learn how the number and location of abutments influence 3. Realize that working hard and smart will make everyone outcome. more fabulous. 2. Understand the differences between various attachments and when to select each. 3. Review various impression techniques to simplify Occlusal Equilibration Workshop overdenture protocol. Recommended Prerequisite, Page 38 DeWitt C. Wilkerson, DMD This workshop will review the key principles of trial equilibration on diagnostic models, after which each participant will equilibrate a model. A discussion of equilibration in the mouth will complete the session. This workshop will sufficiently equip each participant to begin analyzing occlusal problems in their clinical practice on a daily basis. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and repeats 2–5 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #/Fee: 029 (a.m.)/$195 030 (p.m.)/$195 Learning Outcomes 1. Complete an occlusal equilibration on diagnostic study models. 2. Learn key principles of occlusion and occlusal equilibration. 3. Utilize the occlusal principles learned in the workshop in daily practice.42
  • Friday WorkshopsBuilding a Successful Dental Practice TDIC Risk Management: The High CostSponsored by CDA Endorsed Programs of Shortcuts Sponsored by The Dentists Insurance Company     Beverly A. Kodama, DDS Daniel R. Watkins, Esq. Shortcuts have their place, but not in dentistry. Incomplete documentation, the omission of necessary procedures and failure to fully inform patients are why even the best dentist will likely experience a lawsuit at least once throughout a career. With real TDIC cases, this course will illustrate why effective patientJason Tyson – Bank of America Practice Solutions communication and continuity of care are imperative inSamson Landeros – TDIC Insurance Solutions delivering excellent dentistry.Pam Conway – TDIC Insurance Solutions Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.R.J. Przebinda – Gold Leaf Group and repeats 2–5 p.m. Bob Mothershead – Patterson Dental Audience: generalRobyn Thomason – CDA Practice Support Center C.E. units: 20% – 3.0Sherry Mostofi, Esq. – Mostofi Law Group Course #: 820/821Join us in an intimate setting where dentists will have the Fee: $50—dentist and staffopportunity to discuss the various aspects of starting a newpractice. This roundtable format will feature five 30-minute $25—part-time TDIC policyholder sessions, each hosted by industry leaders. Ask yourself the (Must have a TDIC part-time Professionalfollowing questions: Should I continue as an associate or Liability policy to be eligible for this discount.)should I become a practice owner? What options exist for Free—new TDIC policyholder withinpractice ownership? How do I prepare for disaster? What first yearmethods exist to motivate and manage staff? What financing TDIC policyholders are eligible for a 5 percentis available and what are the banks looking for? Get all of professional liability discount upon completion ofyour questions answered in one place. this course.Time: 9 a.m.–noon Learning OutcomesAudience: dentist 1. Establish office procedures to respond when patientsC.E. units: non-eligible complain of pain.Course #/Fee: 031/$45 2. Develop strategies to educate patients on treatment recommendations.Learning Outcomes 3. Deploy effective protocols for medical emergencies.1. Understand the advantages of practice ownership and learn the right time to buy in. This workshop is approved by:2. Break barriers to effectively manage staff.3. Plan for the inevitable and avoid first practice pitfalls. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 43
  • Friday Lectures Endodontic Extravaganza Making Dentistry Fun, Easy and Exciting! Recommended Prerequisite for Workshop on Page 55 Joseph A. Blaes, DDS Learn keys to becoming the best you can be. David A. Beach, DMD, MS Discover communication skills that build trusting relationships, create predictable routines for This course will provide an in-depth presentation comprehensive exams, treatment planning and presenting of the latest concepts and advances in complete dentistry, and create a scheduling system that ends endodontics. All aspects of endodontic therapy hectic, chaotic days. will be covered ranging from diagnosis and pain management to clinical techniques and current treatment methods. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Attendees will learn how to identify, avoid and manage Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, complications that may occur during endodontic therapy. This office staff course is geared toward the general practitioner. C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 UDIO A Time: 9–11:30 a.m. Learning Outcomes and continues 1–3:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student 1. Use interview techniques that help a team discover a patient’s wishes. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session 2. Develop communication skills that quickly establish rapport. Learning Outcomes 3. Design new scheduling systems that streamline hygiene and 1. Understand the different possible etiologies of dental pain dental appointments. and avoid misdiagnosis. 2. Identify and overcome a variety of problems that may occur during the endodontic process. Teamwork Changes the Practice From 3. Manage postoperative complications and restorative issues Good to Great associated with endodontic therapy. Joseph A. Blaes, DDS Great teams make the best use of clinical time to significantly increase hourly production. Structured systems simplify office procedures and produce consistent, quality dentistry. Discover the 10 hallmarks of super teams, six keys to listening and 10 keys to success. Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, office staff C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 UDIO A Learning Outcomes 1. Create an environment where teams are committed to the practice’s vision and goals. 2. Analyze and improve every aspect of the practice as a team. 3. Design systems to simplify the clinical area and team delegation in clinical areas.44 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Friday LecturesTake Two Aspirin and Call Me in the Paid vs. Denied: Practical Tips andMorning Billing Case Studies Ellen Byrne, DDS, PhD Sponsored by the CDA Practice Support Center Prescribing the best pain medication requires a  Patti Cheesebrough clinician to have knowledge of the pharmacology Ann Milar of the drug, the desired effects and undesirable This course will review typical billingside effects. This clinically relevant review will include major scenarios in a dental office. Learndrug interactions involving pain medications, side effects to speak the language of the dental benefit plan and improveand mechanisms of action involving nonsteroidal anti- communication with patients about their coverage. Learninflammatory drugs and narcotics. proactive tips versus reactive steps and available resources to enhance billing efficiency. Case presentations will includeTime: noon–2:30 p.m. coordination of benefits, medical billing, elective upgradeAudience: general examples and others.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A Time: 1:30–4:30 p.m.Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist, dental student, office staff, spouse1. Compare and contrast actions, including side effects and C.E. units: Core – 3.0 UDIO risks, associated with the various NSAIDs and narcotic A analgesics. Learning Outcomes2. Identify appropriate prescribing of NSAIDs based on a 1. Apply strategies to properly address common billing patient’s medical history. challenges.3. Understand the FDA mandated changes in acetaminophen 2. Improve billing communication about dental plans to patients. dosing. 3. Implement proactive steps to enhance billing efficiency.Bugs N’ Drugs Ellen Byrne, DDS, PhD Dentists account for more than 12 percent of prescriptions written for penicillin, not an insignificant amount when microbial resistanceis increasing at an alarming rate. Eighty percent of Americansare infected with the virus that causes herpes labialis. Thisfast-moving, clinically applicable presentation will providean overview of the use of antibiotics and antiviral drugs indentistry, including new dosing formulations, mechanisms ofactions, side effects and drug interactions.Time: 3:30–6 p.m.Audience: generalC.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO ALearning Outcomes1. Learn the mechanisms of actions and the side effects of therapeutic uses of antibiotics and antivirals.2. Identify new antibiotics and antivirals, including new drugs and new dosage formulations.3. Understand clinically important drug interactions associated with antibiotics. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 45
  • Friday Lectures Corporate Forum Predictable Diagnosis and Treatment of The following corporate forum is sponsored and presented Clinical Crown and Gingival Architecture by Pacific Dental Services: Discrepancies Co-sponsored by 3M ESPE Stephen J. Chu, DMD, MSD, CDT The key to success is to understand and develop predictable strategies in patient care. The focus of this presentation is on how to analyze tooth size discrepancies quickly, easily and predictably and how those discrepancies relate to spacing and gingival architecture How to Integrate Cerec in Your Office problems. Solutions will focus on interdisciplinary treatment Yesterday! periodontics (i.e. esthetic crown lengthening) and restorative dentistry. Dr. Chu will present a unique perspective designed to satisfy patients’ and clinicians’ needs and expectations. Time: 9 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, dental student, lab technician C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Dennis J. Fasbinder, DDS, MAGD, ABGD Learning Outcomes Sudhakar R. Chokka, DDS (Moderator) Charles F. Rodgers, DDS (Panelist) 1. Discuss how to analyze tooth size and space discrepancies. Cari Callaway-Nelson (Panelist) 2. Learn how to analyze and treat gingival architecture Brad O’Neill (Panelist) discrepancies. Owner dentists at Pacific Dental Services supported offices 3. Describe solutions to gingival architecture problems involving selected to provide CEREC technology to more than 300 offices. interdisciplinary treatment approaches. This panel presentation, lead by Dr. Fasbinder, will explore what it takes to successfully integrate CEREC technology in your office and utilize it to its full potential. Dentists who are the leaders in this technology will review clinical case studies, explain the key components to convert your office to offer patients same day dentistry and more. Time: 1–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Learning Outcomes 1. Strategies for comprehensive integration and same-day dentistry. 2. Maximize the skills of your dental team. 3. Understand how you can optimize patient acceptance.46 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Friday LecturesPanel on Critical Questions that Lead to Beyond Soft-Tissue ManagementCritical Decisions in Your Practice Bruce A. Edelstein, DDS Soft-tissue management is beneficial for many patients afflicted with periodontitis. However, how does one determine when more extensive treatment is necessary for optimal results? This is a must-see for anyone who includes soft-tissue management in his or herFrank T. Curry, DDS (moderator) practice. Numerous case studies will be presented to illustrateStephen J. Chu, DMD, MSD, CDT when soft-tissue management results in optimal health orKenneth A. Malament, DDS when it is the initial step in treatment. Adjuncts to enhanceTerry T. Tanaka, DDS treatment outcomes will be discussed in detail.Dennis P. Tarnow, DDS Time: 8:30–11 a.m.Quality dentistry is a combination of good decision-making Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student,about technique, materials and procedures. This panel of office staffdental leaders will help guide professionals to decisions that C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO Acombine excellent dentistry and solid ethics. Learning OutcomesTime: 1–4 p.m. 1. Increase understanding of soft-tissue management what canAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech and cannot be achieved and what is possible beyond soft-C.E. units: Core – 3.0 tissue management.Learning Outcomes 2. Understand adjunctive therapies benefits as well as limitations.1. Learn critical areas of decision-making. 3. Diagnose the need and review outcomes for hard-tissue2. Understand the foundations of dentistry successes and failures. regenerative therapy.3. Learn steps to deliver ever-improving quality dentistry. The Periodontal Cosmetic Makeover Bruce A. Edelstein, DDS With the increasing popularity of dental cosmetics, it has become more important than ever to create periodontal health and an attractive gumline. See the latest augmentation and reduction procedures as they set the stage for dramatically improving esthetics. This presentation will provide a complete overview of soft-tissue augmentation geared toward a cosmetic result. For the clinician, these cases are very rewarding because a periodontal makeover can put real “dazzle” in a patient’s smile. Time: 12:30–3 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A Learning Outcomes 1. Learn the basics of what defines cosmetic and foundational proportions and guidelines. 2. Review the importance of gingival symmetry. 3. Gain a better understanding and appreciation for the intricacies of gingival augmentation and reduction procedures. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 47
  • Friday Lectures The Importance of Hygiene in the Treatment of the Medically Complex 21st Century Dental Patient — Assessment and Charles Gerba, BS, PhD Protocols Today we spend most of our time indoors, Michael Glick, DMD which has increased the significance of surfaces Dentists need to screen and monitor patients for (fomites) in the transmission of infectious disease. underlying medical conditions and are required This presentation will identify surfaces that harbor microbes to render dental care to an array of medically and highlight the importance of proper hand hygiene and complex patients. Pertinent medical assessment of patients has fomite disinfection in everyday life, in the office and in become an essential part of dentistry, as even the most common clinical settings. Examples of successful interventions will be medical problems may require modifications to routine dental highlighted. care. Providing oral health care for patients in today’s rapidly changing medical environment is a daunting responsibility. Time: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. This course will simplify this task by reviewing common and repeats 2–4:30 p.m. medical conditions and explaining and providing protocols for Audience: general dental care of patients with complex medical conditions. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session UDIO A Time: 9–11:30 a.m. Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student 1. Understand the importance of fomites in the transmission of C.E. units: Core – 2.5 infectious disease. Learning Outcomes 2. Learn interventions that can be used to reduce fomite transmission of infectious disease. 1. Understand the role of dentists in overall health and well-being of their patients. 3. Know how proper hand hygiene and fomite disinfection can reduce disease transmission in indoor environments. 2. How to interpret information suggesting underlying medical problems. 3. Modify dental treatment based on patients’ medical conditions. What’s Hot and What’s Getting Hotter! Howard S. Glazer, DDS, FAGD The Oral-Systemic Connection — Where Dr. Glazer will present a potpourri of materials Are We Today? and techniques that will make your day at the office easier and more productive. Dr. Glazer Michael Glick, DMD writes a monthly column by the same title for AGD Impact There has been a renewed interest in the magazine, reviewing new products and materials on a association between oral infections and systemic regular basis. Topics may include: composites, adhesives, diseases. Numerous studies have drawn attention whitening, oral cancer prevention, minimally invasive to an array of oral conditions that may be associated with non- products, impression and provisional materials, burs, lasers, oral disease. Patients are becoming aware of these associations matrix bands, artificial dentine, communication tools and and will sometimes ask their oral health care provider for endodontic instruments. more information. This presentation will help oral health care Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon professionals evaluate studies discussing presumed association and continues 2–4:30 p.m. between oral and non-oral conditions, and provide guidance about how to address these associations with their patients. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Time: 1–3:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student Learning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 2.5 1. Learn materials that are faster, easier and better in various product categories. Learning Outcomes 2. Learn how to evaluate product claims and merit. 1. Evaluate studies that report on the association between oral 3. Understand the necessity of oral cancer prevention. and systemic conditions. 2. Learn about the role of oral infections and general health. 3. Find out the best ways to educate patients about the association between oral infections and good health.48
  • Friday LecturesHealth Care Delivery Trends and Their WARNING: Being Female May BeImpact on Dentistry Hazardous to Your Health! Women,Sponsored by the CDA Dental Benefits Task Force Nutrition and Oral Health: Implications  Michael S. Sparer, JD, PhD Throughout the Lifecycle Paul A. Manos, DDS Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD The course will provide a discussion of trends in health care From the teenage years to the golden years, areform and the dental benefit marketplace. Participants woman experiences changes that may impactwill learn how health care trends are changing the market her oral health. As oral health practitioners, we need tofor health and dental care coverage, factors influencing know about these various changes so we can better provideemployer benefits purchasing and how dental benefit our patients with optimum care. This course will focus on thecompanies are responding to current market forces. These interrelationship between oral health and overall health attopics have been included within the information- various stages throughout a woman’s lifecycle.gathering phase of CDA’s Dental Benefits Task Force. Time: 11:30 a.m.–2 p.m.Time: 3:30–5 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental studentAudience: dentist, office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5C.E. units: 20% – 1.5 Learning OutcomesLearning Outcomes 1. Discuss the role oral health plays in the overall health of1. Understand key trends in health care reform. women at various stages throughout the lifecycle.2. Identify factors in the dental benefit marketplace that 2. Learn about nutrient needs and oral implications specific to influence employer purchasing decisions and dental various stages of a woman’s life. benefit plan designs. 3. Discuss systemic conditions and the oral considerations that3. Understand the potential for the changing health care have a higher incidence in women. landscape to impact dental practice. You ARE What You EAT … and DRINK!Peer Review — A Membership Benefit Lisa F. Harper-Mallonee, BSDH, MPH,Sponsored by CDA’s Council on Peer Review RD, LD Henrik E. Hansen, DDS Carbonated beverages are now the most Peer review is one of the most valuable CDA commonly consumed beverage in the United membership benefits. It is an alternative to States, with energy and sports drinks running a close second. litigation for resolving disputes between CDA Add in the fast food and a lack of fresh fruits and vegetablesmember dentists, their patients and insurers regarding the and the American diet starts to resemble a child’s fingerquality and appropriateness of dental treatment. Council painting — it’s a mess. This presentation will walk youon Peer Review Chair Dr. Hansen will explore the overall through the nutrition maze to show you how eating habitsprocess, the grading system applied by committees and how may contribute to cancer risk, the aging process, weight gainmember dentists can best utilize the system. and cardiovascular problems as well as increase the risk of tooth wear, dentin hypersensitivity, caries and periodontitis.Time: 9–11:30 a.m.Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, office staff Time: 3–5:30 p.m.C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staffLearning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 2.51. Understand the peer review system. Learning Outcomes2. Learn how to further develop the ability to maintain patient records in case of liability exposure. 1. Learn the impact of dietary choices on oral health and how to offer alternatives to patients.3. Enhance communication skills to avoid conflicts with patients regarding dental treatment. 2. Explore strategies that encourage healthier living and benefit systemic and oral health. 3. Identify healthful choices and encourage lifestyle 49 modifications as a part of preventive patient care.
  • Friday Lectures Digital Implant Dentistry “New The Impact Dental Insurance Has on Technology for Teeth and Implants” Your Practice Frank L. Higginbottom, DDS Sponsored by the CDA Practice Support Center For many years dentists have performed very Michael W. Perry, DDS well using the analog world. A few years ago, This course will educate participants about the however, dentistry began going digital, beginning types and characteristics of dental benefit plans. with a computer at the front desk and then in the operatory. Dr. Perry will show how provider contracts affect Today dentists have many options when deciding which the business model of a private practice. A detailed analysis of digital technology to incorporate into their practices. This how contracts affect staff costs and other overhead issues will presentation will take a look at digital radiographs, digital be included, and the program will close with a comparison of planning, guided surgeries, digital impressions and CAD/CAM fee and practice profitability levels. restorations. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, dental student, office staff, spouse Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: 20% – 3.0 UDIO C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A A Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Find out how to choose the appropriate model for your dental 1. Learn CBCT technology and digital planning. practice rather than letting the model choose you. 2. Learn guided placements and digital impressions. 2. Learn how various PPO and HMO plans affect a practice. 3. Incorporate CAD/CAM technologies for teeth and implants. 3. Judge the merits of PPOs and HMOs. Current Concepts in Implant Dentistry: Baby Steps — Infant and Preschool The State of the Implant Today Dental Care for the General Practitioner Frank L. Higginbottom, DDS Gregory L. Psaltis, DDS This program will review the philosophy of Today, emphasis is being placed on establishing implant therapy today, when both tissue level and a dental home for all children upon eruption bone level implants are appropriate. The tissue of the first tooth or at 12 months of age. It is level implant, using a cemented approach, has been very essential that all dental care providers become skilled at the successful, making implant restorative dentistry simple. Active steps necessary to make these visits successful for the child and implant surfaces and stable abutment connections impart his or her parents. This course discusses developmental ages, very high predictability. Loading protocols have drastically appropriate guidelines and clinical tips. changed through the years due to advances in surface technology. Time needed to perform needed restorations is Time: 1:30–4 p.m. definitely shorter today. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff Time: 1:30–4 p.m. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech A C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO Learning Outcomes A 1. Understand how the age of the child affects appointment Learning Outcomes expectations. 1. Learn patient selection and treatment planning. 2. Know what preventive regimens to recommend. 2. Identify abutment selection and impression techniques. 3. Learn how to coach the child and parent to a successful visit. 3. Discover provisionalization techniques, final restorations and new technology.50 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Friday LecturesThe Role of Interdisciplinary Dentistry Fundamentals of Laser Dentistry (Part I)and Orthodontics in OptimallyManaging Esthetic Dilemmas Required Prerequisite for Workshop on Page 59 Richard D. Roblee, DDS David M. Roshkind, DMD, MBA, FAGD, Some of the most challenging esthetic MALD dilemmas have solutions that fall into a “gray The first day (Part I) is a thorough review of zone” between traditional therapies. The lasers in dentistry and can be taken alone. Ifcomplexities of diagnosing these issues, coupled with combined with the second day (Part II), the program providesthe lack of optimal treatment options, often lead to a Standard Proficiency dental laser certification courseinappropriate treatment and disappointing compromises. according to the Curriculum Guidelines and StandardsThis presentation will focus on an interdisciplinary for Dental Laser Education, as recognized by the Academymethodology for ideally diagnosing and managing complex of Laser Dentistry. This course includes a comprehensiveproblems by combining traditional approaches with new presentation of laser science, a basic understanding of alloptions to predictably achieve optimal results. dental laser devices, laser-tissue interaction, safety andTime: 9–11:30 a.m. the operation of a variety of laser instruments. Clinical and continues 1–3:30 p.m. applications for use will be discussed with several caseAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, examples. This is a required prerequisite to Saturday’s office staff, lab tech, interdisciplinary workshop to complete the certification. teams Time: 9:30 a.m.–noonC.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session and continues 1:30–4 p.m. Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session UDIO1. Identify esthetic dilemmas with solutions that fall into a “gray A zone” between different disciplines. Learning Outcomes2. Learn an interdisciplinary approach for properly diagnosing 1. Identify the clinical applications and protocols for the safe and planning treatments for these problems. and effective use of a laser instrument while achieving3. Hear about recent advances that enable an interdisciplinary Standard Proficiency Certification. team to treat these problems more predictably. 2. Learn the fundamentals of laser operation, laser-tissue interaction and laser safety. 3. Demonstrate knowledge with a clinical simulation proficiency examination and an online didactic examination. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 51
  • Friday Lectures Geriatric Dentistry: Know Your Audience You’ve Mastered Your Clinical Skills … Eric Z. Shapira, DDS, MAGD, MA, MHA Now It’s Time To Master Your Business Skills! Sometimes we take patients for granted. We may Sponsored by the CDA Foundation not be familiar with them on a social, economic or demographic level. When it comes to our older Kerry K. Straine patients, especially, it may be valuable to ask ourselves, ‘What Mr. Straine will show you how to develop a is it about getting older that might challenge our abilities to step-by-step protocol that will guide your team help our patients?’ in the implementation of your periodontal Time: 9–11:30 a.m. philosophy. Additionally, this presentation will cover how to and continues 1:30–4 p.m. manage multiple hygienists, enabling more patients to receive the treatment they want and need, and ensuring a more Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, established flow in the doctor’s schedule. office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Time: 10 a.m.–noon and repeats 1:30–3:30 p.m. Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist (practice owner) 1. Learn how to adapt your office, techniques and C.E. units: 20% – 2.0 per session UDIO communication style to increase your understanding of older A individuals. Learning Outcomes 2. Learn how to make healthy choices for yourself with respect 1. Learn how to develop a plan to transition from a “prophy to practicing dentistry. palace” to a periodontal-driven hygiene department. 3. Understand your “audience” and how to increase your level 2. Learn how to analyze the historical performance of your of performance. practice and identify growth opportunities. 3. Learn how to analyze your supply of hygiene appointments in relation to patient demand and effectiveness. Have You Tried Staples: Immediate Denture Solutions M. Nader Sharifi, DDS, MS Esthetics and Occlusion: New Restorative Guidelines for 2013 This completely new course will clarify common misconceptions about serial extraction and Terry T. Tanaka, DDS introduces an approach to simplify the most The long-term success of esthetic restorative challenging cases. Options will be provided to determine materials requires a clear understanding of the incisal edge position, identify the proper occlusal plane what the patient does to the restorations when and locate centric relation. Learn to manage the challenges chewing, swallowing, clenching, grinding (bruxing) and how associated with post-operative follow-up of these difficult intense the forces are applied. The physical properties of the patients. Address every aspect of immediate dentures and materials are secondary to the understanding of masticatory provide solutions to the challenges they present. function. New guidelines for patient selection, material Time: 8–10:30 a.m. selection, site selection and the management of oral habits will be presented. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO Time: 8:30–11 a.m. A Audience: general Learning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 2.5 1. Understand different impression techniques for immediate dentures. Learning Outcomes 2. Compare various methods of determining the incisal edge 1. Learn how aging affects anterior esthetics, anterior guidance position. and anterior tooth wear. 3. Learn to manage the follow-up period for immediate dentures. 2. Understand how occlusal forces and parafunctional habits affect the selection of restorative materials. 3. Learn how occlusion and occlusal contacts affect the longevity of restorations.52
  • Friday LecturesImmediate vs. Delayed Socket Placement: Emergency MedicineWhat We Know, What We Think We Geza T. Terezhalmy, DDS, MAKnow, and What We Don’t Know Participants will be introduced to knowledgeCo-sponsored by Dentsply Implants essential to identifying high-risk patients who Dennis P. Tarnow, DDS may experience a life-threatening medical emergency in oral health care settings and to recognize This presentation will focus on the potential common medical emergencies that require immediate problems and benefits, clinically and biologically, response. This presentation will also cover treatment when the choice of immediate socket placement is procedures that a clinician “can’t afford not to do” when facedmade for single and multiple sites. with an unexpected urgent problem.Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. Time: 8:30–11 a.m.Audience: dentist and continues 12:30–3 p.m.C.E. units: Core – 3.0 UDIO Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, ALearning Outcomes office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session 1. Know how to minimize recession with immediate provisionalization. Learning Outcomes2. Learn how to tell if the gap distance really matters. 1. Learn factors to include in the risk stratification of patients3. Know if primary closure should be attempted or if it should with systemic diseases. be left open. 2. Identify factors essential to medical emergency preparedness. 3. Recognize signs and symptoms and formulate a diagnosis for an emerging problem.Cutting Edge Dental Research at theOstrow School of Dentistry of USCParish P. Sedghizadeh, DDS, MSAllan C. Jones, DDS, MSRamiro Murata, DDS, PhDThis program will highlight some of the state-of-the-art dentalresearch being conducted at the University of SouthernCalifornia. Speakers include faculty from the Ostrow Schoolof Dentistry, who will present their multidisciplinary work inclinically relevant hot topics like drug discovery, microbialbiofilms, esthetic dentistry, nanotechnology, plasma physics,osteonecrosis, and metagenomics. This program is gearedtoward the non-researcher to provide insight into the processof innovation.Time: 1:30–4 p.m.Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental studentC.E. units: Core – 2.5Learning Outcomes1. Describe the importance and nature of innovation and discovery.2. Understand the meaning and the application of translational research to clinical practice.3. Provide examples of cutting edge multidisciplinary research being performed at USC. 53
  • Friday Lectures Teamwork Coaching: Getting Your Transitional Bonding: Nontraditional People to Play Nice in the Sandbox and Composite Restorations for Major OWN Their Jobs! Occlusal and Esthetic Changes Kelli S. Vrla, CSP, BBA, BA Corky Willhite, DDS, FAGD Ms. Vrla will take a realistic look at actual Learn a practical technique using composite versus desired team performance in addition to that offers many advantages over traditional pinpointing and working through some of the composite or porcelain. Requiring virtually no common “speed bumps” that hinder optimal team performance. prep, even for smile makeovers and full mouth rehabilitation cases, this technique provides long-lasting results. This course Time: 8:30–11 a.m. differs from other resin courses in that it is not about how Audience: general to layer the resins, tints and opaquers, but covers additional C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 UDIO information that will help any doctor master freehand A bonding skills. Learning Outcomes Time: 8–10:30 a.m. 1. Understand team dynamics. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, 2. Identify critical success factors for high performance teams. lab tech, office staff, spouse 3. Pinpoint and work through speed bumps hindering optimal C.E. units: Core – 2.5 team performance. Learning Outcomes 1. Understand practical occlusal principles for maximizing Have Them AFTER “Hello!” How to Keep longevity. Your Staff Engaged and Ready to Serve! 2. Learn how to build anterior guidance and increase vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) for severe wear cases. Kelli S. Vrla, CSP, BBA, BA 3. Identify which materials work best in noncompliant patients. Based on HR Solutions’ report, only 27 percent of employees are “actively engaged.” The remaining 73 percent is divided between “ambivalent” employees (60 percent) and “actively disengaged” employees The Esthetic Zone Ratio Method of Smile (13 percent). This fast-moving program will quickly provide Analysis and Design “boots-on-the-ground” tips about getting (and keeping) Corky Willhite, DDS, FAGD employees engaged to handle today’s challenges. Using case examples demonstrating the latest Time: 12:30–3 p.m. techniques available in cosmetic dentistry, you Audience: dentist, office managers will learn an innovative system for designing C.E. units: 20% – 2.5 UDIO smiles that is easier and more predictable than traditional A methods. This practical approach does more than help you Learning Outcomes plan a better smile, it will allow you to determine the best 1. Clarify expectations of excellence and help staff connect the smiles possible for your patients. This course provides a dots to patient satisfaction. scientific and technical basis for becoming a smile design artist. 2. Get employees to “own” their jobs and enlist a “No Time: noon–2:30 p.m. Tolerance for Gossip and Negativity” policy. Audience: general 3. Stay laser focused amid chaos and change, motivate and C.E. units: Core – 2.5 energize, recharge for resilience. Learning Outcomes 1. Understand simple mathematical calculations to achieve artistic results. 2. Learn the fallacy of golden proportion. 3. Improve patient motivation for choosing the ideal treatment.54 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Saturday WorkshopsIs it Time for an Upgrade to Your Digital Dentistry SystemsEndodontic Technique?  Dennis J. Fasbinder, DDS, MAGD, ABGD Recommended Prerequisite, Page 44, Supplies Required Dan J. Poticny, DDS David A. Beach, DMD, MS The course will challenge current concepts of restorative dental treatment by providing an Attendees will learn how to use the latest introduction to computerized dental treatment. Chairside generation of endodontics instruments from CAD/CAM systems create esthetic restorations in a single Dentsply, with ample opportunity to gain hands- appointment and digital impression systems transmit digitalon experience. Exercises on extracted teeth and plastic blocks files, instead of conventional impressions, to provide an arraywill allow participants to try the newest rotary files available, of dental procedures. The workshop will break into smallWave One and Vortex Blue. Participants will then experiment groups to offer an opportunity to explore in-depth currentlywith the newest obturation technique, Gutta Core. Attendees marketed digital systems. No supplies required.must bring at least five fully developed extracted teeth withaccess preparations prepared. Time: 9 a.m.–noon (Presented by Dr. Fasbinder)Time: 9 a.m.–noon and repeats 1–4 p.m. and repeats 1:30–4:30 p.m. (Presented by Dr. Poticny)Audience: dentist, dental student Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab techC.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per sessionCourse #/Fee: 032 (a.m.)/$295 Course #/Fee: 034 (a.m.)/$45 033 (p.m.)/$295 035 (p.m.)/$45Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes1. Instrument canals with the Wave One and Vortex Blue 1. Compare computerized systems, the hardware-software rotary file systems. capability, system functions and treatment alternatives.2. Identify appropriate situations for each file system and 2. Integrate digital impression and chairside CAD/CAM understand how to create hybrid techniques. systems into a private practice.3. Learn to obturate canals with Gutta Core and eliminate 3. Determine clinical treatment options for digital impression some of the disadvantages of other carrier systems. systems and chairside CAD/CAM systems for patients. CDA Presents wishes to thank and recognize the following sponsors for their contribution and participation in this program: Things to know about the show Exhibit Hall hours Thursday and Friday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Room assignments Look for room assignments at cdapresents.com or in the On-Site Show Guide. Audio recordings A UDIO Recordings of identified programs will be available on site on the 2nd or 3rd levels of the convention center or following CDA Presents at prolibraries.com/cda. 55
  • Saturday Workshops Implant Esthetics Workshop Finishing and Polishing Anterior Composites Supplies Recommended Supplies Recommended Frank L. Higginbottom, DDS Esthetic treatments involve treatment planning K. William Mopper, DDS, MS with surgical templates, proper temporary and There are many steps involved in creating final abutment selection, impression making and beautiful esthetic restorations. Two of the most provisional fabrication. Laboratory communication is also important, yet often overlooked, are the finishing important for esthetic results. Participants will learn techniques and final polishing of composite restorations. This workshop that will minimize obstacles to success. Participants will select will discuss how polishing techniques enhance the final and place abutments, attach impression copings and make outcome for all types of composites. See the difference in an impression, fabricate provisional restorations and custom how microfills, nanohybrids and hybrids are polished. Optical impression copings. Attendees are encouraged to bring safety lenses are recommended. glasses and/or magnifiers. Time: 8–11 a.m. Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. Audience: dentist, dental student and repeats 1–4 p.m. C.E. units: Core – 3.0 Audience: dentist, dental student, lab tech Course #/Fee: 038/$250 C.E. units: Core – 3.0 per session Course #/Fee: 036 (a.m.)/$195 Learning Outcomes 037 (p.m.)/$195 1. See how polishing techniques affect final restoration outcomes. Learning Outcomes 2. Learn how the choice of composite affects esthetic results. 1. Understand surgical template demo and abutment selection. 3. Identify correct polishing techniques. 2. Learn about impression copings and impression techniques. 3. Fabricate temporaries and custom impression copings. Check out the C.E. courses in See page 556 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Saturday WorkshopsCorporate Forum Corporate ForumThe following corporate forum is sponsored and presented The following corporate forum is sponsored and presentedby Align Technology. by Align Technology.Please note there is a fee for this program. Please note there is a fee for this program. .Invisalign Clear Essentials I Invisalign Clear Essentials II Payam C. Ataii, DMD David Gates, DDS This one-day course is designed specifically for If you are a dentist looking to build on your general practitioners and team members who Invisalign case experience, this highly interactive wish to incorporate the Invisalign system into one-day course is designed to deliver insights fromtheir practices. This case-based training provides participants your colleagues to augment your expertise, contribute to yourwith the clinical and operational confidence to successfully patient success and enhance your practice economics. Duringtreat a range of highly predictable cases. In addition to this course, you will learn how to approach difficult cases andproviding your entire team with essential clinical, operational complex tooth movements with aligners and auxiliaries.and marketing skills, the course presents a full range ofsupport resources designed to meet the needs of the non- Registration is restricted to U.S. and Canadian practices only.orthodontic practice. Time: General Session 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Lunch break noon–1 p.m. Registration is restricted to U.S. and Canadian practices only. Lunch will be provided complimentsTime: eneral session G 8 a.m.–5 p.m. of Align Technology. Lunch break noon–1 p.m. Audience: dentist Lunch will be provided compliments C.E. units: Core — 7.0 Align Technology. of (C.E. provided by Align Technology)Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA Course #: 040C.E. units: Core — 8.0 Fee: $199, must be current Invisalign provider (C.E. provided by Align Technology) Learning OutcomesCourse #: 039Fee: $1,695 tuition covers the dentist and up 1. Improve clinical outcomes for Invisalign treatment. to four auxiliary staff for the full day 2. Understand and implement better practice economics.Learning Outcomes 3. Offer a more complete array of treatment options to your patients.1. Identify ideal case types for Invisalign treatments.2. Integrate all aspects of the Invisalign process into the practice.3. Use software that depicts a virtual setup of your planned treatment. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 57
  • Saturday Workshops Practice Transitions track Schedule 8:30–11 a.m. Junior dentists, less than 10 years in practice “Preparing for Your Practice Opportunity” Speaker: William A. van Dyk, DDS 8:30–11 a.m. Senior dentists more than 20 years in practice “Preparing for Transitioning Out of Practice” Speaker: Arthur Wiederman, CPA, CFP Terry E. Hoover, DDS (moderator) William A. van Dyk, DDS 11 a.m. Break Arthur W. Curley, JD Arthur Wiederman, CPA, CFP 11:30 a.m. Panel discussion for all participants Dwayne Story, TDIC Insurance Solutions Matthew Christie, Bank of America Practice 12:30 p.m. Terry E. Hoover, DDS — moderator Solutions William A. van Dyk, DDS Arthur W. Curley, JD Practice Transitions Arthur Wiederman, CPA Whether you are a new dentist who has been in practice Dwayne Story — TDIC Insurance Solutions for fewer than 10 years or a more experienced dentist Matthew Christie – Bank of America who is getting ready to retire, this course will review the Practice Solutions steps involved in practice transitions. Learn how to make the transition from associate to practice owner and from ownership to retirement. During the panel discussion and 12:45 p.m. Roundtable lunch the roundtable lunch, you will have the opportunity to ask the experts for advice about how to move forward with your 2 p.m. End of program practice business decisions. The speakers will discuss the financial and emotional decisions involved with practice transitions for both the dentist and the staff. Time: 8:30 a.m.–2 p.m. Audience: dentist, dental student C.E. units: non-eligible Course #: 041 (junior dentist)/042 (senior dentist) Fee: $75 (lunch will be provided) Learning Outcomes 1. Identify how to develop business, financial and staffing plans for your practice. 2. Learn important dos and don’ts for transitioning your practice. 3. Learn from real-life experience and have access to experts for Q and A.58 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Saturday WorkshopsStandard Proficiency Laser Certification Let’s Make Some Whitening Trays!(Part II) Victoria L. Wallace, CDA, RDA, LDA Required Prerequisite, Page 51, Supplies Recommended This workshop will review different techniques and provide the necessary information for makingEquipment and supplies coordination are provided take-home, custom-fit whitening trays in thecourtesy of the CDA and participating laser vendors. dental practice. Fabricating whitening trays can be fast and easy, and construction in the office can save time and money. David M. Roshkind, DMD, This course will also provide attendees custom-fit trays along MBA, FAGD, MALD with whitening material so they can whiten their own smiles. Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, FACD, MALD Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental studentThis second day completes the program for the standard C.E. units: Core – 3.0proficiency dental laser course according to the CurriculumGuidelines and Standards for Dental Laser Education and Course #/Fee: 044/$50defines the standard of care for the dental professional. This Learning Outcomescourse contains hands-on learning opportunities on thesecond day and includes a comprehensive presentation of 1. Learn different techniques for creating trays to send homelaser science, safety and the operation of a variety of laser with your patients.instruments. Clinical applications and indications for use will 2. Identify and troubleshoot existing tray fabrication issues.be discussed with several case examples. A variety of dental 3. Decide which technique works best for your practice andlasers will be utilized with support from dental laser vendors. patients.Please bring your magnification loupes. This workshop hasa required prerequisite lecture on Friday. A separate onlineexam fee is required to complete the certification competency.Information about this exam will be given at the course.Time: 8:30–11:30 a.m. and continues 1–4 p.m.Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student Check out the C.E. courses inC.E. units: Core — 6.0Course #/Fee: 043 /$695Prerequisites1. Successful completion of an introduction to lasers course with a minimum equal to or greater than 2.5 credit hours.2. The candidate must own or have access to a dental laser and use it within a scope of practice. After purchasing the ticket, See page 5 candidates will be asked to inform CDA of the laser type.3. A basic understanding of lasers in dentistry.Learning Outcomes1. Identify the clinical applications and protocols for the safe and effective use of a laser instrument while achieving Standard Proficiency Certification.2. Understand the fundamentals of laser operation, laser-tissue interaction and laser safety.3. Demonstrate knowledge with a clinical simulation proficiency examination and an online didactic examination. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 59
  • Saturday Workshops TDIC Risk Management: The High Cost of Shortcuts Sponsored by The Dentists Insurance Company  Beverly A. Kodama, DDS Daniel R. Watkins, Esq. Shortcuts have their place, but not in dentistry. Incomplete documentation, the omission of necessary procedures and failure to fully inform patients are why even the best dentist will likely experience a lawsuit at least once throughout a career. With real TDIC cases, this course will illustrate why effective patient communication and continuity of care are imperative in delivering excellent dentistry. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: general C.E. units: 20% — 3.0 AGD hours Course #: 822 Fee: $50 – dentist and staff $25—part-time TDIC policyholder (Must have a TDIC part-time Professional Liability policy to be eligible for this discount.) Free—new TDIC policyholder within first year TDIC policyholders are eligible for a 5 percent It’s the center of all things CDA. professional liability discount upon completion of this course. Learning Outcomes 1. Establish office procedures to respond to patient pain. It’s the CDA Member Benefits Center, #1107. 2. Develop strategies to educate patients about treatment recommendations. Speak with Practice Support Analysts to answer 3. Deploy effective protocols for medical emergencies. any of your questions. Ask a TDIC representative This workshop is approved by: about the Optimum insurance bundle and multipolicy discounts. Then, visit the CDA Foundation Center next door and learn about CDA Cares and other efforts to help the estimated 10 million Californians who experience barriers to dental care. Explore the discounts at the CDA Endorsed Programs area. A-Z, it’s everything a dentist needs, for less.60
  • International Symposia of Dental LearningMultidisciplinary Treatment Approachesto Complicated Malocclusion Cases Takashi Watanabe, DDS In cases with malocclusion, a comprehensive treatment plan that incorporates all clinical fields including orthodontic treatment is needed.Clinical application of orthodontic treatment can helpminimize the scope of prosthodontics intervention, improveplaque control and occlusion, and efficiently enhance esthetic,thus significantly improving treatment quality and outcomeprediction. However, the team approach that includestechnicians, hygienists, and assistants with complicated caseswhich needs comprehensive dental care is indispensable.Time: 9–11:30 a.m.Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab techC.E. units: Core – 2.5Learning Outcomes1. Describe the diagnosis and treatment procedures based on multidisciplinary treatment planning.2. Discuss the significance of a team approach.3. Identify preferred orthodontic treatment methods for complicated cases.Clinical Applications of OrthodonticTreatment in the Esthetic Zone The best of dentistry in the U.S., Takashi Watanabe, DDS and now a worldwide This lecture will examine outcomes that can be achieved by including orthodontic treatment perspective on dentistry. in the treatment options when solutions aresought for esthetics and functional problems accompanying While dentistry in the U.S.malalignment in the anterior zone. Topics addressed will includeimproved methods with papilla recession, new orthodontic is breaking newground, theextrusion methods for implant site development, precautions same can be said for alternativefor cases with crowded teeth and spaced dental arches, clinicalapplications of the Bolton analysis to obtain esthetic and philosophies and treatmentfunction, and traction of impacted teeth, among other topics. modalities the world over. JoinTime: 1–3:30 p.m. us in a spirit of internationalAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech camaraderie as we delve intoC.E. units: Core – 2.5 new techniques and materialsLearning Outcomes used by dentists across the globe.1. Describe the ways to achieve a harmonious balance between esthetics and function.2. Discuss the new techniques in implant site development using orthodontic extrusion.3. Identify possibilities for traction of impacted teeth. 61
  • Saturday Lectures Differential Diagnosis of Oral Lesions Adhesion, Not Tooth Destruction John L. Alonge, MS, DDS Raymond L. Bertolotti, DDS, PhD For some practitioners, development of a working There are many compelling clinical benefits differential diagnosis is one of the more difficult for utilizing adhesion rather than mechanical tasks in the diagnostic sequence. This session is retention with its inherent tooth destruction. designed to increase skills of both dentists and hygienists to Avoiding crowns increases the chance of avoiding successfully formulate a differential diagnosis to either treat or endodontics. The ideal onlay prep is flat; mechanical retention to confidently refer. leads to weaker restorations and post-op sensitivity. The ideal veneer prep is facial-incisal, avoiding envelope of motion Time: 8:30–11 a.m. alteration. Data confirms that veneers are often stronger than and repeats 12:30–3 p.m. crowns. After a presentation of current adhesive technology, Audience: dentist, RDH clinical protocols for utilization of adhesion are presented. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Extensive annotated references are given and included in a detailed lecture handout. Learning Outcomes 1. Review the diagnostic sequence to formulate a differential Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon diagnosis. and continues 1:30–4 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, lab tech 2. Understand practical classification schemes to refine clinical diagnoses. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session 3. Formulate differential diagnosis on soft-tissue and Learning Outcomes radiographic lesions. 1. Recognize many products that are market-driven and in conflict with Albert Einstein’s statement: “Everything should be as simple as possible, but not simpler.” 2. Learn about current generation bonding agents that show not all bonds in a “generation” are similar. It’s not even close. 3. See how to utilize adhesion to replace tooth destruction for many procedures.62 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Saturday LecturesPerio Education Experience: How to Put Great Question ... Glad You Asked That!Perio into Practice Ellen Byrne, DDS, PhD Charles Blair, DDS Not all pharmacology fits nice and neatly into This program will teach the doctor and staff an a textbook. While many pharmacological approach on how to optimize a perio program. principles remain the same, the number of The lack of treatment of periodontal disease by drugs introduced yearly is explosive. On a daily basisthe profession is a national epidemic, in view of the evolving the practitioner is required to ponder the significance oforal-systemic link. Dental teams do not know how to diagnose, complex medical histories with numerous drugs listed. Thiscode or sequence the treatment of periodontal disease. This informative presentation will answer questions such as: Whatcourse will get the office team on the same page by providing is the latest information on the bisphosphonates? Why hasscenarios, scripting, proper coding, ways to work with PPOs acetaminophen dosing changed? Can some drugs contribute toand the proper integration of technology. bruxism? What are the cardiovascular/GI risks associated with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs? Come preparedTime: 9–11:30 a.m. to enjoy pharmacology and leave with clinically importantAudience: dentist, RDA, lab tech information.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Time: 8–10:30 a.m.Learning Outcomes Audience: general1. Learn the impediments to starting a successful periodontal C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A program. Learning Outcomes2. Understand what elements make a successful periodontal 1. Learn new information on drugs that impact dentistry. program. 2. Understand risk factors associated with NSAIDs.3. Identify the dental insurance coding that applies to periodontal procedures. 3. Identify dental “side-effects” of drugs and drug classes.Stay Out of Jail: Avoid Coding Errors and Take Two Aspirin and Call Me in theExcel in Insurance Administration Morning! Charles Blair, DDS Ellen Byrne, DDS, PhD Learn the top coding errors and how to avoid Prescribing the best pain medication requires the them. Receive new, valuable information on some clinician to have knowledge of the pharmacology of the “hot” sections of the CDT code, which of the drug, desired effects and undesirable sideyou can use to identify and “fix” coding problems that lurk effects. This clinically relevant review will include majorin your practice. Most practices can expect legitimate new drug interactions involving pain medications, side effectsincreases in cash flow immediately by learning correct coding. and mechanisms of action involving nonsteroidal anti-Participants receive essential tools to properly file dental inflammatory drugs, narcotics and local anesthetics.insurance claims, calculate primary and secondary insurance Time: noon–2:30 p.m.receipts and much more. Audience: generalTime: 1–3:30 p.m. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO AAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff, spouse Learning OutcomesC.E. units: Core – 2.5 1. Compare and contrast the actions, including side effects and risks, associated with the various NSAIDs and narcoticLearning Outcomes analgesics.1. Learn predictive error correction and how to avoid typical 2. Identify appropriate prescribing of NSAIDs based on the coding errors. patient’s medical history.2. Gain knowledge into co-pay forgiveness, discounting, 3. Understand the FDA mandated changes in acetaminophen multiple fees, NPI numbers, etc. dosing.3. Learn how to handle patient gifts and evaluate and deal with PPOs. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 63
  • Saturday Lectures LAB TRACK UDIO A Creating a Successful Smile by the Learning Outcomes Numbers 1. Complete the All On-4 worksheet. Retro-fit the provisional Jack E. Edwards Jr., BA, CDT, MDT, TF denture to a fixed implant denture. Fabricate a definitive fixed implant denture. Before any technologist can design and fabricate 2. Understand how to take a dentate patient or an edentulous an esthetic, pleasing and functional removable patient to a fixed provisional implant denture with the All prostheses, correct information must be obtained On-4 protocol. from the dentist and patient. Gathering essential information about the patient’s features, wants and wishes is the best 3. Fabricate a master implant verification model for the CAD/ protocol. Mr. Edwards will talk about the “patient prosthetic CAM definitive implant denture or implant bridge. profile” with the use of clinical instruments and measuring tools and guide. Average evaluation of facial features and pre- existing denture with the help of photography is covered. Digital Restorative Dentistry and the Lab Time: 8–10 a.m. Michael C. DiTolla, DDS Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech There has been a stunning change in the C.E. units: Core – 2.0 UDIO prescribing habits of dentists in the last 7 years A resulting in one of the most dramatic paradigm Learning Outcomes shifts in modern dentistry. CAD/CAM technology has ushered 1. Learn how to obtain and gather case information and in a new generation of digital impressions and high-strength measurements needed for a successful outcome. cementable restorations that have changed the face of 2. Discover how to use clinical and technical tools to write a dentistry. comprehensive prescription. Time: 1:30–3 p.m. 3. Understand the evalution of facial features and pre-existing Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech dentures with the help of photography. C.E. units: Core – 1.5 Learning Outcomes A Proactive Team Approach to Avoid 1. Understand the difference between monolithic and bi-layered Pitfalls With the All On-4 Concept: From restorations and which are suitable for digital restorative Immediate Extraction, Provisionalization dentistry. to a Final CAD/CAM Procera Denture or 2. Learn the new cleaning, cementation and bonding protocol a Zircon Fixed Bridge for different monolithic restorations. Victor S. Rodriguez, AA, CDT, MAAIP 3. Analyze the pros and cons of the different digital impression systems. This course will provide the surgical team, restorative dentist and lab technicians with useful pre-prosthetics, model diagnostics and laboratory techniques utilizing the “All On-4” worksheet for optimum Lab Track Panel Discussion communication and avoiding hidden pitfalls. The course Time: 3–4 p.m. covers the stage one approach for the immediate extraction of Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech the edentulous patient to retro-fit a denture to a provisional C.E. units: Core – 1.0 fixed implant denture. And at stage two, doctors and laboratory technicians will be able to fabricate a master implant Jack E. Edwards Jr., BA, CDT, MDT, TF verification model for the CAD/Cam definitive fixed denture. Victor S. Rodriguez, AA, CDT, MAAIP A Zircon fixed bridge will be discussed with clinical cases. Michael C. DiTolla, DDS Time: 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student, lab tech C.E. units: Core – 2.064 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Saturday LecturesDental Insurance Coding for Success: Contemporary Orthodontic Care —What Every Office Should Know About Recognition and Treatment ofthe NEW CDT Codes Malocclusions Gary L. Dougan, DDS, MPH Steven A. Dugoni, DMD This course will review the latest ADA CDT This course will include an overview of codes effective as of January 2013, including comprehensive orthodontics for patients in any new codes, retired codes and changed code the mixed dentition, adolescent and the adultdescriptors. The course will review some of the most common dentitions. A review of diagnosis and treatment planning,mistakes made when coding dental claims, and codes that growth and development, space maintenance problems inare currently under scrutiny by insurance carriers. This will the mixed dentition, orthodontic appliance systems, stages ofprepare the dental team to know and understand how dental treatment and interdisciplinary care will be presented. Thecoding affects the success of insurance billing. speaker will explain how optimum dental health can be achieved working closely with general dentists and other specialists.Time: 9–11:30 a.m. and repeats 1–3:30 p.m. Time: 9–11:30 a.m.Audience: dentist, office staff and repeats 1–3:30 p.m.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Audience: dentist C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per sessionLearning Outcomes1. Know and understand the new CDT codes effective Learning Outcomes January 2013. 1. Understand growth and development in the young child and2. Know and understand the newly released codes, deleted the adolescent patient. codes and changes to existing dental procedure codes. 2. Analyze diagnosis of orthodontic problems in the mixed3. Code dental insurance claims ethically and avoid typical dentition, adolescent and adult dentition. errors in dental coding that can affect the success of the 3. Understand the role of the general dentist with adult office’s insurance billing. orthodontic interdisciplinary care. Check out the C.E. courses in See page 5 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 65
  • Saturday Lectures The Periodontal Cosmetic Makeover Coumadin, Pradaxa, Xarelto and Eliquis: Bruce A. Edelstein, DDS Oral Anticoagulants You Need to Know About Soft-tissue management is beneficial for many patients afflicted with periodontitis. However, Steven I. Ganzberg, DMD how does one determine when more extensive This course will provide participants with useful treatment is necessary for optimal results? This is a must-see clinical information on patients taking oral and for anyone who includes soft-tissue management in his or her injectable anticoagulants, antiplatelet drugs practice. Numerous case studies will be presented to illustrate and those with bleeding conditions. Clinical protocols when soft-tissue management results in optimal health or for managing these patients and their medications will be when it is the initial step in treatment. Adjuncts to enhance recommended and case presentations will be reviewed. treatment outcomes will be discussed in detail. Time: 8–10:30 a.m. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, C.E. units: Core – 2.5 office staff C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO Learning Outcomes A Learning Outcomes 1. Understand how the new oral anticoagulants work and why patients are taking them. 1. Learn the basics of what defines cosmetic and foundational proportions and guidelines. 2. Learn how to manage different anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications for dental or oral surgery. 2. Review the importance of gingival symmetry. 3. Manage the patient with a bleeding disorder or taking 3. Gain a better understanding and appreciation for the anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. intricacies of gingival augmentation and reduction procedures. Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office: The Art of Digital Photography Are You Prepared? Steven I. Ganzberg, DMD Bruce A. Edelstein, DDS This course will review common medical The technological advancement of digital emergencies and how to effectively manage them. photography has enabled today’s practitioner to Emergency medications and equipment essential capture and utilize clinical data in creative and in the dental office will be discussed. A step-by-step algorithm exciting ways. This course is not a “how-to” but a “what-to- for each common medical emergency will be presented. The do-with” and will clearly empower and inspire the clinician team concept of managing medical emergencies will and office staff to use digital photography to diagnose, be emphasized. communicate, gain case acceptance and orchestrate simple to complex cases. As an added benefit, incorporating these Time: noon–2:30 p.m. techniques can lead to dramatic and explosive practice Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student growth. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Time: 1:30–4 p.m. Learning Outcomes Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff 1. Prepare a functional medical emergency kit for the dental C.E. units: Core – 2.5 office. UDIO A 2. Understand common medical emergencies and how to Learning Outcomes prevent them. 1. Understand the basics of digital photography, which in this 3. Manage common medical emergencies following basic presentation have been made easier than ever to master. guidelines. 2. Learn the benefits of using digital photography in diagnosing and treatment planning dental cosmetic cases. 3. Understand use of digital photography not only to enhance the patient’s experience and communicate with other dental clinicians, but also to experience dramatic practice growth.66
  • Saturday LecturesReal World Dentistry 2013: Options … CAMBRA for the Private Practice A UDIOLimitations … Alternatives V. Kim Kutsch, DMDCo-sponsored by Ultradent and Voco America Dental caries is a complex biofilm disease that David A. Garber, DMD affects the teeth. In spite of all surgical attempts This program will address our need to meet the to treat it, dental caries remains the most escalating public demand for functionality and common childhood disease, and it affects people of all ages. esthetics by integrating innovative restorative This program consists of a review of the biofilm scientificsystems with implants and restoratively driven periodontics. It literature, current dental caries disease model, caries riskwill update the clinician on the most current techniques and assessment, demineralization/remineralization chemistry andmaterials in restorative dentistry, veneers, esthetics composite protocols for treating caries patients. A new model for privateand crown systems. It will incorporate a multidisciplinary practice that is simple to implement, effective and profitableperspective to treatment planning, and hard and soft tissue will be presented.management to enhance restorative outcomes. Everyday case Time: 8:30–11 a.m.examples will showcase practical applications to enhance Audience: generalpredictability and provide superior patient care and satisfaction. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO ATime: 8:30–11 a.m. and continues 1–3:30 p.m. Learning OutcomesAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech 1. Describe the new biofilm disease model for dental caries.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session 2. Understand caries risk assessment and its role in private practice.Learning Outcomes 3. Understand simple demineralization and remineralization1. Understand prosthetic considerations in esthetic restorations, chemistry. from abutment selection to crown options.2. Understand the importance of the soft-tissue component in the esthetic analysis. Dental Caries Therapeutic Strategies3. Learn what to use in different temporary restoration clinical Revisited scenarios. V. Kim Kutsch, DMD Dental caries is a complex biofilm diseaseMicrobiology and Infection Control in the that affects the teeth. Common strategies toDental and Health Care Facilities treat dental caries include restoration of the lesions, antimicrobial therapies and remineralization with Charles Gerba, BS, PhD fluoride. Newer approaches include remineralization with This course will provide participants with a calcium phosphate and probiotics, along with wellness. This background on the occurrence of microorganisms program reviews the biofilm literature and disease model, in dental and other health care facilities. The remineralization chemistry and the potential role of probiotics.types and occurrence of bacteria and viruses found on surfaces The program will also introduce the topic of wellnessand in water will be identified. How to select cleaning tools, coaching.disinfectants and sanitizers will be discussed. Time: 12:30–3 p.m.Time: 9:30 a.m.–noon and Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, repeats 1:30–4 p.m. office staff, spouseAudience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A office staff Learning OutcomesC.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session UDIO A 1. Describe the dental caries biofilm disease model.Learning Outcomes 2. Analyze the crystalline dynamics and pH influence on1. Identify locations most likely to become contaminated with remineralization chemistry and its role as a caries therapeutic microorganisms in dental facilities. strategy.2. Identify the potential risk of infection from microorganisms 3. Discuss the role of probiotics in treating dental caries. on surfaces and in water.3. Understand how to select disinfectants and sanitizers for control of microorganisms. 67
  • Saturday Lectures Integration of Esthetic Dentistry in SM4D — Social Media for Dentists Routine and Complex Prosthodontics (Campaign Strategy) Kenneth A. Malament, DDS Brad Newman The knowledge within dental technology, science This course will educate dental offices on the best and practice has expanded, leading to better ways to market themselves online with a variety quality artistry and better clinical applications. of social media sites. We will explore tools such as Ceramics are the most consistently predictable esthetic dental Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest, Foursquare, YouTube material. The monolithic all-ceramics have become the and more. Leveraging the power of Internet commercials, Yelp standard and do not chip, as do bi-layered ceramic materials. and blogs will also be covered. Coupled with a solid strategy These types of ceramics will dominate the market and future and tenacious execution, social media is a game changer for development, bringing with it more long-term success. dental offices. Time: 8–10:30 a.m. Time: 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and repeats noon–2:30 p.m. and repeats 1:30–4:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, lab tech office staff, spouse C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session C.E. units: non-eligible UDIO UDIO A A Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Understand key factors in treating patients for “esthetic 1. Maintain an online conversation that is fresh, relevant and procedures.” targeted for the right audience. 2. Review the controversies surrounding modern dental materials. 2. Understand what type of content works for social media sites and learn how to have a personality online, yet remain 3. Understand the clinical factors impacting survival of dental professional at all times. ceramic materials. 3. Create a more dynamic and unique website while improving page rank for search results and understand how to launch a social media campaign. Catch The Composite Wave: And Surf its Potential! K. William Mopper, DDS, MS Lasers in Dental Hygiene Learn clinically proven recipes for every Janet A. Press, RDH restorative situation and easy solutions to common esthetic problems, including which This course will discuss the adjunctive use of composites are best, the exact differences between microfill, lasers as an essential element in periodontal microhybrids and nanofills, the easiest techniques for Class therapy and for optimum recall management. Join III, IV and V restorations, techniques for creating realistic in as we explore the value and benefit of laser-assisted hygiene composite veneers, methods for using opaquing and tinting in its relationship to disinfection and biostimulation. Patient to mask metal and unwanted color to create invisible perception and expectations of the laser will be discussed restorations. Diastema closure, restorative orthodontics and regarding overall treatment acceptance. reinforcement of worn incisal edges will also be covered. Time: 9–11:30 a.m. Time: 1–4 p.m. and repeats 1–3:30 p.m. Audience: dentist, RDA, dental student Audience: dentist, RDH C.E. units: Core – 3.0 C.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes 1. Identify materials that bring functional results to overall 1. Discuss the science of laser wavelengths and absorption esthetic procedures. characteristics. 2. Understand why microfills, microhybrids and nanofills are 2. Understand thermal disinfection and how it promotes healing necessary for certain procedures. when used in laser-assisted hygiene. 3. Learn why it’s necessary to properly understand opaquing 3. Interpret laser-tissue interaction with its correlation to energy and tints in addition to finishing and polishing. settings and the variable levels of periodontics.68
  • Saturday LecturesMyths, Science and TMDs: What Do We Forensic Odontology: “The Tales ThatThink We Know? Teeth Tell!” Terry T. Tanaka, DDS Howard S. Glazer, DDS, FAGD The ability to recognize the signs and symptoms This program will familiarize the audience of temporomandibular disorders will make the with the need and responsibility of the forensic difference between a pleasant experience for both odontologist and the role played in multipleyou and the patient and time wasted, remakes and litigation. fatality incidents as well as the odontologist relationship andCome learn from someone who treated TMD patients for interaction with police, fire and judicial agencies. Specialmore than 40 years and lives to talk about it. This program emphasis will be placed on the dental role in mass disasterswill present a common sense approach to the diagnosis and such as the World Trade Center tragedy, the crash of AAmanagement of TMDs for the general dentist. Flight 587 and other such incidents. Forensic odontologists are often involved in both civil and criminal matters.Time: 8:30–11 a.m. and continues 12:30–3 p.m. Time: 9:30 a.m.–noonAudience: general Audience: generalC.E. units: Core – 2.5 per session C.E. units: Core – 2.5Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes1. Learn the two principal keys to TMD diagnosis. 1. Understand the role and responsibilities of the forensic2. Discover a new five-minute TMD examination. odontologist.3. Understand simple and effective TMD management 2. Review the nature and level of activity in recent multiple guidelines. fatality incidents. 3. Confirm the value of proper recordkeeping.OSHA Safety and Update on InfectiousDiseases “Yes is the Answer ... Now What was the Question?” Smart Patient Management Nancy L. Andrews, RDH, BS Howard S. Glazer, DDS, FAGD Based on science, but grounded in clinical reality, this course reviews and updates OSHA-required Successful marketing and ethical dental practices training topics for ordinary and extraordinary are not mutually exclusive. Today’s dentistinfectious diseases. General safety issues are reviewed, such receives excellent training in dentistry, but veryas physical and chemical risks, office organization relative little instruction in running a thriving practice. Dentists can’tto asepsis, accident avoidance and post-exposure strategies. survive on their own. A TEAM approach is essential to ensurePatient screening for aerosol transmitted diseases, standard success. Dr. Glazer is not a management consultant, but he is aprecautions and special accommodations for infectious practicing dentist with a philosophy that can create a win-winindividuals are presented. situation for the entire team. Learn how to generate patient enthusiasm.Time: 2–4:30 p.m.Audience: general Time: 1:30–4 p.m.C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Audience: dentist, RDA, office staff UDIO A C.E. units: 20% – 2.5Learning Outcomes1. Recognize and understand basic principles of disease Learning Outcomes transmission and pathogenesis of representative diseases. 1. Understand how to interact with potential patients.2. Explain the procedures for employee protection using hand 2. Review the proper use of the telephone. hygiene, PPE, sharps safety strategies and devices, as well as 3. Improve communication with patients. environmental asepsis.3. Apply required safety protocol to dental instrument management, waste management, hazards communication, post-exposure protocol and recordkeeping. Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com 69
  • Saturday Lectures State-of-the-Art Hygiene — A Virtual To “B” or Not To “B”: Behavior Reality Trip Through Cutting Edge Scaling Management of the Pediatric Dental Techniques Patient Diane Millar, RDH, MA Gregory L. Psaltis, DDS This course will provide participants with a virtual Have you ever wondered why pediatric dentists hands-on scaling experience in order to learn love their work? Imagine seeing nothing but reinforced periodontal instrumentation techniques. children all day. For some, this may sound like Ideal biomechanical ergonomic postures will be demonstrated and a nightmare. Attend this engaging and informative program then applied through audience participation during the seminar. and discover simple keys to the best kept secret in dentistry The importance of incorporating larger muscle groups and ideal — the joy of children. Child-friendly terminology, appropriate fulcrum rests to enhance lateral pressure, improve scaling efficacy appointments and specific positive feedback are all parts of the and ensure injury prevention will also be emphasized. successful visit for a child. Audience participation enhances the understanding of the child’s dental experiences. Parent Time: 9–11:30 a.m. guidelines are also discussed. Audience: dentist, RDH, dental student, periodontists Time: 8–10:30 a.m. C.E. units: Core – 2.5 Audience: dentist, RDH, RDA, dental student, office staff Learning Outcomes C.E. units: Core – 2.5 UDIO A 1. Demonstrate reinforced periodontal instrumentation Learning Outcomes techniques and ideal fulcrum rests by utilizing both hands. 1. Understand appropriate terminology. 2. Discover the importance of utilizing the larger muscle groups in the arms while scaling to enhance lateral pressure. 2. Learn how parents can be helpful and your best promotional tools. 3. Identify new strategies to prevent harmful posture and repetitive motion injuries. 3. Create a schedule that will optimize success with young patients.70 Registering online is easy at cdapresents.com
  • Advance Registration Deadline: Feb. 13, 2013 Speaker Course # Day/a.m./p.m. Fee Friday Workshops, April 12 (continued)PRESENTS The Art and Science of Dentistry Practice Opportunities Industry Speakers 031 a.m. $45 Speaker Course # Day/a.m./p.m. Fee TDIC Risk Management Courses Kodama/Watkins 820 a.m. $50Required Courses 821 p.m. $50California Dental Practice Act Thomason 001 Thursday $20 Saturday Workshops, April 13Infection Control Canham 002 Thursday $20 Endodontics Beach 032 a.m. $295California Dental Practice Act Curley 003 Friday $20 033 p.m. $295Infection Control Canham 004 Friday $20 Technology Fasbinder/Poticny 034 a.m. $45California Dental Practice Act Curley 005 Saturday $20 035 p.m. $45Infection Control Andrews 006 Saturday $20 Overdentures Higginbottom 036 a.m. $195Thursday Workshops, April 11 037 p.m. $195Lasers Coluzzi 007 a.m. $125 Esthetic Dentistry Mopper 038 a.m. $250 008 p.m. $125 Invisalign Clear Essentials I Ataii 039 a.m. $1,695RDAEF Program Kroll 009 a.m. $75 Invisalign Clear Essentials II Gates 040 a.m. $199 010 p.m. $75 Practice Transition Track (jr dentist) Industry Speakers 041 Full day $75Pediatric Psaltis 011 a.m. $195 Practice Transition Track (sr dentist) Industry Speakers 042 Full day $75 012 p.m. $195 Laser Certification Roshkind/Coluzzi 043 Full day $695Removable Prosthodontics Sharifi 013 p.m. $195 Assistant Program/Bleaching Wallace 044 a.m. $50Esthetics Willhite 014 a.m. $250 TDIC Risk Management Courses Kodama/Watkins 822 a.m. $50 015 p.m. $250 Special EventsTDIC Risk Management Courses Sahota/Sillis 818 a.m. $50 CDA Party in the Plaza 045 Friday $65 819 p.m. $50 Wine FUNdamentals Tasting Reception 046 Friday $30Friday Workshops, April 12 Prepaid Parking Voucher (Thurs. only) 047 Thursday $12Oral Surgery Alonge 016 a.m. $325 Prepaid Parking Voucher (Fri. only) 048 Friday $12 017 p.m. $325 Prepaid Parking Voucher (Sat. only) 049 Saturday $12Lasers Coluzzi 018 a.m. $125 Prepaid Food Voucher 050 N/A $10 019 p.m. $125 To purchase Disneyland® Resort tickets, visit cdapresents.comTechnology Fasbinder/Poticny 020 a.m. $45 Reserved Seating — Thursday, April 11 021 p.m. $45 Nutrition Harper-Mallonee 051 a.m. $10Crown Lengthening Grisdale 022 a.m. $295 052 p.m. $10Periodontics Grisdale 023 p.m. $295 Occlusion/Equilibration Wilkerson 053 Full day $10Esthetic Dentistry Mopper 024 a.m. $250 Reserved Seating — Friday, April 12Endodontics Olmsted 025 a.m. $295 Implants Tarnow 054 a.m. $10 026 p.m. $295 Pediatric Dentistry Psaltis 055 p.m. $10Removable Prosthodontics/Implants Sharifi 027 p.m. $275 Reserved Seating — Saturday, April 13Team Fabulous Wallace 028 Full day $45 Dental Materials Malament 056 a.m. $10Occlusion Wilkerson 029 a.m. $195 057 p.m. $10 030 p.m. $195 Restorative Dentistry Bertolotti 058 Full day $10
  •    Photocopy for additional registrants. Only one dentist per form. Primary Registrant (Print or Type) Membership dues must be paid for 2013. Advance registration deadline is Feb. 13, 2013. Register today! Name Online: Register at cdapresents.com License # ADA # Mail: CDA Presents, 1201 K St., 16th Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814 To ensure that proper C.E. credits are granted, licensed dental professionals Mailing Address must include their license number and formal name as listed with the Dental Board of California. Please complete all areas of this form legibly. Be sure to include registration types (Page 9). City State ZIP •  Registrations are processed in the order they are received. ■ Home ■ Office ■ Other ■ Check here if new address •  If your registration is received by the deadline, you will receive your order at least two weeks prior to the meeting. Telephone ( ) Fax ( ) •  Mailing will begin mid-February. •  Refund requests must be made in writing and materials returned to CDA no later than March 13, 2013. E-mail Address Current CDA members will receive complimentary registration. All staff/guests registering with a ■ I require special assistance ■ I do not wish to receive promotional materials for this meeting. dentist are $5 per person. Dentists must register separately. Primary Registrant (Print or type only primary registrant’s name only.) Registration Information Workshops and Required Courses Total Fees Last Name Formal First Name and Middle Initial License # Reg. type Fee $ Course # Fee $ Course # Fee $ Course # Fee $ Fee $ Staff/Guests Badges (Dentist cannot be registered as staff/guests.) Registration Information Workshops and Required Courses Total Fees Last Name Formal First Name and Middle Initial License # Reg. type Fee $ Course # Fee $ Course # Fee $ Course # Fee $ Fee $ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Special Event Tickets Total Fees Event # Fee $ X Quantity of Tickets = Fee $ This area is for the purchase of the CDA party and special event tickets. Please indicate the total number of tickets per event you wish to purchase in the X = adjacent area. Use the above area to purchase registrant-specific workshop tickets. X = Payment Grand Total Make check payable to California Dental Association. For your security, CDA Presents no longer accepts credit card information by fax or mail. To pay with a credit card please register at cdapresents.com. $ ____________ Questions? Visit cdapresents.com or call 800.232.7645
  • Hotel InformationSave time and Reservation Acknowledgments Acknowledgments will be sent to you directly from CDA’smoney—reach all Housing Bureau.the CDA hotels with Deposit/Cancellation Policyone phone call. Reservations will only be accepted with a credit card or company check payment. Company check must be made payable to requested hotel.Our ability to offer you the best conference dates and com-petitive hotel rates is directly tied to the number of rooms Reservations must be canceled before 5 p.m. Pacific Time onreserved under our block in the Anaheim Resort ™ Reserve . Friday, Feb. 22, 2013, to receive a full refund. Reservationsearly to get the hotel of your choice. A limited number of canceled after 5 p.m. Pacific Time on Feb. 22, but before 5rooms are available at these preferred rates, so call CDA’s p.m. Pacific Time on Friday, March 15, 2013, will be chargedHousing Bureau as soon as possible. Every effort will be made a $35 processing fee per room. Cancellations received afterto accommodate your first hotel choice. If your requested 5 p.m. Pacific Time on March 15, 2013, will forfeit theirhotel is not available, CDA’s Housing Bureau will confirm entire deposit.comparable accommodations for you. Hotel reservations mustbe made by March 15, 2013. Be sure to include a return fax number or email address in case of questions or problems with the fax transmission. Make reservations as soon as possible through CDA’s HousingPhone Bureau, by March 15, 2013. After this date, reservations will714.765.8868 be made on a space-available basis. Do not mail or fax formsOffice hours are 8:30 a.m.    p.m. Pacific Time. –5 to CDA headquarters as this will delay your request.Fax Changes, Cancellations, Refunds714.776.2688 All changes, cancellations and refund requests must be made in writing directly with CDA’s Housing Bureau. This can be done by mail, fax or email (anaheimhousing@anaheimoc.org).Mail An acknowledgment of your request will be sent to you once itCDA Housing Bureau has been completed. Refund and cancellation requests must be800 W. Katella Ave. received prior to Feb. 22, 2013, for full refund of hotel deposit.P.O. Box 4270 Reservations canceled after 5 p.m. Pacific Time, March 15,Anaheim, CA 92803 2013, will forfeit their entire deposit.Online/New ReservationsMaking reservations is easier than ever. Just log ontocdapresents.com, and you can make your hotel reservation.The online service has been upgraded to be more convenientand flexible in making and changing reservations. You mayphone, fax, complete the online housing form, or write tomake your reservations. Be sure to have a copy of the hotelreservation form and your credit card information on hand ifyou call, or complete the hotel reservation form and mail or faxto CDA’s Housing Bureau. Please do not do both! 73
  • Hotel Reservation Form Reservation Deadline: March 15, 2013 (After this date, reservations will be made on a space-available basis.) ONLINE MAIL TO PHONE FAX Book online anytime at CDA Housing Bureau 714.765.8868 cdapresents.com 800 W. Katella Ave. Office hours are 714.776.2688 P.O. Box 4270 8:30 a.m.–  p.m. PT 5 Anaheim, CA 92803 Name Address City State ZIP Phone Fax Email Name of person making the reservation Please indicate how your hotel selection was made: Location Rate Hotel Preference *room type *Room types vary by hotel. Please call the housing bureau for details, including suite information and rates 1st choice Rate . (1) Single (1 person) 2nd choice Rate (2) Double (2 people, 1 bed) (3) Double/Double (2 people, 2 beds) 3rd choice Rate (4) Triple (3 people, 2 beds) (5) Quad (4 people, 2 beds) names of occupants Arrival Departure room type *List corresponding # for room type CREDIT CARD INFORMATION All rooms require a deposit in the amount of a night’s lodging at the time of booking. ADDITIONAL RESERVATION INFORMATION: 1. Reservations will not be processed without a first night’s deposit. 2. If you are making more than one reservation, you will need to provide a credit card and billing address for each room. 3. Billing address should be provided if different than address on reservation. 4. Once a deposit has been posted to a reservation, it cannot be transferred to another reservation. 5. Each credit card must be valid through the reservation dates of the stay. 6. To pay by check, make check payable to requested hotel. 7. For fax or group reservations, you will receive a confirmation within five business days. 8. No refunds on room deposits will be given after March 15, 2013. Credit card number Exp. date Signature Print name as it appears on card IMPORTANT – PLEASE READ: No refunds on room deposits will be given after March 15, 2013. If you do not receive a confirmation within five days, please call for assistance. Please note duplicate/double booking of reservation will result in “no show” charges on your credit card. Deposit policy: Reservations will only be accepted with a credit card or check payment. Reservations and changes are subject to hotel availability. Cancellation policy: All cancellations must be made in writing through the CDA Housing Bureau. Reservations must be canceled before 5 p.m. Pacific Time on Friday, Feb. 22, 2013, to receive a full refund. Reservations canceled after Feb. 22, but before 5 p.m. Pacific Time on Friday, March 15, 2013, will be charged a $35 processing fee per room.74
  • Hotel RatesDeadline: March 15, 2013Reservations will only be accepted with a first night’s deposit.Map # Hotel Single Double 1. Hilton Anaheim Hotel – Main Building $209 $209 Hilton Anaheim Hotel – Lanai $229 $229 2. Anaheim Marriott $205 $205 3. Sheraton Park Hotel $180 $180 4. The Anabella $149 $149 5. Best Western Plus Stovall’s Inn $104 $104 6. Hyatt Regency Orange County $149 $149 7. Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel® $240 $240 8. Disneyland® Hotel $185 $185 9. Portofino Inn & Suites $125 $125 10. Red Lion Hotel Anaheim $116 $116 11. Howard Johnson Plaza Hotel $99 $99 12. Desert Palms Hotel & Suites $109 $109 13. Disney Paradise Pier® Hotel $165 $165 ©2010 Anaheim/Orange County Visitor & Convention Bureau 14. Clarion Hotel Anaheim Resort $132 $132 ARTESIA FREEWAY 15. Doubletree Suites by Hilton Anaheim Resort $152 $152 16. Embassy Suites Anaheim South $155 $155 5 The Anaheim Convention Center is within easy distance of all listed hotels. For rates for suites, please contact the CDA Housing Bureau. To reserve meeting space, please contact the Blvd. SA DISNEYLAND hotel directly, and the hotel will confirm NT Anaheim PARK A 11 AN release of the space with CDA Show A DOWNTOWN DISNEY FR SHOPPING DISTRIC T Management prior to reserving. EE WA 8 7 DISNEY’S HONDA Y CALIFORNIA Disney Wa CENTER ADVENTURE y Exhibit Hall Location ANAHEIM 13 PARK GARDENWALK AMTRAK 12 STATION 5 4 10 THE GROVE OF ANAHEIM Anaheim Convention Center 9 1 3 ANGEL 800 W. Katella Ave. ANAHEIM STADIUM CONVENTION CENTER 2 Anaheim, CA 92802 14 15 Please note: The hotel map is intended only to show proximity of each hotel to the Convention Center. Shuttles to the Convention Center will be 5 16 6 provided from hotels not within walking distance. B O R BL. THE BLOCK AT ORANGE R HA GARDEN GROVE FREEWAY THE ANAHEIM RESORT BOUNDARY 75
  • Hotel Descriptions For complete hotel description and room amenities, please visit cdapresents.com. Map # Hotel Description 1. Hilton Anaheim Hotel Just steps away from the Convention Center, guests can enjoy first- class amenities and features, including Starbucks, a food court and a restaurant, as well as a health club with spa services. 2. Anaheim Marriott This full-service hotel is next to the Convention Center. 3. Sheraton Park Hotel Adjacent to the Convention Center and a half-block from the Disneyland® Resort. 4. The Anabella Situated on the Convention Center campus and directly across the street from the Disneyland® theme parks. 5. Best Western Plus Stovall’s Inn The Best Western Plus Stovall’s Inn is the perfect business and vacation headquarters within walking distance of the Convention Center and the Disneyland® Resort. 6. Hyatt Regency Orange County Located five minutes from Disneyland® Park and the Anaheim Convention Center. 7. Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel® Footsteps away from Disneyland® Park, Disney’s California Adventure™ Park and the Downtown Disney® District, Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel® is a triumph of Arts and Crafts style. 8. Disneyland® Hotel The original Disneyland® Hotel is footsteps away from Disneyland® Park, Disney’s® California Adventure™ Park and the Downtown Disney® District. 9. Portofino Inn & Suites The Portofino Inn & Suites features deluxe rooms with balconies and suites, including kids’ suites with bunk beds. 10. Red Lion Hotel Anaheim The new Red Lion has gone through a complete transformation and reinvented itself into a premier place to stay. 11. Howard Johnson Plaza Hotel The Howard Johnson Plaza Hotel is directly across the street from all the Disney® attractions and minutes from the Convention Center. Amenities include complimentary parking and hot breakfast buffet. 12. Desert Palms Hotel & Suites This hotel is conveniently located within the Anaheim Resort, across the street from the Convention Center. Amenities include complimentary parking and hot breakfast buffet every morning. 13. Disney Paradise Pier® Hotel Disney’s Paradise Pier® Hotel captures the spirit of the Paradise Pier land in Disney’s California Adventure™ Park with its colorful, boardwalk-inspired decor and laid-back beach resort atmosphere. 14. Clarion Hotel Anaheim Resort This full-service hotel is adjacent to the Convention Center. 15. Doubletree Suites by Hilton This hotel at the Anaheim Resort is located adjacent to the Anaheim Resort Anaheim Convention Center, within walking distance from both the Convention Center and Disneyland® Park. 16. Embassy Suites Anaheim South Located in the magical Anaheim Resort area, this all-suite hotel is less than one mile from the Disneyland® Resort and the Anaheim Convention Center.76
  • MAKE ACLEAR IMPACTTO YOUR PRACTICE wITh InvIsALIgn® More patients want the solution they can barely see 9 out of 10 patients recommend InvisalignMany solutions claim to grow your practice, yet fall short of delivering the clinicalresults you expect. Invisalign not only delivers improved clinical outcomes, but it also Take CEI atdelivers demand. Patients are eager to achieve a great smile with a virtually undetectable CDA Springsolution. The facts speak for themselves—and show how Invisalign could grow yourdental practice: Take new Invisalign provider training at • 1.8 million patients have already chosen Invisalign CDA Anaheim • 93% of Invisalign patients are satisfied with their investment • Improved clinical outcomes with the innovative technology of InvisalignG4 www.cdapresents.comIt’s a great time to bring Invisalign into your practice and start attracting new patients.Get started by signing up for training today. No annual case or continuing educationrequirements needed.Register now! Visit: www.cdapresents.com© 2012 Align Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Some restrictions apply. Please see program details for terms and conditions.
  • Presort Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit 604 Sacramento, CAShow Management Debi Irwin Vice President debi.irwin@cda.org Lee Flickner Program Manager lee.flickner@cda.orgCalifornia Dental Association1201 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814 Phone 800.CDA.SMILE (232.7645) Fax 877.293.3752 cdapresents.com