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American Society of Hematology (ASH): Annual Meeting

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  • 1. AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 54th ASH Annual Meeting ® and Exposition PRELIMINARY PROGRAM Atlanta, GA G EO R G I A W O R L D CO N G R E S S C E N T E R Meeting Dates: December 8-11, 2012 Exposition Dates: December 8-10, 2012AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 2021 L Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036 Phone: 202-776-0544 Fax: 202-292-0269 meetings@hematology.org www.hematology.org
  • 2. Acknowledgments Greetings from the President Special thanks are due to: Agnes Y. Lee, MD ADDITIONAL PROG RAM 2012 AS H EXECUTIVE COM M ITTE E 2012 Education Program Co-Chair and Program COM M ITTE E M E M B E RS Committee Member OFFICERS It is my very distinct honor to invite you to join me for the preeminent celebration of research, Steven L. Allen, MD Armand Keating, MD, President education, and patient care in hematology at the 54th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Martin S. Tallman, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Practice Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President-Elect Annual Meeting and Exposition at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia. 2012 Education Program Co-Chair and Program Linda J. Burns, MD, Vice President Committee Member Cynthia E. Dunbar, MD Charles Abrams, MD, Secretary The ASH annual meeting is the main event in hematology that we look forward to each year, Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, Blood Richard Larson, MD, Treasurer Bruce R. Blazar, MD and the 2012 meeting promises to be the most exciting one yet. Our Education Program, 2012 Scientific Program Co-Chair and Program Peter D. Emanuel, MD COUNCILLORS chaired by Drs. Agnes Lee and Martin Tallman, will provide the practicing hematologist with Committee Member Liaison, Chair, Committee on Communications Kenneth C. Anderson, MD invaluable information on nearly 30 of the most important areas of clinical progress, and our David M. Bodine, PhD Scientific Program, chaired by Drs. Bruce Blazar and Roy Silverstein, promises to showcase Roy L. Silverstein, MD Robert A. Hromas, MD Michael A. Caligiuri, MD 2012 Scientific Program Co-Chair Liaison, Chair, Committee on Scientific Affairs Joseph M. Connors, MD the latest scientific advances in 17 key areas of hematology. and Program Committee Member Marilyn J. Telen, MD Jose A. Lopez, MD Alexis A. Thompson, MD In addition to the Education and Scientific Programs, I’m excited to share several new and Charles Abrams, MD 2013 Scientific Program Co-Chair David A. Williams, MD expanded offerings with you. First, and most importantly, we have added more sessions to the Secretary and Program Committee Member John C. Winkelmann, MD schedule. For the first time, sessions from our Education Program will be offered on Monday Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD Linda Burns, MD Liaison, Editor-in-Chief Designee, Bloodin addition to Saturday and Sunday. Our Simultaneous Oral Sessions have also been expanded, with new slots added on Vice President, Executive Editor, HematologySaturday and Sunday. 2012, and Program Committee Member Charles J. Parker, MD Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, The HematologistThis year’s meeting will also feature new Special Symposia. ASH will offer a Special Symposium on Epigenetics in Joseph Mikhael, MDHematopoiesis that will focus on the effects of epigenetic alterations and gene mutations on hematopoietic stem cell function Co-Editor, Hematology 2012 Andrew W. Roberts, MD, PhDand discuss how epigenetics play a role in hematopoietic malignancies. In addition, our popular Tuesday morning Special Liaison, Chair, International Members Committee Bradford Schwartz, MDSymposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis has been reconfigured based on audience feedback. Co-Editor, Hematology 2012 Gary J. Schiller, MDThe afternoon posters have been discontinued in favor of an enhanced morning program that will include a session highlighting Liaison, Chair, Committee on Training Programsthe best thrombosis and hemostasis talks from the entire meeting. Kevin Shannon, MDOur popular, ticketed “Meet-the-Expert” sessions that have become a favorite for many at the ASH meeting have also been 2013 Scientific Program Co-Chairrevamped for 2012. Now titled “Meet the Scientist” and “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas,” these sessions Wendy Stock, MDhave been restructured into basic science and clinical discussions, respectively, designed to foster informal interaction with 2013 Education Program Co-Chairsome of the top experts in hematology. And a brand new session category – the ticketed “Scientific Forums” – will provideattendees with the opportunity to participate in small-group sessions with some of the field’s leading scientific authorities over John F. Tisdale, MD 2013 Education Program Co-Chairlunch. For an entire list of each of the new offerings at this year’s annual meeting, see the “What’s New” section on page 3. Jane N. Winter, MDOf course, the Society’s annual celebration of groundbreaking advances in hematology would not be complete without Liaison, Chair, Committee on Educational Affairshonoring some of the distinguished leaders in the field through awards and special lectures. I encourage you to read moreabout each of our 2012 honorees on pages 7–9.Finally, I hope that in the midst of marveling at the stimulating clinical and scientific advances presented at this year’s meeting,catching up with old friends and colleagues, and enjoying the cultural attractions of Atlanta, you take some time to considerparticipating more actively in ASH in 2013. If you are not yet a member, why not consider submitting an application at ASHCentral to take advantage of the many programs and services ASH has to offer? If you are already a member, considervolunteering to serve on a committee (visit www.hematology.org/Leadership) or make a gift to the new ASH Foundation, to beformally announced at this year’s meeting (learn more on page 44). There are countless ways to get involved, from writing toyour legislators about the importance of federal funding for biomedical research to sharing your expertise with colleagues in adeveloping country (see page 13). It is truly an exciting time for the Society. We need your talents and energy to move the fieldforward!The ASH annual meeting is without question the premier hematology meeting in the world. I hope that you will join me inAtlanta in December!Sincerely yours,Armand Keating, MD2012 President
  • 3. 54th ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition ® Atlanta, GA • Georgia World Congress Center Meeting Dates: December 8-11, 2012 • Exposition Dates: December 8-10, 2012 Table of ContentsProgram InformationCONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION CREDIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ORAL AND POSTER SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43MEETING OVERVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SOCIAL EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Important Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Welcome Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 What’s New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Poster Hall Receptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Schedule At-a-Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 EXPOSITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44GENERAL SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ASH Booth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Ham-Wasserman Lecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ASH Foundation Booth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 ASH/EHA Joint Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 National Institutes of Health Booths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Announcement of Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 • allace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 W Achievement in Hematology • Mentor Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 General Information Remarks by Dr. Bob Löwenberg, Blood’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 REGISTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Editor-in-Chief Designee Plenary Scientific Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION INFORMATION . . . . . . 48 E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Hotel Listing and Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Announcement of Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 • William Dameshek Prize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 TRAVEL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 • Henry M. Stratton Medal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Meeting Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Presidential Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Business Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Air Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Best of ASH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Visa Application Process for International Travelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Public Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53SPECIAL-INTEREST SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Car Rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Training Program Directors’ Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Parking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Special Symposium: Quality Improvement – . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Shuttle Bus Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 A Toolkit for Hematology Practice Remote Airline Check-in Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Special Symposium on Epigenetics in Hematopoiesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Practice Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ATTENDEE SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Practice Forum Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ASH Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ASH Job Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 and Reception Free Wi-Fi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 ASH/ASCO Joint Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Lactation Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Grassroots Network Lunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Georgia World Congress Center: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online . . . . . 13 Guest Services and Dining Options The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing Your Hematology . . . . . . . . 13 Expertise Globally ASH PUBLICATIONS AND MEETING MATERIALS . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Special Symposium on the Basic Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Abstracts on Flash Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 of Hemostasis and Thrombosis Annual Meeting Mobile Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Abstracts Online/Program Planner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56TRAINEE ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Trainee Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Hematology 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Trainee Welcome Reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Program Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Career-Development Lunch Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Annual Meeting Education Program DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Annual Meeting On-Demand Webcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Trainee Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 ASH News Daily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Additional Opportunities and Resources for Trainees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 MEETING RULES AND REGULATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58EDUCATION PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 UPCOMING ASH MEETINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BACK COVERTICKETED SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Education Spotlight Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 American Board of Internal Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Maintenance of Certification Learning Session How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Meet the Scientist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Scientific Forums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Consultative Hematology Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 4. Continuing Medical Education Credit The American Society of Hematology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Society of Hematology designates this live activity for a maximum of 37 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians not licensed in the United States who participate in this CME activity are also eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Please see page 48 for more information on how to obtain these credits, as well as how to claim CME credits through the European Hematology Association.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 2
  • 5. Meeting OverviewImportant Dates June 7 – August 14 Abstract Submission Website Open Only electronic submissions will be permitted. Visit the ASH website (www.hematology.org) for abstract submission information. July 18 – August 7 Online Early-Bird Registration Open for ASH Members Only August 8 – November 7 Advance Registration Open for ASH Members and Non-Members October 5 Group Room Block Request and Cancellation Deadline (see page 49) October 5 Rooming Lists and Full Payments for Group Room Blocks Due to the ASH Housing Center (see page 49) October 22 – 29 Late-Breaking Abstract Submission Website Open The selection process for late-breaking abstracts is extremely competitive; a maximum of six abstracts will be selected, regardless of the number of submissions. This deadline is not intended as an extension of the general submission deadline. Abstract reviewers will focus on capturing abstracts with groundbreaking, novel data that otherwise could not be presented at the annual meeting. November 7 Advance Registration Deadline Registration must be received by this date in order to qualify for the reduced advance registration rates. November 7 Individual Hotel Reservation Deadline Reservations must be made by this date in order to qualify for the reduced room rate. November 7 Child-Care Registration Deadline Space is limited. Registration must be made by this date in order to secure child care. November 27 Meeting Registration Cancellation DeadlineWhat’s NewIn a continuing effort to improve and enhance the ASH annualmeeting experience and offerings, each year the Societyadds new sessions and programs. Attendees should takenote of the new and enhanced offerings listed below that NEW THIS YEARare making their debut at this year’s annual meeting; thesewill be indicated throughout this brochure with a “New ThisYear” or “New Time” icon: • Special Symposium on Epigenetics in Hematopoiesis – new offering (page 11) NEW TIME • Grassroots Network Breakfast now Grassroots Network Lunch – new time (page 13) • Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis – extended schedule (page 13) • Education Program Sessions – extended into Monday (page 17) • Small Interactive Sessions with Experts (formerly “Meet-the-Expert Sessions”) – enhanced sessions › How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas (page 40) › Meet the Scientist (page 41) › Scientific Forums (page 42) • Simultaneous Oral Sessions – extended schedule on Saturday and Sunday (page 43) • ASH Foundation – new organization (page 44) • Abstracts on flash drive only – print book discontinued (page 56) This icon denotes sessions that may be of interest to PhD attendees. 3 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 6. Schedule At-a-GlanceFinal schedule and meeting room assignments will be provided in the program material distributed at the annual meeting. THURSDAY, DECEMBE R 6 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Registration FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (sponsored by nonprofit organizations) These symposia are not part of the official ASH annual meeting and are planned solely by the sponsoring organizations. Brief symposium descriptions are included in a separate booklet provided with this brochure. 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Learning Session (ticketed session) 12:00 noon – 5:00 p.m. Trainee Day (open to trainees wearing a blue badge only; pre-registration required) 12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (sponsored by nonprofit and for-profit organizations) 12:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Training Program Directors’ Workshop 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Trainee Welcome Reception and Meeting Overview (open to trainees wearing a blue badge only) 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Friday Satellite Symposia (sponsored by nonprofit and for-profit organizations) SATURDAY, DECEMBE R 8: ASH ANNUAL MEETING BEGINS 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Registration 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Coffee Break (poster hall) 9:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Viewing 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas (ticketed sessions) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Meet the Scientist (ticketed sessions) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Career-Development Lunch Sessions (open to trainees wearing a blue badge only) 12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Ham-Wasserman Lecture 1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Education/Scientific Program 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Special Symposium: Quality Improvement – A Toolkit for Hematology Practice 3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Special Symposium on Epigenetics in Hematopoiesis 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Education/Scientific Program 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Presentations 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Welcome Reception (poster hall) 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Practice Forum 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception 7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Practice Forum ReceptionASH 54th Annual Meeting 4
  • 7. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Coffee Break (poster hall) 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session II – Viewing 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. ASH/ASCO Joint Symposium 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Education/Scientific Program 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch (A light lunch will be provided in the Exhibit Hall) 11:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Exhibits Open 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Grassroots Network Lunch 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas (ticketed sessions) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Meet the Scientist (ticketed sessions) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Scientific Forums (ticketed sessions) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions (open to trainees wearing a blue badge only) 12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. ASH/EHA Joint Symposium 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Announcement of Awards • Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology • Mentor Award 1:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Remarks by Dr. Bob Löwenberg, Blood’s Editor-in-Chief Designee 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Plenary Scientific Session 4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Education Spotlight Sessions (ticketed sessions) 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session II – Presentations 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Hall Reception 6:15 p.m. – 7:15 p.m. Blood and Beyond: Searching the Scientific Literature Online 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing Your Hematology Expertise Globally 5 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 8. Schedule At-a-Glance MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Education Program 7:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Consultative Hematology Course (ticketed session) 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize 10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Coffee Break (Exhibit Hall) 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Viewing 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Simultaneous Oral Sessions 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Education Program 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon Education Spotlight Sessions (ticketed sessions) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Scientific Forums (ticketed sessions) 12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m. Open Time for Lunch (A light lunch will be provided in the Exhibit Hall) 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions (open to trainees wearing a blue badge only) 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Ernest Beutler Lecture and Prize 2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Coffee Break (poster hall) 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 pm. Education Program 2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Education Spotlight Sessions (ticketed sessions) 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Presentations 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Hall Reception 6:15 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions TUESDAY, DECEMBE R 11 7:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Registration 7:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Special Symposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Simultaneous Oral Sessions 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Late-Breaking Abstracts Session 9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Announcement of Awards • William Dameshek Prize • Henry M. Stratton Medal 9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Presidential Symposium 11:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Business Meeting 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. Best of ASHASH 54th Annual Meeting 6
  • 9. General SessionsS AT U R D AY S U N D AYHam-Wasserman Lecture ASH/EHA Joint SymposiumSATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 12:30 P.M. – 1:30 P.M. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 12:15 P.M. – 1:15 P.M.This lectureship is named in honor of two past Society presidents, the TITLE:late Thomas Hale Ham, MD, and the late Louis R. Wasserman, MD,distinguished hematologists who contributed extensively to the Society. Overcoming Stem Cell Tourism by Promoting Clinical TrialsThe Ham-Wasserman Lecture is given by an individual from outside theUnited States who has made a major contribution to our understanding CO-CHAI R S:of an area that relates to hematology. Armand Keating, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaTITLE: Ulrich Jäger, MD, President, European Hematology Association, MedicalTreatment of AML: Are We Making Progress? University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria S PEAKE R: S PEAKE R S: Alan K. Burnett, MD, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, United Kingdom Alan Trounson, PhD, President, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, San Francisco, CA Age is an important initial consideration in deciding Douglass Sipp, Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe, Japan what treatment strategy to follow for new patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and may represent a How does a hematologist balance the desire to help patients with dire useful surrogate for the likelihood of toleration-intensive clinical prognoses with the need to promote randomized clinical trials for chemotherapy. In younger patients, there is clear new or unproven treatments?evidence of improved survival in the last two or three decades, although thisappears to be due primarily to improvements in supportive care and may Periodically, setbacks occur in the development of clinical trials for stem cellbe limited to those with favorable-risk disease. In older patients, there is treatments. At the same time, the prevalence of stem cell tourism has beenlittle evidence of similar improvement, and the appropriateness of intensive on the rise, providing patients with tempting but very risky alternatives.treatment represents a current dilemma. Epidemiological and limited clinicalstudies might suggest that patients with similar characteristics will benefit The scientific community, while sympathetic to patients’ concerns andfrom an intensive approach; however, there may be several undefined factors motivations, understands the importance of promoting well-designed clinicalthat dictated the treatment decision. The combination of a nucleoside trials that adhere to the scientific process in order to develop safe andanalogue and an anthracycline (7+3) schedule has been the standard of efficacious stem cell treatments. Without these trials, issues with stem cellcare for several years. therapies will remain unresolved and progress in this arena of regenerative medicine will stagnate.The ability to accurately monitor treatment by molecular or immunopheno-typic techniques has the potential to enhance a personalized approach to The session will feature Dr. Alan Trounson of the California Institute fortreatment. A substantial proportion of patients do not receive conventional Regenerative Medicine, who has led this institution since its founding. He willchemotherapy and there is considerable scope not only for novel treatments, be joined by Douglass Sipp, of the Office for Science Communications andbut also for trial design (e.g., the so-called “pick a winner” program). Since International Affairs at the Center for Developmental Biology in Japan. Theyconventional chemotherapy has probably reached its potential, there is will discuss the current obstacles and possible solutions to the challenge ofinterest in novel treatments, particularly in older patients. assuring all avenues of regenerative medical research.In this lecture, recent reports of dose escalation, augmentation by antibody-directed chemotherapy, or alternative chemotherapy to challenge thisstandard will be discussed. Consolidation with high-dose Ara-C is thestandard of care for post-remission chemotherapy, but how often andat what dose level could be debated. Which patients should be offeredstem cell transplant in first remission is also a matter of debate and riskassessment. The molecular and cytogenetic heterogeneity of AML isincreasingly recognized and is being used to direct treatment to patientsubgroups, of which several examples will be demonstrated. While muchof this information is prognostic, the extent to which it is predictive of benefitto a chosen therapy is less clear, but potential examples are emerging. 7 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 10. General SessionsAnnouncement of Awards Plenary Scientific SessionSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1:15 P.M. – 1:45 P.M. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2:00 P.M. – 4:00 P.M. During this prestigious session, a highlight of the annual meeting, attendeesWallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology will hear the presentations of the highest-caliber scientific abstracts selectedThis award, named for Wallace Henry Coulter, a prolific inventor who by the Program Committee from among the thousands submitted frommade important contributions to hematology and to ASH, is bestowed around the world. Plenary Scientific Session speakers and topics will beon an individual who has demonstrated a lifetime commitment and made announced on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) when the abstractsoutstanding contributions to hematology, and who has made a significant are posted online in early November.impact on education, research, and practice. The 2012 Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology will be presented to James George, MD, of the M O N D AY University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City for his remarkable career and commitment to hematology. Dr. George is E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize a pioneer in the field of platelet glycoproteins, specializing in the radiolabeling of platelet MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 9:00 A.M. – 10:00 A.M. surface components and their analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This award and lectureship was created in 1992 and named after Nobel Prize His methods helped define the molecular basis of platelet function laureate and past Society president E. Donnall Thomas, MD. The E. Donnall in hemostasis. Dr. George has received numerous awards, including Thomas Prize recognizes pioneering research achievements in hematology. the Tibor Greenwalt Career Research Award of the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) and the Investigator Recognition TITLE: Award for Contributions to Hemostasis of the International Society The AML Genome on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH). Dr. George’s dedication to hematology spans more than four decades, exemplifying excellence in S PEAKE R: research, clinical care, and education. Timothy J. Ley, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MOMentor Award Cytogenetics has been an important tool for the classification and treatment of acute myeloid leukemiaThe ASH Mentor Award was established to recognize hematologists who (AML) for decades. Since 2008, it has becomehave excelled in mentoring trainees and colleagues. Each year the Society possible to sequence the entire genomes of AMLrecognizes two mentors, one in the basic sciences and one in clinical samples to define their detailed structures. Severalinvestigation and training, who have had a significant, positive impact on hundred AML genomes and exomes have now been sequenced, providingtheir mentees’ careers, and, through their mentees, have advanced research an unprecedented view of all of the common somatic mutations that occurand patient care in the field of hematology. The 2012 award winners will be in this disease. Next-generation DNA sequencing approaches are providingannounced at the meeting. detailed information about the clonal architecture of AML at presentation and its evolution at relapse, and may provide new clues regarding the genetic underpinnings of drug resistance and disease progression. As additional AML genomes are sequenced, a fully integrated view of the AML genome (and epigenome) will become apparent, which will hopefully allow for more accurate classification and treatment plans for all patients with this disease.Remarks by Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD,Blood’s Editor-in-Chief DesigneeSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1:45 P.M. – 2:00 P.M. Dr. Bob Löwenberg, who will assume the role of Blood Editor-in-Chief beginning in January 2013, will introduce his editorial team and his plans for the future direction of the journal, prior to the Plenary Scientific Session.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 8
  • 11. Henry M. Stratton MedalErnest Beutler Lecture and Prize The Stratton Medal, named for the late Henry Maurice Stratton, co-founder of Grune and Stratton, the medical publishing house that first publishedMONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1:30 P.M. – 2:30 P.M. Blood, has traditionally honored an individual known for his or her outstanding, well-recognized contributions to hematology in basic scienceThis two-part lectureship, named for past president of ASH and legendary or clinical and/or translational research. For the first time in 2012, thephysician-scientist Ernest Beutler, MD, recognizes major advances related Stratton Medal will be awarded to two individuals, one in basic researchto a single topic. This award honors two individuals, one who has enabled and the other in clinical/translational research.advances in basic science and another for achievements in clinical scienceor translational research.TITLE: The 2012 Stratton Medal for Basic Research will be awarded to David Ginsburg,T-Cell Infusions: A New Tool for Transfusion Medicine MD, of the University of Michigan in Ann ArborThat Has Come of Age and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, for his many seminal scientific contributions in S PEAKE R S: characterizing the molecular and genetic basis of inherited bleeding and clotting disorders. Bruce R. Blazar, MD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Insights from his profound studies of the biosynthesis, processing, and function of the key Carl H. June, MD, Abramson Cancer Center, protein targets affected in these hemostatic disorders have allowed University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Dr. Ginsburg to define the molecular biology of the major inherited coagulopathies. Dr. Ginsberg has received several other prestigious Adoptive T-cell therapy is an emerging form of awards, including ASH’s 2000 E. Donnal Thomas Prize, and his work transfusion therapy that has potential to establish has led to unprecedented knowledge of the role of clotting factors in tolerance to hematopoietic or solid organ allografts, the body’s response to infection. treat autoimmunity, and promote immunity to cancer and chronic infection. Advances in the understanding of T-cell biology have led to the development of efficient large-scale T-cell cultures, permitting the infusion of autologous or allogeneic T cells with retention of the desired function. Genetic engineering The 2012 Stratton Medal for Clinical/ can be combined with T-cell cultures, so that Translational Research will be awarded strategies to regenerate damaged immune systems to Richard Aster, MD, of the BloodCenter ofor to enhance cell functions as an application of synthetic biology are now Wisconsin and Medical College of Wisconsinpossible. Clinical studies have established proof of concept for the ability in Milwaukee, for his many breakthroughs inof T-cell transfer therapy to either inhibit the adverse effects of allogeneic platelet immunology, mainly in drug-inducedhematopoietic cell transplantation or to promote tumor immunity. antibodies, human leukocyte antigen anti-platelet antibodies, and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Dr. Aster, who founded the Blood Research Institute of the Blood Center of Southeastern Wisconsin in 1970 andT U E S D AY served as its first executive director, has contributed significantly to the development of hemostasis research in blood banks and has also served as a mentor to several generations of physicians and scientists.Announcement of AwardsTUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 9:30 A.M. – 9:45 A.M.William Dameshek PrizeThe William Dameshek Prize, named for the late William Dameshek, MD, apast president of ASH and the original editor of Blood, recognizes a recentoutstanding contribution to the field of hematology. The 2012 Dameshek Prize will be awarded to Margaret A. Goodell, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, for her leadership and outstanding contributions in stem cell biology. Following her early discovery of the “side population” of stem cells, she identified mechanisms that regulate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), particularly during stress, characterizing the self-renewal cycle of HSCs in response to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and showing how tight regulation of the interferon regulatory system is required for normal HSC function. In addition, Dr. Goodell’s work has demonstrated that chronic infection directly alters HSC dormancy through the interferon response, lending new insight into how the entire hematologic response is coordinated during stress. This discovery has major implications for both normal and malignant hematology, providing new targets for manipulation of normal stem cells and therapeutic intervention. 9 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 12. General SessionsPresidential Symposium Business MeetingTUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 9:45 A.M. – 11:15 A.M. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 11:15 A.M. – 11:30 A.M.TITLE: At least one month prior to the annual meeting, reports on ASH’s financial status, Blood, and awards, and information about the Society’s leadershipRegenerative Medicine nominations are made available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) for review by ASH members. The Business Meeting will offer a forum forCHAI R: members to raise issues of concern regarding the information presented inArmand Keating, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, Princess these documents and conclude with the traditional passing of the gavel toMargaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada the new ASH President.S PEAKE R S:Gordon Keller, PhD, McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Toronto,Ontario, CanadaPluripotent Stem Cells: Modeling Human Hematopoietic Development Best of ASHDavid T. Scadden, MD, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Boston, MA TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 12:00 NOON – 1:00 P.M.Adult Stem Cells: Hematopoietic Stem Cells and their Niche CO-CHAI R S:Michele De Luca, MD, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia,Modena, Italy Bruce R. Blazar, MD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MNStem Cells to the Clinic: Lessons from the Limbus Roy L. Silverstein, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WIThe generation of hematopoietic stem cells from pluripotent stem cells Before heading home, make time to attend “Best of ASH” on Tuesday for a(PSCs) depends on our ability to accurately recapitulate key aspects review of the key themes from this year’s meeting. Don’t miss this one-hourof embryonic hematopoietic development in the differentiation cultures. session, led by the 2012 Annual Meeting Scientific Program Co-Chairs, toDuring the 2012 ASH Presidential Symposium, Dr. Gordon Keller will hear about the biggest breakthroughs from the meeting’s more than 4,000discuss the progress in modeling human hematopoietic development from abstract presentations.PSCs in vitro and highlight approaches made to distinguish primitive anddefinitive hematopoiesis and to identify the signaling pathways that regulatethese programs. Dr. Keller will also describe the identification of a PSC-derived definitive hematopoietic progenitor that develops from hemogenicendothelium and displays the capacity to generate lymphoid, myeloid, anderythroid progeny.The advances in isolating and molecularly characterizing hematopoietic stemcells have led to few methods for altering their function in patients. Thesepowerful and potentially dangerous cells rely on complex cues from thebone marrow environment for their regulated activity. Dr. David Scadden willfocus on how dissecting the interaction between hematopoietic stem cellsand the bone marrow has both enriched our understanding of how stemcells are governed and guided the development of treatments to improvehematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Dr. Scadden will also discuss dataindicating that bone marrow stroma is highly dynamic and may contribute todysplastic and neoplastic hematologic disease.Epithelial stem cells, known as holoclones, are responsible for renewaland repair of human stratified epithelium. Stem cells of human cornealepithelium are located in the limbus, the narrow zone between the corneaand the bulbar conjunctiva. Self-renewal and proliferation of limbal stemcells are regulated by known transcription factors. Ocular burns maydestroy the limbus, causing limbal stem cell deficiency. In such cases, thecornea acquires an epithelium through the invasion of bulbar conjunctivalcells. This process causes neovascularization, chronic inflammation, andscarring, leading to corneal opacity and loss of vision. Allogeneic cornealtransplantation, aimed at replacing the scarred corneal stroma and theinner endothelium, is, however, not a successful treatment. The only wayto prevent this invasion is to restore the limbus. The finding that humanlimbal cell cultures contain stem cells led to the first therapeutic use ofsuch cultures in the regeneration of corneal epithelium. Dr. Michele de Lucawill present long-term clinical results of patients successfully treated withautologous limbal stem cell cultures.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 10
  • 13. Special-Interest SessionsF R I D AY This session will expand upon the “plan, do, study, act” cycle, how to develop a multidisciplinary quality improvement team, and how to identify appropriate goals for a quality improvement program. The session will also include practical examples in two clinical areas relevant to hematology: increasing retrieval of temporary vena caval filters and increasing appropriate use ofTraining Program Directors’ Workshop venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized patients. The goal of the session is to focus on the development and successful implementation ofFRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, 12:30 P.M. – 5:00 P.M. quality improvement efforts with illustrative examples that can be translated toThe Training Program Directors’ Workshop provides an interactive forum many other clinical areas of hematology.for directors of all hematology-related training programs to learn from theexperts and from each other.CHAI R:Alison W. Loren, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PADI DACTIC S E SS ION S:S PEAKE R S:F. Daniel Duffy, MD, University of Oklahoma – Tulsa, Tulsa, OKSystems-Based Practice in Fellowship EducationLee R. Berkowitz, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill, NCMilestones in Graduate Medical EducationB R EAKOUT S E SS ION S:S PEAKE R S:Lee R. Berkowitz, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill, NCImplementing Milestones in FellowshipF. Daniel Duffy, MD, University of Oklahoma – Tulsa, Tulsa, OKChristian Cable, MD, Scott & White, Temple, TXImplementing Systems-Based Practice Initiatives in Fellowships Special Symposium on Epigenetics in HematopoiesisThese sessions will provide training program directors outstanding SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 4:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M. NEWopportunities to learn about and share best practices for critical issues THIS YEARfacing their programs. Program directors who complete this workshop CHAI R:will be eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM. A buffet lunch will beavailable at 12:30 p.m. and the program will run from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Ari Melnick, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NYThere will be no business meeting with this workshop. S PEAKE R S: Margaret A. Goodell, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem CellsS AT U R D AY Lucy A. Godley, MD, PhD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Control of Hematopoiesis Olivier Bernard, PhD, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, FranceSpecial Symposium: Quality Improvement Epigenetic Alterations in Myeloid Malignancies– A Toolkit for Hematology Practice This session will focus on the epigenetic paradigms that control geneSATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2:00 P.M. – 3:30 P.M. expression across the hematopoietic cell lineages, the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic alterations control hematopoietic stemCO-CHAI R S: cell function and differentiation, and the effects of gene mutations inJohn J. Strouse, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of hematopoietic malignancies.Medicine, Baltimore, MD Dr. Margaret Goodell will review how epigenetic modifications alterWendy Lim, MD, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada hematopoietic stem cell function, with an emphasis on mouse models withS PEAKE R S: disruptions in the DNA methyltransferase enzymes and how these studies impact our understanding of malignant hematopoiesis.Charles J. Homer, MD, National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality,Boston, MAQuality Improvement in Healthcare Systems Dr. Lucy Godley will review how 5-hydroxymethylcytosine controls differentiation within the hematopoietic compartment, including howMary Cushman, MD, University of Vermont, Colchester, VT the TET2/IDH axis impacts epigenetic modifications and malignantIncreasing Retrieval of Temporary Vena Caval Filters hematopoiesis.Michael B. Streiff, MD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MDIncreasing Appropriate Use of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Dr. Olivier Bernard will focus on recent data on the role of the methylcytosineHospitalized Patients hydroxylase TET2 in both lymphoid and myeloid human malignancies, and their cross-talk with other oncogenic hits. Efforts in modeling theseThis session, organized by ASH’s Subcommittee on the Quality of Care, will oncogenic networks in the mouse will also be presented.introduce the basic concept for quality improvement in healthcare systems. 11 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 14. Special-Interest SessionsPractice Forum S U N D AYSATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 6:00 P.M. – 7:30 P.M.Hematology in Cyberspace: Benefiting from New Technologies and Hematology Course Directors’ WorkshopSocial Networking SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 7:00 A.M. – 9:00 A.M.CHAI R: TITLE:Steven L. Allen, MD, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine at HofstraUniversity, Hempstead, NY Teaching Topics: Red Cell DisordersThe 2012 ASH Practice Forum will provide the ASH practice community CHAI R:with a greater understanding of existing and emerging technologies that help Alice D. Ma, MD, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapelimprove patient care and practice efficiency as well as provide opportunities Hill, NCfor additional education and collaboration. The session will feature severalexamples from ASH members who have successfully implemented new The 2012 Hematology Course Directors’ Workshop will begin a multi-yeartechnologies in their practices, illustrating how practitioners are not only examination of the key topics covered by second-year course directors –becoming more aware of available technologies and better prepared to the first topic will be red cell disorders. Course directors will share bestdeploy them but also staying current on new and emerging technologies. practices, tools, and techniques for teaching this topic.The program will also provide an overview on federal efforts to encouragethe adoption of electronic medical records and move toward additionaltechnology-related programs. ASH/ASCO Joint Symposium SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 9:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.Practice Forum Reception TITLE:SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 7:30 P.M. – 8:30 P.M. Clinical Oncology Update: Studies from the 2012 ASCO Annual MeetingA special reception for practitioners will follow the Practice Forum. The CO-CHAI R S:reception provides an opportunity for participants to network and talkdirectly with members of the ASH Committee on Practice to express issues Armand Keating, MD, President, American Society of Hematology, Princessof concern, learn more about the Society’s practice-related initiatives, and Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canadashare personal experiences. Beverages and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Sandra M. Swain, MD, President, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Washington Cancer Institute, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC The ASH/ASCO Joint Symposium will review some of the best sciencePromoting Minorities in Hematology from the 2012 ASCO Annual Meeting, featuring presentations by thePresentations and Reception investigators who contributed to these clinical research successes. Attendees seeking an overview of the latest clinical oncology research toSATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 6:30 P.M. – 9:00 P.M. complement the research presented at the ASH annual meeting will find this session of value.ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to this event, which willshowcase training and research opportunities committed to increasing thediversity of scholars in the field of hematology. The scientific presentationsof the ASH Minority Medical Student Award Program participants are thehighlight of the session. The reception will also include poster presentationsby students participating in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’sMinority Research Supplement and an announcement about the ASH-AMFDP Award, a partnership between ASH and the Harold Amos MedicalFaculty Development Program (AMFDP) of the Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation. Representatives from the National Institutes of Health will alsobe in attendance to provide information about their training and researchofferings. Please join us to hear the impressive research presentations andlearn more about these exciting opportunities. The event will conclude with abuffet dinner and networking session.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 12
  • 15. Grassroots Network Lunch T U E S D AYSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 11:15 A.M. – 12:15 P.M.ASH has become influential with policymakers because of NEW Special Symposium on the Basic Sciencethe strength of its “Grassroots Network” – ASH members TIMEwho contact their elected officials to share the Society’s of Hemostasis and Thrombosis Presented by the Scientific Committees on Hemostasis,messages, concerns, and recommendations. The Grassroots Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, and PlateletsNetwork Lunch provides a forum for all interested members to learn howthey can participate in ASH’s advocacy efforts, communicate with Congressand the White House, become effective advocates for hematology, anddiscuss the Society’s legislative priorities. Discussion will focus on the TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 7:15 A.M. – 9:15 A.M. NEW TIMEresults of the November congressional and presidential elections and their CO-CHAI R S:impact on hematology. Barbara A. Konkle, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, University niversity of Washington, Seattle, WA Susan S. Smyth, MD, PhD, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KYBlood and Beyond: Searching the Andrew S. Weyrich, PhD, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UTScientific Literature Online S PEAKE R S: James H. Morrissey, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 6:15 P.M. – 7:15 P.M. Urbana, IL Modulation of Hemostasis, Thrombosis, and Inflammation byThe explosion of information on the Internet has led to powerful new Polyphosphatesearch technologies to help make it easier for users to find what theyneed. Blood has partnered with Stanford University’s HighWire Press Wolfram Ruf, MD, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA Coagulation Signaling in Inflammationto provide robust search capabilities within Blood’s online journal site(http://bloodjournal.org). This session will describe the search and alert Charles S. Abrams, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PAfeatures available on Blood Online, including RSS feeds (online features Phosphoinositide Signaling in Plateletsthat automatically deliver updated website content directly to users)and electronic table-of-contents alerts, to mine the scientific literature. Barbara A. Konkle, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center, University ofParticipants will also be introduced to the 2.0 technology now available with Washington, Seattle, WABlood Online and to new search and automatic alert features available from Best of ASH in Hemostasis and Thrombosisthe HighWire portal. These features allow users to conduct in-depth queriesand browse hundreds of online journals and Medline as well as the other This special session is designed to expand the opportunityASH publications that HighWire hosts. for exchange and communication among basic scientists in the fields of hemostasis and thrombosis. It will highlight the NEW THIS YEAR most important basic science contributions made in 2012 in the major areas of these fields.The HVO Volunteer Experience: Sharing A presentation will be made by the 2012 recipient of the Mary RodesYour Hematology Expertise Globally Gibson Memorial Award in Hemostasis and Thrombosis, the trainee with the highest-scoring abstract at the ASH annual meeting in the field ofSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 6:30 P.M. – 8:00 P.M. hemostasis and thrombosis.ASH and its partner organization Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) are New this year is the 30-minute overview of the “Best of ASH in Hemostasislooking for hematologists with a passion for teaching and training who and Thrombosis.” The overview will highlight the key breakthroughswant to broaden their horizons through short-term volunteer experiences presented at this year’s meeting.in developing countries. Interested parties can attend this session to gaininsight into how volunteering with HVO can improve hematology care Please note that the Tuesday afternoon simultaneous oral sessionsoverseas and confront hematology health challenges globally. Several of the Symposium have been discontinued.presentations from ASH members who serve as program directors andvolunteers at various sites around the world will be featured. Attend to learnmore about the sites, their educational, clinical, and laboratory hematologyneeds, and how you can make a difference as a volunteer. Following thepresentations, a question-and-answer session will be held. Bring your senseof adventure and learn how a brief visit can make a very big impact. 13 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 16. Trainee Activities and ServicesThe ASH annual meeting provides hematology S ECON D DI DACTIC S E SS ION S ECON D ROTATIONtrainees with a variety of high-quality educational, S PEAKE R S: B R EAKOUT S E SS ION Scareer-development, and networking S PEAKE R S:opportunities. To help trainees make the most Linda Minium Boxer, MD, PhD, Stanfordof their meeting experience, the following University, Stanford, CA Brad S. Kahl, MD, University of Wisconsin,activities and services have been identified Identifying and Pursuing Funding for Your Basic Madison, WI Science Research Identifying Post-Training Academicas most relevant to the unique interests ofundergraduates, medical and graduate students, Dr. Boxer will cover several important aspects Career Opportunities for MDs and PhDsresidents, and fellows (MD and PhD). of becoming a principal investigator, including This talk will not only cover traditional the importance of working as part of a larger scientist (e.g., lab principal investigator) orThese events are open only to Associate group. This session will also review traditional clinician-scientist roles, but also will identifymembers and non-members in training principal investigator roles as well as new roles new roles in academia, such as clinical labwearing blue trainee meeting badges. in academics, including bioinformatics experts, directors, clinical research roles (e.g., regulatoryTo register for the meeting as a trainee, biostatisticians, lab managers, core facility experts, clinical research managers, etc.), andplease see pages 46-47. managers, and roles closely tied to industry administrative roles (e.g., fellowship and clinic and law. directors). Michael L. Linenberger, MD, Fred Hutchinson David D. Shepard, MD, Northwest Georgia Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA Oncology Centers, P.C., Carrollton, GATrainee Day Identifying and Pursuing Funding for Your Clinical Research Identifying Post-Training Private Practice Career Opportunities for MDsFRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, NEW Dr. Linenberger will focus on how to apply Topics covered in the talk will include traditional12:00 NOON – 5:00 P.M. TIME for clinical research funding via the National and new approaches to private practice,This year’s program will provide Institutes of Health and other government including job sharing, viewing the hematologistattendees with the opportunity agencies, how to identify opportunities to obtain as a “hospitalist,” and managing a clinical lab.to learn about hypothesis generation, basic industry funding and ensure success, and how to search for pilot funding that will eventually lead Julie Hambleton, MD, Clovis Oncology,and clinical investigation design, funding San Francisco, CAidentification, collaborative research team to larger funding opportunities. Identifying Post-Training Industry Careerdevelopment, and exploration of post-training Opportunities for MDs and PhDscareer options. FI RST ROTATION This talk will focus on industry roles in lab B R EAKOUT S E SS ION S research to clinical protocol development,CHAI R S: S PEAKE R S: regulatory roles, medical science liaisons, andSherine F. Elsawa, PhD, Northern Illinois Jeffrey S. Miller, MD, University of Minnesota, roles in clinical research.University, Dekalb, IL Minneapolis, MN Hal E. Broxmeyer, PhD, Indiana University Developing a Collaborative School of Medicine, Indianapolis, INMartha Mims, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Basic Science Research Team Identifying Post-Training PhD CareerHouston, TX Opportunities This talk includes discussion on how to find and engage basic science collaborators at This topic is specifically for PhDs and will coverFI RST DI DACTIC S E SS ION every level, how to lead a team and avoid the traditional principal investigator roles, workingS PEAKE R S: pitfalls of collaboration, and how to ensure that as part of a larger group, as well as new rolesDiane Krause, MD, PhD, Yale University School everyone on the team wins. in academics, such as bioinformatics experts,of Medicine, New Haven, CT Russell E. Ware, MD, PhD, Baylor College biostatisticians, lab managers, and core facilityDefining the Hypothesis/Research Question – of Medicine, Houston, TX managers, as well as roles in industry or law.Basic Science Developing a Collaborative ClinicalDr. Krause will explain how to take a good Research Teamresearch idea and develop it into a testable This talk will cover how to find and engagehypothesis in the lab. Topics covered include clinical collaborators, how to give and receive Trainee Welcomehow to solicit feedback on a research idea, how feedback, defining team roles, and making sureto carefully define aims and milestones, and everyone on the team feels valued. Receptionhow to ensure you achieve meaningful results, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, Helen E. Heslop, MD, Baylor College ofregardless of specific outcome. Medicine, Houston, TX 5:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M.Nancy Heddle, McMaster University, Hamilton, Developing a Collaborative TranslationalOntario, Canada Research Team This informal social event provides theDefining the Hypothesis/Research Question – opportunity for undergraduates, medicalClinical Research This talk will cover finding, engaging, and defining students, graduate students, residents, and the necessary roles of collaborators while valuing fellows (MD and PhD) to gather with theirThis session will discuss how to take a clinical all members of the team. Discussion will focus colleagues. Information highlighting annualobservation and turn it into a research project, on how to find and work with collaborators who meeting training events and sessions with anhow to define clinically relevant outcomes, and do and do not understand the respective science emphasis on those sessions most relevant tohow to involve statisticians to ensure outstanding and clinical sides of the question. trainees will be available to attendees.research design.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 14
  • 17. Career-DevelopmentLunch SessionsSATURDAY, DECEMBER 8,11:15 A.M. – 12:15 P.M.These sessions will provide an intimate venuefor trainees to meet with leaders in hematologyto discuss professional development questions.ASH has invited a diverse group of more than30 distinguished researchers and physiciansto participate, representing the wide arrayof practice areas within hematology. Facultywill be available to discuss careers in clinical,translational, and basic research. There willalso be representatives present to discuss PhDcareers, careers in industry settings, and careersin private and clinical practice. This event isopen only to ASH Associate members andnon-members in training wearing bluetrainee meeting badges. Session 2 Industry Careers Hal E. Broxmeyer, PhD, Indiana UniversityA boxed lunch will be provided. Space is School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN Session 1available on a first-come, first-served basis. D. Gary Gilliland, MD, PhD, Merck Research Tucker W. LeBien, PhD, University of Minnesota, Laboratories, Boston, MAAs seating is limited, attendees are strongly Minneapolis, MNencouraged to arrive early. No additional Bruce J. Dezube, MD, Millennium Nicholas J. Donato, PhD, University of Michigan, Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, MAparticipants will be allowed in the rooms Ann Arbor, MIonce these sessions are filled. Session 2 Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Careers Catherine Ann Wheeler, MD, AcetylonCHAI R: Session 1 Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MAReed E. Drews, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Gregory Reaman, MD, Children’s National David A. Roth, MD, Pfizer, Cambridge, MAMedical Center, Boston, MA Medical Center, Washington, DC Government Careers: U.S. Food and Kevin M. Shannon, MD, University of California –S PEAKE R S: San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health, and Centers for DiseaseAcademic Program in Hematology Session 2 David A. Williams, MD, Children’s Hospital Control and Preventionand Hematology/Oncology for Residentsand Medical Students Boston, Boston, MA Session 1 Albert B. Deisseroth, MD, PhD, U.S. Food andSession 1 Ellis J. Neufeld, MD, PhD, Children’s Hospital Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MDKristie A. Blum, MD, The Ohio State University, Boston, Harvard University, Boston, MA Barbara M. Alving, MD, Former Director ofColumbus, OH Hospital-Based Hematology: Hemapheresis/ National Center for Research Resources,Don M. Benson Jr., MD, PhD, The Ohio State Bone Marrow Transplant/Hematopathology National Institutes of Health, Uniformed ServicesUniversity, Columbus, OH University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD CareersSession 2 Session 2 Session 1Marc J. Kahn, MD, Tulane University School of Cynthia E. Dunbar, MD, Editor-in-Chief, Blood, Deborah L. Ornstein, MD, Dartmouth MedicalMedicine, New Orleans, LA National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, School, Lebanon, NHElaine A. Muchmore, MD, University of California National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Mark D. Fleming, MD, DPhil, Children’s Hospital– San Diego, San Diego, CA Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Hani K. Atrash, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GAPrivate Practice Careers Session 2Session 1 Parul Bhargava, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Adult Hematology/Clinical ResearchIan W. Flinn, MD, PhD, Sarah Cannon Research Medical Center, Boston, MA Session 1Institute, Nashville, TN Terry B. Gernsheimer, MD, Puget Sound Daniel J. DeAngelo, MD, PhD, Dana-FarberL. Crain Garrot, MD, Georgia Cancer Blood Center and University of Washington, Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School,Specialists, Marietta, GA Seattle, WA Boston, MA Laboratory and Translational Hematology Robert S. Negrin, MD, Stanford University,Session 2 Stanford, CADavid C. Portnoy, MD, The West Clinic, Session 1Memphis, TN Alan D. Michelson, MD, Children’s Hospital Session 2Lucio Gordon, MD, Florida Cancer Specialists & Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA David Avigan, MD, Beth Israel DeaconessResearch Institute, Gainesville, FL Medical Center, Boston, MA Michelle M. Le Beau, PhD, University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL Barbara A. Konkle, MD, Puget Sound BloodPhD Careers Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WASession 1 Session 2Robert B. Levy, PhD, University of Miami Miller Robert R. Montgomery, MD, Blood ResearchSchool of Medicine, Miami, FL Institute, Milwaukee, WIJoseph E. Italiano Jr., PhD, Brigham and Elisabeth Battinelli, MD, PhD, Brigham andWomen’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School,Boston, MA Boston, MAJay L. Hess, MD, PhD, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 15 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 18. Trainee Activities and Services Are you a trainee, but not a member of ASH?Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions Visit www.hematology.org/Membership for details about becomingSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 11:15 A.M. – 12:15 P.M. an Associate member. If you reside in North America but are not yet enrolled in a hematology-related training program (and, therefore, doDuring lunch on Sunday and Monday, ASH will offer didactic sessions not yet meet the eligibility requirements for Associate membership),designed to provide trainees with an overview of timely and relevant career- consider participating in ASH’s North American Student Benefit program,oriented issues. designed for trainees in the United States, Canada, and Mexico who are undergraduate or graduate students, residents (in post-graduate years 1-3A boxed lunch will be provided. Space is available on a first-come, first- for Canadians), or PhD candidates. This benefit provides a complimentaryserved basis. As seating is limited, attendees are strongly encouraged to online subscription to Blood, advance annual meeting notifications,arrive early. No additional participants will be allowed in the rooms once and eligibility for reduced meeting registration at the non-member-in-these sessions are filled. training rate. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/NASB. If registering for the annual meeting asCHAI R: a non-member in training, see page 47 for special instructions.Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CAS PEAKE R S:Successful Manuscript WritingCynthia E. Dunbar, MD, Editor-in-Chief, Blood, National Heart, Lung, and Trainee LoungeBlood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Trainees are invited to visit the Trainee Lounge located in the GeorgiaBob Löwenberg, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief Designee, Blood, Erasmus World Congress Center (specific room location to be provided in theUniversity Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands on-site materials). The lounge provides a relaxing place for trainees to meetThe ability to communicate one’s work effectively by publication in high- with colleagues, access the Internet, and recharge with complimentaryimpact journals is a benchmark for success in academic medicine. Even refreshments. The lounge will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. onhigh quality work may not be accepted if not presented in a well-crafted Saturday, December 8, from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 9,manuscript. This talk will provide insight into the elements of a high-quality and Monday, December 10, and from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon on Tuesday,manuscript worthy of publication in Blood, and tips on avoiding common December 11.errors that might result in rejection.Building a Successful Clinical Research ProgramJennifer R. Brown, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MAThe conduct of good clinical research has become a highly specialized and Additional Opportunities and Resourcescomplex endeavor. While appropriate training in rigorous and innovative of Interest to Traineestrial design is essential, the investigator must also be knowledgeableabout regulatory, budgetary, and ethical issues. The clinical research Promoting Minorities in Hematology Presentations and Reception 12enterprise is more dependent than ever on multiple team members includinginvestigators, clinical research coordinators, research nurses, informatics Grassroots Network Lunch 13specialists, and biostatisticians. This talk will provide an overview of essential Education Session – “The Trade Secrets of a Successful 29elements needed to build a viable clinical research program. Academic” and “Junior-Faculty Development Education Program: How to Be Successful in Your First ‘Real’ Job”MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 12:15 P.M. – 1:15 P.M. Education Spotlight Sessions 37 How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas 40CHAI R: Meet the Scientist 41Ted Wun, MD, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, CA Scientific Forums 42S PEAKE R S: ASH Booth 44Building a Successful Research LabTodd A. Fehniger, MD, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, National Institutes of Health Booths 44St. Louis, MO ASH Job Center 55Running a successful laboratory-based research program goes beyondgood science and grant funding. Managing people, money, collaborations,and space are also required skills. This talk will recount lessons learned, Are you a post-doctoral fellow residing outside North America?including mistakes to be avoided, on the road to becoming an independent Consider participating in ASH’s International Post-Doctoral Fellowslaboratory based investigator. (IPDF) program, which allows post-doctoral fellows to access valuable ASH resources at no charge for up to four years. The program is openFinding a Good Mentor/Being a Good Mentee to postdoctoral fellows with a PhD, MD, or equivalent medical degree,Michael R. DeBaun, MD, Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, who reside outside Canada, Mexico, or the United States; registerNashville, TN for the ASH annual meeting as a non-member in training; and areOne of the most important early career choices is finding a mentor. enrolled in an approved hematology or oncology training program.As with any good relationship, expectations need to be aligned and Benefits include a complimentary online subscription to Blood,evolve as the mentee develops and the asymmetric interaction becomes online access to Hematology (the Education Program Book), andmore equal. Though mentors are traditionally thought of as a single a subscription to ASH’s award-winning member newsletter, Theperson, many institutions encourage or even require mentoring teams Hematologist. For more information and to submit an application, visitfor all junior faculty, which might consist of several research mentors or www.hematology.org/IPDF. If registering for the annual meeting as aan overall career mentor. non-member in training, see page 47 for special instructions.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 16
  • 19. Education Program (MRD) during and after dose-intensive therapy, The session will focus on recent advances in EDUCATION PROGRAM CO-CHAIRS: and the development of novel therapies for the basic biology and clinical features of acute patients with refractory AML. Dr. Ross Levine will lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) with an emphasis Agnes Y. Lee, MD review our current understanding of the molecular on the molecular genetics of this malignancy University of British Columbia, genetics of AML and how cytogenetic, genetic, and treatment approaches to both Philadelphia- Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and epigenetic studies can be used to improve chromosome-positive (Ph+) and negative (Ph-) prognostication in AML and to predict response disease. Dr. Charles Mullighan will review the Martin S. Tallman, MD to therapy. Dr. Elisabeth Paietta will review the genomic analyses that have provided important Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer current genetic and flow cytometric approaches insights into the biologic basis of ALL. He will Center, New York, NY to monitoring minimal residual disease in AML and also discuss the approaches used to profile the data indicating how MRD assessment can ALL genomes, including microarrays and next be used to inform clinical decisions. Dr. Jeffrey generation sequencing, and review findings of Szer will review the recent development of novel recent studies in childhood B- and T-lineage Education Program Sessions chemotherapeutic and targeted therapies for ALL that have identified new ALL subtypes, schedule extended to Monday! patients with refractory AML and how biologic characterized alterations in multiple key pathways insights are being translated to the clinic using that contribute to leukemogenesis, and identified The 2012 Education Program novel therapeutic strategies. previously unsuspected targets of mutation. will be held Saturday, December 8, through NEW Notably, these studies contribute to development of new tests for diagnosis and risk stratification TIME Monday, December 10. and have identified new therapeutic targets in Each session will be offered New Insights into the high-risk disease. twice unless otherwise noted. A question-and-answer period will occur Genetic Pathogenesis Dr. Deborah Thomas will discuss the changing at the end of each individual speaker presentation. Chapters based on these of Acute Lymphocytic paradigms for treatment of the genetically distinct subtype of Ph+ or BCR-ABL-positive sessions will be published in Hematology Leukemia and New B-lymphocytic leukemia in the era of second- and 2012 (the Education Program Book). In addition, audio recordings and slides Treatment Strategies later-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), inclusive of emerging data regarding TKI therapy from Education Program presentations after allogeneic HCT. She will then review the will be available on DVD and on-demand CHAI R: prevalence and dynamics of tyrosine kinase webcast (see page 57). Hillard M. Lazarus, MD, University Hospitals domain mutations in the context of novel agents Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH and potential therapeutic strategies designed to circumvent these and other resistance S PEAKE R S: mechanisms. Charles G. Mullighan, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN Dr. Hillard Lazarus will review indications forAcute Myeloid Leukemia: The Molecular Genetic Makeup of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia when to consider proceeding with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in Ph- ALL in firstNewly Discovered Genes, complete remission compared to conventional Deborah A. Thomas, MD, The University of TexasScreens (for Minimal MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX approaches. Next, he will review patient outcomes obtained with myeloablative versusResidual Disease), and Philadelphia-Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: It Was the Worst of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Finally, he will review HCT results using different donorTherapeutic Means Times, It Is the Best of Times sources, including matched-related versus Hillard M. Lazarus, MD, University Hospitals alternative donor sources.CHAI R: Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OHRoss L. Levine, MD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering When, How, and What Cell Source ForCancer Center, New York, NY Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation In First Complete Remission Adult Acute LymphoblasticS PEAKE R S: Leukemia?Ross L. Levine, MD, Memorial Sloan-KetteringCancer Center, New York, NYHow Do Novel Molecular Genetic MarkersInfluence Treatment Decisions in Acute MyeloidLeukemia?Elisabeth Paietta, PhD, The North Divisionof Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NYMinimal Residual Disease in Acute MyeloidLeukemia: Coming of AgeJeffrey Szer, MD, The Royal Melbourne Hospital,Parkville, Victoria, AustraliaThe Prevalent Predicament of Relapsed AcuteMyeloid LeukemiaRecent clinical, genetic, and functional studieshave improved our understanding of the biologyof acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and allowed forthe development of biomarkers to predict relapseand response to therapy, the implementation ofapproaches to monitor minimal residual disease 17 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 20. Education ProgramThe Spectrum of JAK2- Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma I: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma II:Positive Myeloproliferative Changing Therapeutic Understanding the IndolentNeoplasms: Complications Strategies in Aggressive Lymphomasand Therapeutic Advances Lymphomas CHAI R:CHAI R: CHAI R: Ginna G. Laport, MD, Stanford University, Stanford, CAStefan N. Constantinescu, MD, PhD, Ludwig Craig H. Moskowitz, MD, Memorial Sloan-Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY S PEAKE R S:S PEAKE R S: S PEAKE R S: Pier Luigi Zinzani, MD, PhD, Istituto di Ematologia Seràgnoli Università di Bologna,Jean-Jacques Kiladjian, MD, PhD, Hôpital Saint- Laurie H. Sehn, MD, British Columbia Cancer Bologna, ItalyLouis and French Intergroup of Myeloproliferative Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada The Many Faces of Marginal Zone LymphomaDisorders (FIM), Paris, France Paramount Prognostic Factors Which GuideThe Spectrum of JAK2-Positive Therapeutic Strategies in Diffuse Large B-Cell Brad Kahl, MD, University of Wisconsin,Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Lymphoma Madison, WI Is There a Role for “Watch and Wait” in IndolentAnna Falanga, MD, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Craig H. Moskowitz, MD, Memorial Sloan- Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era?Bergamo, Italy Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NYThrombotic Disease in the Myeloproliferative Role of FDG-PET Scanning in Treatment Ginna G. Laport, MD, Stanford University,Neoplasms Decisions Stanford, CA Changing Role of Stem Cell Transplantation inStefan N. Constantinescu, MD, PhD, Ludwig Christian Gisselbrecht, MD, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Follicular LymphomaInstitute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium Paris, FranceSmall-Molecule Inhibitors in Myeloproliferative Is There Any Role for Transplantation inNeoplasms: Are We Aiming for the the Rituximab Era for Diffuse Large B-Cell The indolent lymphomas comprise severalRight Targets? Lymphoma? subtypes, including the marginal zone lymphomas and follicular lymphoma. Indolent lymphomasThe purpose of the session is to present This session will focus on three of the most possess variable clinical characteristics andthe spectrum of JAK2 V617F-positive common consults an expert lymphoma pathologic features, and a consensus has not yetmyeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), to review physician sees during the course of current been reached regarding their optimal treatment,thrombotic complications, and to then identify management of patients with diffuse large which includes observation, radiation therapy,targets for inhibition. It is expected that the B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Dr. Laurie Sehn chemoimmunotherapy, and hematopoietic stemsignaling by JAK2 mutant will be presented in the will review the important pre-treatment, clinical, cell transplantation (HSCT).context of the array of MPNs, how this signaling immunohistochemical, and molecular prognosticcontributes to thrombotic complications, and factors that may help guide primary therapy in the Dr. Pier Zinzani will outline the three distinctwhich signaling proteins and pathways should rituximab era. Importantly, she will help determine entities of marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs):be targeted by screens. Inhibition of JAK2 kinase if any of these factors are potential targets for extranodal MZL of mucosa-associated lymphoidactivity is just one avenue to take; other pathways novel therapy and if they are additive to the tissue (MALT) type, splenic MZL, and nodal MZL,contribute to phenotype, complications, clonal international prognostic index. all of which originate from post-germinal centerdominance, and evolution to leukemia. marginal zone B cells. Pathogenic mechanisms Dr. Craig Moskowitz will review the use and and therapeutic advances will also be presented. abuse of fluorodeoxyglucos positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging in the Dr. Brad Kahl will discuss the role of observation management of DLBCL, focusing on its utility as versus rituximab in indolent lymphoma. The a prognostic tool for risk-adapted therapy in the “watch and wait” approach remains an primary as well as the relapsed setting. acceptable treatment option for asymptomatic indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. However, this Dr. Christian Gisselbrecht will describe why we paradigm has been challenged with the advent may be fighting a losing battle once a patient of rituximab due to its low toxicity profile and its relapses after primary therapy. He will use the efficacy in improving progression-free survival. results of the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) study as a Dr. Ginna Laport will present data regarding the platform for new treatment strategies in patients role of HSCT in advanced follicular lymphoma. with primary refractory and relapsed DLBCL in Both autologous and allogeneic HSCT can the rituximab era. prolong progression-free survival. However, allogeneic HSCT remains the only known cure, and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have broadened eligibility to older patients and can confer long-term remissions.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 18
  • 21. Hematopoietic Stem CellTransplantation I: ExploitingAlternative DonorsCHAI R:Elizabeth J. Shpall, MD, The University of TexasMD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TXS PEAKE R S:Elizabeth J. Shpall, MD, The University of TexasMD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TXUmbilical Cord Transplantation: Front andCenter?Andrea Bacigalupo, MD, Ospedale San Martino,Genoa, ItalyMatched and Mismatched Unrelated DonorTransplantation: Is the Outcome the Same asMatched-Sibling Donor?Ephraim J. Fuchs, MD, The Johns HopkinsUniversity School of Medicine, Baltimore, MDHaploidentical Transplantation for HematologicMalignancies: Where Do We Stand?This session will discuss the state of the artin allogeneic stem cell transplant medicine,demonstrating that with the exciting advancesin the field, almost every patient who needsa transplant will now have access to a stemcell donor. The speakers will focus on donorselection, the optimal strategies for allograftpreparation, and the clinical results for each ofthe major stem sources in use today.Dr. Elizabeth Shpall will review the latest resultsin cord blood transplantation for high-risk Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation II: Towardhematologic cancers and genetic diseases.She will discuss the use of single versus double Safer Allogeneic Transplantationcord blood transplants, myeloablative versusnonmyeloablative preparative regimens, and CHAI R: survival, probably due to longer exposure tothe generation of cord blood immune cells immunosuppression, which leads to a higher Didier Blaise, MD, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, exposure to late infections.to enhance immune recovery and anti-tumor Marseille, Franceresponses. S PEAKE R S: Dr. Didier Blaise will briefly review the conceptDr. Andrea Bacigalupo will review the clinical of reduced-toxicity conditioning approaches. Didier Blaise, MD, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, He will challenge their impact on transplant-outcome of patients transplanted with matched Marseille, Francesiblings or unrelated donors; separate related mortality with their ability to exert an Do Different Conditioning Regimens Reallyanalyses will be presented for acute leukemias, Make a Difference? adequate disease control as compared to usualmyelodysplasic syndromes, myelofibrosis, standard myeloablative conditioning in differentaplastic anemia, and thalassemia. Comparisons Steven Z. Pavletic, MD, National Cancer Institute, pathologies and populations. His presentationwill consider predictive factors such as donor National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD will seek to define the present challenges of theage, stem cell source, transplant protocol, and Are We Making Progress in Graft-Versus-Host area for future development.graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Disease Prophylaxis and Treatment? Dr. Steven Pavletic will review the achievementsDr. Ephraim Fuchs will review the use of human Kieren Marr, MD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, in acute and chronic GVHD managementleukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical stem Baltimore, MD and how they have contributed to improvedcell transplantation in patients with high-risk Delayed Opportunistic Infections in initial survival. He will also cover the long-termhematologic malignancies. This session will Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients: management of GVHD and its implication indiscuss approaches to prophylaxis of GVHD, A Surmountable Challenge disease control, and address the challengeselection of HLA-haploidentical donors, immune represented by an older population in this This session will focus on recent advances in context.reconstitution, and applications to treat non- allogeneic stem cell transplantation, providing anmalignant diseases. overview of conditioning regimens and graft- Dr. Kieren Marr will review the pattern and versus-host disease (GVHD) management, characteristics of delayed infections. She will as well as challenging modifications to both question the reasons for their emergence and that have been introduced in the last decade. will address recent advances in diagnosis, Both aspects have conducted to better initial prophylaxis, and treatment. 19 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 22. Education ProgramAdvances in the Keeping Pace with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia:Pathogenesis Advances in Myeloma The Pristine Paradigm forand Treatment of Successful Targeted Therapy cessful CHAI R:Myelodysplastic Antonio Palumbo, MD, University of Torino, CHAI R:Syndromes Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Susan Branford, PhD, University of Adelaide, Battista, Torino, Italy Adelaide, AustraliaCHAI R: S PEAKE R S: S PEAKE R S:Ghulam J. Mufti, MD, PhD, King’s College Gareth J. Morgan, MD, PhD, Royal MarsdenHospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Hospital, London, United Kingdom David Marin, MD, Imperial College London,Kingdom How to Use New Biology to Guide Therapy London, United Kingdom in Myeloma Initial Choice of Therapy Among Plenty ForS PEAKE R S: Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid LeukemiaMaria F. Figueroa, MD, University of Michigan, S. Vincent Rajkumar, MD, Mayo Clinic,Ann Arbor, MI Rochester, MN Francois-Xavier Mahon, MD, PhD, UniversityInterpreting New Molecular Genetics in Doublets, Triplets, or Quadruplets of Novel Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, FranceMyelodysplastic Syndromes Agents in Newly Diagnosed Myeloma? Is Going for Cure in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Possible and Justifiable?Valeria Santini, MD, University of Florence Antonio Palumbo, MD, University of Torino,Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Susan Branford, PhD, University of Adelaide,Florence, Italy Battista, Torino, Italy Adelaide, AustraliaNovel Therapeutic Strategies: Hypomethylating Have Effective Drug Combinations Supplanted Monitoring After Successful Therapy forAgents and Beyond Stem Cell Transplantation in Myeloma? Chronic Myeloid LeukemiaGhulam J. Mufti, MD, PhD , King’s College This session will focus on recent advances in An expanding range of highly effective BCR-Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, the understanding of multiple myeloma biology ABL1 kinase inhibitors are currently availableUnited Kingdom and the changes in the treatment of this disease or are undergoing clinical trial for patients withMyelodysplastic Syndromes: Who and When after the introduction of the immunomodulatory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), either as first-linein the Course of Disease to Transplant drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide and the therapy or after treatment failure. While there is proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. The role of now a welcome range of options for clinicians, theDuring the past decade myelodysplastic transplantation in the era of novel agents will question of which inhibitor to choose for individualsyndromes (MDS) have emerged as a major be addressed, and future therapeutic directions patients remains unanswered. Long-term follow-upresearch focus for the global hematology will be discussed. This program will report on suggests that a small proportion of patients arecommunity. In addition to the significant advances the most effective treatment strategies available candidates for treatment discontinuation withoutin their diagnosis, prognostic evaluation, and today and outline how to properly integrate them disease recurrence. The new inhibitors maytreatment, there has been an explosion in the in the management of multiple myeloma. increase the frequency of safe discontinuation.characterization of molecular defects. These As some patients reach their second decade ofinclude the consequences of RPS14 gene Dr. Gareth Morgan will review the biological targeted therapy, long-term effective moleculardeletions in 5q- syndrome, the significance of p53 features of multiple myeloma. He will describe monitoring remains important to confirmaberrations, mutations of spliceosome complex the physiological immune system development, adherence and is essential when consideringgenes (such as SF3B1 in refractory anemia with explain the mechanisms determining molecular treatment discontinuation.ring sideroblasts), and a plethora of other genetic alterations in myeloma, and correlate theseabnormalities that either individually or collectively abnormalities with the evolution of the disease. Dr. David Marin will outline the therapeutic optionsalter the hemopoietic differentiation and propensity He will also comment on the clinical implications for newly diagnosed patients and review theto leukemic transformation. of these alterations in myeloma therapy. relative merits of the various kinase inhibitors. He will discuss whether more potent inhibitorsThe spectrum of biological significance of the Dr. S. Vincent Rajkumar will review the offer an advantage in terms of transformation-mutations and their genetic and epigenetic different doublet, triplet, or quadruplet drug free survival and deeper molecular responsesconsequences will be discussed by Dr. Maria combinations used for the treatment of newly compared with imatinib, which is still theFigueroa. diagnosed myeloma. Dr. Rajkumar will provide recommended first-line therapy. efficacy and safety results of various studiesRelationships between the genetic and epigenetic and compare these approaches. He will also Dr. Francois-Xavier Mahon will discuss whetherchanges and the effects of DNMT and HDAC present preliminary results from recent studies cure of CML is possible for some patientsinhibition will be discussed by Dr. Valeria Santini. introducing the concept of second-generation treated with kinase inhibitors. He will describe proteasome inhibitors. the new initiatives to increase the frequency ofAllogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation safe treatment discontinuation, and he will outlinein MDS has come of age. Dr. Ghulam Mufti will Dr. Antonio Palumbo will review the role of stem the risks of stopping therapy and the factorsdiscuss how transplant timing, pre-transplant cell transplantation in myeloma and the clinical that independently predict for molecular diseasepreparative regimens, conditioning regimens, and benefit achieved after the introduction of novel recurrence and their potential biological basis.post-transplant therapies have rapidly evolved to induction, consolidation, and maintenancepromote an increasing disease-free survival and approaches. He will discuss whether drug Dr. Susan Branford will review the role ofpossibly a cure in up to 40 percent of transplanted combinations have replaced stem cell continued therapeutic response monitoringpatients. He will also discuss the remaining transplantation, the risk/benefit ratio of these in optimal responders. She will discuss thechallenges, both in terms of identifying key genetic approaches, and the role of maintenance difficulties of standardizing the analysis ofevents and expanding the therapeutic repertoire treatment. deep molecular response, whether BCR-that will eventually lead to a prolongation in survival ABL1 mutation analysis is necessary in somebeyond what is achieved by currently available circumstances, and whether changes in thetreatments. molecular response can serve as a marker of non-adherence to therapy regimens.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 20
  • 23. Chronic Lymphocytic Untangling Uncommon The Spectrum of PlasmaLeukemia: Can New Lymphoproliferative Cell DyscrasiasPrognostic Factors Disorders CHAI R:Guide New Therapeutic ew Morie Abraham Gertz, MD, Mayo Clinic, CHAI R:Approaches? Claire E. Dearden, MD, The Royal Marsden Rochester, MN Hospital, London, United Kingdom S PEAKE R S:CHAI R: S PEAKE R S: Irene Ghobrial, MD, Dana-Farber CancerNicholas Chiorazzi, MD, The Feinstein Institute Thomas P. Loughran Jr., MD, Penn State Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MAfor Medical Research, North Shore-LIJ Health Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA Are You Sure This is WaldenströmSystem, Manhasset, NY Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia: Macroglobulinemia?S PEAKE R S: Molecular Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, and Treatment Giampaolo Merlini, MD, Fondazione IRCCSNicholas Chiorazzi, MD, The Feinstein Institute Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia,for Medical Research, North Shore-LIJ Health Robert J. Kreitman, MD, National Cancer Pavia, ItalySystem, Manhasset, NY Institute, National Institutes of Health, Differential Diagnosis of MonoclonalImplications of New Prognostic Markers in Bethesda, MD Gammopathy of Undetermined SignificanceChronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Immunoconjugates and New Molecular Targets In Hairy Cell Leukemia Morie Abraham Gertz, MD, Mayo Clinic,Adrian Wiestner, MD, PhD, National Heart, Lung, Rochester, MNand Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Claire E. Dearden, MD, The Royal Marsden Case Vignettes and Other Brain Teasers ofBethesda, MD Hospital, London, United Kingdom Monoclonal GammopathiesEmerging Role of Kinase Targeted Strategies in B- and T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia:Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Antibody Approaches This session will focus on the complex diagnostic challenges that are associated with plasma cellPaolo Ghia, MD, PhD, Università Vita-Salute San This session will present recent advances in dyscrasias. The focus will be on those disordersRaffaele and Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, the molecular pathogenesis and management that can cause diagnostic confusion and canMilan, Italy of three rare and distinct lymphoproliferative potentially result in the incorrect treatmentA Look Into the Future: Can Minimal Residual disorders: large granular lymphocyte (LGL) selection for patients. The session is aimed atDisease Guide Therapy and Predict Prognosis? leukemia, hairy cell leukemia (HCL), and busy practicing clinicians and is focused on prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL). There will be making the correct diagnosis, determining theThis session will focus on recent advances and a focus on the understanding of underlying appropriate time to treat, and determining whennew concepts in chronic lymphocytic leukemia mechanisms of disease and how these can be to observe.(CLL). The existence of several prognostic exploited to develop effective therapy.makers, the advent of targeted therapies, and Dr. Irene Ghobrial will review the diagnosticthe possibility of accurately assessing the depth Dr. Thomas Loughran will review the molecular criteria for Waldenström macroglobulinemia.of treatment responses have increased the pathogenesis of LGL leukemia focusing on While a number of disorders are associatedcomplexity of managing CLL patients while at global dysregulation of apotoposis and survival with the monoclonal IgM protein, they are notthe same time providing tools for future progress pathways which are constitutively activated Waldenström macröglobulinemia, underscoringtoward the eradication of the disease. in leukemic LGL. He will then discuss clinical the importance of taking specific, required manifestations, indications for treatment, and considerations. The management of IgM andDr. Chiorazzi will address the biologic therapeutic options for this disease. neuropathy will be discussed.underpinnings of several existing prognosticmarkers. He will draw these concepts from Dr. Robert Kreitman will describe the clinical Dr. Giampaolo Merlini will review the differentiallaboratory and clinical data that have emerged development of immunoconjugates for HCL, diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy ofover the past decade. including the results of clinical trials using agents undetermined significance (MGUS). Many that target CD22 and CD25. He will also discuss patients with small monoclonal gammopathiesDr. Adrian Wiestner will discuss the emerging the current understanding of the molecular are often assumed to have MGUS when in factrole of kinase inhibitors in the treatment of CLL. pathogenesis of HCL and HCL-variant, including they fulfill the criteria of a dangerous small B-cellHe will introduce the pathogenic pathways the role of the BRAF gene and the prognostic clone. New classification schemes for MGUStargeted by novel small-molecule drugs in current impact of specific immunoglobulin gene usage, and smoldering multiple myeloma focusing onclinical testing. He will then review the results such as VH4-34. criteria for starting treatment will be reviewed.from clinical studies using kinase inhibitorsand discuss the promise and challenges of Dr. Claire Dearden will discuss PLL of B- and Dr. Morie Gertz will review the records of sevenincorporating these agents into treatment T-cell sub-types, briefly outlining the clinical patients that were initially incorrectly diagnosed.strategies. presentation and diagnosis before concentrating He will present a detailed schema to recognize on management of these disorders with an how to not overlook these entities.Dr. Paolo Ghia will discuss the future of CLL emphasis on the use of monoclonal antibodyprognostication based on evidence that the therapy.quality of response to therapy is an independentpredictor of overall survival. He will briefly reviewthe methods for quantification of minimal residualdisease and will discuss their potential use topredict prognosis and guide treatment. 21 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 24. Education ProgramInsights into Biology and Refinement of Treatment Dynamic DiscoveriesStrategies in Hodgkin Lymphoma and Directions in He will discuss the histogenesis of Hodgkin/ Pediatric LeukemiasCHAI R:Richard T. Hoppe, MD, Stanford University Reed-Sternberg cells and lymphocyteSchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA predominant cells, including their cellular origin CHAI R: and relationship to putative precursor cells; the Elizabeth A. Raetz, MD, New York UniversityS PEAKE R S: genetic lesions that have been identified; and the Medical Center, New York, NYRalf Küppers, PhD, University of Duisburg- deregulated transcription factor networks and S PEAKE R S:Essen, Essen, Germany signaling pathways that contribute to the survivalNew Insights in the Biology of Hodgkin and proliferation of these cells. Martin Schrappe, MD, University Medical CenterLymphoma Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany Dr. Martin Hutchings will review the multi-faceted Minimal Residual Disease: Optimal Methods,Martin Hutchings, MD, PhD, Rigshospitalet- Timing, and Clinical Relevance for an roles of positron emission tomography (PET)Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Individual Patient imaging in Hodgkin lymphoma. He will discussDenmark its applications in staging, early assessment ofHow Does PET/CT Help in Selecting Therapy Renier J. Brentjens, MD, PhD, Memorial Sloan- chemosensitivity, treatment response assessment, Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NYfor Patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma? and post-treatment surveillance. He will also note Novel Cellular Therapies for Leukemia important current clinical trials that incorporateRalph M. Meyer, MD, Queen’s University, PET imaging in defining patient management. Elizabeth A. Raetz, MD, New York UniversityKingston, Ontario, Canada Medical Center, New York, NYRichard T. Hoppe, MD, Stanford University Drs. Ralph Meyer and Richard Hoppe will Where Do We Stand in the Treatment ofSchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA debate the advantages and disadvantages Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia?Point-Counterpoint: Early Stage Hodgkin of incorporating radiation therapy into theLymphoma: The Role of Radiation Therapy management of patients with early-stage Acute leukemia is one of the most curable Hodgkin lymphoma. They will include a malignances in children. While outcomes forThis session will focus on recent advances in discussion of clinical trials that have tested the newly diagnosed disease have now improvedour understanding of the biology of Hodgkin concept of Hodgkin lymphoma management with significantly, subgroups of patients with a highlymphoma and important clinical issues related to chemotherapy alone, as well as trials that have risk for treatment failure remain, and challengesthe management of patients with the disease. incorporated radiation therapy routinely. They include both how to integrate evolving new will note the importance of different outcome discoveries into clinical practice to identify theseDr. Ralf Kuppers will review current concepts measures for defining efficacy and identify high-risk patients and how to improve theirrelated to the biology of Hodgkin lymphoma. opportunities for new clinical trials. outcomes. Detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) has evolved as one of the most powerful tools in the risk assessment of acute leukemia. Clinical application of this highly sensitive tool, particularly in acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) requires reliable, reproducible, and quality- assured methods to ensure patient safety. To that end, the prognostic impact of MRD needs to be established prospectively in the context of clinical protocols. Dr. Martin Schrappe will provide an overview of existing methods and evaluate the future role of this method in single and multiagent protocols. Dr. Renier Brentjens will discuss the latest in cellular therapies for leukemia. An emphasis will be placed on adoptive therapy with T cells genetically modified to express tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). An update on currently ongoing clinical trials using this technology for B-cell malignancies will be included. Dr. Elizabeth Raetz will highlight the outcome disparity that remains for children with relapsed ALL. Current strategies for treating relapsed ALL and the potential for using early measures of disease response to prioritize new agents and to allocate therapy will be discussed. Examples of how laboratory discoveries can inform clinical trial design will also be explored.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 22
  • 25. Thrombosis in Challenging The New Era in Landscape Changes andPopulations Antithrombotic Therapy Challenges in HemophiliaCHAI R: CHAI R: CHAI R:Alok A. Khorana, MD, University of Rochester Jeffrey I. Weitz, MD, Thrombosis and Guy Young, MD, Children’s Hospital LosMedical Center, Rochester, NY Atherosclerosis Research Institute and Angeles, Los Angeles, CA McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaS PEAKE R S: S PEAKE R S:Alok A. Khorana, MD, University of Rochester, S PEAKE R S: Guy Young, MD, Children’s Hospital LosRochester, NY Jeffrey I. Weitz, MD, Thrombosis and Angeles, Los Angeles, CACancer-Associated Thrombosis: Updates and Atherosclerosis Research Institute and New Challenges in Hemophilia: Long-TermControversies McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Outcomes and Complications Novel Anticoagulants: Which One Should MyMichael B. Streiff, MD, The Johns Hopkins Patient Use? Peter W. Collins, MD, Cardiff University SchoolHospital, Baltimore, MD of Medicine, Cardiff, United KingdomThromboprophylaxis in Non-Surgical Patients Alan K. Jacobson, MD, VA Loma Linda Therapeutic Challenges in Acquired Factor VIII Healthcare System, Loma Linda, CA DeficiencyPieter W. Kamphuisen, MD, PhD, University Is There a Role for Warfarin Anymore?Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Katherine A. High, MD, The Children’s HospitalNetherlands Jessica L. Mega, MD, Brigham and Women’s of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PALife Line or a Pain in the Neck: Catheter- Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA The Gene Therapy Journey for Hemophilia: AreRelated Thrombosis. Triple Therapy or Triple Threat? We There Yet?Thrombosis remains an important cause of For more than 60 years, the only orally available The hemophilia landscape is changing andmorbidity and mortality among patients with anticoagulants were the vitamin K antagonists, will continue to undergo dramatic changes inmedical illnesses in a variety of settings. such as warfarin. The recent introduction of the next several years. After a relatively quietConflicting results from recent large randomized new oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or period of novel treatment development andtrials and contradictory recommendations from factor Xa have changed the current landscape. the initial setbacks with gene therapy, it isguidelines panels have led to controversy about For example, dabigatran etexilate, an oral clear that innovation in hemophilia care is nowthe best approach to prophylaxis and treatment. thrombin inhibitor, and rivaroxaban, an oral moving more rapidly. There are a host of new factor Xa inhibitor, are licensed as alternatives treatments for factor VIII and IX deficiency asDr. Alok Khorana will discuss emerging data and to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients well as for inhibitor patients that are in late stagescontroversies in the field of cancer-associated with atrial fibrillation. Apixaban, another oral of clinical trials. Additional research regardingthrombosis. Novel risk-assessment tools, factor Xa inhibitor, is likely to follow soon. These the management of acquired hemophilia hasbiomarkers, and prophylaxis strategies, including agents also show promise for treatment of also provided new evidence to assist in theresults of recent randomized studies, will be venous thromboembolism, and, when given in management of this rare disorder. Finally, theoutlined. conjunction with antiplatelet therapy in stabilized prospects for gene therapy appear to be much acute coronary syndrome patients, rivaroxaban brighter given the recent breakthrough in theDr. Michael Streiff will provide insight into reduces cardiovascular death, stroke, and clinical trial of factor IX-deficient patients.results of large thromboprophylaxis studies recurrent infarction compared with placebo. Theconducted in medical and other populations, new oral anticoagulants are more convenient Dr. Guy Young will review the current challengesincluding the Prophylaxis of Thromboembolism than warfarin because they can be given in fixed in the management of hemophilia and willin Critical Care (PROTECT) and the Study to doses without routine coagulation monitoring and discuss long-term outcomes and complications,Evaluate the Mortality Reduction of Enoxaparin there are few drug interactions. In addition, the including the management of inhibitor patients.in Hospitalized Acutely Ill Medical Receiving new agents are associated with less intracranial He will also discuss the changing landscape ofEnoxaparin (LIFENOX) trials. Controversial bleeding than warfarin. With these advantages, hemophilia given the new agents that are on therecommendations from recent guidelines panels the new oral anticoagulants are poised to replace horizon.will also be discussed. warfarin for many indications. Dr. Peter Collins will review the current statusDr. Pieter Kamphuisen will explore optimal Dr. Jeffrey Weitz will compare the of the management of acquired hemophilia anddiagnostic and management strategies for pharmacological properties of the new oral discuss the results of recent studies and theircatheter-related thrombosis in the contemporary anticoagulants and discuss the pros and cons impact on the care of these patients.era, with updates from recent studies. of each drug for the various indications. Dr. Katherine High will review the most recent Dr. Alan Jacobson will highlight the opportunities results of gene therapy trials in humans as well and challenges of the new oral anticoagulants as as explore the different techniques that are being replacements for warfarin. studied for the treatment of both factor VIII and factor IX deficiencies. Dr. Jessica Mega will outline the role of rivaroxaban as an adjunct to dual antiplatelet therapy to reduce the risk of recurrent ischemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes. 23 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 26. Education ProgramEveryday Bleeding Perioperative Hematology: Evidence-BasedDisorders To Bleed or Not To Bleed Approaches to CytopeniasCHAI R: CHAI R: CHAI R:Sarah H. O’Brien, MD, Nationwide Children’s Sam Schulman, MD, PhD, McMaster University, Laurence A. Boxer, MD, University of Michigan,Hospital, Columbus, OH Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Ann Arbor, MIS PEAKE R S: S PEAKE R S: S PEAKE R S:Sarah H. O’Brien, MD, Nationwide Children’s Thomas L. Ortel, MD, PhD, Duke University Laurence A. Boxer, MD, University of Michigan,Hospital, Columbus, OH Medical Center, Durham, NC Ann Arbor, MIBleeding Scores: Are They Really Useful? Perioperative Anticoagulation How to Approach NeutropeniaJorge Di Paola, MD, University of Colorado Jeannie Callum, MD, Sunnybrook Health Mark J. Koury, MD, Vanderbilt University,School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Nashville, TNMaking a Diagnosis of von Willebrand Disease Assessing Perioperative Bleeding How to Approach Chronic AnemiaPier Mannuccio Mannucci, MD, Fondazione Sam Schulman, MD, PhD, McMaster University, Roberto Stasi, MD, PhD, St. George’s Hospital,IRCCS Ca’ Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Hamilton, Ontario, Canada London, United KingdomPoliclinico, Milan, Italy Role of Tranexamic Acid and Reversal Agents in How to Approach ThrombocytopeniaHemostatic Defects in Liver and Renal Perioperative BleedingDysfunction This session will focus on recent advances on This session will provide a review and update the diagnosis of neutropenia, chronic anemia,This session will focus on three commonly on the management of patients in association and thrombocytopenia. Emphasis will be placedencountered challenges in the evaluation of with surgery, focusing on blood coagulation. on approaches for diagnostically difficult casespatients with bleeding symptoms. The collection Successful surgery often requires an appropriate and how to resolve the diagnosis.and interpretation of bleeding histories remains a balance between avoidance of thrombosis and ofsubjective process. excessive bleeding. Although preventive planning Dr. Laurence Boxer will review the approaches is the foundation for safe invasive procedures, to establishing a diagnosis in challengingDr. Sarah O’Brien will describe the development the hematologist should also give advice when cases of acute and chronic neutropenia. He willof standardized bleeding scores as tools for a bleeding becomes uncontrollable. focus on utilizing state-of-the-art cellular andmore quantitative assessment of bleeding, and molecular information to arrive at the cause of thefor identification of patients with higher likelihood Dr. Ortel will address the management of neutropenia. Dr. Boxer will also discuss molecularof developing an underlying bleeding disorder. patients who are receiving chronic anticoagulant diagnosis, mechanisms underlying neutropenia,She will discuss recent research applications therapy and require an elective surgery or cellular metabolism, and immunologic processesof bleeding scores in adult and pediatric procedure. Consideration must be given to that suppress myeloid production or lead tohematology, as well as their potential utility in the indication for anticoagulant therapy and neutrophil destruction.clinical practice. The diagnosis of von Willebrand associated thrombotic risk, as well as to thedisease (VWD) remains a challenge because no potential hemorrhagic risks in the post-operative Dr. Mark Koury will discuss a diagnosticsingle test is entirely diagnostic. setting. Dr. Ortel will discuss options for various approach to chronic anemia based on the clinical scenarios and will also address the role of evaluation of complete blood count, reticulocyteDr. Jorge DiPaola will discuss the molecular “bridging” therapy in high-risk situations. count, and red cell indices. The basicinteractions of von Willebrand factor (vWF) that pathophysiological causes for the developmenthave fueled the recent development of tests Dr. Jeannie Callum will discuss the available of chronic anemia will be reviewed, and theirthat allow for more accurate diagnosis. He will laboratory tests for the massively bleeding effects on each of these laboratory results willdescribe the utility of genetic testing for VWD patient, the transfusion strategies available, and be discussed. Examples of patient presentation,type 2 and 3 and new laboratory techniques the alternatives to transfusion. The discussion evaluations, and treatments will be presented.that improve the accuracy of subtype diagnosis. will include the evidence for near-patient testing,Finally, he will discuss type 1 VWD and the 1:1:1 formula resuscitation, antifibrinolytics, Dr. Roberto Stasi will suggest a systematicdiagnostic dilemmas that arise from the overlap recombinant factor VIIa, and coagulation diagnostic approach to challenging cases ofof borderline low vWF levels and mild bleeding. concentrates. thrombocytopenia. Dr. Stasi will focus on the interpretation of clinical findings as well as theDr. Pier Mannucci will review the mechanism Dr. Sam Schulman will highlight the transfusion- relevance and appropriateness of diagnostic tests.of hemorrhagic complications in liver cirrhosis saving role of antifibrinolytic therapy,and renal insufficiency. He will review current particularly with tranexamic acid. He will alsoevidence that improvement of anemia through review the possibility, in the era of severaluse of erythropoietin in renal insufficiency has new antithrombotic agents without availabledramatically reduced bleeding tendencies. antidotes, of assessing the risk of bleeding or theIn liver disease, bleeding is not explained by contribution of such an agent to actual bleeding,abnormalities of routine coagulation tests as well as methods to reverse or mitigate thebecause a decrease in natural anticoagulants anti-hemostatic effect.compensates for the decrease of procoagulantfactors. In both diseases, thrombosis is actuallya problem more pertinent than bleeding.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 24
  • 27. Hemoglobinopathies: New Frontiers and Insights Immune DysregulationCHAI R: to compensate for the defective β-globin CHAI R: genes or inhibit HbS polymerization, has nowElliott P. Vichinsky, MD, Children’s Hospital and reached phase I/II clinical trials. Five years after Phillip Scheinberg, MD, Hospital São José –Research Center Oakland, Oakland, CA Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, lentiviral β-globin gene therapy, a severe β-E/β-0 São Paulo, BrazilS PEAKE R S: thalassemia patient has remained transfusion independent. Protocol details along with S PEAKE R S:Philippe Leboulch, MD, Brigham and Women’s alternative approaches to increase safety andHospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Phillip Scheinberg, MD, Hospital São José – efficacy will be discussed.Advances in Gene Therapy and Stem Cell Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo,Transplantation In Hemoglobinopathies: Is the São Paulo, BrazilFuture Here? Dr. Elliott Vichinsky will discuss novel Aplastic Anemia: Therapeutic Updates in therapies to address the pathophysiology of Immunosuppression and TransplantationElliott P. Vichinsky, MD, Children’s Hospital and hemoglobinopathies. These strategies includeResearch Center Oakland, Oakland, CA improvement of nitric oxide availability (arginine), Charlotte Cunningham-Rundles, MD, PhD,Emerging “A” Therapies in Hemoglobinopathies: decreased inflammation and hypoxia reperfusion Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NYAgonists, Antagonists, Antioxidants, and Arginine injury (5-lipoxygenase inhibitors and adenosine The Many Faces of Common Variable 2A agonists), decreased cellular adhesion and ImmunodeficiencyJulie A. Panepinto, MD, Children’s Hospital endothelial dysfunction (propanolol, pan-selectinof Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, inhibitors, statins), and the effects of antioxidant Jill M. Johnsen, MD, Puget Sound Blood Center,Milwaukee, WI therapy (glutamine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-L- University of Washington, Seattle, WAHealth-Related Quality of Life in Patients carnitive, curcuminoids) on tissue injury. The Pathogenesis of Immune Thrombocytopenia:with Hemoglobinopathies use of hepcidin agonists in thalassemia will New InsightsThis session will focus on emerging therapies also be reviewed. Immune dysregulation can lead to severalin the treatment of hemoglobinopathies and the Dr. Julie Panepinto will review what is known hematologic disorders that include aplasticpotential of quality-of-life instruments to measure regarding patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in anemia, immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), andtheir efficacy. hemoglobinopathies. She will discuss the role of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). PROs within clinical trials in hemoglobinopathies An aberrant immune response can lead toDr. Leboulch will discuss curative treatments and their benefits in measuring the effects of auto-reactivity and cytopenia(s) in patients withfocusing on gene therapy. The only available treatment. Dr. Panepinto will also review U.S. aplastic anemia and ITP, or an inability to mountcurative therapy for the hemoglobinopathies Food and Drug Administration guidelines on PRO an effective immune response with susceptibilityis allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell instruments to measure efficacy endpoints in a to infections in patients with CVID.transplantation. However, a general lack ofavailable donors, transplant rejection, and the clinical trial. Lastly, she will highlight potential uses for PROs in a clinical setting. Dr. Phillip Scheinberg will briefly summarizedevelopment of graft-versus-host disease are recent insights into the pathogenesis of aplasticsignificant problems. Gene therapy, designed anemia. He will discuss the results of recent immunosuppression trials using alemtuzumab, horse and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG), and how these studies are likely to affect clinical practice. He will then discuss transplantation outcomes in aplastic anemia in recent years and how the role of this therapeutic modality is evolving in aplastic anemia. Dr. Charlotte Cunningham-Rundles will be discussing the presentations of CVID consisting of two phenotypes: one in which only infections are the characteristic; and another in which inflammatory and/or hematologic complications develop, including lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, enteropathy, and granulomatous disease. She will discuss how these phenotypes appear to be stable, how they are related to both immunologic and inflammatory markers, and how they are predictive of outcomes. Dr. Jill Johnsen will present an overview of our current understanding of the pathogenesis of ITP. She will summarize the immune dysregulation observed in ITP and the associated phenotypes of accelerated platelet destruction and reduced platelet production. She will also discuss the implications of these evolving mechanistic models in the diagnosis and treatment of ITP. 25 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 28. Education ProgramThe Thrombotic Hematologic Diseases Not So “Benign”Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Pregnancy Hematologic Issuesand Hemolytic Uremic in Children CHAI R:Syndromes: New Insights Terry B. Gernsheimer, MD, Puget Sound Blood CHAI R:and New Treatments Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Anthony K. C. Chan, MD, McMaster University, S PEAKE R S: Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaCHAI R: Terry B. Gernsheimer, MD, Puget Sound Blood S PEAKE R S:James N. George, MD, University of Oklahoma Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WAHealth Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy: Is This Janna M. Journeycake, MD, University of Texas Immune Thrombocytopenia or...? Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas,S PEAKE R S: TXJames N. George, MD, University of Oklahoma Sophie Lanzkron, MD, The Johns Hopkins Childhood Immune Thrombocytopenia: Role ofHealth Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Rituximab, Recombinant Thrombopoietin, andDiagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in the Baby on Board: What You Need to Know about Other New TherapeuticsThrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Pregnancy in the HemoglobinopathiesHemolytic Uremic Syndromes Anthony K. C. Chan, MD, McMaster University, Ian A. Greer, MD, University of Liverpool, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Liverpool, United Kingdom Updates in Thrombosis in Pediatrics: WhereJohanna A. Kremer Hovinga, MD, Bern University Thrombosis in Pregnancy: Updates in Diagnosis Are We After 20 Years?Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland and ManagementADAMTS13: Its Roles in Pathogenesis,Diagnosis, and Treatment in Thrombotic Shoshana Revel-Vilk, MD, Hadassah Hebrew-Thrombocytopenic Purpura Diagnosis and management of hematologic University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel disorders in the pregnant patient present special The Conundrum of Neonatal CoagulopathyCarla Nester, MD, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA challenges with consideration for safety of bothAtypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: What Is It, the woman and her fetus. Exacerbation may This session will focus on three differentHow Is It Diagnosed, and How Is It Treated? occur during pregnancy, and treatment goals pediatric hematologic issues that, although change as pregnancy progresses and delivery generally appearing to be somewhat benign,This session will focus on understanding the nears. The fetus may be at risk of complications indeed cause significant morbidity and mortality.evaluation and management of syndromes of the disease and its management, and may These topics will be explored through review ofdiagnosed as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura also require special monitoring before and the current findings and projection of potential(TTP) or hemolytic uremic syndromes (HUS) after delivery. There is a marked lack of direct directions in care.in adults and children. New diagnostic studies, evidence and decisions based on extrapolationsuch as measurement of ADAMTS13 activity or of data from non-pregnant cohorts and reported Dr. Janna Journeycake will review currentassessment of complement system abnormalities, experience. New observations are expanding evidence in the use of rituximab, thrombopoeitin-may be important for establishing etiologies that our understanding of pathologic mechanisms receptor agonists, and other new therapeutics inmay require specific treatments. For patients with in pregnancy, improving management and the management of childhood chronic immuneTTP associated with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency, opportunities for successful outcomes in thrombocytopenia.rituximab may be an important adjunctive treatment “high-risk” pregnancies.for selected patients. For patients described as Dr. Anthony Chan will review the progress that hasatypical HUS (aHUS) resulting from an abnormality Dr. Terry Gernsheimer will discuss pathogenic been made in the area of venous thromboembolismof complement regulation, treatment with mechanisms of thrombocytopenia and differential in children over the last 20 years.eculizumab may be important. diagnosis of this common complication of pregnancy. Safety of the fetus limits therapeutic Dr. Shoshana Revel-Vilk will discuss theDr. James George will describe the diversity of the options and goals may be different than in the developmental hemostatic system that isTTP and HUS syndromes that are encountered non-pregnant patient. A rational approach to risk seemingly abnormal compared to adults andin clinical practice, reflecting several different assessment and management of both the patient whether neonates are more prone to bleeding oretiologies and distinct long-term outcomes following and her offspring during pregnancy and delivery to thrombotic problems. She will also describerecovery. will be outlined. approaches to diagnose coagulopathy in neonates.Dr. Johanna Kremer Hovinga will describe the role Dr. Sophie Lanzkron will review maternal andof ADAMTS13 deficiency in the pathogenesis fetal risks of pregnancy for individuals with βof TTP and the importance and limitations of thalassemia major and sickle cell disease. AsADAMTS13 measurements for evaluation of treatment for individuals with hemoglobinopathiespatients with suspected TTP. She will also address has improved and life expectancy has increased,problems specific to the rare families with hereditary many people with these disorders are optingADAMTS13 deficiency (Upshaw-Schulman to have children. Treatment strategies tosyndrome). minimize complications during pregnancy will be discussed.Dr. Carla Nester will describe the clinical featuresof patients with abnormalities of complement Dr. Ian Greer will discuss the implications ofregulation, resulting in excessive complement venous thromboembolic disease for pregnancyactivation and the syndrome described as aHUS. as well as for the long-term health of the mother.She will describe the clinical features that may The diagnosis of thrombosis and the safety andallow recognition of aHUS and consideration of efficacy of available anticoagulants in the gravidintervention with the recently approved treatment, patient will be reviewed.eculizumab.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 26
  • 29. Pearls and Pitfalls in theHematology Lab: Clottingand BleedingCHAI R:Jacob H. Rand, MD, Montefiore Medical Center,Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NYS PEAKE R S:Dorothy Marie Adcock, MD, Esoterix, Inc.,Englewood, COCoagulation Assays and AnticoagulantMonitoringJacob H. Rand, MD, Montefiore Medical Center,Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NYDos and Don’ts in Diagnosing AntiphospholipidSyndromeTeresa Quiroga, MD, Pontifical Catholic Universityof Chile School of Medicine, Santiago, ChileIs My Patient a Bleeder? A DiagnosticFramework for Mild Bleeding DisordersHematologist-oncologists are often asked tosee patients for a variety of blood coagulationissues. These consultations usually require theconsultant to make decisions about orderingand interpreting coagulation assays – anarea in which practicing physicians have hadprogressively less direct contact. This sessionis designed to provide clinicians with currentinformation on the latest guidelines and also withhandy tips and practical advice on how to best Pearls and Pitfalls in the Hematology Lab: Updates onutilize these assays. Cellular DiagnosticsDr. Dorothy Adcock will discuss the current CHAI R: laboratory markers and assays useful to delineateapproaches to deciding when and how to the mechanism(s) of cytopenia, with specialmonitor anticoagulant therapies. The discussion Tracy I. George, MD, Stanford University School reference to bone marrow function-relatedwill include recommendations on the latest group of Medicine, Stanford, CA parameters. Dr. Valent will also discuss availableof anticoagulants: the oral direct inhibitors of S PEAKE R S: criteria and diagnostic algorithms throughthrombin and factor Xa. which a provisional or a final diagnosis can be Peter Valent, MD, Medical University of Vienna, established in these patients.Dr. Jacob Rand will review the current diagnostic Vienna, Austriacriteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, describe Low Blood Counts: Immune, Idiopathic, or Myelodysplasia Dr. Tracy George will focus on the evaluationthe clinical indications for testing, and offer of leukocytosis, describing useful laboratoryrecommendations on how the tests should be Tracy I. George, MD, Stanford University School assays that separate malignant from benigninterpreted. of Medicine, Stanford, CA proliferations. She will discuss practical aspects Malignant or Benign Leukocytosis of cellular diagnostics, including examination ofDr. Teresa Quiroga will provide insight on the the peripheral blood smear, when flow cytometrycurrent approaches to identifying and evaluating Ralph Green, MD, PhD, University of California – immunophenotyping is appropriate and when itpatients who are suspected to have bleeding Davis, Sacramento, CA can be misleading, and when molecular geneticdisorders. Anemias Beyond B12 and Iron Deficiency: testing is helpful. The Buzz about Other B’s, “Elementary” and “Non-Elementary” Problems Dr. Ralph Green will present a practical approach to the diagnosis of anemia. He will This session will focus on laboratory testing in discuss general principles including the use and hematology including new diagnostic assays, the limitations of red cell indices, testing algorithms, interpretation of diagnostic laboratory tests, and and discriminant functions. With the backdrop problems associated with such testing. of the changing spectrum of the more and less commonly encountered anemias and through Dr. Peter Valent will discuss the diagnostic illustrative case examples from the obvious to the interface in mild cytopenias, ranging from low-risk obscure, Dr. Green will focus on when to order myelodysplastic syndromes to immune-mediated what tests, how to interpret them, and what’s cytopenias. He will review available clinical and new and interesting beyond the commonplace. 27 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 30. Education Program3 P’s In a PodCHAI R:Jeffrey Lawrence Winters, MD, Mayo Clinic,Rochester, MNS PEAKE R S:Gregory Grabowski, MD, Cincinnati Children’sHospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OHPhilippe Gaucher Disease and Other StorageDisordersRobert J. Desnick, MD, PhD, Mount Sinai Schoolof Medicine, New York, NYPorphyrias: Advances in Diagnosis andTreatment of the “Purple” DiseasesJeffrey Lawrence Winters, MD, Mayo Clinic,Rochester, MNPlasma Exchange: Concepts, Mechanisms,and an Overview of the American Society forApheresis GuidelinesThis session will consist of a potpourri ofpathologic processes and procedures ofparticular interest to the practicing hematologist,all involving the letter “P”!Dr. Gregory Grabowski will review Gaucherdisease as the prototype for lysosomal storagediseases (LSD) such as Fabry, Pompe, andNiemann-Pick diseases. He will also discuss Pediatric Issues in Platelet Transfusionsthe clinical and economic success of enzymereplacement therapy in this disorder-stimulated CHAI R: survival, and function between neonates andresearch, development in these diseases, and adults, and describe some of the key molecular Cassandra Josephson, MD, Emory University, mechanisms underlying these differences.the recognition of disruption of autophagy/ Atlanta, GAlysosomal function in other diseases, such as She will then discuss the unique characteristicsage-related degenerative diseases and idiopathic S PEAKE R S: of the neonatal hemostatic system and thehypertrophic cardiomyopathy. potential impact of transfusing “developmentally Martha Sola-Visner, MD, Children’s Hospital mismatched” adult platelets on neonatal Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MADr. Robert Desnick will review the porphyrias, physiology. Platelets in the Neonatal Period: Developmentalfocusing on congenital erythropoietic porphyria Differences in Platelet Production, Function,(CEP), erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), and and Hemostasis, and the Potential Impact of Dr. Simon Stanworth will briefly review severitythe recently identified X-linked protoporphyria Therapies and clinical characteristics of neonates that(XLP). The diagnosis, treatment, and results develop thrombocytopenia. He will then discussof recent clinical trials will be presented. Dr. Simon J. Stanworth, MD, DPhil, NHS Blood prevalence and patterns of bleeding in neonatesDesnick will also discuss chronic phlebotomy for and Transplant, Oxford University Hospital NHS with severe thrombocytopenia. Finally, Dr.Porphyria Cutanea Tarda and hematin and liver Trust, Oxford, United Kingdom Stanworth will review surveys and clinical studiestransplantation for the acute neurologic attacks in Thrombocytopenia, Bleeding, and Platelet that focus on the effectiveness of prophylacticacute hepatic porphyrias. Transfusions in Sick Neonates platelet transfusions and platelet transfusion thresholds in this vulnerable population. Cassandra Josephson, MD, Emory University,Dr. Jeffrey Winters will review basic concepts Atlanta, GA Dr. Cassandra Josephson will review theand mechanisms of plasma exchange. He will Thrombocytopenia and Bleeding in Pediatricdiscuss issues that must be considered when historic data and studies that focus on platelet Oncology Patients transfusion thresholds, dosing of platelets, andprescribing or performing plasma exchangein order to ensure safe and effective therapy. bleeding incidence in pediatric oncology and THIS SESSION IS JOINTLY SPONSORED hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. SheHe will review the “Guidelines on the Use of WITH AABB.Therapeutic Apheresis in Clinical Practice – will then explore the lack of standardization ofEvidence-Based Approach from the Apheresis bleeding assessment tools for reporting bleeding This session will be devoted to recent advances outcomes and examine the clinical relevance ofApplications Committee of the American Society in the basic science of developmental plateletfor Apheresis” as a practical tool for determining bleeding in this population. production and function and implications forthe role of plasma exchange in disease treatment. therapy. It will also discuss thrombocytopenia, Finally, Dr. Josephson will discuss the pediatric transfusion thresholds, and bleeding in sick sub-analysis of the National Heart, Lung, and neonates and pediatric oncology/hematopoietic Blood Institute and Transfusion Medicine/ stem cell transplant patients. Hemostasis Clinical Trial Network-sponsored trial on platelet dosing and bleeding outcomes in Dr. Sola-Visner will review the main patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia, developmental differences in platelet production, the Prophylactic PLAtelet DOse (PLADO) trial.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 28
  • 31. International Hematology: The Trade Secrets of a Junior FacultyLimitations and Successful Academic Development EducationAccomplishments in Sickle Program: How to be CHAI R:Cell Disease Barbara M. Alving, MD, Former Director of Successful in Your First National Center for Research Resources, “Real” JobCHAI R: National Institutes of Health, Uniformed ServicesGriffin P. Rodgers, MD, National Institute of University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD CHAI R:Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, S PEAKE R S:National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Stephen Hunger, MD, University of Colorado Barbara M. Alving, MD, Former Director of School of Medicine, Aurora, COS PEAKE R S: National Center for Research Resources, S PEAKE R S:Isaac Odame, MD, The Hospital for Sick National Institutes of Health, Uniformed ServicesChildren, Toronto, Ontario, Canada University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD Donald Small, MD, PhD, The Johns HopkinsGlobal Perspectives on Sickle Cell Disease Secrets of Successful Mentors University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Developing a Productive Research ProgramJulie Makani, MD, PhD, Muhimbili University of Sara K. Vesely, PhD, University of OklahomaHealth and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK Mignon Loh, MD, University of California – SanTanzania Secrets of Statistics: What You Need to Know Francisco, San Francisco, CASickle Cell Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa: but Were Afraid To Ask Developing a Focused Area of ClinicalChallenges, Progress, and Next Steps Expertise J. Douglas Rizzo, MD, Medical College ofZakari Aliyu, MD, Taraba State Specialist Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Barbara A. Konkle, MD, Puget Sound BloodHospital, Taraba, Nigeria Secrets of a Great Talk: How to Create and Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WAPrivate-Public Partnerships: Model for Finding Deliver Effective Presentations Considering a New Job: Should I Stay orSolutions to Sickle Cell Disease in Low-Income Should I Go?Countries THIS SESSION IS OFFERED ONCE. THIS SESSION IS OFFERED ONCE.THIS SESSION IS OFFERED ONCE. This session will explore the secrets behind three critical factors in attaining academic success: This session will focus on issues critical to careerThis session will highlight the global burden of achieving leadership through mentoring and development of junior faculty members.sickle cell disease (SCD) and steps being taken being mentored; conducting research studiesby an international village to advance research and of value supported by appropriate knowledge Dr. Donald Small will review how to defineclinical care in countries with few health resources. of statistics, as well as engaging statisticians realistic research goals based on a researchSpeakers will describe a network that aims to in- as team members; and creating and delivering effort assignment, how to establish effectivecrease awareness of and treatment for the disease, presentations that captivate your audiences. research collaborations, and how to obtainthe challenges of providing care, research projects critical early career extramural funding.and opportunities where disease prevalence is Dr. Barbara Alving will provide case studies ofhigh, and efforts to establish a new clinical care highly successful mentors and then examine Dr. Mignon Loh will discuss why it is important tocenter in one of the largest hospitals in Nigeria. questions that arise in considering mentorship. identify a niche, how to decide on an appropriate What defines a successful mentor? Is mentoring niche and become the local expert in this area,Dr. Isaac Odame will provide an overview of the an altruistic activity? What is the difference and how to move from being a local expert to aglobal burden of SCD and discuss steps that need between mentoring and coaching? When does national/international expert.to be taken to begin to address the problem. He a professional outgrow the need for mentoring,will discuss the formation and role of a network of and are mentors needed in this highly connected, Dr. Barbara Konkle will illustrate the advantagesSCD clinicians and scientists committed to foster- mobile world? and disadvantages of transitioning from trainee toing North-South and South-South collaborations junior faculty member at the same institution, howaimed at furthering research and advancing clinical Dr. Sara Vesely will discuss how to interact to identify potential issues, and how to remedycare for patients with SCD, particularly in low- with a biostatistician to ensure an appropriate problem situations in constructive ways. She willincome countries with the highest disease burden. study design and utilization of resources and also discuss appropriate considerations when clinical research participants. She will explain things are going well and you are approachedDr. Julie Makani will provide an overview of the chal- how the power of statistics is available to every with other career opportunities.lenges in delivering comprehensive care for SCD investigator, regardless of career level.in Africa within the context of limited resources andhigh disease burden. She will discuss opportunities Dr. Douglas Rizzo will discuss preparing dynamic,presented by high patient numbers and the steps innovative presentations based on an abilitytaken by African investigators and their collabora- to understand a variety of potential audiences,tors in promoting and performing SCD research in including community members, clinical trialsub-Saharan Africa through the establishment of participants, potential donors, management,active regional research networks. academic colleagues, or international groups with language challenges. He will also describeDr. Zakari Aliyu will discuss an effective model of effective use of presentation formats, such aspartnerships involved in building sustainable capac- PowerPoint, and delivery techniques to engageity through health system strengthening to advance the audience and overcome anxiety.clinical care and promote research in low-incomesettings. He will describe his collaborative effortsto establish a new blood, sickle cell, cancer, andpalliative care institute within one of the largesthospitals in Nigeria. 29 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 32. Scientific Program SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM CO-CHAIRS: Scientific Committee Scientific Committee on Blood Disorders in on Hematopathology Bruce R. Blazar, MDUniversity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Childhood and Clinical Laboratory Roy L. Silverstein, MD Misguided Myeloid Cells: From Hematology Medical College of Wisconsin, Inflammation to Malignancy New Insights into Blood Disorders Milwaukee, WI CHAI R: from Sequencing of Genomes and Catherine M. Bollard, MD, Baylor College Transcriptomes The 2012 Scientific Committee Program of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital, The CHAI R: Sessions will be held Saturday, December Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 8, and Sunday, December 9. Each Catherine P. M. Hayward, MD, PhD, McMaster session will be offered twice. A question- S PEAKE R S: University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and-answer period will occur at the end Miriam Merad, MD, PhD, Mount Sinai School of S PEAKE R S: of each individual speaker presentation. Medicine, New York, NY Invited abstracts of these sessions will be The Origin and Function of Langerin (CD207) Elaine R. Mardis, PhD, Washington University published in the Program Book and on the Expressing Cells in Mice and Humans School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO flash drive containing the annual meeting Next-Generation Sequencing: A Discovery Tool for abstracts. In addition, this information Carl E. Allen, MD, PhD, Baylor College of Blood Disorders will be provided online through the Medicine, Texas Children’s Cancer and ASH website (www.hematology.org) Hematology Centers, Houston, TX Torsten Haferlach, MD, MLL Munich Leukemia Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Back to Laboratory, Munich, Germany in early November. Histiocytosis X Next-Generation Sequencing: Should it Become Part of Routine Diagnostics for Leukemias and Lisa Filipovich, MD, Cincinnati Children’s Other Myeloid Neoplasms? Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Biology Randy D. Gascoyne, MD, British Columbia Cancer and Stem Cell Transplant Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Insights into the Pathogenesis of B-Cell Disorders This session will provide a bench-to-bedside from Sequencing overview of the histiocytic disorders Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and hemophagocytic This session will focus on the scientific lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The emphasis underpinnings and advances in blood disorder of the basic science will be on the evolving diagnosis from deep sequencing of the genome understanding of intrinsic molecular lesions as and transcriptome. Speakers will cover new insights that deep sequencing has provided into well as the systemic immune dysregulation that the diagnosis and pathogenesis of leukemias underlie these disorders. and B-cell disorders, with potential for translation into state-of-the-art clinical diagnostic testing and Dr. Miriam Merad will focus on the origin and personalized medicine. function of myeloid dendritic cells. Specifically, she will focus on the significance of langerin+ Dr. Elaine Mardis will provide a fundamental cells (CD207), an antigen receptor with explanation of next-generation sequencing promiscuity and complexity beyond the epidermal methods, including their strengths and Langerhans cell. weaknesses, for comprehensive genome and transcriptome analysis. She will provide pertinent Dr. Carl Allen will discuss how recent molecular examples of emerging uses of these technologies insights into the pathogenesis of LCH may to address important clinical questions in redefine the disorder as a myeloid neoplasia and leukemias, using her work as an example. Lastly, may affect future approaches to therapy. Dr. Mardis will present an illustrative scenario whereby genomic information about a patient’s Dr. Lisa Filipovich will review the genetic leukemia can be used to better treat the disease, mutations and functional immune defects using each patient as a specific example in the that lead to unrestrained inflammation in spectrum of personalized medicine. hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. She will Dr. Torsten Haferlach will discuss the application of also discuss novel diagnostic and therapeutic deep sequencing and the insights it has provided strategies, including promising results with stem for both leukemias and other myeloid neoplasms. cell transplant. He will further discuss the translation of the discoveries into state-of-the-art clinical diagnostic testing for diagnosis and clinical management. Particularly, Dr. Haferlach will address how this novel laboratory method can be integrated into useful diagnostic algorithms. Dr. Randy Gascoyne will describe the insights that whole genome, exome, and transcriptome (RNA-seq) sequencing have provided for mature B-cell and T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Recent discoveries from lymphoid cancers will be highlighted; including both the novel insights into biology and the potential for clinical translation based on recurrent somatic mutations, novel fusion discovery, and targeted re-sequencing strategies.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 30
  • 33. Scientific Committee Scientific Committee on Hemostasison Hematopoiesis New Aspects of von Willebrand Factor BiologyRNA Splicing in Normal and Malignant CHAI R: Dr. Timothy Springer will discuss new molecularHematopoiesis and biophysical studies of vWF. Recent electronic Barbara A. Konkle, MD, Puget Sound Blood microscopy structures provide insight into the Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WACHAI R: domain architecture of vWF and the basis for itsWilliam Vainchenker, MD, PhD, Institut National S PEAKE R S: flexibility. The extraordinary length of vWF allowsde la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Institut it to act as a sensor of vascular flow. Dr. Springer Timothy A. Springer, PhD, Children’s Hospital will also provide new insights into how forcesGustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France Boston, Boston, MA acting on vWF affect its function, including inS PEAKE R S: von Willebrand Factor Biology and Structure types 2A and 2B Von Willebrand disease.Adrian Krainer, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Cécile V. Denis, PhD, Institut National de laLaboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Le Kremlin- Dr. Cécile Denis will provide an overview ofBiology of RNA Splicing and Processing Bicêtre, France recent advances in identifying novel pathways Determinants of von Willebrand Factor Function regulating vWF function. She will discuss resultsSeishi Ogawa, MD, PhD, Graduate School of from in vitro studies and in vivo approachesMedicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan X. Long Zheng, MD, PhD, The Children’s using dedicated animal models.Pathway Mutations in the Splicing Machinery Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PAin Myeloid Neoplasms von Willebrand Factor-ADAMTS13 Interactions Dr. Long Zheng will discuss new findings in the structural components of ADAMTS13 requiredCatherine J. Wu, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Over the past few years there have been for productive cleavage of vWF. He will alsoHarvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, MA significant advances in our understanding of the describe the cofactor-dependent regulation ofUnderstanding the Role of Mutations in SF3B1 structure and function of von Willebrand factor ADAMTS13 function in vitro and in vivo usingand Splicing in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (vWF) and its regulation by the vWF cleaving animal models. protease ADAMTS13. This session will highlightThis session will focus on recent discoveries of new findings in these areas and their implicationsspliceosome mutations in myeloid malignancies in hemostasis and thrombosis.and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with theunexpected observation that mutations in thesame gene are present in both myelodysplasticsyndromes with ring sideroblasts and CLL. Thissession will begin with the basic aspects of RNAsplicing, describe the spectrum of spliceosomalgene mutations, their biological consequences,their implications in disease prognosis, and thepossibility of new therapeutic approaches.Dr. Adrian Krainer will review the generalmechanisms of RNA splicing and how splicingmisregulation may lead to various diseases,including cell transformation. He will discussthe possibilities of new therapeutic strategiesspecifically targeting relevant alternative isoforms.Dr. Seishi Ogawa will provide an overview ofthe genetic alterations in the splicing pathwayin myeloid malignancies and their correlationwith disease phenotypes. He will then presentthe consequences of these spliceosomemutations on RNA splicing and on the biology ofhematopoietic cells, including stem cells.Dr. Catherine Wu will present the results of next-generation sequencing in CLL. She will focuson the mutations in SF3B1, their consequenceson splicing, and the new mechanistic insightsprovided by understanding the role of splicingon the pathogenesis of CLL. Dr. Wu will discussthe impact of these mutations on prognosis andtreatment. 31 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 34. Scientific ProgramScientific Committee Scientific Committee Scientific Committeeon Immunology and on Iron and Heme on Lymphoid NeoplasiaHost Defense Orchestration of Systemic Iron Balance B-Cell Receptor Signaling in theImmune Cells Bridging Innate and CHAI R: Pathogenesis and Treatment ofAdaptive Immunity Lymphoid Malignancy Gordon D. McLaren, MD, University of CaliforniaCHAI R: – Irvine, Irvine, CA and VA Long Beach CHAI R: Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA Clark W. Distelhorst, MD, Case WesternFabio Candotti, MD, National Human GenomeResearch Institute, National Institutes of Health, S PEAKE R S: Reserve University, Cleveland, OHBethesda, MD Herbert Yih-Fuu Lin, MD, PhD, Massachusetts S PEAKE R S:S PEAKE R S: General Hospital, Boston, MA Freda Stevenson, DPhil, University of The Liver: Conductor of Systemic Iron Southampton, Southampton, United KingdomHergen Spits, PhD, Academic Medical RegulationCenter, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, B-Cell Receptor Signaling in ChronicNetherlands Lymphocytic Leukemia Carole Peyssonnaux, PhD, Institut National deInnate Lymphoid Cells: Development and la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, InstituteFunction in Innate Immunity and Tissue Louis M. Staudt, MD, PhD, National Cancer Cochin, Paris, France Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,Remodeling The Gut: Role at Steady State and Variations in MD Disordered Conditions Chronic Active B-Cell Receptor Signaling inMadhav Dhodapkar, MD, Yale University, NewHaven, CT Lymphoma Yelena Ginzburg, MD, New York Blood Center,Harnessing Invariant Natural Killer T Cells for New York, NYCancer Therapy John C. Byrd, MD, The Ohio State University, The Red Cell: How Erythropoiesis Modulates Columbus, OH Hepcidin Expression Therapeutic Targeting of B-Cell ReceptorJames W. Young, MD, Memorial Sloan-KetteringCancer Center, New York, NY Signaling Pathways This session will focus on the three majorDendritic Cells Biology and Adaptive Immunes organs involved in orchestrating systemic ironResponses The speakers in this session will highlight recent balance: the liver, the intestine, and the erythron. advances in understanding the role of B-cell The role of each of these organs and their receptor (BCR) signaling in the pathogenesisThis session will explore the widening knowledge interactions will be reviewed, including normalof the cellular players at the interface between of B-cell malignancies and the potential of control mechanisms in health and alterations targeting abnormal BCR signaling for therapeuticthe innate and adaptive immune systems. Special in disease. Recent advances in understandingfocus will be placed on the discussion of innate purposes. hereditary disorders associated with abnormallymphoid cells, invariant natural killer cells, and iron homeostasis and therapeutic implicationsdendritic cells, with particular attention to notions Dr. Freda Stevenson will discuss the role of will be discussed in relation to conditions such BCR signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemiaderiving from studies in human cells. as hemochromatosis, the thalassemias, and iron- (CLL), based on evidence that ligand-induced refractory iron deficiency anemia. modulation of surface immunoglobulin MDr. Hergen Spits will discuss the multifacetedfunctions of innate lymphoid cells, a novel and (IgM) contributes to the pathogenesis of this Dr. Herbert Lin will present recent research on malignancy by engaging downstream proliferativeexpanding family of immune effector cells that hepatic iron sensing and how the liver acts as theserve multiple roles including lymphoid tissue and anti-apoptotic pathways. New observations conductor of systemic iron regulation through the on the intraclonal heterogeneity in selective IgMformation in embryogenesis, immune protection BMP signaling pathway that controls productionfrom microorganisms, and tissue remodeling after expression important for therapeutic targeting of hepcidin. A review of current knowledge about also will be described.infection or inflammatory injury. the regulation of hepcidin expression will be presented, including the effects of altered iron Dr. Louis Staudt will summarize how the useDr. Madhav Dhodapkar will focus his stores, inflammation, and hereditary disorders.presentation on the latest understanding of of functional and structural genomics revealeddiversity and functional properties of lipid- that the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of Dr. Carole Peyssonnaux will focus on the role diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) reliesreactive natural killer T cells and the potential of of hepcidin in the normal control of intestinalharnessing the properties of these cells in clinical on a “chronic active” form of BCR signaling iron absorption and variations associated for survival. Therapies targeting chronic activestudies for cancer treatment. with disorders, such as increased ineffective BCR signaling have significant clinical activity in erythropoiesis and hypoxia. The roles of Hif2α, relapsed/refractory ABC DLBCL. Other humanDr. James Young will provide an update duodenal iron transporters (DMT1, ferroportin),on dendritic cell biology and describe the lymphoma subtypes also rely on constitutive and duodenal ferritin in regulation of iron BCR signaling for survival but engage thisheterogeneous features of human dendritic cells transport across the duodenal mucosa will alsoand their effects on adaptive immune responses. pathway in a mechanistically distinct fashion. The be explored. expanding potential of BCR-directed therapies in human lymphomas will be discussed. Dr. Yelena Ginzburg will discuss modulation of hepcidin expression by erythropoiesis Dr. John Byrd will explain how novel targeted both under normal conditions and in disease therapies directed at BCR signaling produce a states associated with increased ineffective high rate of durable responses in both low- erythropoiesis, including the role of humoral grade lymphoma and CLL. Remarkably, these erythropoietic factors that influence hepcidin agents have produced very modest toxicity that regulation and thereby control the iron supply has allowed prolonged continuous dosing of from both the reticuloendothelial system and medication and prolonged remissions. Many dietary sources. questions remain relative to the integration of these agents into routine clinical practice that will be reviewed during this session.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 32
  • 35. Scientific Committee Scientific Committee Scientific Committeeon Myeloid Biology on Myeloid Neoplasia on PlateletsRole of HOX Genes in Normal and Personalized Diagnostics in Acute Myeloid Secrets of SecretionMalignant Hematopoiesis Leukemia and Myelodysplasia CHAI R:CHAI R: CHAI R: Andrew S. Weyrich, PhD, The University of Utah,Emmanuelle Passegué, PhD, University of Raul Ribeiro, MD, St. Jude Children’s Research Salt Lake City, UTCalifornia – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Hospital, Memphis, TN S PEAKE R S:S PEAKE R S: S PEAKE R S: Walter H. Kahr, MD, PhD, University of Toronto,Patricia Ernst, PhD, Dartmouth College, Benjamin L. Ebert, MD, PhD, Brigham and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario,Hanover, NH Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, CanadaCoordinating Self-Renewal and Proliferation Boston, MA Molecular Triggers of Granule Formation invia Mll1-Hox Pathways and Beyond Discovery Science and Integrating Molecular Megakaryocytes and Platelets Diagnosis into Clinical PracticeElizabeth A. Eklund, MD, Northwestern Joseph E. Italiano Jr., PhD, Brigham andUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine, Jesse Matthew J. Walter, MD, Washington University Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School,Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Boston, MARegulation of Myelopoiesis by Differentiation Biology of Myelodysplasia Clonality: Clinical New α-Granule Biology Reveals How PlateletsStage-Specific Activities of HoxA9 and HoxA10 Implications of Whole Genome Sequencing May Regulate AngiogenesisJay L. Hess, MD, PhD, University of Michigan, Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD, Erasmus Medical Sidney Whiteheart, PhD, University of Kentucky,Ann Arbor, MI Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands Lexington, KYMechanisms of Transcriptional Regulation and The Impact of Novel Molecular Markers on Risk Temporal Secretion of α-Granular Products:Transformation by HoxA9 Stratification in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Insights into the Mechanisms of Release ReactionHox proteins are central regulators of A major challenge in clinical medicine andhematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic biomedical research is to integrate current This session will provide an overview ofdifferentiation. Groups of Hox proteins are knowledge and technological advances into secretory processes in megakaryocytes andexpressed in a differentiation stage-specific the best care for each individual patient. platelets. Emphasis will be placed on howmanner during hematopoiesis. Anterior Hox Genomic technologies have transformed our granules are formed in megakaryocytes andproteins (Hox1-4) are expressed predominantly understanding of the genetic basis of myeloid how constituents are packaged into granulesin hematopoietic stem cells and posterior Hox malignancies, and it is expected that a new and released upon activation. Evolving conceptsproteins (Hox7-11) are expressed in committed disease taxonomy that incorporates existing on the homogeneity and/or heterogeneity ofprogenitors. Moreover, HOX genes are critical for clinical parameters with data about mutations – α-granules in platelets will also be addressedthe pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and and potentially epigenomic, metabolomic, and and discussed.are the target of some of the genetic lesions that microbiomic research – will provide accurate anddrive leukemogenesis. This session will review precise definitions of diseases and opportunities Dr. Walter Kahr will focus on the genetic andthe role of HOX gene regulation in both normal for specific treatment modalities and improved biochemical triggers of granular formation inand malignant myelopoiesis. individual health outcomes. This evolutionary megakaryocytes and platelets. His presentation process requires that patients, communities, will include discussion of mutations in VPS33BDr. Patricia Ernst will discuss the role of Mll1 and and diseases be considered together and and NBEAL-2 that are the genetic causes ofits downstream targets, including Hox genes, in will demand new biomedical paradigms abnormal α-granule formation in arthrogryposis,coordinating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal whereby physical and biological scientists and renal dysfunction and cholestasis, and graywith proliferation. The mechanisms by which Mll1 clinicians work closely to answer health-related platelet syndrome, respectively.controls the expression of its target genes will questions. This session will focus on examiningbe considered, including the role of chromatin opportunities for translating new knowledge from Dr. Joseph Italiano will discuss the release oftargeting and catalytic activities in maintaining different sources in the management of acute proteins from platelet α-granules that modulatedifferent categories of genes required for normal myeloid leukemia and myelodysplasia. angiogenic processes. His discussion willhematopoiesis. also shed light on how differential release of Dr. Benjamin Ebert will discuss the clinical angiogenic factors from platelets may provide aDr. Elizabeth Eklund will discuss the role impact of point-mutations in myelodysplastic new modality for the treatment of cancer.that posterior Hox proteins play in progenitor syndromes, and how genetic data can be usedexpansion and differentiation focusing on target to improve the prediction of prognosis and Dr. Sidney Whiteheart will discuss the patternsgenes for HoxA9 and HoxA10. Cooperative response to therapy. of α-granule cargo release in response toand antagonistic functions of these transcription differential platelet activation. He will also reviewfactors in controlling myeloid progenitor Dr. Matthew Walter will discuss the clonal the molecular mechanisms underlying the plateletexpansion and differentiation will be considered. architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes release reaction and speculate on how these and the clinical implications of whole genome steps may be viable targets for anti-thromboticDr. Jay Hess will discuss emerging evidence sequencing. therapies.suggesting that HoxA9, which is overexpressedin more than half of myeloid acute leukemias, Dr. Bob Löwenberg will discuss how a multitudemodulates the activity of lineage-specific of emerging potentially relevant molecularenhancers controlling a network of pro- biomarkers are creating a growing informativeleukemogenic target genes. prognostic background that can be used for risk- adapted therapy decisions. 33 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 36. Scientific ProgramScientific Committee Scientific Committee Scientific Committeeon Red Cell Biology on Stem Cells and on Thrombosis andHow to Make a Red Blood Cell Regenerative Medicine Vascular BiologyCHAI R: Stressed Out Stem Cells Initiation of Thrombus FormationDwayne Barber, PhD, Ontario Cancer Institute, CHAI R: During the Innate Immune ResponseToronto, Ontario, Canada CHAI R: Margaret A. Goodell, PhD, Baylor College ofS PEAKE R S: Medicine, Houston, TX Susan S. Smyth, MD, PhD, University ofJames Palis, MD, University of Rochester Kentucky, Lexington, KY S PEAKE R S:Medical Center, Rochester, NY S PEAKE R S:Primitive and Definitive Erythropoiesis Markus G. Manz, MD, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Hartmut Weiler, PhD, BloodCenter of Wisconsin,Igor Slukvin, MD, PhD, University of Wisconsin, Microbial Impact on Hematologic Homeostasis Milwaukee, WIMadison, WI Innate Immunity and Vascular HomeostasisInduced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Erythrocyte Andreas Trumpp, MD, German Cancer ResearchProduction Center (DKFZ) and HI-STEM, Heidelberg, Thomas M. McIntyre, PhD, Cleveland Clinic Germany Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OHLuc Douay, MD, PhD, Université Pierre et Marie Dormant HSCs and Their Response to Stress Inflammatory Cytokines and ThrombosisCurie, Paris, FranceIn Vitro Production of Erythrocytes Toshio Suda, MD, School of Medicine, Keio Fahumiya Samad, PhD, Torrey Pines Institute University, Tokyo, Japan for Molecular Studies, San Diego, CAThis session will focus on recent progress in the Metabolic Regulation of HSCs During Stress Inflammation, Obesity, and Thrombosisunderstanding of developmental erythropoiesis,advances in induced pluripotent stem cells, and Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) continuously Emerging evidence from animal models andthe use of stem cell precursors in the expansion replenish the peripheral blood at a steady rate clinical studies supports close connectionsand production of erythrocytes. during normal conditions. The hematopoietic between immune responses to tissue injury/ system is highly flexible, with effector cell insult and pathways involved in thrombosis. TheDr. James Palis will review aspects of red blood production augmented and restrained as interplay between the innate immune system,cell development including embryonic, fetal, needed. Recently, the role of hematopoietic platelets, and the coagulation cascade mayand adult erythropoiesis. His laboratory has stem cells in responding to these changing promote host-defense responses and tissuemade significant advances in understanding the demands has become increasingly appreciated. repair. It may also contribute to progression ofontogeny of fetal erythropoiesis. This session will focus on the types of stresses disease processes such as atherosclerosis, HSCs experience, their response to stress, and autoimmune disorders, inflammatory lung andDr. Igor Slukvin will discuss the development the mechanisms involved in these responses. bowel disorders, and obesity. This sessionof induced pluripotent stem cells and describe Individual presentations will elaborate on will provide the latest scientific evidenceoptimization of conditions for the optimal the highly dynamic role that stem cells play of the molecular mechanism(s) underlyingproduction of differentiated red blood cells. in hematologic homeostasis, as well as the these interactions and, when known, theirDevelopment of red blood cells from a defined regulatory mechanisms and the key questions pathophysiologic consequences.progenitor has several advantages, including that will shape research in the coming years.minimizing risk of transfusion reactions such as Dr. Hartmut Weiler will discuss the fact thatgraft-versus-host disease. Dr. Slukvin will also Dr. Markus Manz will review the impact of activated protein C (APC) – although initiallydiscuss the emerging ethical and societal issues infection on the effector, progenitor, and stem cell demonstrating promise in reducing mortalityinvolved in utilizing an engineered blood product. populations. in sepsis – exerts complex effects that alter its efficacy as a therapeutic agent. In preclinicalDr. Luc Douay will report his exciting findings Dr. Andreas Trumpp will focus on the signaling models, the sepsis mortality reduction by APCin the production of large quantities of red molecules that enable the HSC response, involves signaling through protease-activatedblood cells from CD34-positive precursors. particularly interferons. receptors, the endothelial protein C receptor,His laboratory has shown that cultured red and integrins. Additionally, APC may interact withblood cells are functional when introduced into Dr. Toshio Suda will focus on the unique metabolic novel substrates such as histones and tissuean immunodeficient mouse. Furthermore, Dr. status of HSCs and the changes that occur in factor pathway inhibitor to control coagulationDouay’s team illustrated that labeled cultured HSC metabolism during the stress response. and inflammation. Such receptor interactions mayblood cells had a comparable half-life when determine the biological response to endogenousinjected into a volunteer. Dr. Douay will also and therapeutically administered APC.provide perspectives on future directions in theuse of progenitor cell, cord blood, and pluripotent Dr. Thomas McIntyre will briefly summarize thestem cell technologies that have the potential to ability of platelets to splice and translate RNAtransform regenerative medicine. and the pathways involved. He will then discuss how endotoxin promotes the synthesis and release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL1β, from platelets. Dr. Fahumiya Samad will briefly review the links between obesity, inflammation, and thrombosis. In particular, she will focus on new evidence that tissue factor (TF) may have coagulation- independent functions in promoting obesity and its consequences. Dr. Samad will also describe the contributions of TF and PAR2 to diet- induced obesity and the molecular mechanism(s) responsible.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 34
  • 37. Scientific Committee Scientific Committee on Transplantation Biologyon Transfusion Medicine Microbiota, Gut Inflammation, and Transplantation: Back to the FutureToxicologic Effects of Blood Transfusion CHAI R: Dr. Wendy Garrett will discuss how specific microbes can instigate, promote, or inhibit colitisCHAI R: Marcel R.M. van den Brink, MD, PhD, Memorial through their effects on the mucosal immune Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NYJames C. Zimring, MD, PhD, Puget Sound Blood system or the microbial communities in the gut.Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA S PEAKE R S: Chronic inflammation in the intestine is also an important risk factor for colorectal cancer.S PEAKE R S: Wendy S. Garrett, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Ongoing work on the colorectal microbiome Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School,Eldad A. Hod, MD, Columbia University Medical using experimental models and human tumors Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MACenter, New York, NY Gut Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammation will be discussed, as well as the potentialThe Role of Iron in Toxicity of Stored Red Blood benefits for beneficial microbes and functionalCell Units Ernst Holler, PhD, Universitätsklinikum foods in the context of these diseases. Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyNilam S. Mangalmurti, MD, University of Intestinal Microbiota: From Inflammatory Bowel Dr. Ernst Holler will review the role of moleculesPennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Disease to Bone Marrow Transplantation involved in immune defense against microbiota,Erythrocyte Advanced Glycation Endproducts especially NOD2/CARD15. Polymorphismsas Novel Mediators of Endothelial Dysfunction Robert R. Jenq, MD, Memorial Sloan-Kettering within these genes have been identified asFollowing Transfusion Cancer Center, New York, NY risk factors of inflammatory bowel disease but Intestinal Microbiota in Bone Marrow have also been more recently associated withChristopher C. Silliman, MD, PhD, Bonfils Blood Transplantation intestinal GVHD following allogeneic stem cellCenter, Denver, CO transplantation and rejection in small bowelLipids: Free Fatty Acids, Eicosanoids, and With the advent of novel methodologies,Lysophospholipids and the Pro-Inflammatory transplantation. Potential mechanisms, such as studies regarding human microbiota have altered antibacterial peptides – mainly defensinsEffects of Transfusion made remarkable progress in the elucidation – as well as responses, microbiome changes, of the role of microbes in human health and and altered recruitment of protective intestinalThis session will focus on recent developments in disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is T cells will be discussed and linked to theour understanding of potential toxicities that may an ideal setting for such studies, as disruption increased activation of the T-cell response.be inadvertently generated as a result of storing of homeostasis between the host immuneblood and blood products prior to transfusion. system and the gut microbiota is central to IBD Dr. Robert Jenq will review the relationship pathogenesis. The pathophysiology of intestinal between the intestinal bacterial flora and GVHD.Dr. Eldad Hod will speak about the effects graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has many He will then discuss the recent studies on theof transfusing stored red blood cells on infection similarities with IBD. This session will review cross-talk between the intestinal microbiota,and inflammation. Both animal and human data recent developments in the study of microbiota, nutrition, and intestinal inflammation inwill be discussed, with a focus on how iron IBD, and intestinal GVHD. murine and human recipients of allogeneicand iron biology may play a mechanistic role ininfluencing this process. hematopoietic stem cell transplants.Dr. Nilam Mangalmurti will discuss the specificchemical class that accumulates both naturallyand also in stored blood products calledadvanced glycation endproducts. The role thatsuch chemical moieties play in potential toxicity ofblood products will be discussed with a focus onbiological interactions with vascular endothelium.Dr. Christopher Silliman will discuss howproinflamamtory lipid entities (eicosanoids andlysophospholipids) are generated during bloodstorage and discuss the biological sequelae oftransfusing products containing such entities. 35 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 38. Scientific ProgramAd Hoc Scientific Committee on Bone Marrow Failure Ad Hoc ScientificDNA Damage, Cell Cycle, and Fanconi Anemia Committee on PlasmaCHAI R: illustrating how insights into the pathogenetics Cell Neoplasia and pathobiology directly impact diagnosis, care,Monica Bessler, MD, PhD, University of and treatment of patients with FA. Furthermore, Histone Modification in B-CellPennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA Malignancies insights into the pathways of this rare geneticS PEAKE R S: disease may lead to discovery of novel biological CHAI R: principles, such as the definition of a DNA repairMarkus Grompe, MD, Oregon Health & Science pathway, with implications far beyond its own Nikhil C. Munshi, MD, Dana-Farber CancerUniversity, Portland, OR Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston VA disease pathology.Fanconi Anemia: Emerging Therapeutic Healthcare System, Boston, MAOpportunities Dr. Markus Grompe will review the phenotypic S PEAKE R S:Stephen C. West, PhD, Cancer Research UK- and genetic heterogeneity of FA, the genotype-London Research Institute, South Mimms, United phenotype correlations, and the pathways Peter A. Jones, PhD, DSc, University ofKingdom responsible for bone marrow failure. He will Southern California, Los Angeles, CALinks Between Defective DNA Strand Break discuss how insight into these pathways provides Decoding the Chromatin CodeRepair and Genome Instability in Fanconi Anemia novel therapeutic targets that may improve the severity of BMF or delay disease onset. Jonathan D. Licht, MD, Robert H. LurieKetan J. Patel, PhD, Medical Research Council Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, ILLaboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, Histone Methylation in Multiple Myeloma: Dr. Stephen West will discuss how the FAUnited Kingdom Clinical Applications proteins, encoded by genes that are mutatedLinks Between DNA Damage and Metabolism, in FA, participate in the repair of DNA strandPathways Causing Bone Marrow Failure in James E. Bradner, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer breaks and how mutations in these genes lead to Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MAFanconi Anemia, and Therapeutic Implications genetic instability and cancer predisposition. He Targeting Bromodomains in Myeloma will demonstrate how the understanding of theFanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow disturbed pathways uncovers unexpected novel This session will focus on understanding thefailure syndrome. Clinically, FA is characterized therapeutic options that might counterbalance distinct patterns of chromatin modifications andby a variety of congenital abnormalities and the genomic stability and improve defective repair their impact on alterations in gene expression,progressive bone marrow failure (BMF). Cells pathways in FA cells. the role of histone methylation in plasma cellfrom FA patients have a striking hypersensitivity and related malignancies, and targeting histoneto DNA interstrand crosslinks, which has become Dr. Ketan Patel will discuss exciting new insights methyl transferases in myeloma. The session willthe basis of a clinical diagnostic test for FA and into the link between metabolism and DNA also explore the functional role and therapeuticis the basis of the genomic instability in patients damage and the consequences for potential potential of the Bromodomain proteinswith this condition. Among inherited bone marrow new treatments. associated with acetylated chromatin in myeloma.failure syndromes, FA has been the “poster child,” Dr. Peter Jones will discuss the chromatin architecture and present an integrated view of the epigenome, including DNA methylation, histone modification, histone variants, and nucleosomal positioning, essential for chromatin- dependent signal transduction. He will also explain how these parameters change during the formation of most kinds of human cancers. Dr. Jonathan Licht will review how histone methylation can be disrupted in multiple myeloma and related hematologic malignancies and how this affects cell growth, chromatin structure, gene expression, and DNA repair. He will also discuss how histone methyl transferases such as MMSET, rearranged and overexpressed in t(4;14)-associated myeloma, represent a therapeutic target in multiple myeloma. Dr. James Bradner will discuss bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) subfamily of human bromodomain proteins (BRD2-4) associated with acetylated chromatin. These proteins facilitate transcriptional activation by increasing the effective molarity of recruited transcriptional activators. Dr. Bradner will also discuss the impact of targeting bromodomain proteins in myeloma and their therapeutic application in B-cell malignancies.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 36
  • 39. TICKETED SESSIONSEducation Spotlight SessionsFor this year’s Education Spotlight New Insights Into the Point-Counterpoint:Program, ASH will offer eight excitingtopics. Each 90-minute session will Biology and Treatment Benefits and Hazards ofbe presented once on either Sunday of Waldenström T-Cell-Depleted Allogeneicor Monday, in a small-venue format forapproximately 100 ticketed attendees. Macroglobulinemia Transplantation in AcuteSpeakers will discuss the topic with ampletime reserved for audience questions SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 Myeloid Leukemiaand participation. The talks will facilitate 4:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9discussions of evidence-based practice, 4:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M. CO-CHAI R S:decision making, and controversiesin diagnosis and management. The Steven Treon, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer CO-CHAI R S:lectures will address the current state Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Robert J. Soiffer, MD, Dana-Farber Cancerof knowledge, translational and clinical Enrica Morra, MD, Ospidale Niguarda Ca’ Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MAapplications, and future directions. Granda, Milan, Italy Richard J. O’Reilly, MD, Memorial Sloan- Ticket Prices (per session) Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Member: $25 At this session, participants will learn about Associate Members: $25 recent advances in the biology and therapy of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) accounts for a Non-Member in Training: $25 significant fraction of the morbidity and mortal- Allied Health Professional: $35 ity associated with allogeneic hematopoietic cell Non-Member: $40 Dr. Steven Treon will discuss predisposition transplantation (HCT). GVHD negatively impacts to WM, highlighting recent studies that show survival directly as a result of organ damage andThe Education Spotlight Sessions are strong familial clustering, and the potential indirectly as a consequence of infectious complica-restricted to medical professionals impact of familial disease on clinical outcomes. tions prompted by GVHD prophylaxis and therapy.only; no businesspersons or media will Participants will also learn about the findingsbe admitted. Individuals are limited to from recent whole-genome sequencing efforts, Donor T-cell depletion (TCD), when it was initiallyone ticket per session. Tickets may be including the identification of a highly recurrent introduced, offered the potential for prevention ofpurchased during the online registration mutation (L265P) in the MYD88 gene, and the GVHD without the toxicity associated with immuneprocess. diagnostic and therapeutic implications for this suppressive drugs. However, numerous TCD mutation. Participants will also learn about novel methods achieving varying degrees of T-cellAttention Trainees! signaling cascades triggered by MYD88 L265 depletion have been utilized over the past threeA number of tickets for the Education and the implications of these findings on the decades, and most of these were employedSpotlight Sessions will be reserved development of targeted therapeutics. The role together with post-transplant immunosuppres-especially for trainees. Proof of status as of the microenvironment in supporting WM cell sive agents. These have included ex vivo negativean Associate member or non-member expansion will also be discussed with a focus on selection approaches using monoclonal antibod-in training will be required to purchase a mast-cell/tumor-cell interactions. ies specific for different T-cell antigens, physicalticket. Please show your name badge to separation, or photodepletion techniques, ex vivothe staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter. Dr. Enrica Morra will lead a discussion on positive selection through CD34+ columns, or treatment options for WM including the use of in vivo administration of commercially available monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulatory agents, anti-T-cell antibody preparations. Most early trials proteasome inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, and documented that TCD could substantially limit bendamustine. In her presentation, Dr. Morra will acute GVHD. However, this reduction in GVHD discuss a personalized approach to treatment did not translate into improved overall survival selection based on consensus guidelines because of unexpected high rates of graft failure, emerging from the 7th International Workshop Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative on WM. Dr. Morra will also review data related disorders (EBV-LPD), and, in patients transplanted to treatment-associated secondary malignancies for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), disease and the impact of these findings on treatment recurrence following T-cell-depleted bone marrow stratification. transplantation. The session will also include a discussion on the There have been a limited number of prospective role of maintenance therapy and transplantation, randomized studies evaluating TCD, but those as well as updates from ongoing clinical trials with that have been performed have not convincingly novel agents. demonstrated a survival advantage from this approach. However, recent evidence suggests a reduction in GVHD without compromising graft- versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. If advances in graft engineering can accomplish the goal of GVHD prevention without adversely affecting engraftment, immune competence, and anti-leukemic activity, then substantial improvements in overall transplant outcome can become reality. This session will examine the state of the art in in vivo and ex vivo TCD in 2012, focusing on the ad- vantages and disadvantages of current techniques, its application in different diseases, and the impact of conditioning regimen intensity on its efficacy. Speakers will discuss whether apparent benefits outweigh documented hazards. 37 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 40. TICKETED SESSIONSEducation Spotlight Sessions in these diseases. Treatment strategies for Burkitt and other aggressive lymphomas have alsoVirally Driven Lymphomas evolved, and, for Burkitt lymphoma in particular, Reproductive IssuesSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 approaches that maintain high cure rates but and the Use of reduce toxicity are being investigated. Diffuse4:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M. large B-cell lymphoma can now be divided into Pre-ImplantationCO-CHAI R S: molecular subtypes, and therapies that target individual subtypes are currently in development. Genetic Diagnosis inRichard F. Ambinder, MD, PhD, The Johns Thalassemia and OtherHopkins University School of Medicine,Baltimore, MD Dr. Harris will discuss current classification strategies for these diseases and how recent Hematologic DisordersKensei Tobinai, MD, PhD, National Cancer insights into their genetics and molecular biology MONDAY, DECEMBER 10Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan have influenced them. 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 NOONSeveral entities of lymphoma have been known Dr. Dunleavy will review current treatment CO-CHAI R S:to be closely associated with viral infections. strategies for Burkitt and other aggressiveUntil now, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphomas with a focus on approaches that Sylvia Titi Singer, MD, Children’s Hospital andhuman T-cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV- Research Center Oakland, Oakland, CA reduce toxicity as well as novel agents that are1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and hepatitis C under investigation. Alison Lashwood, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHSvirus (HCV) have been recognized as causative Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdomagents of lymphoma. Although many thalassemia major (TM) patientsIn this spotlight session, Dr. Richard Ambinder attain sexual maturation, low gametogenesiswill provide an overview of the current recognition Incidental Pulmonary and impaired reproductive capacity areof virally driven lymphomas and will summarize Embolism or Venous common. The pathophysiology and evolutionthe recent progress in the management of HIV- of infertility, relationship with iron burden, andassociated lymphoma, incorporating a case- Thrombosis: Is This early intervention for preserving fertility are notbased approach. a Real Disease? well explored. Advancements in reproductive technology are increasingly implemented for theDr. Kensei Tobinai will summarize recent progress MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 care of TM patients and for families who are atin the management of HTLV-1-associated adult 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 NOON risk of having a child affected by thalassemiaT-cell leukemia/lymphoma and EBV-associated or by other serious hematologic disorders. Thenatural killer/T-cell lymphoma, incorporating a CO-CHAI R S: scope of pre-implantation genetic diagnosiscase-based approach. (PGD) to have an unaffected child has Clive Kearon, MD, PhD, McMaster University, increased over time, from direct mutation testing Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaThe spotlight session will allow participants to applied to monogenic conditions including theacquire the updated information regarding the Menno V. Huisman, MD, PhD, Leiden University hemoglobinopathies in the early ‘90s to the firstcurrent recognition of major entities of virally Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched birthdriven lymphoma and how to manage them reported in 2001.appropriately. Symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) require treatment Dr. Sylvia Singer will discuss infertility in TM with anticoagulant therapy. With widespread patients, current methodology for assessing use of computed tomography (CT) examinations reproductive potential, possible treatment for staging of cancer and improvements in the interventions, and evaluation and management ofClassification and quality of CT imaging, incidental PE and venous TM women prior to and during pregnancy.Treatment Strategies thrombosis, including those in the splanchnic area, are increasingly reported. Whether this type Ms. Alison Lashwood will discuss the current usefor Burkitt and Other of venous thromboembolism (VTE) should be of PGD as a reproductive option for those at risk treated in the same way as symptomatic VTE isAggressive Lymphomas uncertain. of having a child with an inherited hematologic disorder and the development of PGD for HLAMONDAY, DECEMBER 10 tissue typing. She will highlight the complexities10:30 A.M. – 12:00 NOON The purpose of this spotlight session is to of clinical application of PGD and the inherent provide the audience with an update on current ethical dilemmas associated with it.CO-CHAI R S: evidence. The central issue of this session is whether anticoagulant treatment is routinelyNancy Lee Harris, MD, Massachusetts General indicated upon detection of these asymptomaticHospital, Waban, MA thrombi. The session with begin by reviewing theKieron Dunleavy, MD, National Cancer Institute, scope of the problem.National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Using a debate format, Dr. Menno Huisman willSignificant progress has been made in argue in favor of usual anticoagulant therapy forelucidating the clinicopathologic characteristics patients with incidental VTE and Dr. Clive Kearonand molecular biology of Burkitt and other will argue for a less aggressive approach toaggressive lymphomas. These insights have been treatment of these patients.incorporated into the diagnostic criteria codifiedin the World Health Organization classification of The debate will be followed by a discussiontumors of the lymphoid tissues. This evolution in involving the audience. Toward the end of theclassification has been driven by the identification session, the speakers will identify issues in theof “hallmark” genetic abnormalities and has management of incidental VTE on which theypaved the way for discovering “driver” pathways agree, and those on which they disagree.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 38
  • 41. American Board of Internal MedicineNovel Approaches toStem Cell Mobilization What Is The Optimal Treatment For MaintenanceMONDAY, DECEMBER 10 Refractory Immune of Certification2:45 P.M. – 4:15 P.M. Thrombocytopenia andCO-CHAI R S: When To Do What? LearningGianni Parise, PhD, McMaster University,Hamilton, Ontario, Canada MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 2:45 P.M. – 4:15 P.M. SessionJohn F. DiPersio, MD, PhD, WashingtonUniversity School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO CO-CHAI R S: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 Douglas B. Cines, MD, Hospital of the University 9:00 A.M. – 12:00 NOONMobilization of stem cells is critical for successful of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PAstem cell transplantation. Pathways, mediators, Nichola Cooper, MD, Hammersmith Hospital- CHAI R:and mechanisms of stem cell mobilization havebeen poorly understood. Over the past 10 years, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, Marc J. Kahn, MD, Tulane University School ofnumerous mediators of stem cell mobilization and United Kingdom Medicine, New Orleans, LAtrafficking have been identified and tested in bothpreclinical models and in the clinic for patients The majority of adults with primary immune S PEAKE R S:undergoing both autologous and allogeneic stem thrombocytopenia (ITP) who require treatment Selina M. Luger, MD, Abramson Cancer Center,cell transplantation. will respond to glucocorticoids; most will University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA relapse once treatment is tapered to avoid their cumulative toxicity. The physician-patient Peter M. Voorhees, MD, The University of NorthIn this session, current knowledge of the pathways Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NCand biochemical mechanisms of stem cell and dialogue then focuses on the evidence thatleukemic cell trafficking will be discussed. In treatment is needed, criteria for intervention, and Marc J. Kahn, MD, Tulane University School ofaddition, a contemporary overview of all U.S. treatment options. This involves an evaluation Medicine, New Orleans, LAFood and Drug Administration-approved and of the balance of risk of no treatment againstexperimental mobilizing agents and their modes of the relative benefits and risks of each treatment This Maintenance of Certification (MOC)action for both stem cell mobilization and leukemic option. Thrombopoetin receptor agonists (TRAs) Learning Session will feature an American Boardcell sensitization will be discussed. have been studied in randomized, controlled of Internal Medicine (ABIM) medical knowledge trials, but comparisons with other “second- module on hematology; it is intended for thoseAnother interesting and novel strategy for the line” treatment options, such as rituximab and who are enrolled in the MOC process and due tomobilization of stem cells that will be discussed splenectomy among others, are complicated recertify in the next few years. Learning Sessionsis physical activity. Exercise is known to have by uncertainty over the natural history of ITP, are conducted in an interactive group setting anda multitude of physiological effects often different mechanisms of actions of available are led by ABIM-certified physicians. The three-associated with improved health. Recently, we agents, difference in numbers of patients treated, hour session will cover the 25 multiple-have described the effect of exercise training choice of endpoints, duration of follow-up, choice questions in the “2012 Update inon the hematopoietic system. Notably, exercise scarcity of data on long-term adverse effects, Hematology” ABIM module.has remarkable effects on remodeling of the and lack of controlled trials comparing differenthematopoietic stem cells niche – improving interventions. At the completion of this session, those enrolledthe capacity for stem cell mobilization and in the ABIM MOC program can submit theirsurvival following transplantation in murine Drs. Douglas Cines and Nichola Cooper will answers to ABIM for scoring to receive MOCmodels, and up-regulation of factors known discuss the evidence (and its limitations) for the credit. Enrolled participants can order a copyto induce mobilization. Interestingly, there are various options in the treatment of adults with ITP of the module(s) online from ABIM’s website,several examples in the literature demonstrating who continue to have thrombocytopenia after a www.abim.org. At the conclusion of the session,enhanced mobilization of CD34+ cells into course of glucocorticoids and how this evidence participants will transfer the answers to theircirculation following acute exercise. was assessed in the most recent ASH and online module and submit the module to ABIM International Consensus guidelines. This will be for scoring. For additional information aboutWith a growing body of evidence supporting the an interactive session during which discussion ABIM’s MOC program requirements, visit www.positive impact of exercise on the hematopoietic will focus on the pros and cons of the various abim.org or call the ABIM Contact Center atsystem and the organic nature in which this options in the context of a specific patient with 800-441-ABIM. Please note that this is not ahappens, it is interesting to consider whether ITP who has significant medical conditions that board review activity; the workshop is designedexercise may be an appropriate therapeutic influence treatment decisions. to facilitate completion of ABIM’s Self-Evaluationstrategy for the mobilization of stem cells. of Medical Knowledge MOC requirement. Ticket Prices (per session) Member: $75 Associate Member: $50 Non-Member in Training: $75 Non-Member: $125 Tickets can be purchased online during the meeting registration process. 39 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 42. TICKETED SESSIONSNEW NETHIS YEAR How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas (F (FORMERLY MEET-THE-EXPERT SESSIONS) THIS Y Saturday, December 8, and S AT U R D AY S U N D AY Sunday, December 9 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Anthony K.C. Chan, MD, McMaster Richard H. Aster, MD, BloodCenter of University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Wisconsin and Medical College The “How I Treat: Bringing Science L-Asparaginase-Associated Thrombosis of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions are Drug-Induced Immune Thrombocytopenia Donna DiMichele, MD, National Heart, designed to provide an opportunity for a Lung, and Blood Institute, National Laurence A. Boxer, MD, University of small number of attendees to meet with Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI a clinical expert in a setting that fosters Immune Tolerance Induction Therapy in Neutropenias interaction. This year, ASH has invited Hemophiliacs with Inhibitors experts from all over the world to facilitate Alan K. Burnett, MD, Cardiff University informal discussions allowing participants Lisa Filipovich, MD, Cincinnati Children’s School of Medicine, Cardiff, United to present their questions and gain new Hospital, Cincinnati, OH Kingdom perspectives. A boxed lunch will be Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Does Molecular Information in Acute Myeloid provided. Leukemia Change Treatment Decisions? Andra H. James, MD, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Joseph M. Connors, MD, British Columbia Ticket Prices (per session) Hematologic Emergencies in Pregnancy Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Member: $35 and Delivery Columbia, Canada Associate Member: $35 Hodgkin Lymphoma Clive Kearon, MD, PhD, McMaster Non-Member in Training: $35 University Clinic, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Mary Cushman, MD, University of Vermont, Allied Health Professional: $35 Clinical Guidelines on Testing for Heritable Colchester, VT Non-Member: $50 Thrombophilia Tailoring Thrombosis Management in the Elderly Robert A. Kyle, MD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN H. Joachim Deeg, MD, Fred Hutchinson The “How I Treat: Bringing Science When to Worry about Monoclonal Gammopathy Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA to Clinical Dilemmas” sessions are of Undetermined Significance and Smoldering Can We Separate Graft-Versus-Host Disease restricted to medical professionals only; Myelomas from Graft-Versus-Leukemia Effects? no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Tickets are limited and only Susan F. Leitman, MD, National Institutes Michael W. Deininger, MD, PhD, available on site on a first-come, first- of Health, Bethesda, MD The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT served basis. Only one ticket per person Transfusion and When to Consider Granulocyte Approach to Patients with Suboptimal Response is allowed. Tickets can be purchased Transfusion to Initial Therapy at the Ticketed Sessions counter in the Pier Mannuccio Mannucci, MD, Jonathan Friedberg, MD, University registration area of the Georgia World The University of Milan, Milan, Italy of Rochester, Rochester, NY Congress Center beginning Thursday, Management of Unexplained Coagulopathies Mantle Cell Lymphoma December 6, during registration hours until all tickets are sold. The location for Effie W. Petersdorf, MD, Fred Hutchinson Nicola Goekbuget, MD, J.W. Goethe each session will be published on the Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, ASH website (www.hematology.org) Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-Typing Germany prior to the meeting as well as indicated for Allogeneic Transplant: Selecting the Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia in Older Adults on the ticket and in the on-site materials. Optimal Donor Nicolaus Kröger, MD, University Medical Please check your ticket carefully to J. Evan Sadler, MD, PhD, Washington Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, ensure proper date, time, location, and University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Germany session choice. Perioperative Management in von Willebrand Transplant for Myelodysplastic Syndromes Disease Ruben A. Mesa, MD, Mayo Clinic, Attention Trainees! Srdan Verstovsek, MD, PhD, The University Scottsdale, AZ A number of tickets for the “How I Treat: of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Management of Myelofibrosis Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” Houston, TX sessions will be reserved especially for Susan O’Brien, MD, The University of Texas What Do JAK2 Inhibitors Do in trainees. Proof of status as an Associate MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and member or non-member in training will Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia How Do They Work? be required to purchase a ticket. Please Jesus F. San-Miguel, MD, PhD, Hospital show your name badge to the staff at the Andrew D. Zelenetz, MD, PhD, Memorial Universitario de Salamanca and Centro de Ticketed Sessions counter. Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Investigación del Cáncer, Salamanca, Spain Targeted Therapy for Lymphoma Myeloma Schedule Subject to Change James C. Zimring, MD, PhD, Emory Please note that the “How I Treat: University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas” Red Cell Storage session schedule included here is not final. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org) in late September to view an updated schedule. ASH 54th Annual Meeting 40
  • 43. TICKETED SESSIONS NEWs THIS YEAR Meet the Scientist (F (FORMERLY MEET-THE-EXPERT SESSIONS) Saturday, December 8, and S AT U R D AY S U N D AY Sunday, December 9 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Julie A. Panepinto, MD, Medical College Elliott P. Vichinsky, MD, Children’s Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Oakland, CA of Wisconsin and Children’s Hospital of The “Meet the Scientist” sessions are Oxidative Injury and Novel Antioxidants in Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI designed to provide an opportunity for a Hemoglobinopathies Quality of Life and Other Health Outcome small number of attendees to meet with Measurements Mark J. Levis, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins a scientific expert in a setting that fosters David A. Williams, MD, Children’s Hospital University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD interaction. This year, ASH has invited Boston, Boston, MA New Generation FLT3 Inhibitors in Acute experts from all over the world to facilitate Translational and Clinical Gene Therapy Myeloid Leukemia informal discussions allowing participants to present their questions and gain new Timothy J. Ley, MD, Washington University Catherine P.M. Hayward, MD, PhD, perspectives. A boxed lunch will be School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, provided. Turning Discovery Genomics into Clinical Canada Genomics Platelet Storage Disorders Ticket Prices (per session) Jeffrey J. Molldrem, MD, The University Catriona Jamieson, MD, PhD, University Member: $35 of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, of California – San Diego, La Jolla, CA Associate Member: $35 Houston, TX Does the Stem Cell Survive Tyrosine Kinase Non-Member in Training: $35 Tumor-Specific Vaccines Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and, Allied Health Professional: $35 If So, How? Timothy Graubert, MD, Washington Non-Member: $50 Krishna V. Komanduri, MD, University of University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Implications of Clonal Evolution in Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer The “Meet the Scientist” sessions are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Center, Miami, FL restricted to medical professionals only; Immune Reconstitution After Allogeneic Anthony V. Moorman, PhD, Newcastle Transplantation no businesspersons or media will be University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, admitted. Tickets are limited and only United Kingdom David Ginsburg, MD, University of Michigan available on site on a first-come, first- Clinical Relevance of Cytogenetics in Acute and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, served basis. Only one ticket per person Lymphocytic Leukemia Ann Arbor, MI is allowed. Tickets can be purchased Inherited Disorders of Bleeding and Clotting at the Ticketed Sessions counter in the registration area of the Georgia World Congress Center beginning Thursday, December 6, during registration hours until all tickets are sold. The location for each session will be published on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) prior to the meeting as well as indicated on the ticket and in the on-site materials. Please check your ticket carefully to ensure proper date, time, location, and session choice. Attention Trainees! A number of tickets for the “Meet the Scientist” sessions will be reserved especially for trainees. Proof of status as an Associate member or non-member in training will be required to purchase a ticket. Please show your name badge to the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter. Schedule Subject to Change Please note that the “Meet the Scientist” session schedule included here is not final. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org) in late September to view the schedule. 41 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 44. TICKETED SESSIONSNEWTHIS YEAR Scientific Forums Consultative Hematology Sunday, December 9, and S U N D AY Course Monday, December 10 MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 7:30 AM – 12:30 PM 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Scientific Forum on Epigenetics Following the overwhelming success of ASH’s in Hematopoiesis inaugural Consultative Hematology Course at The Scientific Forum sessions are the 2011 ASH Annual Meeting, the Society designed to provide an opportunity for S PEAKE R S: is pleased to offer the course again in 2012. a small number of attendees to meet Geared toward North American practitioners with Scientific Program speakers in an Lucy A Godley, MD, PhD, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL trained in hematology or hematology-oncology informal setting that fosters interaction who infrequently see patients with non- and discussion. A boxed lunch will be Margaret A. Goodell, PhD, Baylor College of malignant hematologic disorders, the 2012 provided. Medicine, Houston, TX Consultative Hematology Course will cover Olivier Bernard, PhD, Institut Gustave-Roussy, commonly encountered clinical problems that Ticket Prices (per session) Villejuif, France arise in everyday practice and require the Member: $35 expertise of a hematologist. It will focus on Associate Member: $35 non-malignant hematology and will use case- Non-Member in Training: $35 Scientific Forum on Platelet Secretion based presentations and interactive discussions Allied Health Professional: $35 on topics from thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, Non-Member: $50 CHAI R: bleeding, white blood cell abnormalities, and Andrew S. Weyrich, PhD, The University of Utah, other areas. The hands-on course will be led by The Scientific Forum sessions are Salt Lake City, UT faculty familiar with consultative practice issues. restricted to medical professionals only; S PEAKE R S: no businesspersons or media will be admitted. Tickets are limited and only Walter H. Kahr, MD, PhD, University of Toronto Registration Category Rate* available on site on a first-come, first- and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, served basis. Only one ticket per person Ontario, Canada Member with Annual Meeting $75 is allowed. Tickets can be purchased Joseph E. Italiano Jr., PhD, Brigham and Registration at the Ticketed Sessions counter in the Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Non-Member with Annual $125 registration area of the Georgia World Boston, MA Meeting Registration Congress Center beginning Thursday, Sidney W. Whiteheart, PhD, University of December 6, during registration hours Kentucky, Lexington, KY Member without Annual Meeting $125 until all tickets are sold. The location for Registration each session will be published on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) Non-Member without Annual $175 prior to the meeting as well as indicated Meeting Registration on the ticket and in the on-site materials. Please check your ticket carefully to M O N D AY *Registration fee includes continental breakfast and coffee break. Advance online registration ensure proper date, time, location, and session choice. is limited to clinical hematologists practicing Scientific Forum on Personalized in North America; on-site registration will be possible for other groups if space is available. Attention Trainees! Diagnostics in Acute Myeloid Leukemia A number of tickets for the Scientific and Myelodysplasia Forum sessions will be reserved S PEAKE R S: especially for trainees. Proof of status as Please contact ashregistration@jspargo.com an Associate member or non-member Benjamin L. Ebert, MD, PhD, Brigham and if interested in registering for this course and in training will be required to purchase a Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, not registering for Annual Meeting. ticket. Please show your name badge to Boston, MA the staff at the Ticketed Sessions counter. Matthew J. Walter, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Schedule Subject to Change Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD, Erasmus Medical Please note that this Scientific Forums Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands session schedule is not final. Please check the ASH website (www.hematology.org) in late September to view the schedule. Scientific Forum on RNA Splicing in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis S PEAKE R S: Adrian Krainer, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY Seishi Ogawa, MD, PhD, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Catherine J. Wu, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, MA ASH 54th Annual Meeting 42
  • 45. Oral and Poster Sessions Abstracts selected for oral and poster presentations featureNEW the latest research in the field and are considered the best ofTHIS YEAR the thousands submitted for the 2012 ASH Annual Meeting. To help accommodate the increasing volume of research presented at the meeting, additional time for oral presentations has been added to the schedule. Additional Simultaneous Oral Sessions will take place on Saturday, December 8, and Sunday, December 9, from 12:00 noon to 1:30 p.m. A complete schedule of the Simultaneous Oral Sessions is listed below:SATURDAY, DECEMBER 812:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.SUNDAY, DECEMBER 912:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (Plenary Scientific Session)4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.MONDAY, DECEMBER 107:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. An exception is made for non-flash photography and audio recording6:15 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. using hand-held equipment, so long as it is strictly for personal, non- commercial use and not disruptive. Violators of this policy will be escortedTUESDAY, DECEMBER 11 and barred from the session or exhibit hall. Repeat offenders will have their7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. (Late-Breaking Abstracts Session) meeting badges revoked and will not be allowed to continue to attend the meeting. Please note that annual meeting content may not be published orThe Late-Breaking Abstracts Session will take place on Tuesday, December reproduced in any medium (including social media) without express written11, from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and will feature up to six abstracts of significant permission from ASH (or, in the case of the posters, from the author).scientific impact, the results of which were not available in time for the standarddeadline. These abstracts will be published online only and will not be part of thespecial abstracts issue of Blood. Poster Session SchedulePosters will be available for viewing in Hall B1-B2 of the Georgia WorldCongress Center at the times listed. Meeting attendees will also have the SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8opportunity to meet the abstract authors to discuss their research and ask 9:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – Viewingquestions during the presentation times listed. 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Poster Session I – PresentationsA detailed schedule listing individual oral and poster abstract presentationsand the full abstracts will be included on the abstracts on flash drive which SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9will be mailed in mid-November to all registrants who register for the meeting 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session II – Viewingby November 7. In addition, this information will be provided on the ASH 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session II – Presentationswebsite (www.hematology.org) in early November. MONDAY, DECEMBER 10Materials contained in the ASH annual meeting presentations, including 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Viewingslides, audio, abstracts, and posters, are protected by copyright. Any 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Poster Session III – Presentationsphotography, filming, or audio-video recording of the presentations orposters is strictly prohibited, except by registered members of the media.Social EventsWelcome Reception Poster Hall ReceptionsSATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 5:30 P.M. – 7:30 P.M. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 6:00 P.M. – 8:00 P.M. MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 6:00 P.M. – 8:00 P.M.All meeting attendees are invited to attend this kick-off event and enjoya relaxing evening with their friends and colleagues. Complimentary ASH invites meeting attendees to take advantage of these receptions tohors d’oeuvres and drinks will be served. This event will take place in meet abstract authors, discuss their research, and ask questions. Lightthe poster hall (Hall B1-B2) of the Georgia World Congress Center. snacks and beverages will be served. 43 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 46. ExpositionNearly 300 pharmaceutical companies, medical suppliers, clinical diagnosticand research-based companies, publishers, and nonprofit organizations willbe participating in the 2012 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition. The state- Come by the ASH Booth and Seeof-the-art exhibit hall will feature the latest technology and research as well What the Society Has to Offeras a wide range of products and services. ASH is not just the annual meeting; it is the largest society in the world thatThe exposition will be held in Halls B3 and B4 of the Georgia World focuses primarily on hematology with a wide variety of resources available toCongress Center, and badges will be required for entrance. For safety the global hematology community.and liability reasons, ASH does not permit any children 12 years of ageor younger at any time in the exhibit areas. During move-in or move-out, Be sure to visit the ASH booth (#3105) and get the latest details on grantsNO ONE under the age of 18 will be permitted within the exhibit areas. and awards, publications, educational materials, and other ASH meetings.(Please refer to page 55 for information on the child-care program.) While you’re there, check out and pick up the most recent issues of Blood, see what materials are available for hematologists around the world, andExhibit Hours discover free ASH online resources. Our friendly staff will be glad to Saturday, December 8 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. answer your questions and hear your feedback about the annual meeting Sunday, December 9 11:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. or the Society. Monday, December 10 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Consider this an open invitation to visit the booth on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday to explore all areas of ASH. Be sure to pick up a lanyard and a small giveaway as a token of our appreciation for attending the meeting. New This Year – the ASH Foundation Booth! ASH will be launching the ASH Foundation, dedicated to moving hematology forward, at this year’s annual meeting. The Foundation builds on ASH’s strong commitment to hematology NEW THIS YEAR – both in the United States and throughout the world. Stop by the ASH Foundation booth (#3801) to learn about the foundation’s programs and how you can help support its important mission. Staff will be available on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday in the exhibit hall. You can make a donation on site and learn more about how your gift will impact critical issues in hematology. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Booths Several Institutes from the NIH will have booths in the exhibit hall that will offer opportunities to discuss many areas of hematology, research grants, career-development programs, and NIH policies. The following Institutes will be exhibiting at the 2012 Annual Meeting: • National Cancer Institute (NCI) • National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) • National Institute on Aging (NIA) These exhibitors are confirmed as of June 2012.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 44
  • 47. General Information 45 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 48. Registration Registration HoursHow to Register Thursday, December 6 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.Online: www.hematology.org/ASH2012 Friday, December 7 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.On Site: Registration will be located in Hall A2, Building A in the Georgia World Congress Center, beginning Thursday, Saturday, December 8 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. December 6, at 3:00 p.m. local time. Sunday, December 9 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.If you are unable to register online, registration forms can be requested by Monday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.contacting ashregistration@jspargo.com. Tuesday, December 11 7:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. To avoid waiting in line at the on-site registration counters, ASHQuestions? Contact the ASH Registration Center encourages you to register for the meeting online in advance.Phone: 888-273-5704 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 001 703-449-6418 – InternationalEmail: ashregistration@jspargo.com Registration FeesFax: 703-563-2715 – Domestic 001 703-563-2715 – International Registration Categories Advance On-SiteMail: ASH Registration Center Member (Active and International) $440 $495 c/o J. Spargo and Associates Non-Member $860 $990 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030 Associate Member $95 $95Agents are available to help you from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), Non-Member in Training $195 N/AMonday through Friday. The ASH Registration Center will be closed onweekends and holidays. Allied Health Professional $440 $495 Spouse/Guest $115 $115 Honorary/Emeritus Member No Charge No ChargeASH Member-Only RegistrationJULY 18 – AUGUST 7 Registration fees can be paid by credit card or by check only. Wire transfers will not be accepted.ASH members who have paid their dues for 2012 are eligible for early-birdregistration from July 18 until August 7. Members can register and makehotel reservations at www.hematology.org/ASH2012. WHAT I S I NCLU DE D I N TH E R EG I STRATION FE E? • Abstracts on Flash Drive*When registering online, please be sure to enter your member ID number as • Hematology 2012 (the Education Program Book)it appears in ASH’s membership directory. You must register before making • Program Booka hotel reservation. • Access to ASH Annual Meeting Mobile Application • Admission to the General, Special-Interest, Education, Scientific,If you need to renew your membership for 2012, visit www.hematology.org Oral, and Poster Sessionsand click on “My Account” to log in or call 866-828-1231; international callers • Admission to the exhibit hall**dial 001 202-776-0544. • Admission to receptions in the poster hall** • Boxed lunch in the exhibit hall on Sunday and Monday** • Daily coffee breaks in the exhibit hall**Advance Registration (Members and *The Abstract Book will only be provided in electronic (flash drive) format;Non-Members) the print book has been discontinued. The annual meeting schedule and full program will be available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) inAUGUST 8 – NOVEMBER 7 early November, and attendees are encouraged to use the online personalFrom August 8 until November 7, both members and non-members can scheduler.register for the meeting. Attendees who register after November 7 will becharged on-site registration rates. **Spouse/guest registrants will receive only the items marked with two asterisks.Meeting badges will be mailed to all advance registrants inmid-November. Meeting Cancellation Policy The American Society of Hematology reserves the right to modify orLate and On-Site Registration cancel any or all activities associated with this meeting due to unforeseenAFTER NOVEMBER 7 circumstances. In the event that we have to unexpectedly cancel this annual meeting, the registration fee, less a processing charge, will be returned toAttendees who register online or on site after November 7 will be charged each registrant.the late/on-site registration fee. On-site registration will begin on Thursday,December 6, at 3:00 p.m. local time in Hall A2, Building A in the GeorgiaWorld Congress Center. Registration Cancellation Policy Registration cancellations must be submitted to the ASH Registration Center in writing by November 27 to receive a refund, less a $50 processing fee (see above for contact information). Refunds will not be granted after November 27.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 46
  • 49. U N DE RG RADUATE, G RADUATE, AN D M E DICALRegistration Badges STU DE NTS:Badges and abstracts on flash drive will be mailed to all advance registrants During the online registration process, you will need to provide:beginning the week of November 12. If you do not receive your badge prior • Name of your university/institutionto the meeting, please go to the registration area in Hall A2, Building A in • Name and contact information for your school counselorthe Georgia World Congress Center to pick up your badge and meeting • Field of studymaterials on site. • Start date and expected month and year of graduation A verification letter (on official letterhead confirming that the registrant is a trainee) is required. An email notification will automatically be sent toMeeting Materials your program director or school counselor requesting a signed letter ofDue to popular demand for an electronic version of annual NEW verification after your registration is received. THIS YEARmeeting abstracts, the Abstract Book will not be printed forthe 2012 annual meeting. Abstracts are being provided on Individuals who registered in the non-member in training category last yearflash drive and online. Advance registrants will receive the and are still enrolled in their training programs will not need to send a letterflash drive in mid-November with their registration materials. The annual verifying their enrollment status.meeting abstracts and the full annual meeting program will be availableonline on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) in early November. Verification letters may be emailed (in PDF format) toRegistrants may also use the ASH annual meeting mobile ashverification@jspargo.com. Verification may also be mailed toapplication to download the abstracts and annual meeting program the address below. Fax copies will not be accepted.to a smartphone (e.g., iPhone, Android, Blackberry) or tablet (iPador Android). ASH Registration Center c/o J. Spargo and Associates 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030Group RegistrationIf you are planning to register a group, please contact the ASH Registration Individuals will be officially registered for the meeting once ASH confirmsCenter at ashgroupreg@jspargo.com. their training status. The North American Student Benefit is designed for U.S.,Registration Categories Canadian, and Mexican students (undergraduate, graduate,ACTIVE / I NTE R NATIONAL M E M B E RS medical, or osteopathic), residents (in post-graduate years 1-3Applications for Active and International membership are considered by for Canadians), and PhD candidates who have an interest inthe Executive Committee twice per year; applications received between hematology but are not yet enrolled in a hematology-related trainingnow and the annual meeting will not be processed in time for applicants to program. The benefit provides:register as an ASH member for the 2012 annual meeting. Please consider • A complimentary online subscription to Bloodapplying by March 1, 2013, to become a member in time for the 2013 ASH • Online access to Hematology (the Education Program Book)Annual Meeting. and The Hematologist • Advance annual meeting notificationsASSOCIATE M E M B E RS • Eligibility for reduced meeting registration at the non-Associate membership applications are reviewed on a rolling basis and member-in-training ratemust be received by November 7, 2012, to be eligible for reduced member Those registering online for the ASH annual meeting as non-meeting-registration rates. Applicants who are accepted will be billed for members in training will be invited to apply. For more informationtheir 2012 membership dues immediately upon approval. Dues must be paid and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/NASB.in full in order to qualify for the Associate member meeting-registration rate. As part of our continuing efforts to provide valuable opportunitiesMembership applications may be submitted on site at the ASH Resource to international hematologists, ASH has established theCenter during the annual meeting. Resulting memberships will begin in International Post-Doctoral Fellows (IPDF) program, which2013. allows post-doctoral fellows to access valuable ASH resources at no charge for up to four years. The program is open to post-NON-M E M B E RS I N TRAI N I NG doctoral fellows with an MD, or equivalent medical degree, whoAUGUST 8 – NOVEMBER 7 reside outside Canada, Mexico, or the United States, register for the ASH annual meeting as a non-member in training, and areAny resident or any post-doctoral fellow with an MD or PhD in a recognized enrolled in an approved hematology or oncology training program.hematology or oncology training program as well as any undergraduate, Benefits include:graduate, or medical student may register as a non-member in training. Toreceive the non-member-in-training advance registration rate of $195, you • A complimentary online subscription to Bloodmust register and submit your verification by November 7. Non-members in • Online access to Hematology (the Education Program Book)training who register after the advance registration deadline of November 7 and The Hematologistwill be charged the non-member rate of $990. • Advance annual meeting notifications • Eligibility for reduced meeting registration at the non-Residents and Post-Doctoral Fellows: member-in-training rateDuring the online registration process, you will need to provide: Those registering online for the ASH annual meeting as non- • Program director’s name and contact information members in training will be invited to apply. For more information • Name of the program that you are enrolled in and to submit an application, visit www.hematology.org/IPDF. • Length (in years) of the program • Program start date (month and year) • Expected program completion date (month and year) 47 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 50. RegistrationALLI E D H EALTH PROFE SS IONAL Verification entails providing a letter from the registrant’s immediateAllied health professionals may register for the meeting beginning August supervisor on institutional letterhead confirming the name of the organization8. To register in this category, an individual will need to provide evidence and the registrant’s position there, a copy of a state license, proof ofof his/her status as an allied health professional. Individuals who qualify membership in another affiliated association, or a copy of an institutionalfor this category include nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physician identification card. Registrants who do not provide verification will beassistants, clinical nurse specialists, pharmacists, research technicians, and charged the ASH non-member registration rate.technologists. S POUS E /G U E STVerification of one’s status as an allied health professional must be submitted Spouses and guests are welcome to register for the ASH annual meeting.prior to the meeting to receive meeting materials in advance. ASH strongly Spouses and guests will receive a badge that allows access to the exhibitencourages registrants to send their verification by email in PDF format to hall including daily coffee breaks and Sunday and Monday boxed lunches,ashverification@jspargo.com. Verification may also be sent by mail to the the Saturday evening welcome reception, and Sunday and Monday posteraddress below. Fax copies will not be accepted. hall receptions. This registration rate does not include entrance to the Education, Scientific Program, or poster viewing sessions, and does not ASH Registration Center include meeting materials. c/o J. Spargo and Associates 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030Continuing Medical Education Information through the ASH website (www.hematology.org) by clicking the CME link on the homepage.Educational ObjectivesUpon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to: The online process for claiming CME credits and printing a • Employ the knowledge gained regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CME certificate for the 54th ASH Annual Meeting must be benign and malignant hematologic disorders to improve patient care; completed no later than April 12, 2013. • Discuss state-of-the-art research in hematology; and • Analyze the potential contribution of novel, not-yet-approved modalities of therapy to current evidence-based management of hematologic disorders. Certificate of Attendance Physicians and other health-care professionals attending the meeting canAccreditation receive a Certificate of Attendance on site by completing the Annual MeetingThe American Society of Hematology is accredited by the Accreditation Survey online at any of the Internet stations available at the conventionCouncil for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical center. Alternately, the survey and certificate can be accessed through theeducation for physicians. ASH website (www.hematology.org) after the meeting is over. The online process of filling out the annual meeting survey must be completed noThe American Society of Hematology designates this live activity for a later than April 12, 2013. There is no charge to meeting registrants formaximum of 37 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim this service.only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in theactivity.Physicians not licensed in the United States who participate in this CME European Hematology Association CMEactivity are also eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. ASH is applying for CME accreditation with the European Hematology Association (EHA). For information about claiming EHA CME, please stop by the ASH CME desk or email cme@hematology.org.CME Certificate EligibilityASH is accredited to provide AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ to Conflict-of-Interest Policy for the ASH Annual Meetingphysicians only. ASH is committed to providing quality, objective, balanced, and scientifically rigorous continuing medical education activities that arePhysicians not licensed in the United States who participate in this free from commercial and non-commercial bias. All meeting sessionCME activity are also eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. chairs, speakers, and moderators are required to disclose, in writing, any conflicts they may have prior to the meeting and to orally disclose their relationships as displayed at the start of their presentations. AllHow to Obtain a CME Certificate poster presenters are required to disclose, in writing, any conflictsA processing fee of $25 will be charged for CME certificates. If you plan they may have prior to the meeting, and display their disclosures onto claim CME credit for attending the meeting, you must indicate this by their poster boards. If bias, actual or perceived, occurs during thechecking the appropriate box during online registration. Attendees may presentations, session attendees are encouraged to address such biascomplete the process to claim their CME credits and print their CME during the question-and-answer periods following the presentations.certificates on site through the Internet stations available at the conventioncenter by selecting “CME program.” Alternately, credits can be claimedASH 54th Annual Meeting 48
  • 51. Hotel AccommodationsHotel rooms have been reserved throughout the city of Atlanta for meetingattendees. Pages 50-52 of this brochure include maps of the downtownAtlanta, Midtown, and Buckhead areas with hotel locations marked, as well ASH Cancellation/Change Policyas a list of participating hotels and their room rates. Additional hotel rooms You may cancel or make changes to your hotel reservation either in writingare available in the Northwest Perimeter, Perimeter Center, and Century or online until 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) Wednesday, November 14, 2012.Center area of Atlanta. ASH will provide complimentary shuttle service Written requests should be sent to the ASH Housing Center and willbetween these hotels and the Georgia World Congress Center, except as be acknowledged with a confirmation as soon as possible or within fivenoted on the list of participating hotels. For more information on this service, business days. After this date, all changes to accommodations must besee page 54. made directly through your hotel. Between November 14 and November 19, housing records will be transferred from the ASH Housing Center to the individualHeadquarters/Members-Only Hotels hotels; therefore, attendees are strongly encouraged to wait untilThe Omni Hotel at CNN Center is the official headquarters hotel for the after Monday, November 19, to contact the hotels directly to make2012 ASH Annual Meeting and is designated for ASH members only. In changes or cancellations.addition, the Atlanta Marriott Marquis and Embassy Suites Centennial Parkare available exclusively to Society members. Non-members, international To cancel or change a hotel reservation online, you will need yourtour groups, and exhibitors will not be able to reserve rooms in these hotels. confirmation number and the email address you used to make your reservation. Online requests are acknowledged with an immediate email confirmation.Hotel Reservations A cancellation must be made at least five days prior to your scheduled arrivalYou must register for the meeting before you make your hotel reservation. date or you will be assessed a cancellation fee equivalent to two nights’ roomHotel reservations must be made directly with the ASH Housing Center no rate (plus tax). The hotel will not hold your room if you do not arrive onlater than Wednesday, November 7, using any of the methods listed below. the first night of your reservation and you will lose your deposit.Online reservation is strongly encouraged, though hotel reservation formscan also be requested by contacting meetings@hematology.org or This hotel cancellation policy will be strictly enforced. Please retain the202-776-0544. cancellation confirmation from the ASH Housing Center or the cancellation number provided to you by the hotel, as this proof of cancellation will beOnline: www.hematology.org required to resolve any credit card disputes.Phone: 888-273-5704 – U.S. and Canada (toll free) 001 703-449-6418 – InternationalFax: 703-563-2715 – Domestic Group Room Reservations 001 703-563-2715 – International A group room reservation is defined as two or more rooms. All requestsMail: ASH Housing Center for group room blocks must be received at the ASH Housing Center by c/o J. Spargo and Associates October 5. 11208 Waples Mill Road, Suite 112 Fairfax, VA 22030 The ASH Housing Center will provide a website for all groups to manage their own room blocks and rooming lists online. A Group BookingFor additional information regarding hotel reservations, please contact Agreement, including a password, will be sent to each group contact afterthe ASH Housing Center at the phone numbers listed above. Agents are the group room reservations are approved by ASH.available to answer questions from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time),Monday through Friday. Please note that the ASH Housing Center is closed After October 5, the ASH Housing Center will cancel any group roomon weekends and holidays. Questions may also be emailed to the ASH reservations for which it has not received a rooming list and full payment.Housing Center at ashhousing@jspargo.com. Any rooms not accounted for on the rooming list will automatically be released. Cancellations must also be made by October 5. Any cancellations after October 5 will result in forfeiture of the entire payment.Hotel Confirmations/Deposits The rules and regulations governing group room reservations are explicitlyAll hotel reservations must be guaranteed by a major credit card or by check detailed on the Group Room Reservation Form.made payable to the hotel. A deposit amount of two nights’ room rate(plus tax) will be charged to your credit card if you do not cancel at Please contact the ASH Housing Center at 888-273-5704 (U.S. andleast five days prior to your arrival date. Canada toll free) or 001 703-449-6418 (international) for additional instructions on how to obtain a group room block.If you plan to guarantee your hotel reservation by check, please be sureto indicate this on your Hotel Reservation Form. The check must be madepayable to the hotel and received by the ASH Housing Center by November7. If the ASH Housing Center does not receive the check by November 7,your hotel reservation will be cancelled.The ASH Housing Center will mail, fax, or email a confirmation in responseto every reservation requested. If you make a hotel reservation online, you willreceive a confirmation instantly, and if you make a hotel reservation by fax ormail, a written confirmation will be sent to you by mail, fax, or email within fivebusiness days of receipt. If you do not receive your confirmation, please callthe ASH Housing Center to verify that your request has been received. 49 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 52. The hotels listed here have been reserved for annual meeting attendees. ASH will provide complimentary shuttleHotel Map service between these hotels and the Georgia World Congress Center unless otherwise indicated. For more information on this service, please see page 54. Rates listed are for single/double accommodations. Downtown Hotels 1 Atlanta Marriott Downtown 2 Atlanta Marriott Marquis 3 Best Western Inn at the Peachtrees 4 Fairfield Inn & Suites Atlanta Downtown (formerly Comfort Suites Downtown Atlanta Convention Center) 5 Courtyard Atlanta Downtown 6 Embassy Suites Centennial Park 7 Hampton Inn & Suites Downtown 8 Hilton Atlanta 9 Holiday Inn Atlanta Capitol Conference Center 10 Holiday Inn Atlanta Downtown 11 Hyatt Place Atlanta Downtown 12 Melia Hotel Atlanta 13 Hyatt Regency Atlanta 14 The Omni Hotel at CNN Center 15 The Ritz-Carlton Atlanta 16 Sheraton Atlanta 17 The Glenn Hotel 18 Twelve Hotel & Residences Centennial Park 19 W Atlanta Downtown 20 Westin Peachtree PlazaHotel Listing (in alphabetical order)Atlanta Marriott Buckhead Atlanta Marriott Courtyard Atlanta Crowne Plaza Atlanta Embassy SuitesHotel and Conference Center Midtown Suites Downtown Perimeter at Ravina** Atlanta Buckhead3405 Lenox Road NE 35 14th Street 133 Carnegie Way 4355 Ashford 3285 Peachtree Road NEAtlanta, GA 30326 Atlanta, GA 30309 Atlanta, GA 30303 Dunwoody Road Atlanta, GA$229/$229 $244/$244 $225/$225 Atlanta, GA 30346 $186/$186 $149/$149Atlanta Marriott Century Atlanta Marriott Courtyard by Marriott Embassy Suites CentennialCenter** Northwest at Galleria** Buckhead Crowne Plaza Atlanta Park – Members Only*2000 Century Boulevard NE 200 Interstate North Parkway 3332 Peachtree Road NE Perimeter Galleria** 267 Marietta StreetAtlanta, GA 30345 Atlanta, GA 30339 Atlanta, GA 30326 6345 Powers Ferry Road NW Atlanta, GA 30313$189/$189 $174/$174 $139/$139 Atlanta, GA 30339 $238/$258 $149/$149Atlanta Marriott Downtown Atlanta Perimeter Courtyard by Marriott Fairfield Inn & Suites160 Spring Street NW Hotel & Suites** Midtown Doubletree by Hilton Atlanta Downtown (formerlyAtlanta, GA 30303 111 Perimeter Center West 1132 Techwood Drive Atlanta – Marietta** Comfort Suites Downtown$204/$214 Atlanta, GA 30346 Atlanta, GA 30318 2055 South Park Place Atlanta Convention Center) $209/$209 $199/$199 Atlanta, GA 30339 54 Peachtree StreetAtlanta Marriott Marquis – $119/$119 Atlanta, GA 30303Members Only Best Western Plus Inn at Courtyard by Marriott $119 /$119265 Peachtree Center Avenue NE the Peachtrees Perimeter Center** Doubletree HotelAtlanta, GA 30303 330 W. Peachtree Street NW 6250 Peachtree-Dunwoody Atlanta Buckhead Fairfield Inn & Suites by$225/$225 Atlanta, GA 30308 Road 3342 Peachtree Road NE Marriott Buckhead $139/$139 Atlanta, GA 30328 Atlanta, GA 30326 3092 Piedmont Road $176/$176 $179/$179 Atlanta, GA 30305 $99/$99*Shuttle service will not be provided to these hotels as they are within walking distance of the Georgia World Congress Center.**Midday shuttle service will not be provided to this hotel. Look for detailed shuttle bus schedules in the hotel lobby.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 50
  • 53. Midtown Hotels1 Atlanta Marriott Midtown Suites2 Courtyard by Marriott Midtown3 Four Seasons Hotel Atlanta4 Hampton Inn Atlanta Georgia Tech5 Hotel Indigo6 Loews Atlanta Hotel7 Regency Suites Hotel8 Renaissance Atlanta Midtown Hotel9 Residence Inn Atlanta Midtown10 The Artmore Hotel11 The Georgian Terrace Hotel12 W Midtown AtlantaFour Seasons Hotel Atlanta Hampton Inn Holiday Inn Atlanta Capitol Hyatt Place Atlanta Buckhead75 14th Street NE Perimeter Center** Conference Center 3242 Peachtree Road NE JW Marriott HotelAtlanta, GA 30309 769 Hammond Drive NE 450 Capitol Avenue SW Atlanta, GA 30305 Buckhead$320/$320 Atlanta, GA 30328 Atlanta, GA 30312 $140/$140 3300 Lenox Road NE $110/$110 $159/$169 Atlanta, GA 30326Grand Hyatt Atlanta Hyatt Place Atlanta $229/$2293300 Peachtree Road NE Hilton Atlanta Holiday Inn Atlanta DowntownAtlanta, GA 30305 255 Courtland Street NE Downtown 330 Peachtree Street NE Loews Atlanta Hotel$249/$249 Atlanta, GA 30303 101 Andrew Young Atlanta, GA 30308 1065 Peachtree Street NE $225/$225 International Boulevard $179/$189 Atlanta GA 30309Hampton Inn & Suites Atlanta, GA 30303 $229/$229Atlanta Downtown Hilton Garden Inn $159/$159 Hyatt Place Atlanta161 Spring Street NW Perimeter Center** Perimeter** Marriott PerimeterAtlanta, GA 30303 1501 Lake Hearn Drive Homewood Suites Atlanta 1005 Crestline Parkway NE Center**$179/$179 Atlanta, GA 30319 Buckhead Atlanta, GA 30328 246 Perimeter Center $149/$149 3566 Piedmont Road $115/$115 Parkway NEHampton Inn Atlanta, GA 30305 Atlanta, GA 30346Atlanta Buckhead Hilton Suites Atlanta $139/$139 Hyatt Regency Atlanta $179/$1793398 Piedmont Road NE Perimeter** 265 Peachtree Street NEAtlanta, GA 30305 6120 Peachtree-Dunwoody Hotel Indigo Atlanta, GA 30303 Melia Hotel Atlanta$149/$159 Road 683 Peachtree Street NE $225/$225 590 West Peachtree Street Atlanta, GA 30319 Atlanta, GA 30308 NWHampton Inn Atlanta $149/$149 $229/$229 InterContinental Atlanta, GA 30308Georgia Tech Buckhead Atlanta $209/$209244 North Avenue NW 3315 Peachtree Road NEAtlanta, GA 30313 Atlanta, Ga 30326$169/$169 $199/$219 51 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 54. Hotel Map Buckhead Hotels1 Atlanta Marriott Buckhead Hotel and Conference Center2 Courtyard by Marriott Buckhead3 Doubletree Hotel Atlanta Buckhead4 Embassy Suites Atlanta Buckhead5 Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Buckhead6 Grand Hyatt Atlanta7 Hampton Inn Atlanta Buckhead8 Homewood Suites Atlanta Buckhead9 Hyatt Place Atlanta Buckhead10 InterContinental Atlanta Buckhead11 JW Marriott Hotel Buckhead12 Residence Inn Atlanta Buckhead13 The Ritz-Carlton Buckhead14 Springhill Suites by Marriott Buckhead15 St. Regis Atlanta16 Staybridge Suites Buckhead17 The Mandarin Oriental Atlanta (formerly The Mansion on Peachtree)18 W Atlanta Buckhead19 Westin Buckhead Atlanta Hotel Listing (continued in alphabetical order) Regency Suites Hotel Residence Inn Staybridge Suites The Omni Hotel W Atlanta Downtown 975 W. Peachtree Street NE Atlanta Midtown Buckhead at CNN Center – 45 Ivan Allen Jr. Boulevard Atlanta, GA 30309 1365 Peachtree Street 540 Pharr Road Headquarter Hotel Atlanta, GA 30308 $179/$179 Atlanta, GA 30309 Atlanta, CA 30305 Members Only* $259/$279 $209/$209 $129/$129 100 CNN Center Renaissance Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30303 W Midtown Atlanta Midtown Hotel Sheraton Atlanta The Artmore Hotel $245/$245 188 14th Street 866 West Peachtree Street NW 165 Courtland Street NE 1302 West Peachtree Street Atlanta, GA 30361 Atlanta, GA 30308 Atlanta, GA 30303 Atlanta, GA 3039 The Ritz-Carlton Atlanta $244/$244 $199/$199 $195/$195 $159/$169 181 Peachtree Street NE Atlanta, GA 30303 Westin Atlanta Renaissance Atlanta Sheraton Suites Galleria** The Georgian $260/$260 North at Perimeter** Waverly Hotel** 2844 Cobb Parkway SE Terrace Hotel 7 Concourse Parkway 2950 Galleria Parkway SE Atlanta, GA 30339 659 Peachtree Street The Ritz-Carlton Buckhead Atlanta, GA 30328 Atlanta, GA 80339 $189/$189 Atlanta, GA 30308 3434 Peachtree Road NE $119/$119 $189/$189 $179/$179 Atlanta, GA 30326 SpringHill Suites by $260/$260 Westin Buckhead Atlanta Residence Inn Marriott Buckhead The Glenn Hotel* 3391 Peachtree Road NE Atlanta Buckhead 3459 Buckhead Loop NE 110 Marietta Street Twelve Hotel & Residences Atlanta, GA 30326 2960 Piedmont Road NE Atlanta, GA 30326 Atlanta, GA 30303 Centennial Park $220/$240 Atlanta, GA 30305 $189/$189 $199/$199 400 W. Peachtree Street $189/$189 Atlanta, GA 30308 Westin Peachtree Plaza St. Regis Atlanta The Mandarin Oriental $215/$215 210 Peachtree Street 88 West Paces Ferry Road Atlanta (formerly The Mansion Atlanta, GA 30303 Atlanta, GA 30305 on Peachtree) W Atlanta Buckhead $219/$219 $290/$290 3376 Peachtree Road NE 3377 Peachtree Road NE Atlanta, GA 30326 Atlanta, GA 30326 $235/$235 $244/$244 *Shuttle service will not be provided to these hotels as they are within walking distance of the Georgia World Congress Center. **Midday shuttle service will not be provided to this hotel. Look for detailed shuttle bus schedules in the hotel lobby. ASH 54th Annual Meeting 52
  • 55. Travel InformationMeeting Location WeatherThe Georgia World Congress Center is located in the heart of downtown Atlanta has mild winters. Temperatures in December typically range from 36°Atlanta at 285 Andrew Young International Blvd., NW. Key meeting areas will to 55° F (2 to 12° C), so attendees should bring a light jacket.be located as follows: • Registration – Hall A2, Building A • ASH Central – International Boulevard Concourse Air Travel between Buildings A and B EWA Travel, Inc., has been selected as the official travel agency for the 2012 • General Sessions – Hall B5, Building B ASH Annual Meeting in Atlanta. To make your travel arrangements, please • Exhibit Hall – Halls B3-B4, Building B contact: • Poster Hall – Halls B1-B2, Building B • Other session rooms – Level 1 and 4, Building A; Levels 2-5, EWA Travel, Inc. Building B; Levels 2-3, Building C Phone: 800-705-8580 U.S. and Canada (toll free)Atlanta offers many attractions for tourists visiting the area, such as 001 520-797-0291 Internationalthe Georgia Aquarium, Centennial Olympic Park, and the World of Email: marika@ewatravel.comCoca-Cola. For more information about Atlanta’s popular attractions, Agents are available for reservations from 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Easternvisit www.atlanta.net. Time), Monday through Friday.VI S ITOR SAFETYTo stay safe during your visit to Atlanta, please follow the tipsprovided below: Visa Application Process for International • Always lock your front and/or patio doors. Use the safety chain/lock Travelers for security. If you are not a U.S. citizen and are planning to attend the annual meeting, • Never open your room door unless you know who is there. If you did advance planning is critical. Citizens of some foreign countries will need not call for the hotel service offered by the person at the door, call hotel a visa to enter the United States and attend the ASH annual meeting. security or the front desk to see if they have sent someone to your room. Therefore, ASH encourages you to start your visa application process as • Place valuables in a safety deposit box in your room or at the hotel office. soon as possible. Because of new U.S. State Department regulations, U.S. Do not leave valuables in your car. embassies and consulates may require a face-to-face interview for most • When checking into a hotel, consult the floor plan on the back of your room non-immigrant visa applications. You should apply for your visa at least three door to familiarize yourself with fire and emergency exits. to four months before the annual meeting. To schedule an interview for • When driving, keep all car doors locked. the visa application process, please contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. For more information, please visit http://travel.state.gov/visa. Effective January 20, 2010, citizens of countries participating in the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) may be unable to enter the U.S. without Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) approval from the U.S. Government. For more information on the visa waiver countries or how to apply for ESTA authorization, please visit http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/id_visa/esta/. If you would like to request an invitation letter from the American Society of Hematology for your visa application, you must first register and pay in full for the meeting. To obtain a visa invitation letter, have your registration confirmation number available and visit the visa link in your registration confirmation email. Please contact ashregistration@jspargo.com for any questions regarding visa invitation letters. Public Transportation Taxis are available at designated areas of the airport; follow the signs leading to the transportation plazas and a transportation coordinator will assist you. Atlanta has established set taxi fares between the airport and the downtown convention district and several other locations. For more information regarding taxi rates and destinations, visit http://attend.atlanta.net/transportation.aspx. Shuttles are another great way to travel and may be less expensive for larger groups. For a complete list of transportation options, including shuttle services, visit www.atlanta-airport.com/GroundTransportation/ shuttlesLocal.aspx. Convenient transportation is also available through MARTA, Atlanta’s public rail system. Service is available from the airport to the city of Atlanta and surrounding areas. Trains begin service at 5:00 a.m. on weekdays and 6:00 a.m. on weekends/holidays and run until 1:00 a.m. daily. A visitor pass provides unlimited travel for consecutive calendar days on MARTA bus and rail and is an easy and inexpensive way to travel. Visit www.itsmarta.com for fares and schedule information. 53 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 56. Travel InformationCar Rental Shuttle Bus ServiceHertz is offering 2012 ASH Annual Meeting attendees special rental ASH will provide complimentary shuttle service between the majority ofcar rates, including unlimited mileage. Reservations can be made from hotels in ASH’s housing block (see pages 50-52) and the Georgia Worldall metro Atlanta Hertz locations, online at www.hertz.com, or by calling Congress Center.800-654-2240 (in the U.S.) or 405-749-4434 (International and Canada). Shuttles will run during the periods listed below. Service frequency will varyBe sure to mention CV# 04PW0002 when booking your rental. Rates are throughout the day. Midday service will not be provided to hotels inavailable from December 1 through December 18. the Northwest Perimeter, Perimeter Center, and Century Center areas of Atlanta. Look for detailed shuttle bus schedules in your hotel lobby.H E RTZCV number: 04PW0002 Shuttle Bus Service HoursWebsite: www.hertz.com Thursday, December 6 2:30 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.Phone: 800-654-2240 United States (toll free) 405-749-4434 International and Canada Friday, December 7 6:30 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. Saturday, December 8 6:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Car Class Daily Weekend Weekly Sunday, December 9 6:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. (per day) (per day) (5-7 days) Monday, December 10 6:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. A – Economy $48 $29 $192 Tuesday, December 11 6:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. B – Compact $54 $32 $206 C – Mid-Size $58 $34 $223 Service will not be provided for Embassy Suites Centennial Park, The Omni Hotel at CNN Center, or The Glenn Hotel, as they are D – Standard 2/4 DR $61 $39 $239 within walking distance of the Georgia World Congress Center. F – Full-Size 4 DR $64 $41 $255 G – Premium $69 $46 $266 Remote Airline Check-in Service I – Luxury $89 $72 $357 The Georgia World Congress Center offers a remote check-in baggage L – Standard SUV $83 $72 $357 service (called “BAGS, Inc.”) for attendees taking domestic flights out of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Those flying on AirTran, R – Minivan $86 $74 $366 American, and Delta can check their luggage with BAGS, Inc., and receive U – Convertible $83 $72 $357 their boarding pass in the International Boulevard lobby of the convention center. The cost for this service is $12 per passenger. Normal airline baggage fees apply. Pre-enrollment is strongly encouraged. Simply fill out the form online (www.hematology.org/AMbags) and email toParking GWCC@airportbags.com.The fee for all-day parking at the Georgia World Congress Center is $10per car. The convention center accepts cash, traveler’s checks, American BAGS, Inc. HoursExpress, MasterCard, and Visa. In addition, there are many parking lotssurrounding the convention center. These lots are privately owned and Monday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.operated, and prices vary. Tuesday, December 11 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 54
  • 57. Attendee Services For additional program information and to reserve a spot for your child,ASH Central – Attendee Services in please visit www.kiddiecorp.com/ashkids.htm. KiddieCorp is also available by phone at 800-942-9947 or e-mail at info@kiddiecorp.com.One LocationASH will bring all essential attendee services together in one convenient The child-care room will be located in the Georgia World Congress Center.location, ASH Central, which will be located in the International BoulevardConcourse between Building A and Building B at the Georgia WorldCongress Center. Attendee services, Internet stations, comfortable lounge Childcare Hoursareas, and much more will be available in ASH Central. Saturday, December 8 6:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.AS H R E SOU RCE CE NTE R I N AS H CE NTRAL Sunday, December 9 6:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.Be sure to stop by the ASH Resource Center counter to learn about ASHmembership, apply for or renew your membership, update your address, or Monday, December 10 6:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.purchase ASH products. Tuesday, December 11 6:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.ASH offers a variety of products to aid hematologists in their professionaldevelopment. Plan to stop by to peruse the latest ASH educational products,including: Lactation Room A private lactation room will be available for nursing mothers during • American Society of Hematology Self-Assessment Program the annual meeting. This room contains a private bathroom and will (ASH®-SAP), Fourth Edition also be equipped with a table, chair, electrical outlet, and hospital-grade • 2012 Annual Meeting Abstracts on Flash Drive breast pump. The lactation room will be located in the Georgia World • 2012 Annual Meeting Education Program DVD Congress Center. • 2012 Annual Meeting On-Demand Webcast (Education Program and Special Lectures) • Hematology 2012 (the Education Program Book) Lactation Room Hours • 2012 Highlights of ASH® DVD Friday, December 7 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. • 2012 State-of-the-Art Symposium DVD Saturday, December 8 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.These items will also be available for purchase in the online ASH Store atwww.hematology.org/Store. Sunday, December 9 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Monday, December 10 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 11 7:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.ASH Job CenterThe ASH Job Center connects you to open hematology and hematology-oncology job opportunities throughout the world. This resource makesit easy to find your next position – search by job title, location, type of Georgia World Congress Center Guestemployment, or educational requirements. New features include the ability Services and Dining Optionsto post your resume and save job listings of interest. A wide variety of services and amenities are available at the Georgia World Congress Center:Available year-round on the ASH website, this service is always free forjob seekers. Look for the designated Job Center computers at the meeting I N FOR MATION DE S KSor visit the site today at www.hematology.org/JobCenter. Georgia World Congress Center staff can be found at the entrance to each building to provide assistance with brochures and maps, lost andNeed to fill a position? Don’t miss out on the increased traffic to the found, wheelchair service, and information about the location of key ASHASH website during the annual meeting. Email jobbank@hematology.org meeting areas.for more information. TOU R I S M & CONCI E RG E DE S K Located in the Building B entrance lobby, the Tourism & Concierge Desk features brochures for attractions in the metro Atlanta area and offersFree Wi-Fi complimentary restaurant reservation services.ASH is pleased to offer Internet access to all attendees in public lobbies and COAT/ BAGGAG E CH ECKmeeting rooms at the Georgia World Congress Center, as well as meeting Attendees can check coats and bags for $2 per item during the meeting atrooms and adjacent pre-function space at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis the coat check located in the International Boulevard Concourse betweenand Omni Hotel at CNN Center. This complimentary service is provided to Buildings A and B.support annual meeting activities requiring Internet access, Web browsing,and email connectivity. ATMs ATM machines are located throughout the facility. Avail, Plus, Honor, Discover, MasterCard, Visa, Cirrus, and Alert cards are accepted.Child Care FE DEX OFFICE B US I N E SS CE NTE R Located in the Building B entrance lobby, FedEx Office is a full-serviceFor safety reasons, children under the age of 12 (including infants in carriers business center. Mobility scooters and wheelchairs can also be rentedand strollers, or hand-carried infants and toddlers) are not permitted in the from FedEx Office.exhibit hall and poster sessions. Additionally, ASH prohibits children andinfants in the sessions as they may distract the speakers and other attendees. DI N I NG OPTION S Levy Restaurants at the Georgia World Congress Center offers a wideASH has made arrangements with KiddieCorp to provide subsidized variety of dining options, including the Terraces Restaurant (fine dining),child-care services at the meeting beginning on Saturday, December 8, Starbucks, and a variety of quick, grab-and-go items.and ending on Tuesday, December 11. KiddieCorp staff members arebonded and trained child-care specialists. The cost to parents is $5 perhour, per child with a two-hour minimum required per child, per day. Snacks,light meals, and beverages will be provided each day. Pre-registration isrecommended to ensure participation. Space is limited, so please registeryour child by November 7. 55 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 58. ASH Publications and Meeting MaterialsAttendees will have a variety options for receiving annual meeting content,including the oral and poster session abstracts. In addition to a flash drive Abstracts Online/Program Plannercontaining the abstracts and a link to the online program and scheduler, Check the ASH website (www.hematology.org) in early November for theregistrants may use a mobile application to download the abstracts and annual full text of the annual meeting abstracts. The online system will allow youmeeting program to a smartphone (iPhone, Android, Blackberry) or tablet to search the full and up-to-date annual meeting program and generate(iPad or Android). ASH News Daily, the daily on-site newspaper of the annual your own personal annual meeting schedule, which can be printed ormeeting, will also be accessible via a mobile-friendly website this year. downloaded to your portable device. Additionally, attendees have the option of using the annual meeting mobile application to download the abstracts and annual meeting program to their smartphones (iPhone, Android,Abstracts on Flash Drive Blackberry) or tablets (iPad or Android).Beginning with the 2012 ASH Annual Meeting, the AbstractBook will no longer be printed and will instead be available on A mobile-Web version of the online abstracts/program planner will also beflash drive. The flash drive will include the full text of all annual NEW available to attendees. This site is for attendees who prefer to access this THIS YEARmeeting abstracts as well as the full annual meeting program information using a mobile Web browser.(accurate as of the mid-October print date) and allow users tosearch for presentations of interest. Hematology 2012The flash drive will be mailed with meeting badges in mid-November to those Hematology 2012, the ASH Education Program Book, provides an updatedwho register during early-bird and advance registration. Attendees who and comprehensive review of each of the topics covered in the annualregister after the advance registration deadline may pick up the flash drive meeting education sessions. The peer-reviewed manuscripts are writtenon site. by the Education Program speakers. A chapter on the Ham-Wasserman Lecture, as well as evidence-based mini-reviews related to the topicsMembers and Blood subscribers who are NOT attending the annual covered in this year’s Education Program, will also be included. Hematologymeeting will receive the abstracts on flash drive in the mail in December. The 2012 will be distributed on site to registrants, and extra copies may befinal program will be available online in early November, and attendees are purchased for $80 per copy for members and $130 per copy for non-encouraged to use the online program planner and the mobile application members. (ASH will not be responsible for shipping books purchased on(see below). site.) ASH members not attending the meeting will be mailed a copy of Hematology 2012 in January 2013.Annual Meeting Mobile ApplicationLooking for annual meeting information at your fingertips? Download the Program Bookofficial 2012 ASH Annual Meeting mobile application, which will provide This book contains the master schedule and complete annual meetingprogram and exhibitor information, abstracts, maps, messaging capability, program (as of the mid-October print date), including detailed information forand other general annual meeting information. The application includes the the general and special-interest sessions, trainee activities, Education andfull text of annual meeting abstracts and articles from Hematology 2012 Scientific Programs, oral and poster sessions, and ticketed events. A listing(the Education Program Book). The application allows users to add a of exhibitors and Friday Satellite Symposia is also included.session to their device’s calendar which will build their itinerary for themeeting. The 2012 ASH Annual Meeting mobile application will be available Please note that the abstracts on flash drive will also contain programfor download on iPhone, Android, and Blackberry smartphones as well as on information (as of the mid-October print date) for the meeting.iPad and Android tablets. Attendees are encouraged to downloadthe application when it is published in late November. For the most up-to-date program information, attendees are encouraged to use the online program planner at www.hematology.org (available in early November) or download the annual meeting mobile application for smartphones and tablets.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 56
  • 59. The On-Demand Webcast may be purchased on site. Discounts will be available for ASH Members, Associate Members, and Non-Members inAnnual Meeting Education Program DVD Training. For additional details and pricing, please visit the ASH websiteEducation Program DVDs will be available for pick-up beginning Monday, (www.hematology.org).December 10, during the evening poster session, and on Tuesday,December 11, during registration hours at the ASH Resource Center. Namebadges will be required to purchase DVDs on site. The Education ProgramDVD will include all Education Program Sessions, including “The TradeSecrets of a Successful Academic” and “Junior-Faculty Development: How ASH News Dailyto Be Successful in Your First ‘Real’ Job.” The on-site daily meeting newspaper, ASH News Daily, will be available to attendees each day. Four separate issues of ASH News Daily, coveringThe DVD may be purchased on site. Discounts will be available for ASH the four days of the 2012 ASH Annual Meeting, will feature informativeMembers, Associate Members, and Non-Members in Training. For additional articles on a wide range of Education and Scientific Program sessionsdetails and pricing, please visit the ASH website (www.hematology.org). and abstract presentations written by distinguished ASH members. Each issue of ASH News Daily will highlight the day’s sessions and events and provide information about the city of Atlanta. This publication will be distributed throughout the Georgia World Congress Center, madeAnnual Meeting On-Demand Webcast available on all of the shuttle buses, and delivered to select hotels. Once(Education Program and Special Lectures) again this year, a mobile version of ASH News Daily will be available.On-demand webcasts of all the Education Program sessions and the special You can access the newspaper from your laptop, tablet, or mobile phone.lectures will be available on the ASH website (www.hematology.org) after the Meeting attendees will receive an email each morning; just click on the linkmeeting. Users will be able to access audio recordings of the presentations from your device to read the latest issue.while viewing associated color slides. Sessions that will be captured for thewebcast are as follows: • All Education Program Sessions, including “The Trade Secrets of a Successful Academic” and “Junior-Faculty Development Education Program: Mentorship – How to Be Successful in Your First ‘Real’ Job” • Education Spotlight Sessions • Presidential Symposium • Ham-Wasserman Lecture • E. Donnall Thomas Lecture • Ernest Beutler Lecture • ASH/EHA Joint Symposium • Trainee Simultaneous Didactic Sessions • Special Symposium from the Quality of Care Subcommittee – Quality Improvement: A Toolkit for Hematology Practice • Practice Forum 57 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 60. Meeting Rules and RegulationsPhotography/RecordingMaterials contained in the ASH annual meeting presentations, includingslides, audio, abstracts, and posters, are protected by copyright. Anyphotography, filming, or audio-video recording of the presentations orposters is strictly prohibited, except by registered members of the media.An exception is made for non-flash photography and audio recording usinghand-held equipment, so long as it is strictly for personal, non-commercialuse and not disruptive. Attendees taking photos or audio/video recording inthe exhibit hall for personal use must obtain permission from the exhibitingcompany before engaging in such activities within a particular booth.Violators of this policy will be escorted and barred from the session or exhibithall. Repeat offenders will have their meeting badges revoked and will not beallowed to continue to attend the meeting. Please note that annual meetingcontent may not be published or reproduced in any medium (including socialmedia) without express written permission from ASH (or, in the case of theposters, from the author).DisclaimerASH will have professional photographers present at the annual meeting;therefore, please note that any photographs taken at the meeting may beused in future ASH publications, on the ASH website (www.hematology.org),or in other Society materials. Exhibitors in the exhibit hall also may betaking photographs or recordings; however, they are required to obtainwritten permission from attendees if using such photos or recordingsfor promotional or commercial purposes. Attendance or participation inthe meeting constitutes an agreement with ASH by the registrant for theSociety to use and distribute the registrant’s image or voice in photographs,videotapes, audiotapes, or other electronic media pertaining to annualmeeting events and activities.No SmokingSmoking will not be permitted in any of the hallways, lobbies, meeting rooms,exhibits, or poster sessions at the convention center. Please refrain fromsmoking unless you are outside the building.Prohibited Session Room BehaviorIn crowded sessions, please honor the instructions provided by ASH staff. Children Under 12You may be told not to stand against the walls in these rooms or not to For safety reasons, children under the age of 12 (including infants in carriersblock the aisles. Please note that if a room reaches full capacity, you may and strollers, or hand-carried infants and toddlers) are not permitted in thebe denied entry, as ASH must obey the guidelines established by the Fire exhibit hall and poster sessions. Additionally, ASH prohibits children andMarshall at the convention center. infants in the sessions, as they may distract the speakers and disrupt other attendees. (See page 55 for child-care services provided at the meeting.)Participation of Financial ProfessionalsFinancial professionals and other individuals whose principal reason forattending the annual meeting is to seek business opportunities or obtaininformation affecting investment positions are welcome to register for theASH Annual Meeting. However, the educational and scientific aspects ofthe annual meeting are always top priority. Financial professionals arerequired to identify themselves when speaking with presenters,particularly when asking questions for which the answers may haveimplications for corporate valuation or positions in equity markets.Speakers and moderators are also asked to give preference to questionerswith scientific or clinical enquiries.ASH 54th Annual Meeting 58
  • 61. Upcoming ASH Meetings2012STATE- OF-TH E-ART SYM POS I U M CON S U LTATIVE H E MATOLOGY COU RS EThe theme of this year’s State-of-the-Art Symposium is “Recent Advances Two Consultative Hematology Courses will be offered in 2012. The first willin Hematologic Malignancies Including a Special Focus on Thrombosis.” take place on Friday morning, September 28, 2012, prior to the State-of-the-This annual, clinically focused, CME-accredited symposium is designed to Art Symposium in Chicago; the second will be held on Monday, December 11,offer the same high caliber of educational content for which the ASH annual 2012 during the 54th annual meeting (details regarding this meeting can bemeeting is known. The symposium will feature leading experts who will found under the “Ticketed Sessions” section of this preliminary program onpresent current best practices for treatment in the field of hematology. page 42). Geared toward North American practitioners trained in hematology or hematology-oncology who infrequently see patients with non-malignantNew in 2012, the State-of-the-Art Symposium will be held in hematologic disorders, the 2012 Consultative Hematology Course will covertwo locations: commonly encountered clinical problems that arise in everyday practice and require the expertise of a hematologist. Chicago, IL September 28-29 Los Angeles, CA October 12-13 Please visit www.hematology.org/CHC2012 for more information.Advance registration is now open. Visit www.hematology.org/SAS2012for the most current information on this meeting. Chicago, IL Los Angeles, CA Chicago, IL 59 ASH 54th Annual Meeting
  • 62. Upcoming ASH Meetings2013H IG H LIG HTS OF AS H ® I N NORTH AM E R ICA 55TH AS H AN N UAL M E ETI NG AN D EXPOS ITIONThese smaller, clinically focused meetings, held a few weeks after the Ernest N. Morial Convention Centerannual meeting, provide another opportunity to hear leading experts New Orleans, LApresent unbiased analyses of the 54th ASH Annual Meeting abstracts andsessions; attendees also learn more about the evolving therapies, latest Meeting: December 7-10, 2013treatment options, and their clinical applications that were discussed at the Exposition: December 7-9, 2013meeting. The program format is designed to allow practitioners, fellows,academicians, and allied health professionals the opportunity to discusssome of the most rapidly evolving developments in the field with expertsas well as colleagues.The 2013 Highlights of ASH® in North America meetings will be heldin six locations: Phoenix, AZ, and Toronto, Ontario, Canada January 18-19 Dallas, TX, and New York, NY January 25-26 Miami, FL, and San Francisco, CA February 1-2Phoenix, AZ Dallas, TX Miami, FLToronto, Ontario, New Orleans, LACanada New York, NY San Francisco, CAI NTE R NATIONAL H IG H LIG HTS OF AS H ® PLAN AH EAD FOR N EXT YEARThe international Highlights of ASH meetings provide opportunities for ASH members receive special advantages for ASH annual meetings, includinghematologists who would otherwise not travel to attend the annual meeting advance copies of the Preliminary Program, the ability to reserve rooms in thea chance to take advantage of expert analysis of the 54th ASH Annual prime hotels reserved exclusively for ASH members, and reduced registrationMeeting closer to home. The content is similar to the North American rates that are significantly less than those for non-members.Highlights of ASH program with the addition of new topics that are relevantto the region. The 2013 International Highlights of ASH meetings will be If you are interested in becoming a member of the Society, you may submitheld in Santiago, Chile, and Shanghai, China. an application online at www.hematology.org/Membership. If you have questions about eligibility or benefits, please contact ASH Headquarters atFor more information, please visit the ASH website at membership@hematology.org or 202-776-0544.www.hematology.org/Meetings. Applications for Active and International membership must be received by March 1, 2013, in order to take advantage of these benefits in time for the annual meeting in December. Don’t miss out on these special opportunities for the 2013 ASH Annual Meeting! Santiago, Chile Shanghai, ChinaASH 54th Annual Meeting 60
  • 63. Acknowledgments Greetings from the President Special thanks are due to: Agnes Y. Lee, MD ADDITIONAL PROG RAM 2012 AS H EXECUTIVE COM M ITTE E 2012 Education Program Co-Chair and Program COM M ITTE E M E M B E RS Committee Member OFFICERS It is my very distinct honor to invite you to join me for the preeminent celebration of research, Steven L. Allen, MD Armand Keating, MD, President education, and patient care in hematology at the 54th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Martin S. Tallman, MD Liaison, Chair, Committee on Practice Janis L. Abkowitz, MD, President-Elect Annual Meeting and Exposition at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia. 2012 Education Program Co-Chair and Program Linda J. Burns, MD, Vice President Committee Member Cynthia E. Dunbar, MD Charles Abrams, MD, Secretary The ASH annual meeting is the main event in hematology that we look forward to each year, Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, Blood Richard Larson, MD, Treasurer Bruce R. Blazar, MD and the 2012 meeting promises to be the most exciting one yet. Our Education Program, 2012 Scientific Program Co-Chair and Program Peter D. Emanuel, MD COUNCILLORS chaired by Drs. Agnes Lee and Martin Tallman, will provide the practicing hematologist with Committee Member Liaison, Chair, Committee on Communications Kenneth C. Anderson, MD invaluable information on nearly 30 of the most important areas of clinical progress, and our David M. Bodine, PhD Scientific Program, chaired by Drs. Bruce Blazar and Roy Silverstein, promises to showcase Roy L. Silverstein, MD Robert A. Hromas, MD Michael A. Caligiuri, MD 2012 Scientific Program Co-Chair Liaison, Chair, Committee on Scientific Affairs Joseph M. Connors, MD the latest scientific advances in 17 key areas of hematology. and Program Committee Member Marilyn J. Telen, MD Jose A. Lopez, MD Alexis A. Thompson, MD In addition to the Education and Scientific Programs, I’m excited to share several new and Charles Abrams, MD 2013 Scientific Program Co-Chair David A. Williams, MD expanded offerings with you. First, and most importantly, we have added more sessions to the Secretary and Program Committee Member John C. Winkelmann, MD schedule. For the first time, sessions from our Education Program will be offered on Monday Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD Linda Burns, MD Liaison, Editor-in-Chief Designee, Bloodin addition to Saturday and Sunday. Our Simultaneous Oral Sessions have also been expanded, with new slots added on Vice President, Executive Editor, HematologySaturday and Sunday. 2012, and Program Committee Member Charles J. Parker, MD Liaison, Editor-in-Chief, The HematologistThis year’s meeting will also feature new Special Symposia. ASH will offer a Special Symposium on Epigenetics in Joseph Mikhael, MDHematopoiesis that will focus on the effects of epigenetic alterations and gene mutations on hematopoietic stem cell function Co-Editor, Hematology 2012 Andrew W. Roberts, MD, PhDand discuss how epigenetics play a role in hematopoietic malignancies. In addition, our popular Tuesday morning Special Liaison, Chair, International Members Committee Bradford Schwartz, MDSymposium on the Basic Science of Hemostasis and Thrombosis has been reconfigured based on audience feedback. Co-Editor, Hematology 2012 Gary J. Schiller, MDThe afternoon posters have been discontinued in favor of an enhanced morning program that will include a session highlighting Liaison, Chair, Committee on Training Programsthe best thrombosis and hemostasis talks from the entire meeting. Kevin Shannon, MDOur popular, ticketed “Meet-the-Expert” sessions that have become a favorite for many at the ASH meeting have also been 2013 Scientific Program Co-Chairrevamped for 2012. Now titled “Meet the Scientist” and “How I Treat: Bringing Science to Clinical Dilemmas,” these sessions Wendy Stock, MDhave been restructured into basic science and clinical discussions, respectively, designed to foster informal interaction with 2013 Education Program Co-Chairsome of the top experts in hematology. And a brand new session category – the ticketed “Scientific Forums” – will provideattendees with the opportunity to participate in small-group sessions with some of the field’s leading scientific authorities over John F. Tisdale, MD 2013 Education Program Co-Chairlunch. For an entire list of each of the new offerings at this year’s annual meeting, see the “What’s New” section on page 3. Jane N. Winter, MDOf course, the Society’s annual celebration of groundbreaking advances in hematology would not be complete without Liaison, Chair, Committee on Educational Affairshonoring some of the distinguished leaders in the field through awards and special lectures. I encourage you to read moreabout each of our 2012 honorees on pages 7–9.Finally, I hope that in the midst of marveling at the stimulating clinical and scientific advances presented at this year’s meeting,catching up with old friends and colleagues, and enjoying the cultural attractions of Atlanta, you take some time to considerparticipating more actively in ASH in 2013. If you are not yet a member, why not consider submitting an application at ASHCentral to take advantage of the many programs and services ASH has to offer? If you are already a member, considervolunteering to serve on a committee (visit www.hematology.org/Leadership) or make a gift to the new ASH Foundation, to beformally announced at this year’s meeting (learn more on page 44). There are countless ways to get involved, from writing toyour legislators about the importance of federal funding for biomedical research to sharing your expertise with colleagues in adeveloping country (see page 13). It is truly an exciting time for the Society. We need your talents and energy to move the fieldforward!The ASH annual meeting is without question the premier hematology meeting in the world. I hope that you will join me inAtlanta in December!Sincerely yours,Armand Keating, MD2012 President
  • 64. AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 54th ASH Annual Meeting ® and Exposition PRELIMINARY PROGRAM Atlanta, GA G EO R G I A W O R L D CO N G R E S S C E N T E R Meeting Dates: December 8-11, 2012 Exposition Dates: December 8-10, 2012AMERICAN SOCIETY of HEMATOLOGY 2021 L Street NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036 Phone: 202-776-0544 Fax: 202-292-0269 meetings@hematology.org www.hematology.org

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