American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM): Annual Meeting

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American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM): Annual Meeting

  1. 1. • Preliminary ProgramPP_2012.indd 1 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  2. 2. TE E THE DA S & JOIN SAV A joint meeting of the US ! European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine THE BEST OF ESHRE & ASRM March 6-10, 2013 Atlantis, Paradise Island, Bahamas Registration and program details available in July 2012 at www.asrm.orgPP_2012.indd 2 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  3. 3. Welcome to San Diego California’s second largest city and the United States’ eighth largest, San Diego boasts a citywide population of nearly 1.3 million residents and more than 3 million residents countywide. San Diego County encompasses numerous charming neighborhoods and communities, including downtown’s historic Gaslamp Quarter, Little Italy, Coronado, La Jolla, Del Mar, Carlsbad, Escondido, La Mesa, Hillcrest, Barrio Logan and Chula Vista, just to name a few. San Diego is renowned for its idyllic climate, pristine beaches and a dazzling array of world-class family attractions. Popular attractions include the world- famous San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park, SeaWorld San Diego and LEGOLAND California. San Diego offers an expansive variety of things to see and do, appealing to guests of all ages from around the world. San Diego’s arts and culture and culinary arts are booming. The hottest, new culinary arts talents prepare award-winning meals throughout the region’s 6,400 eating establishments. Balboa Park, the largest urban cultural park in the U.S., is home to 15 museums, numerous art galleries, beautiful gardens, the Tony Award-winning The Globe Theatres and the world-famous San Diego Zoo. San Diego County also features 92 golf courses and a variety of exciting participatory and spectator sports, beachfront resorts and luxury spas, gaming, a dynamic downtown district, annual special events and unique holiday offerings, multicultural festivals and celebrations, colorful neighborhoods and communities, a rich military history and much more. The most difficult decision to make regarding a visit to San Diego is determining what to do and see among the region’s vast and diverse offerings. San Diego County promises a truly remarkable experience for everyone. CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAUPP_2012.indd 3 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  4. 4. Saturday Sunday, October 21st October 20th Opening Ceremony Networking Event at 6:30pm at 5:00pm Opening Reception Sails Pavilion San Diego Convention Center at 7:30pm PETCO Park These are ticketed events.PP_2012.indd 4 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  5. 5. WELCOME INSIDE I would like to personally invite you to attend this year’s 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine to be held in San Diego, California, October 20-24, 2012. This year’s meeting theme, “Setting the Course in WELCOME TO SAN DIEGO . . . . . . . . . 3 Reproductive Medicine,” reflects the focus of the meeting with OPENING CEREMONY & state-of-the-art plenary and symposium presentations on areas NETWORK EVENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 of broad interest such as assisted reproductive technologies, contraception, obesity, environmental toxins, surgical ASRM 5K RUN INFORMATION . . . . . . . 4 challenges, fertility preservation, stem cells, reproductive PRESIDENT’S WELCOME . . . . . . . . . . . 5 genetics, urology, psychosocial aspects, and the newest ASRM ANNUAL MEETING research advances in our field. Indeed, Dr. Bob Oates, together POLICIES & DISCLAIMERS . . . . . . . . . . 6with the Scientific Program Committee, has developed a superb program that addresses theclinical and research challenges of all aspects of reproductive medicine. REGISTRATION & MEETING INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9 Dr. Kirk Lo and the Postgraduate Program Committee have worked closely with theaffiliated societies, professional groups, and special interest groups to develop postgraduate HOUSING INFORMATION . . . . . . . 10-11courses that meet the needs of our clinicians, scientists, laboratory technologists, nurses and CONTINUINGother healthcare professionals. EDUCATION CREDIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 The meeting includes the popular roundtables, videos and interactive sessions, as well DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS &as sessions focused on menopause and contraception. Our new Surgery Day will focus CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY . . . . 13on robotic surgery mini-labs and surgical instrument demonstrations, as well as lectures POSTGRADUATEand tutorials. The special interest groups, professional groups, and affiliated societies will PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-27highlight the advances in their fields and provide opportunities for in-depth participationand communication. The most recent advances in reproductive medicine will be FUTURE ASRM MEETING DATES . . . . . 27highlighted in the oral and poster presentations. NEEDS ASSESSMENT & We welcome our members and trainees, as well as our colleagues from abroad, to LEARNING OBJECTIVES . . . . . . . . . . . 28attend the meeting. Indeed, several symposia will be presented by a group of experts from SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMsister societies around the world. As always, opportunities for networking and interactive DAILY SCHEDULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-36sessions abound. CONTRACEPTION DAY . . . . . . . . . . . 37 San Diego is a delightful city, and the meeting also offers a most enjoyable social SURGERY DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-39program for attendees and their guests. I look forward to meeting you in San Diego, where together we will be “Setting the MENOPAUSE DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40Course in Reproductive Medicine.” NICHD OVARIAN RESERVE Sincerely, SYMPOSIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 PLENARY SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . 42-43 Dolores J. Lamb, Ph.D. SMRU MINI-SYMPOSIA . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 ASRM President 2011-2012 VIDEO SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE MEET THE PROFESSORS . . . . . . . . . . . 44 OFFICERS DIRECTORS President Nancy L. Brackett, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. SREI MEMBERS PRACTICE Dolores J. Lamb, Ph.D. Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D. RETREAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Christos Coutifaris, M.D., Ph.D. President-Elect INTERACTIVE SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . 45-48 Ann J. Davis, M.D. Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D. Marc A. Fritz, M.D. ASRM MORNING SYMPOSIA . . . . 49-50 Vice President Michael P. Diamond, M.D. Richard Reindollar, M.D. Bradley J. Van Voorhis, M.D. (SREI) ASRM AFTERNOON Immediate Past President Mark Sigman, M.D. (SRS) SYMPOSIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51-52 Roger A. Lobo, M.D. Robert M. Oates, M.D. (SMRU) ROUNDTABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53-56 Sangita K. Jindal, Ph.D. (SRBT) Past President SPOUSE/GUEST PROGRAM . . . . . . . 57 Glenn L. Schattman, M.D. (SART) William E. Gibbons, M.D. Secretary EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR WRITE THE NEXT CHAPTER Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. Robert W. Rebar, M.D. CONTRIBUTION OPPORTUNITIES . . . . 57 Treasurer SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR Stuart S. Howards, M.D. Andrew R. La Barbera, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. 5
  6. 6. ASRM Annual Meeting Policies and Disclaimers CANCELLATION POLICY The American Society for Reproductive Medicine reserves the right to cancel this activity due to unforeseen circumstances. In the event of such cancellation, the full enrollment fee will be returned to the registrant. REFUND/NON-ATTENDANCE POLICY Cancellations received before or by September 14th will receive a full refund minus a $50 processing fee. Cancellations received after September 14th will not be eligible for a refund. ADA STATEMENT The American Society for Reproductive Medicine fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA and the rules and regulations thereof. Accommodations for Disabilities: Please notify the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, 1209 Montgomery Highway, Birmingham, Alabama, USA 35216, telephone 1-205-978-5000, a minimum of 10 working days in advance of the event if a reasonable accommodation for a disability is needed. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY STATEMENT The American Society for Reproductive Medicine values and promotes diversity among its members, officers and staff. The Society prohibits discrimination toward any member or employee due to race, color, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, citizenship, disability, military status or other basis prohibited by law. The Society strives to achieve gender, racial and ethnic balance in hiring and governance. The Society maintains policies, procedures and personnel actions that conform to the letter and spirit of all laws and regulations pertaining to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in employment, appointments and elections to office. DISCLAIMER STATEMENT The content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the faculty/authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. This material is prepared based upon a review of multiple sources of information, but it is not exhaustive of the subject matter. Therefore, healthcare professionals and other individuals should review and consider other publications and materials on the subject matter before relying solely upon the information contained within this educational activity to make clinical decisions about individual patients.PP_2012.indd 6 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  7. 7. Registration & Meeting Information How to Register 8 Register online @ www.asrm.org and receive immediate confirmation! ! On-site in San Diego, CA Choices may be limited on-site. Pre-registration is recommended. On-Site Registration Desk: San Diego Convention Center Friday, October 19 . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Saturday, October 20 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Sunday, October 21 . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Monday, October 22 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 23 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 24 . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Be Sure to Visit the Exhibit Hall Monday, October 22 . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 23 . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 24 . . . . . . 9:0–0 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. For the safety of your child and in order to maintain the scientific nature of the display, no children under the age of 16 (except infants under 6 months of age carried in arms at all times) will be allowed in the Exhibit Hall. Strollers and infants in backpacks are not permitted in the Exhibit Hall or Poster Hall at anytime. ASRM Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee Dolores J. Lamb, Ph.D., President Robert D. Oates, M.D., Scientific Program Chair Joe Conaghan, Ph.D., Ad Hoc Member Serdar E. Bulun, M.D., Interactive Sessions Chair Wendy Kuohung, M.D., Ad Hoc Member Lawrence C. Layman, M.D., Roundtable Program Chair Thomas L. Toth, M.D., Ad Hoc Member G. David Ball, Ph.D. Postgraduate Program Committee Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Program Chair Kirk C. Lo, M.D., Postgraduate Program Chair Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D. Anuja Dokras-Jagasia, M.D., Ph.D., Postgraduate Program Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Program Chair Co-Chair Grace M. Centola, Ph.D. Lisa Halvorson, M.D., Postgraduate Program Coordinating Society for Male Reproduction and Urology Program Chair Chair Penelope Fenton, M.A., ASRM Postgraduate Program Thomas G. Turner, M.S. Coordinator Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists Program Chair Grace M. Janik, M.D. Video Committee Society of Reproductive Surgeons Program Chair Steven F. Palter, M.D., Chair Tien-cheng A. Chang, Ph.D. Nidhi Desai, J.D. Tommaso Falcone, M.D. Legal Professional Group Program Chair Emilio Fernandez, M.D. Claudia Pascale, Ph.D. Antonio R. Gargiulo, M.D. Mental Health Professional Group Program Chair Arik Kahane, M.D. Deborah L. Jaffe, B.S.N. Philip S. Li, M.D. Nurses’ Professional Group Program Chair Stephen R. Lindheim, M.D. Marius Meintjes, D.V.M., Ph.D. Kira Copperman, L.M.S.W. Dana A. Ohl, M.D. Association of Reproductive Managers Program Chair David L. Olive, M.D. Robert W. Rebar, M.D., ASRM Executive Director Marc P. Portmann, M.T. Andrew R. La Barbera, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., ASRM Scientific Director Togas Tulandi, M.D. C. Lee Hutchison, M.A., ASRM Scientific Program Coordinator Paul J. Turek, M.D. Nancy Bowers, B.S.N., R.N., M.P.H., ASRM Education Specialist 7PP_2012.indd 7 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  8. 8. Registration Information Book in the ASRM Housing Block and save $50 off Registration fees! Individual Registration for the 2012 ASRM Annual Meeting opens April 16TH. Group Registration for the 2012 ASRM Annual Meeting opens April 23RD. To register, visit: www.asrm.org and click on “Annual Meeting” and then “Register for 2012 Annual Meeting.” Use your 2012 ASRM Preliminary Program as a guide in registering for the courses you wish to attend. For questions, please call (866) 471-7224 or (703) 449-6418 or email asrmregistration@jspargo.com. Register early to take advantage of discounted rates! Early Bird Deadline 7/12 • Advanced Deadline 9/14 Cancellations received before or by September 14 TH will receive a full refund minus a $50 processing fee. Cancellations received after September 14 TH will not be eligible for a refund. 8PP_2012.indd 8 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  9. 9. Registration Information POSTGRADUATE COURSE REGISTRATION SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM REGISTRATION FEES FEES Early Bird Advanced Onsite Early Bird Advanced Onsite By 7/12 By 9/14 After 9/14 By 7/12 By 9/14 After 9/14 Member (Doctoral) $430 $465 $500 Member (Doctoral) Member (Non-Doctoral) $355 $390 $425 One 1-day course $320 $350 $380 Life Member $255 $290 $325 Two 1-day courses $580 $640 $700 Fellow $255 $290 $325 (Proof of status letter from chair/dept. head required) Member (Non-Doctoral) Non-Member (Doctoral) $705 $740 $775 One 1-day course $220 $240 $260 Non-Member (Non-Doctoral) $555 $590 $625 Two 1-day courses $400 $440 $480 Team Member $255 $290 $325 Non-Member (Doctoral) Resident $55 $55 $55 One 1-day course $380 $420 $460 Full-time Student $30 $30 $30 (Undergraduate, Medical and Graduate; Documentation required) Two 1-day courses $680 $750 $820 Spouse/Guest Program $75 $75 $75 Spouse/Guest registration includes Opening Reception, Non-Member (Non-Doctoral) Exhibit Hall, Plenary Sessions & Hospitality One 1-day course $270 $300 $330 TICKETED EVENTS Two 1-day courses $480 $530 $580 SREI Members’ Practice Retreat $150 Saturday, October 20, 2012 • 10:30 am - 4:45 pm Resident, Fellow, Team Member One 1-day course $220 $240 $260 Saturday Networking Event at Sails Pavilion $45 Saturday, October 20, 2012 • 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Two 1-day courses $400 $440 $480 Opening Reception at PETCO Park $25 Sunday, October 21, 2012 • 7:30 pm SRS Hands-on Postgraduate Courses PG #18 $300 additional charge will apply Roundtable Luncheons $50/day PG #19 $300 additional charge will apply You may attend only one Roundtable Luncheon per day. Women’s Council Breakfast $30 Held on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 7:30 a.m. Morning Poster Sessions Poster Sessions will be held on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings from 7:00 a.m. until 9:00 a.m. Complimentary continental breakfast will be available. No reservation is required. 9PP_2012.indd 9 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  10. 10. Housing Information Book in the ASRM Housing Block and save $50 off Registration fees! To book housing for the 2012 ASRM Annual Meeting, visit www.asrm.org Click on “Annual Meeting” and then the appropriate housing link. For questions, please call (866) 471-7224 or (703) 449-6418 or email asrmhousing@jspargo.com 1. Manchester Grand Hyatt 6. Hilton San Diego Gaslamp 1 Market Place 401 K Street San Diego, CA 92101 San Diego, CA 92101 SGL $253 / DBL $253 SGL $224 / DBL $224 2. San Diego Marriott Marquis Hotel 7. Horton Grand Hotel and Marina (Headquarters Hotel) 311 Island Ave 333 West Harbor Drive San Diego, CA 92101 San Diego, CA 92101 SGL $204 / DBL $204 SGL $278 / DBL $278 cityview SGL $298 / DBL $298 bayview 8. Embassy Suites San Diego Bay 601 Pacific Highway 3. Hilton San Diego Convention Center San Diego, CA 92101 (Bayfront) SGL $228 / DBL $228 1 Park Blvd San Diego, CA 92101 9. Westin Gaslamp Quarter Hotel SGL $277 / DBL $277 910 Broadway Circle San Diego, CA 92101 4. Omni San Diego SGL $232 / DBL $232 675 L. Street San Diego, CA 92101 10. The US Grant SGL $272 / DBL $272 326 Broadway San Diego, CA 92101 5. Hard Rock Hotel SGL $253 / DBL $253 207 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 STUDIO SGL $243 / DBL $243 HARD ROCK SUITE SGL $274 / DBL $274 10PP_2012.indd 10 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  11. 11. ASRM 2012 San Diego Hotel Map American Society of Reproductive Medicine Oct 20, 2012 to Oct 24, 2012 10 9 8 7 1 2 6 5 4 3 Hotel Distance (in miles) from SDCC Downtown San Diego 1 Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego 0.32 2 San Diego Marriott Marquis & Marina (Headquarters Hotel) 0.05 3 Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel 0.04 4 Omni San Diego Hotel 0.12 5 Hard Rock Hotel San Diego 0.09 6 Hilton San Diego Gaslamp Quarter 0.06 7 Horton Grand Hotel 0.33 8 Embassy Suites Hotel San Diego Bay - Downtown 0.45 9 Westin Gaslamp Quarter 0.48 10 THE US GRANT - A Luxury Collection Hotel 0.65 11PP_2012.indd 11 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  12. 12. Continuing Education Credit Continuing Education Credit Information will be located in the front American Board of Bioanalysis (ABB) of each Postgraduate Course syllabus and the Final Program. The American Society for Reproductive Medicine has been approved to provide Professional Enrichment Education Renewal CE/CME Credit reporting is done online. You will receive an (PEER) credit through the American Board of Bioanalysis. PEER email requesting you to log-in to complete evaluations of the CEUs will be recognized for the Scientific Program. CEUs will Postgraduate and Scientific Programs and claim your AMA, be recognized for postgraduate courses 3, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 14. ACOG, NASW and Nursing credits, or to request a Certificate of PEER credit forms for eligible postgraduate courses and for the Attendance. The Website contains detailed instructions on how Scientific Program will be available at the American Association of to complete the report and you will be able to print or email a Bioanalysts (AAB) booth in the Exhibit Hall. ABB certification exams certificate to the email address you provided at registration. Final will be administered Friday, October 19, 2012. date to report credit is December 31, 2012. American Psychological Association (APA) Credits other than those specified below are the responsibility of The Mental Health Professional Group (MHPG) of the each attendee. American Society for Reproductive Medicine is approved Commercially Supported Symposia by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Commercially Supported Symposia presented at the Annual continuing education for psychologists. The MHPG maintains Meeting of the ASRM are a part of the Scientific Program, unless responsibility for this program and its content. Application for credits otherwise noted. has been made. The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education National Association of Social Workers (NASW) (ACCME) Application has been made for approval of Mental Health The American Society for Reproductive Medicine is Professional Group postgraduate course 16 for 6.5 Continuing accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education Contact Hours in the Scientific Program. Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Nursing Credits Scientific Program Designation Statement Nursing credits have been applied for course 13 from the The American Society for Reproductive Medicine designates this Continuing Education Approval Program of the National Association live activity for a maximum of 24.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health. Nursing CE credit for Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the the Scientific Program has been applied for from the Continuing extent of their participation in the activity. Education Approval Program of the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health. Postgraduate Program Designation Statement The American Society for Reproductive Medicine designates this Note: No credits will be given for Association of Reproductive Managers live activity for a maximum of 6.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Continuing Education Course PG17. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Continuing education/continuing medical education credit is not offered during meals, breaks, receptions/cocktail parties, training The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has sessions, satellite meetings or any private group meeting (e.g., assigned cognates to the Scientific Program and 7 cognates to the council meetings, invitation-only meetings, editorial board meetings, one-day Postgraduate Program. etc.). In addition, CME credit is not offered during poster sessions, oral abstract presentations, or roundtable luncheon discussions. CME This symbol indicates a postgraduate course that qualifies for CE This symbol indicates a postgraduate course that qualifies for CME credit. CE credit. Continuing medical education is a lifelong learning modality enabling physicians to remain current with medical advances. The goal of ASRM is to sponsor educational activities that provide learners with the tools needed to practice the best medicine and provide the best, most current care to patients. As an accredited CME provider, ASRM adheres to the Essentials and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). CME activities now must first, address specific, documented, clinically important gaps in physician knowledge, competence or performance; second, be documented to be effective at increasing physician knowledge, skill or performance; and third, conform to the ACCME Standards for Commercial Support. ASRM must not only obtain complete disclosure of commercial and financial relationships pertaining to reproductive medicine but also resolve any perceived conflicts of interest. All postgraduate course faculty members and all organizers, moderators and speakers in the Scientific Program have completed disclosures of commercial and financial relationships with manufacturers of pharmaceuticals, laboratory supplies and medical devices and with commercial providers of medically-related services. The disclosures were reviewed by the Subcommittee for Standards of Commercial Support of the ASRM CME Committee, which resolved perceived potential conflicts of interest. The next few years will be an exciting time for the community of reproductive medicine practitioners as we adapt to the changing environment of healthcare and CME. The American Medical Association is advancing a transition of CME from a system of credits based on hours of attendance to a system based on improvement in physician performance. CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE Proof of attendance is available on request from J Spargo at the registration desk. Continuing Education Credit information is located in the front of the Postgraduate Course syllabi, and the Final Program and online. ADMISSION BADGES Name badges will be issued for the Postgraduate and Scientific Programs and are required for admission. Spouse/guest badges will be issued and are required for admission to spouse/guest activities and the Exhibit Hall. PHOTO/AUDIO/VIDEO RECORDING Photographing or audio/video recording of any session for personal or commercial purposes without permission is prohibited. 12PP_2012.indd 12 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  13. 13. Disclosure Statements/Conflict of Interest Policy AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE 2012 Conflict of Interest Policy Honoraria The following speakers may receive for Invited Speakers honoraria and/or discounted or free registration: As a provider of continuing medical education (CME) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education • Plenary Speakers (ACCME), the American Society for Reproductive Medicine must • Postgraduate Course Faculty ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all • Symposia Speakers its educational activities. All presenters must disclose to the learners • Interactive Session Speakers any commercial or financial interests and/or other relationships The following speakers do not with manufacturers of pharmaceuticals, laboratory supplies and/or receive honoraria: medical devices. All relationships, whether or not they directly apply to this CME event, must be disclosed. All non-FDA approved uses of • Roundtable Presenters products must be clearly identified. Disclosures may be made in the • Abstract Presenters form of a slide, printed material, or oral statement. • Video Presenters The intent of this disclosure is not to prevent a speaker with a Disclosure Statements commercial or financial interest from making a presentation. The intent Postgraduate Faculty, Symposia is to assist ASRM in resolving conflicts of interest and to provide learners Speakers, Plenary Lecturers, Abstract with information on which they can make their own judgments Authors, Abstract Graders, Round- regarding any bias. Although ASRM reviews and resolves potential table Presenters, Video Presenters, conflicts of interest, it remains for the audience to determine whether and Interactive Speakers are the speaker’s interests or relationships may influence the presentation required to disclose commercial with regard to exposition or conclusion. relationships or other activities that might be perceived as potential Disclosures will be revealed to the learners. For postgraduate conflicts of interest. courses, disclosure information will be provided in the syllabus. For Postgraduate course faculty other activities, where no syllabus or other similar printed material is disclosures will be listed in the course available, disclosures must be made verbally to the audience by the syllabi. speakers, preferably with the visual aid of a slide. Symposium speakers’ disclosures will For those situations where there is no potential for conflict of interest, be presented in handout materials, the portion of the form that so states should be completed. In those as well as on slides. situations where a speaker does not complete a form or refuses to complete a form, the individual is ineligible to participate as a speaker Disclosures from speakers in the in the CME activity. Plenary Sessions, Interactive Sessions, Roundtables, Videos and Symposia will be published in the Final Program. Speakers should also reveal to the audience any “off label” uses Abstract authors’ disclosures will be (not approved by the FDA) of any drugs or products discussed. published in the 2012 Program Supplement. Each presenter should reveal his/her disclosure information during his/her presentation, preferably with the visual aid of a slide. Abstract authors’ disclosures are listed in the 2012 Program Supplement. Roundtable presenters should Speakers in the Symposia and Interactive, Video, Roundtable and Abstract provide a copy of their disclosure Sessions have also complied with ASRM policies and their disclosures are printed forms to the participants at their in the ASRM Final Program. The speaker should reveal this information during table. his/her presentation, preferably with the visual aid of a slide. 13PP_2012.indd 13 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  14. 14. Postgraduate Program One-Day Courses Saturday, October 20TH 45TH ANNUAL ULTRASOUND IMAGING IN ART CME POSTGRADUATE Course PG1 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine PROGRAM FACULTY COMMITTEE Laurel A. Stadtmauer, M.D., Ph.D., Chair Eastern Virginia Medical School Steven Goldstein, M.D., Co-Chair CHAIR NYU School of Medicine Kirk C. Lo, M.D. Donna R. Session, M.D. Emory Reproductive Center James M. Shwayder, M.D., J.D. CO-CHAIR University of LouisvilleAnuja Dokras-Jagasia, M.D., Ph.D. NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION COORDINATING CHAIR Ultrasound has become the most widely used and important tool in diagnosis and treatment of infertility. Ultrasound and ultrasound-guided procedures have Lisa M. Halvorson, M.D. become integral components not just of ART, but also in the day-to-day practice of reproductive medicine, infertility and gynecology. 3-D ultrasound allows better imaging, as well as more accurate volume rendering. It has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of uterine anomalies, and may assist in more accurate WEEKEND COURSES follicular monitoring measurements. In 2009, new practice guidelines for ultrasound Dates: in reproductive medicine were published by the American Institute of Ultrasound Saturday, October 20TH in Medicine (AIUM) and in collaboration with ASRM. Surveys of members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the Imaging Special Interest Sunday, October 21ST Group and ASRM have revealed a strong desire for CME credits in ultrasonography that would prepare reproductive medicine professionals and gynecologists for Hours: accreditation by AIUM. In addition, there is an interest in training and credentialing 8:15 a.m.-5:00 p.m. reproductive nurses and nurse practitioners to perform limited ultrasounds in the Lunch is from Noon-1:00 p.m. office. This live one-day course, designed to meet the needs of physicians and other health care providers who use gynecologic sonography, will fulfill CME requirements for AIUM credentialing. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive survey of the use of ultrasonography in the female pelvis for physicians, nurses Courses PG1-PG8 are one-day and ultrasonographers actively involved in reproductive medicine, infertility and courses on Saturday. gynecology. This course will emphasize the use of ultrasound in maximizing ART success and including follicular monitoring with 3-D sono AVC, evaluation of the uterine liningCourses PG9-PG19 are one-day during retrieval and embryo transfer in an evidence based manner. Newer courses on Sunday. technologies, such as 3-D ultrasound, Doppler and the use of CT- and MRI- guided procedures, will also be discussed, along with cost-effective current or potential applications. Participants will be encouraged to actively take part in case presentations and discussions of controversies. Practical applications of the technology will be addressed along with case presentations, and participants will Postgraduate Course have the opportunity to manipulate 3-D images. Syllabi will be posted ACGME Competency online in Patient care September 2012. LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: Printed copies will be 1. Summarize the appropriate use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of infertility, distributed on-site. uterine abnormalities and the pathology of the reproductive tract. 2. Describe the proper assessment of early pregnancy and list findings on early pregnancy assessments that are associated with poor outcome. 3. Discuss the importance of 3-D ultrasonography in reproductive medicine, and the importance of Doppler blood-flow assessment in reproductive medicine and gynecology. 4. Evaluate the use of fallopian tube patency with ultrasound. 5. Critically evaluate how ultrasound can maximize the success of ART. 14
  15. 15. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM FERTILITY PRESERVATION AND BEYOND: DO THE 2006 ASCO GUIDELINES REFLECT THE CURRENT STATE OF PRACTICE AND TECHNOLOGIC ADVANCES? CME Course PG2 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the Fertility Preservation Special Interest Group FACULTY Nicole L. Noyes, M.D., Chair NYU School of Medicine Lynn M. Westphal, M.D., Co-Chair Stanford University School of Medicine Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, M.D. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Isabelle Demeestere, M.D., Ph.D. University Libre de Bruxelles NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION In 2006, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) formed an expert panel to develop guidelines for practicing oncologists regarding available fertility preservation methods and related issues in people treated for cancer. Despite publication of these guidelines, the degree to which practicing oncologists adhere to the recommendations is still unclear. It does appear, however, that awareness in the lay community is improving due to advocacy groups such as Livestrong, Fertile Hope and Fertile Action, and that referrals to reproductive specialists for fertility preservation in cancer patients are increasing. Since 2006, rapid advancements in the field of fertility preservation, particularly in oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation, have created a need for more educational access regarding this topic. This live course is aimed at all health care professionals whose practices include patients considering fertility preservation options. Current medical evidence will be presented to help participants integrate the latest technology and information into their clinical practices and provide guidance in managing this complicated patient population. Topics discussed will include recent advances in oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation, fertility preservation ethical challenges, and fertility-sparing options for cancer patients. ACGME Competency Systems-based practice LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Summarize the current status of available fertility preservation options, including outcomes and applications, as it relates to individual cancer diagnoses. 2. Describe recent advances in oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation, including in vitro maturation from excised tissue. 3. Discuss post-cancer treatment parenthood options, as well as ethical considerations in challenging fertility preservation scenarios. 4. Summarize the current status of fertility-sparing options available to young women and men in the setting of cancer. APPROACHES TO OPTIMIZING ART OUTCOMES Course PG3 (Saturday) CME Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology FACULTY R. Stan Williams, M.D., Chair University of Florida G. David Ball, Ph.D. Seattle Reproductive Medicine Owen K. Davis, M.D. Weill Medical College Richard T. Scott, M.D., H.C.L.D. Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION The field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) is rapidly evolving. In order to obtain the best results for their patients, health care professionals in the field need to be aware of the very latest medical evidence in the science and practice of assisted reproductive technology. This course targets ART practitioners, laboratory personnel, and nurses. Faculty will review the known effects of ART on offspring, as well as the latest guidelines for determining the number of embryos to transfer in order to achieve the highest possible pregnancy rate, while at the same time reducing the number of multiple pregnancies. Other topics to be covered include optimal ovarian stimulation and embryo selection; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) donor screening and recent results of FDA inspections; and tips from and techniques of highly successful ART programs. 15PP_2012.indd 15 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  16. 16. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM ACGME Competency Patient care LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Provide patients with appropriate informed consent about the risks of ART and the risks and prevention of multiple pregnancy 2. Describe the best protocols for ovarian stimulation in various prognosis patients. 3. Discuss how to best cryopreserve oocytes and select the best embryos for transfer. 4. Summarize FDA regulations for donor screening and list the most common errors cited by inspectors and how to avoid them. UTERINE FIBROIDS: INNOVATIVE APPROACHES AND OPTIONS FOR TREATMENT CME Course PG4 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the Fibroid Special Interest Group FACULTY Shannon K. Laughlin-Tommaso, M.D., M.P.H., Chair Mayo Clinic William H. Catherino, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Chair Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Gregory M. Christman, M.D. University of Michigan NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Uterine fibroids are the most common reproductive tract tumor, with associated morbidities in about 25% of women. Despite being common, the mainstay of therapy remains hysterectomy, with over 200,000 performed in the United States each year. Research is abundant for less invasive surgical and medical therapies that are safer for the patients and allow women to retain their uterus and, often, their fertility. Unfortunately, these newer treatments are not well known and underutilized. Future therapies offer much promise for targeting signaling pathways that will inhibit the growth and development of fibroids, leading to several unanswered questions: What are the roles of progesterone, estrogen, and inflammatory pathways in the development of fibroids? Can we inhibit growth by blocking these pathways? Are there newer ways of delivering therapy directly to the fibroids? What risk factors or exposures can be identified to decrease the incidence of fibroids? What are the long-term results and recurrence rates of the less invasive treatments such as MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery and uterine artery embolization? What is the optimal management of women with fibroids and infertility? This live course is designed to close the gaps in understanding for physicians between text book teaching and ongoing research, while offering innovative and minimally invasive therapies for this common condition. We will offer cutting-edge research results, updates on efficacy of the newest treatments, and the very latest information regarding the risk factors and future directions in medical therapy. ACGME Competency Patient care LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. List the known risk factors and mechanisms of development for uterine fibroids and identify patients at higher risk. 2. Identify the new therapies available for uterine fibroids and the effects of treatment on reproduction. 3. Discuss new medical therapies and potential targets for treating uterine fibroids. 4. Explain how to apply select options for fibroid symptoms. THE EMBRYO AS THE PATIENT: UPDATE ON DIAGNOSIS CME Course PG5 (Saturday) FACULTY Carlos Simón, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Chair Fundación IVI Renee A. Reijo Pera, Ph.D., Co-Chair The Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Marcos Meseguer, Ph.D. Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad William Schoolcraft, M.D. Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Human embryo viability and aneuploidy are currently assessed by morphological and genomic techniques, but are far from being completely understood. There is a need for practical knowledge that is clinically applicable and basic knowledge that 16PP_2012.indd 16 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  17. 17. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM will contribute to scientific progress in this field. This live course, aimed at obstetrician/gynecologists, embryologists and geneticists, as well as laboratory scientists and technicians, will update participants on the clinical relevance of new technologies applied to assess human embryo viability and aneuploidy from imaging to genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, as well as the future of the “new” IVF lab. ACGME Competency Medical knowledge LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the mechanisms implicated in human embryonic development, blastomere fate and embryonic genome activation. 2. Summarize the clinical relevance of noninvasive imaging to assess embryo viability and improve clinical outcome. 3. Explain the practical relevance of invasive comprehensive chromosome screening after trophectoderm biopsy and evaluate the translational relevance of noninvasive proteomic and metabolomic markers in embryo viability and aneuploidy. 4. Describe the clinical value of the vitrification program through oocyte and embryo development. 5. Discuss the future possibilities in the IVF lab. THE MALE IS HALF THE PICTURE: EMERGING CLINICAL AND LABORATORY ISSUES CME AFFECTING MALE REPRODUCTIVE COMPETENCE Course PG6 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology FACULTY Grace M. Centola, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., Chair CryoBank Compliance Services Gerald P. Schatten, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh Peter N. Schlegel, M.D. Weill Cornell Medical College Paul J. Turek, M.D. The Turek Clinic NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Less common clinical scenarios, toxins and diet, clinical relevance of lab findings, and genetics continue to be important topics in the management of infertile males. New technologies that have implications for the treatment of male infertility are developing rapidly, and healthcare professionals need the latest information in order to incorporate these technologies into clinical practice. This course is designed for all clinicians, including urologists, reproductive endocrinologists, geneticists, embryologists and even mental health practitioners, all of whom should be aware of developments in technology that may have an impact on treatment for male infertility at the present time or in the future. Topics to be covered include: unusual and rare sperm morphologies and their genetic basis; testicular tissue processing and cryopreservation; testicular tissue versus severely oligozoospermic specimens in ART; the role of the sperm in early embryo quality and testing in cases of fertilization failure; paternal age effects on pregnancy achievement, congenital illness and disease in the offspring; and copy number variation and whole-genome sequencing in the infertile male. Experts in the field will address these issues and answer participants’ questions about their experiences with management of the less common clinical issues. ACGME Competency Patient care LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Explain the processes of spermatogenesis and oogenesis, including recombination and mismatch repair. 2. Discuss the effects of paternal age and anabolic steroid use on male fertility. 3. Outline methods for testicular and epididymal sperm processing. 4. Discuss the differences between testicular sperm and severely oligozoospermic ejaculated sperm on assisted reproduction. 17PP_2012.indd 17 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  18. 18. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM STATE-OF-THE-ART MICROMANIPULATION TECHNIQUES IN THE IVF LAB CME Course PG7 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists FACULTY Thomas G. Turner, Jr., M.S., E.L.D., Chair Texas Fertility Center/Austin IVF Dawn A. Kelk, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. RMA of Connecticut Klaus E. Wiemer, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. Northwest Center for Reproductive Sciences NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Controversies exist concerning the benefit of certain micromanipulation procedures that are performed on embryos of in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients. In addition, qualified, competent lab directors across the country are not always in agreement as to the best way to provide quality patient care. Even when these micromanipulation procedures are performed in excellent labs by experienced embryologists, they are not always performed with the same methods. The outcomes also vary greatly, leading to more controversy about their efficacy. Relatively new techniques like trophectoderm biopsy and blastocyst collapsing prior to vitrification are now being performed. Many of these techniques and procedures have been presented in lecture form, along with some very impressive statistics. However, there remains a group of embryologists who have purchased expensive micromanipulation equipment and feel compelled to attempt to duplicate these techniques in their lab without ever having seen these procedures performed. This can certainly lead to poor quality care for the infertile patient. This course, aimed at physicians and laboratory scientists and technicians, will use videos to demonstrate some of these new techniques, allowing participants to watch and ask questions so that they can duplicate the procedures with more skill. Alternative ways to perform some of these microtechniques will be demonstrated for those embryologists who do not have the benefit of the most costly micro-instruments, allowing them to learn the best way to perform these techniques with other effective but less expensive methods and instrumentation. ACGME Competency Patient care LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Establish the efficacy of assisted hatching (AH) as a micromanipulation technique in their lab, analyze the benefit of a laser in accomplishing the technique, and summarize how to improve their performance of AH without the benefit of a laser. 2. List the alternatives available for opening the zona pellucida and explain the method that works best with the equipment and staff in their own lab. 3. Decide how best to prepare the embryo on day 3 for a safe and effective biopsy of cells on day 5 and list the benefits and limitations of applying this technique. 4. Decide which embryos to vitrify and when, explain the benefits of blastocyst collapsing and list reasons why blastocysts should not be collapsed. 5. Describe a micromanipulation system that could work best in their own lab and discuss whether there are better choices for a particular culture system. DISORDERS OF FEMALE PUBERTAL DEVELOPMENT CME Course PG8 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Special Interest Group FACULTY Jennifer E. Dietrich, M.S., M.Sc., Chair Baylor College of Medicine Samantha M. Pfeifer, M.D. University of Pennsylvania Medical School Elisabeth H. Quint, M.D. University of Michigan Beth W. Rackow, M.D. Columbia University NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION The last few decades have seen physicians across many disciplines caring for more children, adolescents and young women in their childbearing years. Due to changes in population growth, variation in patterns of disease, trauma statistics and effects of the environment, as well as increased prevalence rates of chronic conditions, such as childhood cancer, cystic fibrosis and diabetes mellitus, knowledge of long-term risks is important. Because ovarian function may be altered based on patterns of 18PP_2012.indd 18 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  19. 19. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM events, a broad understanding of pubertal effects is needed. In addition, understanding the long-term ramifications of early puberty in the child versus delayed puberty in the adolescent is important in the care of these patients once matured to adulthood. Finally, with the advent of in vitro fertilization techniques and continued advancements in the field of reproductive medicine, an understanding of pubertal effects spanning generations, is also critical. Aimed at physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals whose practices include pediatric and adolescent girls, this course will focus on issues regarding female puberty. Topics to be addressed include evaluation and treatment of precocious puberty; structural anomalies, hormones and genetics and their relation to delayed puberty; and the management of puberty in the developmentally delayed patient. Interesting cases will also be presented for discussion. ACGME Competency Medical knowledge LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Identify specific risk conditions and situations leading to precocious pubertal development in the female child and genetic tendencies leading to delayed puberty. 2. Identify “normal” precocity, as may frequently be the case in precocious adrenarche, versus pathologic pubertal progression and expected constitutional delay versus pathologic delay. 3. Discuss generational effects of pubertal alteration and pubertal outcomes of children who were products of IVF and reproductive technologies. 4. Describe the evaluation and management of precocious puberty and of delayed puberty. 5. Summarize the unique challenges the provider is faced with in caring for the developmentally delayed patient of pubertal age. One-Day Courses Sunday, October 21ST ULTRASOUND IMAGING IN REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE: A PRACTICAL APPROACH CME Course PG9 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine FACULTY Laurel A. Stadtmauer, M.D., Ph.D., Chair Eastern Virginia Medical School Steven Goldstein, M.D., Co-Chair NYU School of Medicine Elizabeth Puscheck, M.D. Wayne State Medical Center Ilan Tur-Kaspa, M.D. Institute for Human Reproduction NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Ultrasound and ultrasound-guided procedures have become integral components, not just of assisted reproductive technology (ART), but also in the day-to-day practice of reproductive medicine, infertility and gynecology. In 2009, new practice guidelines for ultrasound in reproductive medicine were published by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) and in collaboration with the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.  Surveys of members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the Imaging Special Interest Group and ASRM have revealed a strong desire for CME credits in ultrasonography that would prepare reproductive medicine professionals and gynecologists for accreditation by the AIUM. In addition, there is an interest in training and credentialing reproductive nurses and nurse practitioners to perform limited ultrasounds in the office. The objective of this course is to provide comprehensive survey of the use of ultrasonography in the female pelvis for physicians and other health care providers who use gynecologic sonography.  A practical problem-solving approach will be implemented with case presentations. The faculty will critically review the application of ultrasonography to the infertility evaluation, diagnosis, treatments and complications as a way to maximize ART success. Ultrasound has helped in the early pregnancy evaluation and monitoring as well as in assessing pregnancy complications. Many other gynecologic findings on ultrasound such as congenital uterine anomalies, ovarian masses, tubal disease and other uterine pathologies will be discussed along with their impact on fertility and the decision for surgery. A variety of reproductive problems throughout the reproductive lifespan, from puberty through menopause, will be addressed from an ultrasound perspective. Newer technologies with current or potential applications, such as 3-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound, Doppler, and cost-effective use of CT- and MRI-guided procedures will also be covered. There will be interactive discussion of cases and controversies, and participants will also have the opportunity to learn practical applications and manipulate 3-D images. This course will fulfill CME requirements for AIUM credentialing. 19PP_2012.indd 19 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  20. 20. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM ACGME Competency Patient care LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Summarize the appropriate use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of infertility, uterine abnormalities and the pathology of the reproductive tract. 2. Describe the proper assessment of early pregnancy and list findings on early pregnancy assessments that are associated with poor outcomes. 3. Discuss the importance of 3-D ultrasonography in reproductive medicine, and the importance of Doppler blood flow assessment in reproductive medicine and gynecology. 4. Evaluate patients with pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding and adnexal masses using a practical approach. 5. Evaluate when surgical intervention is needed, when cancer is suspected and when imaging procedures can be performed to treat abnormalities on ultrasound. CODING FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE PRACTICES 2012 CME Course PG10 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Coding Committee FACULTY John T. Queenan Jr., M.D., Chair University of Rochester Medical Center George A. Hill, M.D. Nashville Fertility Center NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Every reproductive medicine practice has a legal and ethical obligation to follow a specific set of rules and regulations that determine how reimbursements are calculated. Failure to follow these rules can result in unfair practices to patients and/ or legal consequences from government or third-party payers. The problem is those rules and regulations have become so complex that most people cannot understand them without receiving special training. This live course, designed for physicians, practice managers, billers, office managers, sonographers, laboratory managers and physician assistants, will include didactic lectures, panel discussions, case presentations, and interactive question and answer sessions. The correct way to report diagnosis codes and select the appropriate procedure code will be explained, with a focus on quality improvement and minimizing errors. Systems-based resources available to aid in improving patient billing accuracy will be addressed, as will information technology resources that provide participants with the ability to continue updating their knowledge of correct coding in the future. Special attention will be given to the upcoming changes in ICD-10. ACGME Competency Systems-based practice LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Demonstrate correct coding of diagnostic conditions that are typically encountered in the practice of reproductive endocrinology. 2. Identify the correct Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code for surgical procedures encountered in the practice of reproductive endocrinology and list additional resources available to aid with correct coding procedures in the future. 3. Summarize the rules and regulations required by third-party payers regarding documentation guidelines to verify that physician services were rendered according to medical necessity and in accordance with the requirements of CPT. 4. Describe the proper steps for successful verification or negotiation of coverage in obtaining third-party payer coverage for fertility services. 20PP_2012.indd 20 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  21. 21. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: PROMISE, PITFALLS AND REALITIES CME Course PG11 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology Special Interest Group FACULTY Gerald P. Schatten, Ph.D., Chair University of Pittsburgh Pasquale Patrizio, M.D. Weill Cornell Medical College Gianpiero Palermo, M.D., Ph.D. Yale University Alan O. Trounson, Ph.D. California Institute for Regenerative Medicine NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Patients throughout the United States and worldwide are seeking innovative treatments involving stem cells from various sources, including reproductive tissues. Physicians and other caregivers are frequently confronted with patients requesting treatments for a diverse set of disorders and diseases. Frequently these patients or their loved ones, with benevolent motives, are encouraged to participate in medical tourism for these alleged “stem cell therapies.” The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and several professional associations are trying to discourage these unapproved and unwarranted therapies, while still maintaining enthusiasm for the development of reliable stem cell research. Against this background, there are emerging changes in the federal and state regulations governing stem cells that directly influence assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics and their practices. Furthermore, the ability to generate gametes from pre-gametes offers the theoretical promise of restoring fertility in survivors of childhood cancer. Finally, significant progress has been made in making gametes of varying quality from stem cells in vitro in model systems. These strategies hold promise for understanding the mechanisms that result in germ cells versus somatic cells, and they also might help in designing novel contraceptives and treating infertility as its root causes. The goal of this course is to help inform physicians, genetic counselors, lawyers, social workers, and laboratory scientists and technicians, about the scientific status of stem cells and regenerative medicine, and also to alert them to the progress being made in the process of safely translating them to use in ART for routine clinical practice. This course will provide up-to- date information regarding the regulatory and ethical considerations of stem cell therapies by arming participants with the knowledge they need to accurately inform and counsel patients seeking these novel treatments. ACGME Competency Medical knowledge LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Evaluate the multicenter efforts to generate de novo gametes from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), including current achievements and limitations. 2. Describe the current treatment options for severe forms of nonobstructive azoospermia and critique the current research focused on replicating the male genome. 3. Evaluate the potential treatment of premature menopause and female sterility. 4. Identify the ethical issues surrounding the use of human embryos for stem cell research and explain the informed consent, provenance and regulatory bodies overseeing human embryonic stem cell research. 5. Discuss some of the ethical issues in both research and clinical practice regarding production of gametes from pluripotent cells.       21PP_2012.indd 21 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  22. 22. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM CONTROVERSIES IN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION CME Course PG12 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the Middle East Fertility Society FACULTY Hassan N. Sallam, M.D., Ph.D., Chair Alexandria University Botros Rizk, M.D., Co-Chair University of South Alabama G. David Adamson, M.D. Fertility Physicians of Northern California David R. Meldrum, M.D. Reproductive Partners Medical Group, Inc. NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Responses to test questions in 2009 and 2010 revealed stark differences among physicians in the selection of the most appropriate gonadotropin stimulation regimen to achieve high live birth rates in assisted reproduction. It was evident that many clinicians do not follow evidence-based protocols for ovarian stimulation in obese patients or patients with endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome or other diseases of the reproductive system. The goal of this course is to teach clinicians, scientists and nurses working in the field of assisted reproduction how to identify patients who are likely to benefit from assisted reproductive technologies, the criteria for selecting a stimulation regimen, and procedures to optimize the chances of achieving live births. Issues related to obesity, endometriosis, ovarian stimulation, embryo transfer, the role of the endometrium and repeated implantation failure will be discussed. ACGME Competency Patient care LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Select the most appropriate regimen for ovarian stimulation that will yield optimal oocytes but not cause ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. 2. Balance the benefits of achieving pregnancy with the risks of complications in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. 3. Treat infertility in patients suffering from obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome, endometriosis and repeated implantation failure. GETTING INTO THE ZONA: A NURSE’S GUIDE TO THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN THE ART LABORATORY CE Course PG13 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the Nurses’ Professional Group FACULTY Elizabeth B. West, R.N.C., B.S.N., Chair Institute for Reproductive Health Laurie D. Black, M.S., C.G.C. Pacific Reproductive Genetic Counseling Mark R. Hughes, M.D., Ph.D. Genesis Genetics Institute Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D. Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School NEEDS ASSESSMENT COURSE DESCRIPTION Assisted reproductive technology (ART) nurses play a pivotal role in educating patients, establishing their expectations, providing emotional support and coordinating communication between patients and the ART team. When patients have questions or concerns, they are most likely to contact a nurse first. The better informed nurses are about ART treatment processes in general, the more effectively they will be able to convey necessary information, allay fears and keep the practices for which they work operating efficiently. This is especially relevant in the context of the ART laboratory. New techniques and technological innovations make ART the vibrant and exciting field that it is, but they can also be daunting for professionals outside the laboratory who do not feel that they understand the work of laboratory professionals well enough to be able to explain it to patients. This course, aimed at nurses in assisted reproduction practices, is intended to demystify the activities in the ART laboratory, highlighting preimplantation genetics and the latest developments in laboratory procedures, particularly measures taken to ensure that transferred embryos are of the highest quality. 22PP_2012.indd 22 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  23. 23. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM ACGME Competency Practice-based learning and improvement LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Discuss state-of-the-art lab laboratory procedures for culturing gametes and embryos and for assessing embryo quality. 2. Summarize current procedures for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). 3. Explain the roles of PGD and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). 4. Describe the role of the genetic counselor as it relates to ART. THE PROCESS OF FERTILIZATION: DIALOGUE BETWEEN GAMETES CME Course PG14 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology FACULTY Kersti Lundin, Ph.D., Chair Sahlgrenska University Hospital M. Cristina Magli, Ph.D. S.I.S.Me.R. Christopher Barratt, Ph.D. University of Dundee John Carroll, B.Sc. University College London NEEDS ASSESSMENT COURSE DESCRIPTION The mechanisms controlling gamete interaction in humans are not yet fully understood, and a great deal of research is dedicated to elucidating the physiology of this process. Following their union, the oocyte and the spermatozoon undergo irreversible changes that promote oocyte activation, nuclear decondensation and fusion of the genetic material, followed by a complex series of events leading to embryo formation and growth. The oocyte, through the factors accumulated during maturation, has a key role in determining embryo development by properly responding to the activating factor released by the fertilizing spermatozoon. According to the latest findings, the next steps of embryogenesis occur in a network of time-dependent processes where the extensive epigenetic marking in sperm that correlates with developmental regulators and a complex but specific population of RNA molecules seem to be necessary for normal embryo development. This course will discuss the most recent knowledge about the progression of these events, giving special emphasis to the continuous dialogue between the two cells. ACGME Competency Medical knowledge LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Describe the main biological features of a cell. 2. Summarize the processes of oogenesis and spermatogenesis. 3. Compare the interaction and contribution of sperm vs. oocyte during the fertilisation process. 4. Apply the knowledge of gamete interaction into ART practice regarding e.g. choice of fertilisation method. 23PP_2012.indd 23 4/10/12 11:42 AM
  24. 24. 45TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM THE CLINICIAN’S ROLE IN CARE FOR THE POSTREPRODUCTIVE WOMAN CME Course PG15 (Sunday) Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility and the Menopause Special Interest Group FACULTY Genevieve Neal-Perry, M.D., Ph.D., Chair Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center James H. Liu, M.D. Case Western Reserve University Lubna Pal, M.B.B.S, M.Sc. Yale University School of Medicine Nanette Santoro, M.D. University of Colorado at Denver NEEDS ASSESSMENT COURSE DESCRIPTION Menopausal and perimenopausal women have specific healthcare issues. These women often have many medical and quality-of-life concerns, and the healthcare professionals who treat them need to have the most complete, up-to-date information in order to offer the appropriate care options for each individual. This course is aimed at healthcare professionals who care for women who are in the postreproductive years of their lives. Hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms will be addressed, as well as sleep disorders and sexual concerns particular to menopausal and perimenopausal women. ACGME Competency Practice-based learning and improvement LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Discuss the pros and cons of hormone replacement therapy for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. 2. Summarize how the onset of menopause can be predicted and describe the natural history of menopausal symptoms. 3. List some of the sexual concerns of menopausal and perimenopausal women and ways in which the healthcare professional can help address these concerns. 4. Accurately diagnose sleep disorders that may present as menopausal symptoms and discuss the appropriate treatment. 5. Summarize the recommendations for bone density testing and list the medications available to treat osteoporosis. EXAMINING THE GENETIC LINK:  WHEN THE DONOR-CONCEIVED, DONORS, GENETIC SIBLINGS AND PARENTS SEARCH FOR AND MEET EACH OTHER CE Course PG16 (Sunday)  Developed in Cooperation with the Mental Health Professional Group FACULTY Jean Benward, M.S., L.C.S.W., Chair Offices of Jean Benward Marilyn A. Crawshaw, B.Sc., Ph.D. University of York Alice H. Ruby, M.P.H., M.P.P.M. The Sperm Bank of California Joanna E. Scheib, Ph.D. University of California NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Participation in gamete donation has thrust a host of complex issues upon those involved: donors, intended parents, the donor-conceived and providers. While research has focused on disclosure and psychosocial outcomes in families formed by gamete donation, less attention has been given to the motivations and experiences of participants, including donors, parents and donor-conceived individuals, who wish to make contact with each other after conception. Mental health professionals have been hampered in their response to participants’ queries by the lack of research data and their own uncertainties about the ethics of contact. The past fifteen years have seen a trend toward more openness in gamete donation, which has included a growing number of programs with open-identity donors. While non-anonymous donation is not the norm in the United States, contact among gamete-donation participants is becoming more common. This includes contact between open-identity donors and their adult offspring, contact among families who share the same donor, unplanned retroactive contact between donor- conceived adults and their formerly anonymous donors, and the use of the Internet for communication among participants. Such varied forms of contact now occur frequently enough that it behooves us to understand the policy and ethical and psychosocial implications of gamete-donation participants seeking contact with each other after conception. This live course will increase participants’ understanding of the varied meanings of genetic links for the donor-conceived, 24PP_2012.indd 24 4/10/12 11:42 AM

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