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American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting
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American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA): 2013 National Winter Meeting

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  • 1. T R AV EL & H OT EL Welcome Newcomers! Waldorf Astoria Hotel Is this your first APsaA meeting? If you are attending for the first time, 301 Park Avenue you can schedule an appointment with a New York, NY 10022 program committee member who can offer 212-355-3000 personal guidance based on your interests. (Main Hotel) A member of the program committee 877-476-8792 will contact you by email or phone to (Reservations go over the program and offer suggestions Use group code APS) on which sessions might be most www.apsa.org/ beneficial and enjoyable to you. 2013NationalMeetingHotel To schedule an appointment, contact meetadmin@apsa.org or 212-752-0450 ext 28.The Waldorf Astoria Hotel is synonymous with theelegance and grandeur of New York City at its best.The landmark hotel is world renowned not only for its rich P l ease n ote :history, but also for its impeccable style and customer Sessions marked with the CEC iconservice. Amenities include beautifully appointed rooms are contingent on final approvalin English country and French provincial styles; a fully from the Continuing Education Committee.equipped fitness center, concierge, multi-lingual staff,three restaurant lounges and exclusive boutiques. CECYou may make your hotel reservations by calling(877) GROUPWA (1-877-476-8792), for the special rate Please check the final program for those sessionsof $255.00 (Deluxe Room)/$275.00 (Superior Room). that are eligible for CE credit.Our group code is APS.Or visit www.apsa.org/2013NationalMeetingHotel S AV E T H E DAT E!to book online. 2013 June Administrative Meeting June 5-9, 2013 Renaissance Washington DC Downtown HotelMeeting attendees will receivea 5% discount off any airfare Washington, DCwhen booking through aa.com.Use promotion code 6213BV. 2014 National Meeting January 14-19, 2014 Waldorf Astoria Hotel Meeting attendees will New York City, NY receive a 10% discounton roundtrip reservations made and paid online. Go toSupershuttle.com and use discount code APSAA. Be sure to register by December 17th to take advantage of the reduced registration fee.Meeting attendees will receivea 10% discount off the bestavailable fare to New York City. To book your reservation Policy regarding animals at the meeting:call Amtrak at 1 (800) 872-7245 and give them Dogs and other pets (except for service animals) are not allowed in meeting rooms and the exhibit areaConvention Fare Code Number X95L-958. during any APsaA National Meeting.On the CoverLincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre complex of buildings on Manhattan’s West Side. Lincoln Center is the world’s leading performing artscenter and home to 11 resident arts organizations that represent the highest standards of excellence in symphony, opera, chamber music, theater, dance,film, and arts education, including The Metropolitan Opera, The New York City Ballet and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra.
  • 2. TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S W ELCO M E TO T H E 2013 N AT I O N A L M EE T I N G Registration & Exhibit Hours . . . . . . . . . 3 A Glossary to the Dear Colleagues: Scientific Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 In a few short months we will gather in New York City for APsaA’s 2013 National Meeting. We hope you will join us for a conference that Daily Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-55 promises to be lively, clinically engaging, and focused on trenchant issues in our professional practice. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Our plenary speakers this January are Rosemary Balsam, M.D., who Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 will speak on “(Re)-Membering the Female Body in Psychoanalysis,” Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 and Warren Procci, M.D. whose address is “Second Century for Psychoanalysis and for APsaA: Their Fates may Differ.” Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Our Meet-the-Author Program features Phillip Bromberg, Ph.D. in a session that will be chaired by Melinda Gellman, Ph.D. and discussed Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 by Christine Kieffer, Ph.D.The University Forum this January will be on Shakespeare’s Othello. Professor Michael Wood, Continuing ProfessionalCharles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Education Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56Princeton University and Robert Brustein, Founder of the Yale Repertory Theater will presentat this session, which will be chaired by Stanley Coen, M.D. Paul Schwaber, Ph.D. will bethe discussant. Meeting Registration Form . . . . . . . . . 58This January we inaugurate a new format called Innovations. Mark Solms, Ph.D. from CapeTown, South Africa will be a guest of the American Psychoanalytic Association. In addition Session Registration Form . . . . . . 59-60to participating in several sessions on neuropsychoanalysis, Dr. Solms will present on anengagement aimed at breaking down the apartheid divide in South Africa by working alongsideof the descendants of slaves on a successful wine estate originally owned by Dr. Solms’ family.I look forward to chairing this session.Our symposia offering include the Presidential Symposium on “The Twilight of the TrainingAnalyst System (with Otto Kernberg, M.D. & Robert Pyles, M.D.) and a Research Symposium S O C I A L E V EN TSon “Long-term Outcomes of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Personality Disorders” (with AllanAbbass, M.D., John F. Clarkin, Ph.D., Benedicte Lowyck, Ph.D., Patrick Luyten, Ph.D.). APsaA’s T H U R S DAY, J A N U A RY 17, 2 013Research Seminar takes up “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Culture and Emotion” (withCharles Amrhein, Psy.D, Alicia J. Christoff, Ph.D, Anna Fishzon, Ph.D. and Hsuan-Ying Huang, M.D.) 7:45 a.m.-8:15 a.m.APsaA is again pleased to host six Two-Day Clinical Workshops during which distinguished Breakfast Gathering for Candidate Membersdiscussants discuss detailed clinical material shared by a presenter. Over the two days, there is (see page 21)ample time for attendees to become part of the conversation themselves in this very interactiveformat. This January we welcome the following discussants and presenters: 7:45 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Jorge Canestri, M.D. and Judith Felton, C.S.W. Breakfast Gathering for Current & Former (Two Day Clinical Workshop #1, chaired by Irene Cairo, M.D.) Fellows and Mentors (see page 22) Adrienne Harris, P.h.D. and Abby Wolfson, Ph.D. (Two Day Clinical Workshop #2, chaired by Nancy J. Chodorow, Ph.D.) 12:30 p.m. Candidate Dutch Treat Lunch (see page 28) Antonino Ferro, M.D. (Two Day Clinical Workshop #3 chaired by Sharon Zalusky Blum, Ph.D.) Larry Sandberg, M.D., Beatrice Beebe, Ph.D., and Suzi Tortora, Ed.D, BC-DMT 8:00 p.m. (Two Day Clinical Workshop #4, chaired by Larry Sandberg M.D.) Candidates’ Council Annual Winter Bash Larry Brown, Ph.D. and Henry Schwartz, M.D. (see page 42) (Two Day Clinical Workshop #5 chaired by Richard B. Zimmer, M.D.) Alessandra Lemma, DClin Psych. and Gabriel Ruiz, M.A. F R I DAY, J A N U A RY 18, 2 013 (Child and Adolescent Two Day Clinical Workshop, chaired by Christine Kieffer, Ph.D.)Finally, our half-day Panels engage a rich array of clinical topics for those working with adults, 8:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m.adolescents, and children: Coffee Hour Sponsored by Silence, Now (chaired by Melinda Gellman, Ph.D. with Salman Akhtar, M.D., Ronald Britton, Mary S. Sigourney Award Trust (see page 42) M.D., Jody Davies, Ph.D. and Virginia Ungar, M.D. as presenters) 6:45 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Safety for the Analysand, Safety for the Analyst, Safety for the Dyad (chaired by Joseph Lichtenberg, M.D. with James Hansell Ph.D., Evelyne Schwaber, M.D., Estelle Shane, Dutch Treat Cocktail Party (see page 48) Ph.D. and Arietta Slade, Ph.D. as presenters) 6:45 p.m. Transference in Child and Adult Analysis: Current Views (chaired by Thomas F. Bartlett, Cocktail Party for Fellowship Program Ph.D. with Charles E. Parks, Ph.D., Anita G. Schmukler, D.O., and Stephen Seligman, D.M.H. Alumni and Current Fellows (see page 48) as presenters and Ruth K. Karush, M.D., as discussant) Learning from Ourselves (chaired by Theodore Jacobs, M.D. with Richard Almond, M.D., Judy Kantrowitz, Ph.D. and Shelley Orgel, M.D. as presenters, and Warren Poland, M.D. S AT U R DAY, J A N U A RY 19, 2 013 as discussant) Mourning, Identity, Creativity (chaired by Adele Tutter, M.D., Ph.D. and Otto F. Kernberg, 7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. M.D., Anna Ornstein, M.D. and Leon Wurmser, M.D. as presenters, and Jeanine M. Vivona, COCAA/COCAP Breakfast for All Interested Ph.D. as discussant.) in Work with Children and AdolescentsWe also have scientific paper and research poster sessions, discussion groups, and special (see page 49)programs for trainees in psychology, psychiatry, and social work. 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.Join us in New York to reflect, renew, and recharge. We’re eager to have you! Student and Alumni PsychotherapyKimberlyn Leary, Ph.D., MPA Program Cocktail Party (see page 55)Chair, Program Committee 1
  • 3. 2013 National Meeting Dine-Around New York City restaurants set their tables for APsaA attendeesWondering what to do for dinner after conference hours? If you want to enjoy a relaxed evening of dinner and conversationwith fellow conference attendees, the Dine-Around Committee has you covered! The committee members have selected someof their favorite restaurants and will take care of reservations, all you have to do is sign up for a memorable meal with friendsand soon-to-be-friends. The Dine-Around is scheduled for Tuesday, January 15 at 7:00 p.m.A Dine-Around is a casual dining experience with fellow APsaA attendees who want to enjoy a nice meal and interestingconversation. A host will coordinate the details of the evening, including restaurant selection and reservations.Dine-Around attendees are responsible for the cost of their meal, drinks, and associated tip.The Dine-Around is one more way that APsaA conferenceattendees can make the most of the conference and connectwith colleagues.There are five Dine-Around options for Tuesday, January 15 Dine-Around #1 #1 Shun Lee Palace — 155 East 55th Streetat 7:00 p.m. (55th between Lexington and 3rd Avenue)To join a Dine-Around, you must pre-register (as though you Prices range: $13 to $38were pre-registering for a session). The host decides on the Group size: 10 peoplenumber of participants; once that maximum has been reached, Host: Carol Reichenthal, Ph.D.the group will close. Please note, there will be no on-site Chinese food is always fun to share and Shun Lee’s is a NY Magazine’sregistration for the Dine-Around. “Critics’ Pick.” Please join us for good food and conversation! Carol Reichenthal is Co-Chair of APsaA’s Psychotherapy Department and welcomes conversation about what we do, how we can better serve your interests, how we support psychoanalysts and psychotherapists in #2 APsaA, A Psa A, and how we reach out beyond the A ssociation. , reach out beyo y ssociation. Dine-Around #2 Má Pêche — 15 West 56th Street (56th between 5th and 6th Avenue) Price range: $22 to $36 Group size: 12 people #3 Host: Brenda Bauer, Psy.D. Dine-Around #3 Má Pêche awaits us, as does a mini-lecture on 1930s New York Matisse — 924 2nd Avenue architecture! Please join us for a French-Vietnamese feast at Má Pêche (49th Street between 2nd and 1st Avenue) in sparkling Midtown Manhattan. Professor Jason Montgomery will Price range: $16-$32 school us on a period in New York architecture that brought us two of Group size: 10 people the most iconic structures, the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings, Host: Dhipthi Mulligan, M.D. as well as our “own” Waldorf=Astoria. Please join us! Matisse is a small French restaurant with a warm and friendly Brenda auer Brenda Bauer is a Senior Candidate at NYUPI/ IPE, New York. Senior andidate UPI/ E, ew ork. / , atmosphere. This promises to be a cozy way to get to know other participants. Dr. Mulligan is a fourth year psychiatry resident at Duke University with a horrible French accent, which should make this an all the more #4 a v nturous dining perience adventurous dining experience. g #5 Dine-Around #4 FRESCO by Scotto — 34 East 52nd Street (52nd Street between Madison and Park Avenues) Price range: $13-$32+ Group size: 5-8 people Dine-Around #5 Host: Cathy Beaton, M.S., NCPsyA The Four Seasons — 99 East 52nd Street (52nd Street between Park and Lexington Avenues) Please join us for warm conversation and welcoming Italian cuisine at our dinner destination. Marion Scotto and family offer generous Price range: $50+ portions of delicious, seasonally prepared fish, chicken, veal, beef and Group size: 5 people homemade pasta dishes (with gluten-free and vegetarian options). Host: Nathan Szajnberg, M.D. Cathy Beaton is a certified diplomate of sex therapy and licensed The Four Seasons is paneled in pear-wood with matching grain; its psychoanalyst in private practice on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. decor changes with each season. There are two dining areas: the grill A former clinical associate of Dr. Helen Singer Kaplan, she specializes room (and bar) and via a passageway, the pool room. in working with couples and individuals on relationship issues and Nathan Szajnberg is in private practice in Manhattan and a member s xual y f nction. sexual dysfunction. of the A PM /Columbia and NYPSI. f PM/Columbia and NYPSI. / 2
  • 4. R E G I S T R AT I O N & E X H I B I T SRegistration will be located in the Silver Corridor. Thursday, January 17Exhibits will be located in the Astor Salon. Registration & Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Evening Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:30 p.m.-7:15 p.m.Tuesday, January 15Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Friday, January 18 Registration & Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:00 a.m.-5:15 p.m.Wednesday, January 16Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday, January 19Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Registration & Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.Evening Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:30 p.m.-7:15 p.m. Sunday, January 20 Registration & Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Psychoanalysts are known for their sensitivity to the suffering, conflicts, and inhibitions of their patients. What is less well known is that many are also sensitive and talented artists. APsaA is happy to provide a forum for that expression and an opportunity for sharing those visions and talents with others. Contact Jon Meyer (jkmeyermd@comcast.net) for details about exhibiting your work including photography, painting, small sculptures and jewelry. Members’ Photography and Art Friday, January 18, 2013 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. APsaA’s Education Department is pleased to present Student/Resident Day SATURDAY, JANUARY 19th 9:30 AM – 5:00 PM (Lunch provided)This event is open and free to all graduate students in mental health disciplines and all medical students & residents. LOCATION: New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute, 247 E 82nd Street (Between 2nd & 3rd Avenues) Students/residents will participate in interactive lectures, psychoanalytic case presentations, and group discussions. To attend, please email the following information to Lisa Madsen at lisa.madsen@gmail.com 1. Name: 2. Email: 3. Graduate/Medical School: 4. Degree Sought/Field of Study: 5. Paragraph Explaining Why You Would Like to Attend: For more information visit: www.apsa.org/studentresidentday 3
  • 5. A G LOS SA RY TO T H E S O N LY T H ES E S ES S I O N S A R E EL I G I B L E FO R CO NCommittee Sponsored Workshops Oral History WorkshopVarious days and times Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.Sponsored by a standing committee of the American Explores the history of psychoanalysis throughPsychoanalytic Association, these workshops emphasize presentations by analysts and related professionals.the exchange of ideas and the demonstration andapplication of techniques based on the mission The Committee on Research and Special Trainingstatement of the committee. (CORST) Essay Prize Winner in Psychoanalysis and CulturePPRS Research Forum Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noonVarious days and times Features a presentation by the winner of the CORSTThe Psychodynamic Psychoanalytic Research Society Essay Prize in Psychoanalysis and Culture, which is(PPRS) is an independent research organization affiliated awarded for an essay on psychoanalytically informedwith APsaA. The forum provides a venue for researchers research in the biobehavioral sciences, social sciences,to discuss their work with each other and with clinician arts or humanities.colleagues. The forum focuses on advances in systematicresearch in the framework of psychoanalysis and Candidates’ Forumpsychodynamic science. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Devoted to the demonstration and exploration of innovativeDiscussion Groups techniques in psychoanalytic education.Wednesday & Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Scientific Paper Prize for Psychoanalytic Research. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.Permits a small number of participants to discuss a topic The Scientific Paper Prize is awarded annually for theof mutual interest. Discussion groups meet regularly at conceptual and empirical research paper representing thebi-annual meetings. This continuity offers the opportunity most outstanding contribution to psychoanalysis. Authorsto build collaborations with colleagues nationally and of the winning paper will describe practical lessons of theirinternationally. New participants are welcome to each group. research for the practice of psychoanalysis and implications for theory and technique.Senior Analyst Presentation ProgramWednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon Clinical Conferences for Residents, Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. and Social Work Trainees, and Students,A senior analyst presents process material illustrating Presented by APsaA Fellowshis/her own analytic work. Registration for the Senior Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m.Analyst Presentation is limited to candidate members and Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday & Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.students. Space is limited so pre-registration is required. Four sessions directed to psychiatric residents, psychology and social work students but open to all registrants. TheTwo-Day Clinical Workshops format is a lecture on a particular topic by the designatedWednesday & Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. faculty member, followed by a case presentation by aDemonstrates and explores the specific manner in which a participant in the APsaA Fellowship Program.distinguished psychoanalyst listens to clinical material andconceptualizes process and technique. Artist/Scholar-in-ResidencePre-Registration is required. Seats are limited. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.Research Seminar This program, sponsored by the Education Department,Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. will bring an educator/scholar to the meeting to conductFellows of the American Psychoanalytic Association briefly a series of seminars and other exercises for analysts.present their current research studies in psychoanalyticpsychotherapy, psychoanalysis, and applied psychoanalysis. 4
  • 6. S C I EN T I FI C PRO G R A MN T I N U I N G PRO FES S I O N A L ED U C AT I O N C R ED I T Two-Session Film Workshop Scientific Papers Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Films that are related thematically through their Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. psychoanalytic relevance are shown and interpreted by formal discussants and the audience. Selected by a juried review process, papers are presented by the author and considered by a formal discussant. Ample time is allotted for the audience to respond. Plenary Address Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:45 a.m.-11:15 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. Psychoanalysis and Health Care Reform Major addresses by outstanding psychoanalysts Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. or other professionals. Focuses on crucial health legislation and how it will directly affect your practice. Note: This program is intended to satisfy the requirements of those states that require CME Candidates’ Council Scientific Paper Prize/ credits in the area of risk management or medical ethics Candidates’ Writing Workshop for medical license renewal, but the final judgment for such Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. qualification is made by each state medical board. The Candidates’ Council Scientific Paper Prize is awarded annually to the best paper by a candidate on a topic of psychoanalytic interest. The Writing Workshop will explore University Forum how to write a successful paper. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Psychoanalysts will engage with academic presenters for a dialogue across disciplines. Ethics Course Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. This session is sponsored by Frenkel and Company, Inc. Discussion with the Committee and Chartis Insurance and is only open to members and on Scientific Activities candidates. Note: This program is intended to satisfy the Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. requirements of those states that require CME credits in Interested participants discuss the use of personal the area of risk management or medical ethics for medical computers for psychoanalytic studies. license renewal, but the final judgment for such qualification is made by each state medical board. Coffee with a Distinguished Analyst Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Symposia A distinguished analyst is invited to meet with participants Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. and candidates to discuss topics that are relevant to Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. psychoanalytic training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. This format explores the interface between psychoanalysis, society and related disciplines. Many attempt to Innovations Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. demonstrate how psychoanalytic thinking can be Innovations is an occasional program event that is focused applied to non-psychoanalytic settings. on the development and implementation of new value for psychoanalysis that meets new needs or traditional needs Panels in new ways. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Meet-the-Author Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Panels bring together nationally recognized psychoanalysts The author of a recent book of psychoanalytic interest to present papers on clinical and theoretical topics. discusses the work with other colleagues in panel format. Active interchange between panelists and the audience is encouraged. 5
  • 7. DA I LY S C H ED U L E T U E S DAY, JA N UA RY 15, 2 013 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Administrative Meeting: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Board on Professional Standards Administrative Meeting: Reference Committee This special meeting of the Board on Professional At the June 2012 meeting of the Board on Professional Standards has been called by the chair and secretary Standards a reference committee was appointed of BOPS. This meeting is for BOPS fellows and chairs to review the Pyles Perlman Procci proposal for of BOPS committees only. The agenda for this meeting consistencies and inconsistencies with internal will include: a discussion with the BOPS fellows obligations (APsaA bylaws and educational standards) regarding their institute’s thoughts about the resolution and external commitments (IPA and APCE, Inc.). In late on educational policy concerning credentials for training September the product of the work of this committee analyst appointment passed by the Executive Council at was posted on the APsaA website for comment. Each the June 2012 APsaA meeting, a report from the BOPS point made in the PPP proposal will be discussed reference committee regarding its findings, an update separately in terms of its consistency or inconsistency on the Psychoanalytic Development Project, as well with other APsaA documents and obligations. This as topics to be determined as a result of the BOPS session is scheduled to provide APsaA members with Listserv discussions. further opportunity for public comment. 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Committee Sponsored Workshop 2: Directors Administrative Meeting: of Institutes and Education CommitteeT U E S DAY Association of Administrators Meeting Chairs Workshop: The Future of the Board This meeting is open to administrators of APsaA’s on Professional Standards CEC accredited training institutes, centers and affiliated Chairs: Elizabeth Brett, Ph.D. (Woodbridge, CT) societies and study groups. Daniel H. Jacobs, M.D. (Brookline, MA) The resolution on educational policy concerning 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon credentials for training analyst appointment passed in Committee Sponsored Workshop 1: COCAA the Executive Council at the June 2012 APsaA meeting Workshop: Child Analysis and the Interpretation will be discussed. The BOPS Reference Committee of Dreams CEC was appointed to study some of the different proposals Co-chairs: Ruth K. Karush, M.D. (New York, NY) for the future and will report. Institutes will discuss the Charles E. Parks, Ph.D. (Bethesda, MD) possible future directions for BOPS. This workshop will continue the discussion of the After attending this session, participants should be technique of working with dreams in child analysis that able to: 1) Describe different proposals for education had begun last January (it is not necessary to have and training; 2) Recognize the changes they require for attended that session). Clinical vignettes from the analyses implementation. of several children will be presented to demonstrate ways of engaging children in trying to make sense of 7:00 p.m. their dreams. The clinical material will also demonstrate 2013 National Meeting Dine-Around how useful the analyst’s understanding of a child’s A Dine-Around is a casual dining experience with dream may be in elucidating the child’s unconscious fellow APsaA attendees who want to enjoy a nice meal conflicts and interpreting these conflicts in a constructive and interesting conversation. A host will coordinate the manner. Some children become quite adept at dream details of the evening, including restaurant selection and interpretation and may continue to utilize these skills reservations. Dine-Around attendees are responsible even after termination. Some children will work on one for the cost of their meal, drinks, and associated tip. dream over several sessions. See page 2 for details. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify ways of engaging children and adolescents in working with dreams; 2) Describe the benefits of dream interpretation in analytic work with children. 6 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 8. DA I LY S C H ED U L E the “negative therapeutic reaction” will be studied withW E D N E S DAY, JA N UA RY 16, 2 013 the help of an in-depth case presentation.8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify the phenomena of the archaic superego,Administrative Meeting: especially in form of the “negative therapeutic raction,”Board on Professional Standards and how to deal with them with as little judgment asAPsaA’s Board on Professional Standards (BOPS) is possible; 2) Recognize the patients’ tendency to provokeresponsible for establishing and maintaining standards punishment and elicit humiliation.for psychoanalytic education and clinical training inAPsaA-approved psychoanalytic training institutes. Discussion Group 2: Writing and InterviewingBOPS consists of two representatives from each for Certification CEC CNDapproved or provisionally approved training institute and Chair &one representative from each approved or provisionally Presenter: David Turner, M.D. (Portland, OR)approved new training facility for the teaching ofpsychoanalysis recognized by this association. Members of the Certification Examination Committee (CEC) and participants will discuss a written caseThe Board on Professional Standards meeting is open together. Participants will observe how the CECto any member of the association except when there functions and will also participate as committeeis a need for BOPS to be in executive session. members in discussing the case. Participants are W E D N E S DAY encouraged to ask the CEC members whatever9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. questions they might have about case write-ups,Professional Development Workshop 1: the interviews, and the workings of the committee.Guidelines for Engaging with the Media SOC After attending this session, participants should beChair: William H. Braun, Psy.D (New York, NY) able to: 1) Recognize better ways to write up casesCo-chairs: Lynn V. Friedman, Ph.D. (Washington, DC) to submit to the Certification Examination Committee Gail Saltz, M.D. (New York, NY) (CEC); 2) Distinguish and describe the interviewPresenters: Gail Saltz, M.D. (New York, NY) process and the functioning of the CEC. Geralyn Lederman, Ph.D. (New York, NY)Mental health professionals are sought after by members Discussion Group 3: Presentingof the media seeking background information or quotes Clinical Material While Maintainingfor their stories. Engaging with the media offers analysts Confidentiality CEC CND PSYTthe opportunity to lend a news story a psychoanalytic Chair: Kevin V. Kelly, M.D. (New York, NY)perspective, leading to a greater understanding of Presenters: Judy L. Kantrowitz, Ph.D. (Brookline, MA)psychoanalysis among members of the public. This Richard M. Gottlieb, M.D. (New York, NY)workshop will address how to give an interview for Robert Michels, M.D. (New York, NY)print, television and radio, what to keep in mind when “Disguise” refers to the practice of altering details whichspeaking to reporters and tips for staying on message. the author considers inessential. The discussion will beginWe will also discuss writing successful opinion pieces with the presenters’ responses to a series of questionsand letters-to-the-editor. from the Committee on Confidentiality, including: What criteria determine which details may be altered? Are thereDiscussion Group 1: The Role of the differences between oral and written presentations?“Archaic Superego” in Individual and Between disguising and withholding details? Does disguiseCultural Pathology CEC SOC require that the patient cannot recognize him/herself?Chair & Is the practice of using details from several patients toPresenter: Leon Wurmser, M.D. (Towson, MD) produce an unrecognizable composite acceptable?Co-chair & How should the obligation to protect confidentiality bePresenter: Heidrun Jarass, Dr.med* apportioned among authors, editors, and sponsoring (Regensberg, Germany) organizations? A vigorous discussion will follow.There will be a continued in-depth study of the After attending this session, participants should betotalitarian, implacable, often sexualized nature of the able to: 1) Describe the tension between scientific andarchaic superego, its relationship with severe childhood ethical imperatives that surrounds the issue of disguise;traumatization and family pathology, as well as its 2) Apply the criteria used to decide which detailsconnections with history. Its importance in dealing with www.apsa.org 7
  • 9. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. (continued) in a clinical presentation can be altered or withheld Discussion Group 6: Buddhism and to protect confidentiality. Psychoanalysis CEC Chair: Edward T. Kenny, M.D. (New York, NY) Discussion Group 4: Separation-Individuation Presenter: Joseph Loizzo, M.D., Ph.D.* Revisited: Integrating Observations from (New York, NY) the Mahler Nursery with Contemporary Note: This program is intended to satisfy the Attachment Methodology CEC PSYT requirements of those states that require CE credits Chair & in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, Presenter: Wendy Olesker, Ph.D. (New York, NY) but the final judgment for such qualification is made Presenter: Inga Blom, Ph.D. (Brooklyn, NY) by each state’s board. Discussants: Anni Bergman, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Miriam Steele, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Interest in Buddhist meditation and psychology steadily has risen among analysts, therapists and This discussion group will present research that has patients in recent years. A presentation by Joseph operationalized the developmental trajectories of children Loizzo, M.D., Ph.D. will aim to view that groundswell studied in the Margaret Mahler’s Masters Children’s in historic perspective, from the standpoints of Center program during toddlerhood, who were then both modern scientific psychology and Buddhism. interviewed and evaluated later as adults using the Dr. Loizzo will comment on the growing dialogue Adult Attachment Interview. The data provides a unique between psychoanalysis and Buddhism, drawing onW E D N E S DAY opportunity to study the central constructs of Mahler’s the tradition of Buddhist teaching and contemplative work and their relation to more contemporary theories, healing developed at Nalanda University in ancient with a special focus on long-term issues of continuity and India and preserved in Tibet. After surveying pitfalls in discontinuity in development. Clinical material from one current East-West dialogue, he will discuss how a more of the research subjects as an adult will be presented. comprehensive dialogue between psychoanalysis and After attending this session, participants should Buddhism may help enrich both traditions. be able to: 1) Identify Margaret Mahler’s studies After attending this session, participants should be able of separation-individuation as well as other theories to: 1) Differentiate and describe differences between the of child development, particularly those concerning Tibetan tradition and other Buddhist traditions; 2) Define modes of attachment; 2) Formulate bridges between major points of agreement and differences between Mahler’s studies and those of more contemporary psychoanalysis and the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. investigations, thus integrating multiple psychoanalytic theories of childhood development. Discussion Group 7: Modern Ego Psychology CEC PSYT Discussion Group 5: The Analysis Chair: Eric R. Marcus, M.D. (New York, NY) of Masturbatory Fantasies CEC Co-chairs: Denise C.K. Fort, Ph.D. (Washington, DC) This discussion group discusses the various aspects Christopher J. Keats, M.D. of modern ego psychology and seeks to understand (Chevy Chase, MD) how various approaches and theories fit together in the Presenter: Robin Gomolin, Psya.D. integrated individual ego. Dynamic processes and their (Chestnut Hill, MA) development as they organize symbolic representations and their affect-contents are discussed at all levels, This discussion group explores how masturbatory from drives, defenses and agencies, to object relations, fantasies can be analyzed to promote a deeper to self-organizations. understanding of the patient’s character structure, self and object matrix and response to trauma. The unifying After attending this session, participants should be able function of body ego is examined. Special consideration to: 1) Describe the modern ego psychology approach; is given to how this material emerges and is expressed 2) Identify ego psychology in the clinical situation. in the transference. Discussion Group 8: Forgotten Analysts and After attending this session, participants should be Their Legacy CEC able to: 1) Describe and critically evaluate historic and Co-chairs: Joseph Reppen, Ph.D. (New York, NY) contemporary theories about the construction, structure Henry Zvi Lothane, M.D. (New York, NY) and function of masturbatory fantasies; 2) Identify and Presenter: Arnold Wilson, Ph.D. (New York, NY) apply technical strategies which promote the elaboration and exploration of masturbatory fantasies. 8 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 10. DA I LY S C H ED U L E9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. (continued)This seventh presentation will examine John Gedo’s “Being and Nothingness,” Part One, Chapter Two: “Badconceptual contributions to clinical psychoanalysis. Faith” and Part Four, Chapter Two, Section I: “ExistentialHis early ideas of “models of the mind” presaged later Psychoanalysis”). Critics to be discussed in futurethoughts on the analysis of difficult patients. His later sessions will include Michel Foucault, Martin Heidegger,hierarchical schema continued this line of investigation, Julia Kristeva, Claude Levi-Straus, Ludwig Wittgenstein,and constituted an effort to bring psychoanalysis into and perhaps Adolf Grunbaum.other strands of scientific investigation, such as cognitive After attending this session, participants should be abledevelopment and neuroscience. Throughout his to: 1) Analyze the structure of criticism of psychoanalysisengagement with disciplines external (but not unfriendly) and develop the capacity to respond thoughtfully;to psychoanalysis, his emphasis was upon clinical 2) Apply a close reading of all the relevant texts.issues, such as analyzability, non-interpretive elementsand their relationship to what is mutative and other Discussion Group 11: Mind and Literature:technical considerations. The Talking Cure in Chekhov’s ShortAfter attending this session, participants should be Story Trilogy CEC PSYTable to: 1) Recognize the creative mind of John Gedo; Co-chairs &2) Describe the “models of the mind” and efforts to bring Discussants: Silvia M.V. Bell, Ph.D. (Baltimore, MD)psychoanalysis into engagement with other disciplines. Jean McGarry, M.A.* (Baltimore, MD) Much as the analyst, relying on a theoretical W E D N E S DAYDiscussion Group 9: Psychoanalysis and perspective, reads a deeper structure in the patient’sCouple Therapy CEC communications, the student of literature focuses onCo-chairs: Graciela E. Abelin-Sas, M.D. formal and thematic aspects to understand the power (New York, NY) of a literary work. The purpose of this discussion group Peter Mezan, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) is to bring the expertise of a creative writer and anThis discussion group centers on three overlapping analyst to the study of literary works as reflections ofareas of great current interest: 1) the application of psychological activity that are intrinsic to communicationpsychoanalytic principles to the treatment of couples; and psychic change. Participants should read Chekhov’s2) the distinction between the unconscious organization short story trilogy: “Man in a Case,” “Gooseberries,”of the individual and the unconscious organization and “About Love,” the three works around which theof the couple; and 3) the synergy in the increasingly discussion is centered.common dual treatment situation between individual After attending this session, participants should be ablepsychoanalysis and psychoanalytic couple therapy. to: 1) Describe the narrative from the perspective of theAfter attending this session, participants should be creative writer; 2) Recognize elements in the literaryable to: 1) Demonstrate the power of psychoanalytic work that elucidate mental processes central to theprinciples in understanding and interpreting the therapeutic endeavor.unconscious structure and dynamics of a couple;2) Evaluate the mutually synergizing effects between Discussion Group 12: Schizoid Modesconcurrent individual and couple treatments. in Narcissistic and Borderline States: Levels of Disturbance in the Capacity to Discussion Group 10: Symbolize and Establishing a Space–Time The Critics of Psychoanalysis: Continuum CECJean-Paul Sartre CEC PSYT Co-chairs: Susan Finkelstein, LCSW (New York, NY)Co-chairs: Jonathan Lear, Ph.D. (Chicago, IL) Nasir Ilahi, L.L.M. (Riverside, CT) Alfred Margulies, M.D. (Auburndale, MA) Presenter: Grace Conroy, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)This session will take a careful look at a significant Schizoid modes and mechanisms can be foundcritic of psychoanalysis, think through what the in a broad spectrum of patients. In British objectcriticisms amount to as well as how one might respond relations theory, Klein incorporated Fairbairn’s ideasthoughtfully. The focus will be on one thinker at each of schizoid defenses in her concepts of the paranoidsession and require that participants come to the schizoid position and projective identification. Reydiscussion group having read assigned reading. The first emphasized the unconsciously concrete ways in whichsession (January, 2013) will discuss Sartre’s criticism borderline patients experience mental space and theirof Freud as well as his own positive conception of claustro–agoraphobic encapsulation, hindering true“existential psychoanalysis.” (Please read, J.-P. Sartre, symbolization, including possibly disturbances in the www.apsa.org 9
  • 11. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. (continued) space–time continuum, in sense of self identity and their After attending this session, participants should be body ego. Clinical material will illustrate aspects of these able to: 1) Describe the issues involved in creating phenomena and types of factors involved if unconscious and maintaining a psychotherapy program within their anxieties associated with paralyzed affectivity are to be institute; 2) Identify other programs around the country worked through. that can serve as models and provide resources. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Recognize the nature of schizoid mechanisms 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. and their links with neurotic, narcissistic and borderline Committee Sponsored Workshop 4: The Business functioning; 2) Develop skills to recognize transference of Practice Workshop: How We Think About the and counter transference manifestations and a capacity Fee in the Clinical Hour CEC PSYT to think about interpretative approaches in working with Chair: Carol Reichenthal, Ph.D. (Cambridge, MA) narcissistic and borderline patients. Co-chair: Judith F. Logue, Ph.D.* (Princeton, NJ) Presenter: Barbara Stimmel, Ph.D. (New York, NY) 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon The Psychotherapist Associates Committee’s Business Senior Analyst Presentation (Part 1) CEC CND of Practice Workshop focuses on practice growth, Chair: Ethan M. Grumbach, Ph.D. practice management, financial issues and career (Los Angeles, CA) choices. Presenter, Barbara Stimmel, Ph.D., is a Presenter: Lynne Zeavin, Psy.D. (New York, NY) psychoanalyst in private practice; Past-President,W E D N E S DAY Training Analyst and Faculty Member at the New York Please Note: This program is open to candidate Freudian Society; Training Analyst, IPA; and Assistant members and students only. Your registration for this Professor, (Dept. Psychiatry) Mt. Sinai School of session is subject to the approval of the session chair. Medicine. The focus of this session will be on setting, Space is limited so please pre-register. This is a understanding, and confronting the complicated and two-part session. Because of limited space, we ask all complex layers of meaning of the fee, for both patient participants in this program to register for both parts. and therapist. The group will consider ways in which Part 2 takes place 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. the fee, and money in general, affect the dynamic of the Participants in this session will be able to demonstrate therapeutic relationship and contribute to the success, an understanding of specific techniques utilized by a and sometimes failure, of the treatment. This workshop senior analyst during the presentation. The format of the welcomes psychotherapists and psychoanalysts at all program will provide a discussion of an analytic week stages of their professional lives. of clinical case material presented with great detail. After attending this session, participants should be After attending this session, participants should be able able to: 1) Identify ways in which the fee can affect the to: 1) Describe the various ways of listening to material; dynamic of the therapeutic relationship; 2) Apply new 2) Identify the theoretical concepts that may influence ways of thinking about the fee to the successes and their capacity to understand the analytic process. failures in treatment. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Service Members and Veterans Initiative: Open Forum on Next Steps PSYT SOC Committee Sponsored Workshop 3: Workshop Chair: Harold Kudler, M.D. (Chapel Hill, NC) on Psychotherapy Training CEC Presenter: Carol Tanenbaum, Ph.D.* Chairs: Marcia J. Kaplan, M.D. (Cincinnati, OH) (Sherman Oaks, CA) Sally Rosenberg, D.O. Discussants: Russell Carr, M.D.* (Gaithersburg, MD) (West Bloomfield, MI) Nathan Szajnberg, M.D. (New York, NY) This workshop is designed to provide faculty from Prudence Gourguechon, M.D. APsaA and non-APsaA psychoanalytic institutes a (Chicago, IL) forum for discussion about creating, maintaining and As the Service Member and Veterans Initiative seeks recruiting students for psychoanalytic psychotherapy to guide the American Psychoanalytic Association’s programs. The workshop allows an opportunity to meet efforts to elucidate and alleviate the psychological and exchange ideas with those around the country who trauma of war, it looks to lessons from The Soldier’s are involved in psychotherapy training programs within Project, a non-profit organization of mental health institutes. One program’s progress will be highlighted professionals which, since 2004, has provided free at the workshop and attendees are encouraged to bring psychoanalytically-informed services to those who have questions, problems and suggestions for discussion. 10 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 12. DA I LY S C H ED U L E12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. (continued)served in Iraq and/or Afghanistan, their families and their combine psychoanalytic hospitalist work with privateloved ones. Dr. Carol Tanenbaum will share insights and psychoanalytic/psychodynamic practice. These dualpractical knowledge gleaned as a founding member training and practice tracks provided an interestingof The Soldiers Project, followed by discussion by Drs. contrast and led to the creation of this discussionCarr, Szajnberg and Gourguechon and open forum group. There are two modes of theorizing comingamong participants. from these different backgrounds; one (much more explored) focusing on the therapeutic dyad and anotherCommittee Sponsored Workshop 5: COPE (less explored) approach — emphasizing the patient’sWorkshop for Child/Adolescent Supervisors dynamics within the context of a family group, andand Associate Child/Adolescent Supervisors: therapeutic milieu. Both traditions can enrich andWorking with Common Learning Problems enhance one another.of the Supervisee CEC After attending this session, participants should beChair: Paula G. Atkeson, Ph.D. (Washington, DC) able to: 1) Recognize regressions of individuals in theCo-chair: Anita G. Schmukler, D.O. context of dyads or families as an aspect of pathology; (Wynnewood, PA) 2) Formulate therapeutic interventions with this largerThis workshop is open to child/adolescent supervisors frame in mind.and associate child supervisors. Issues will be exploredthat arise during the supervision of candidates and Discussion Group 14: Facing the Facts: W E D N E S DAYaffiliated professionals who are treating child and Self-disclosure and the Analyticadolescent patients. Discussion will focus on the Relationship CEC PSYTsupervision of clinical and technical issues which are Chair: Stephanie Brody, Psy.D. (Lexington, MA)unique to child and adolescent psychoanalysis and Presenter: Susan Pasternak, D.M.H. (New York, NY)psychotherapy. Special attention will be given to ethical None of us will escape the experience of personal loss,matters that arise in treating children and adolescents illness, aging, or mortality. Yet we have, as analysts,and in work with parents. Supervisory sessions will spent little time addressing this topic within a publicbe presented to provide clinical material for discussion. arena. This discussion group will focus on the intrusionThe discussion will be led by Paula Atkeson, Ph.D. of the analyst’s personal life into the therapeuticand Anita Schmukler, D.O. relationship and how to work with the inevitability ofAfter attending this session, participants should be able self-disclosure, the wish for privacy, and the evolutionto: 1) Describe the issues unique to the supervision of analytic identity within these contexts. Self-disclosureof supervisees treating child/adolescent patients provides us with a useful lens within which wewith special attention to ethical issues; 2) Generate may explore the shifting landscape of our field, thesupervisory approaches to facilitate the learning process applications of a one-person or two-person psychology,of the supervisee including techniques to address and the existential limitations that are part of life.supervisee’s learning problems. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Compare theoretical perspectives regarding2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. self-disclosure from one-person vs. two-personSenior Analyst Presentation (Part 2) CEC CND psychologies; 2) Improve the capacity to work with ourFor description and educational objectives patients and support our colleagues when challengingsee Part I at 9:00 a.m. personal events intrude within the analytic dyad.Discussion Group 13: Psychoanalysis and Discussion Group 15: History of Psychoanalysis:Psychotherapeutic Hospitals CEC A Poet in Therapy: A Case Study and itsChair: M. Sagman Kayatekin, M.D. Repercussions CEC (Missouri City, TX) Chair: Peter L. Rudnytsky, Ph.D., LCSWCo-chair: Michael Groat, Ph.D.* (Houston, TX) (Gainesville, FL) Co-chair: Madelon Sprengnether, Ph.D.*M. Sagman Kayatekin, M.D. is a psychoanalyst (Minneapolis, MN)and Michael Groat, Ph.D., is a psychoanalytic Presenter: Dawn M. Skorczewski, Ph.D.*therapist. They were trained in psychoanalytically (Cambridge, MA)informed hospitals, and psychoanalytic institutes and www.apsa.org 11
  • 13. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued) In 1956, Anne Sexton entered therapy with Discussion Group 17: The IPA at the United psychiatrist Martin Orne, who encouraged her to Nations: Human Trafficking: Psychoanalytic write the confessional poetry for which she received Perspectives CEC SOC the Pulitzer Prize. After Sexton’s suicide, Dr. Orne Chair: Vivian Blotnick Pender, M.D. released audiotapes of the therapy to biographer (New York, NY) Diane Middlebrook. Although Orne viewed Sexton Presenter: Norma Ramos, Esq.,* (New York, NY) as hysterical, his own hysteria arguably led to a Discussant: Adrienne Harris, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) misinterpretation of Sexton and the intersubjective This discussion group will explore the vicissitudes of vision of psychoanalysis in her “Dr. Martin” poems. human trafficking and the psychological impact on the After attending this session, participants should be able individual and large group psyche. Trafficking results in to: 1) Identify the ethical issues raised by Dr. Orne’s multi-billion dollar profits for the perpetrators. This kind decision to release the therapy tapes to Anne Sexton’s of human slavery is one of the worst assaults on the biographer; 2) Describe the vision of psychoanalysis ego. The principle of the universality of human rights implicit in Sexton’s poetry, as well as the interplay was first emphasized in the Universal Declaration on between the therapeutic and the creative process Human Rights in 1948 by the United Nations. Despite exemplified by her relationship with Dr. Orne. international laws and treaties, discrimination and abuse of children, women, migrants, minorities, religious and Discussion Group 16: Insights from Infant ethnic groups continue.W E D N E S DAY Research for the Practicing Psychoanalyst: After attending this session, participants should be Analytic Parent-Child Psychotherapy CEC able to: 1) Describe the psychological impact of human Chair & trafficking on the individual and large group; 2) Apply this Presenter: Alexandra Harrison, M.D. knowledge in the clinical situation with individuals who (Cambridge, MA) have a history of trafficking. Co-chair & Presenter: Professor Edward Z. Tronick, Ph.D.* Discussion Group 18: Assessment and the (Cambridge, MA) Analytic Identity CEC Drs. Tronick and Harrison will introduce the concept Chair: James H. Kleiger, Psy.D., ABPP of “infant mental illness” and the effects of trauma (Bethesda, MD) in infancy. Dr. Tronick will illustrate these points with Co-chairs: Jed Yalof, Psy.D. (Narberth, PA) mother-infant videotapes, and Dr. Harrison will present Anthony Bram, Ph.D. (Lexington, MA) the case of a 3-4-year-old child who experienced Presenter: Charles Peterson, Ph.D.* physical trauma in the first weeks of life. The effect both (Minneapolis, MN) on the child and on the family in terms of shifting the This discussion group serves as a forum for child’s developmental trajectory in the direction of rigidity psychoanalysts trained as psychodiagnosticians and poor adaptation will be described. The discussion to discuss their work and learn from each other. will explore the potential for integration of developmental The group will begin by reviewing testing protocols and psychoanalytic theories of trauma and will suggest mailed out ahead of time (please make sure to ways in which videotape technique can assist the pre-register). The ensuing discussion will focus on clinician in the evaluation and treatment of dysfunction 1) applying psychoanalytic principles to the process in families of young children. of diagnostic testing, 2) identifying testing approaches After attending this session, participants should be able that highlight dynamically significant aspects of to: 1) Distinguish how mental illness can have its roots personality functioning, while simultaneously sharpening in infancy and recognize some of the effects of traumatic our understanding of theoretical concepts, and experience on infants; 2) Identify the complexity of 3) using test formal scores, thematic material, and the childhood mental disorders, the contexts in which they patient-examiner relationship to guide psychoanalytic arise, and the role the child analyst can play in helping treatment planning. child and parents. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Discuss psychological testing data from the perspectives of ego psychology, object relations, self-psychology, and attachment theory; 2) Demonstrate 12 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 14. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued)how assessment can be utilized as a model for Discussion Group 21: IPSO: Internationalanticipating transference and countertransference Perspectives in Psychoanalysis:reactions and for predicting how the patient will “Maria: Notes on Separation andrespond to different kinds of treatment approaches Intrusion Anxiety” CECand interventions. Chair: Deisy C. Boscan, Ph.D. (San Diego, CA) Presenter: Graciela Hoyos, M.A.* (Cali, Colombia)Discussion Group 19: Pharmacotherapy Discussants: Holger Himmighoffen, M.D.*and Psychoanalysis CEC (Zurich, Switzerland)Co-chairs: Larry Sandberg, M.D. (New York, NY) Michael Garfinkle, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Fredric Busch, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Aura Lorenzo, Ph.D.* (Mexico City, Mexico)The discussion group will explore the common Organized by the International Psychoanalytical Studieschallenges when medication is part of an analysis. Organization (IPSO), the international candidates’These include: What factors contribute to the decision organization, this discussion group provides a forumto prescribe or withhold medication? What are the for presentation and discussion of clinical cases andcommon countertransference challenges in combining theoretical ideas from around the world.treatment for medical and non-medical analysts? After attending this session, participants should beHow does the introduction of medication impact able to: 1) Describe the different clinical and theoreticalthe psychoanalytic process? In what situations may perspectives discussed, compare and contrast some W E D N E S DAYthe use — or non-use — of medication threaten the of the various psychoanalytic cultures from around theanalysis? What are some of the challenges in monitoring world; 2) Identify new ideas to be utilized in their ownmedication once it is introduced? clinical practice.After attending this session, participants should be ableto: 1) Characterize those factors that lead the analyst Discussion Group 22: Masculinity: “Mad Men”to consider the use of medication; 2) Describe some and Gender Roles CEC PSYT SOCways in which the introduction of medication affects Chair: Janice S. Lieberman, Ph.D.the psychoanalytic process. (New York, NY) Presenter: Stephanie Newman, Ph.D.Discussion Group 20: Psychoanalysis and (New York, NY)Spirituality: “Where Art Thou?” CEC SOC Discussant: Prudence Gourguechon, M.D.Chair: Paula J. Hamm, M.A., LPC (Chicago, IL) (Centreville, VA) Dr. Stephanie Newman will discuss the popular televisionPresenter: Dori Laub, M.D. (New Haven, CT) series “Mad Men,” which is about aggressive advertisingDiscussant: Jonathan Lear, Ph.D. (Chicago, IL) men in the 1950s and 1960s. She will elaborate onThe atrocity of the Holocaust inhumanly infringed several themes from her recent book, “Mad Men on theupon sacred human life, fragmenting a person’s Couch,” including gender roles, masculine behavior in“understanding of being.” Survivors grasped for hope, the workplace, and the rigidity of gender roles then andlonged for love, and the capacity to think in intelligible now. There are many similarities to be drawn betweenways was destroyed. Resurrecting and reclaiming a new the professions of advertising and psychoanalysisframe of reference is a brave new act of faith. Dr. Dori at that time. In both fields, white men predominated.Laub, M.D. will present video testimonies of Holocaust Most analysts were male and most patients female. Dr.survivors and speak to the process of internal dialogue, Prudence Gourguechon will join the group in exploringsymbolization and the narrative formation leading to these topics.recovery. Dr. Jonathan Lear, Ph.D. will focus on the After attending this session, participants should be ablerelation between “trauma to meaning” and “trauma to: 1) Recognize the differences between male roles 50to psyche.” years ago and today; 2) Increase their awareness of theAfter attending this session, participants should be able progress in gender equality that has been made in theto: 1) Distinguish the process between the “internal thou” workplace and in the field of psychoanalysis.and the spiritual thou; 2) Identify key concepts on thenature of traumatic memories. www.apsa.org 13
  • 15. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued) Discussion Group 23: Perversions: and Madeleine Baranger and further developed by Psychoanalytic Concepts and Treatment CEC other psychoanalysts. The theoretical framework will Chair & be discussed, followed by case material selected to Presenter: Joseph P. Collins, D.O. (Bethesda, MD) highlight salient aspects of the clinical application of field Discussant: Salman Akhtar, M.D. (Ardmore, PA) theory. The emerging sense that some notion of a field underlies each clinical and theoretical psychoanalytic This discussion group was formed to explore classical perspective will be discussed. and contemporary concepts of perversions and perverse dynamics. Case material highlighting a fetish will be After attending this session, participants should be presented. The expression of the fetish in the context able to: 1) Describe the theoretical underpinnings of of compulsive Internet use will be discussed. The psychoanalytic field theory and be able to apply field emergence of the underlying dynamics in the transference theory to their clinical work; 2) Compare different and countertransference will also be included. psychoanalytic perspectives using field theory. After attending this session, participants should be Discussion Group 26: Philosophy able to 1) Understand a psychoanalytic concept of and Psychoanalysis CEC sexual fetishism; 2) Apply psychoanalytic interventions Chair: John C. Foehl, Ph.D. in the treatment of fetishism and compulsive use (Newton Centre, MA) of Internet pornography. Co-chair: Donna Orange, Ph.D., Psy.D.*W E D N E S DAY (New York, NY) Discussion Group 24: Psychoanalysis Presenter: Roger Frie, Ph.D., Psy.D., R.Psych.* with Adoptees CEC (Vancouver, Canada) Co-chairs: Maida Greenberg, Ed.D. (Newton Centre, MA) This discussion group invites members to explore the Paul Brinich, Ph.D. (Chapel Hill, NC) philosophical context of our theory and clinical work as Coordinator: Kenneth M. Gruenberg, M.D. psychoanalysts. Freud’s discovery of the unconscious (Newton Centre, MA) drew on ideas about the unconscious in European philosophy. These philosophical ideas also form This discussion group will explore some of the issues the basis for an alternative view of the unconscious encountered when doing analytic work with patients developed by Freud’s Swiss colleague, Ludwig who have been adopted. The session will examine how Binswanger. Dr. Roger Frie will examine how Binswanger the adoption echoes in analytic work and especially and the traditions of phenomenology and hermeneutics how it is reflected in transference phenomena. have contributed to the development of contemporary After attending this session, participants should be able theories of the unconscious. Interaction between to: 1) Identify how work with adoptees throws a spotlight psychoanalysis and European philosophy, with particular on the vicissitudes of normal parent-child ambivalence; attention to the role of social and cultural contexts in 2) Describe how the internal reality of adoption affects shaping unconscious life will be discussed. self- and object-representations, and how these then After attending this session, participants should be able resonate in the life of the adoptee. to: 1) Describe the hermeneutic view of the unconscious; 2) Discuss the role of social and cultural contexts in Discussion Group 25: shaping unconscious life. Field Theory CEC Co-chairs: Montana Katz, Ph.D., L.P.* (New York, NY) Discussion Group 27: Analytic Work with Giuseppe Civitarese, M.D., Ph.D. Children and Adults with Asperger’s (Pavia, Italy) Syndrome: Integrating Winnicottian Theory Psychoanalytic field theory is an increasingly important, with Neurological Data CEC international development in psychoanalysis in the Chair: Michael Krass, Ph.D. (Falls Church, VA) last half century. This group will progressively explore This discussion group will use a clinical case of analytic theoretical and clinical aspects of the variety of field work with a child and/or an adult with Asperger’s theories in current use by psychoanalysts. This session as a vehicle for looking at Asperger’s through the lens will focus on the basic concepts and technique of of Winnicott’s work on the parent-infant relationship (e.g., analytic field theory as originally developed by Willy the holding environment, the good-enough mother, 14 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 16. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued)the progression from relating with to using the object, Two-Day Clinical Workshop #1: Workshoptransitional experience) within the framework of the Series in Analytic Process and Techniqueneuropsychology of Asperger’s. The group will function (Part I) CEC CNDas a space in which to think together about innovating Chair: Irene Cairo, M.D. (New York, NY)techniques for working therapeutically with adults, Presenter: Judith Felton, C.S.W. (New York, NY)adolescents and children in analysis and analytic therapy Discussant: Jorge Canestri, M.D.* (Rome, Italy)that take into account perspectives that reflect multiple This is a two-part session. Part 2 will take placeplanes of observation and understanding. on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Participants are expectedAfter attending this session, participants should be able to attend both days.to: 1) Apply modifications of analytic technique that take In this two-day clinical workshop, a clinical presenter willinto account analytic clinical theories on AS and Autism present detailed case and process material to a featuredSpectrum Disorders (ASDs), developmental theories discussant known especially for his or her contributionsand research findings as well as neuropsychological to and views on clinical process. Participants alongand neuroanatomical research findings; 2) Assimilate with the featured discussant will have the opportunityWinnicott’s theories about the infant-parent relationship, to discuss this material in two sessions over twoof infant development and of analytic treatment of consecutive days and to observe first-hand how thechildren and adults with the understanding and featured discussant thinks clinically.treatment of AS and ASDs. W E D N E S DAY After attending this session, participants should4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. be able to: 1) Describe how the featured discussant thinks about a specific clinical case; 2) Apply someResearch Seminar: Interdisciplinary Approaches of the featured discussant’s ideas to his or her ownto Culture and Emotion CEC PSYT subsequent clinical work.Co-chairs: Anna Fishzon, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Charles Amrhein, Psy.D. (Bronx, NY) Two-Day Clinical Workshop #2: WorkshopPresenters: Hsuan-Ying Huang, M.D.* Series in Analytic Process and Technique (Cambridge, MA) (Part 1) CEC CND Alicia J. Christoff, Ph.D. (Amherst, MA) Chair: Nancy J. Chodorow, Ph.D.Note: This program is intended to satisfy the (Somerville, MA)requirements of those states that require CE credits Presenter: Abby Wolfson, Ph.D. (Berkeley, CA)in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, Discussant: Adrienne Harris, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)but the final judgment for such qualification is made This is a two-part session. Part 2 will take placeby each state’s board. on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Participants are expectedIlluminating the intersection of culture and psyche is to attend both days.a project that analysts share with a diverse group of In this two-day clinical workshop, a clinical presenter willscholars. This panel offers presentations by two APsaA present detailed case and process material to a featuredfellows, an anthropologist and literature scholar, who discussant known especially for his or her contributionsboth rely upon psychoanalytic thought to help situate to and views on clinical process. Participants alongselfhood, emotion, and interiority within particular with the featured discussant will have the opportunitytimes, places, and cultures. Hsuan-Ying Huang is an to discuss this material over two consecutive meetingsanthropologist and psychiatrist who will present from his and to observe first-hand how the featured discussantongoing ethnographic study of the rise of psychoanalysis thinks clinically.in China. Anna Christoff studies emotion in literature andwill discuss how the novel teaches us to experience our After attending this session, participants should be ableown subjectivity. Anna Fishzon, a historian of selfhood to: 1) Describe how the featured discussant thinks aboutand emotion, will moderate the discussion. clinical case material and apply some of the featured discussant’s ideas to his or her own subsequent clinicalAfter attending this session, participants should be able work; 2) Compare approaches to the same clinicalto: 1) Describe how selfhood and emotions are situated material by different colleagues.within history and culture; 2) Compare psychoanalytic,literary, and anthropological approaches to the studyof culture and the construction of emotion. www.apsa.org 15
  • 17. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued) Two-Day Clinical Workshop #3: Workshop of the novel interventions that may have contributed Series in Analytic Process and Technique to a freeing up of the process. (Part 1) CEC CND Chair: Sharon Zalusky Blum, Ph.D. Two-Day Clinical Workshop #5: Workshop (Los Angeles, CA) Series in Analytic Process and Technique Discussant: Antonino Ferro, M.D. (Pavia, Italy) (Part 1) CEC CND Chair: Richard B. Zimmer, M.D. (New York, NY) This is a two-part session. Part 2 will take place Presenter: Henry Schwartz, M.D. (New York, NY) on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Participants are expected Discussant: Lawrence Brown, Ph.D. to attend both days. (Newtown Center, MA) In this two-day clinical workshop, a clinical presenter will This is a two-part session. Part 2 will take place present detailed case and process material to a featured on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Participants are expected discussant known especially for his or her contributions to attend both days. to and views on clinical process. Participants along with the featured discussant will have the opportunity This workshop will focus on analytic process, analytic to discuss this material in two sessions over two technique, and analytic listening, with particular consecutive days and to observe first-hand how the attention to listening for, following, and working with featured discussant thinks clinically. intersubjective phenomena. Dr. Schwartz will present several selected sessions from an ongoing analysis.W E D N E S DAY After attending these sessions, participants should Dr. Brown will comment, with particular attention to be able to 1) Describe how the featured discussant intersubjective phenomena as they manifest in the thinks about a specific clinical case; 2) Apply some clinical material. Open discussion of the material by all of the featured discussant’s ideas to his or her own participants will be encouraged. subsequent clinical work. After attending this session, participants should be Two-Day Clinical Workshop #4: Psychotherapy able to: 1) describe the intersubjective phenomena Technique and Process (Part 1) CEC CND PSYT as they appear in clinical material, and be able to Chair: Larry Sandberg, M.D. (New York, NY) listen for and identify such phenomena; 2) Formulate Presenters: Larry Sandberg, M.D. (New York, NY) interventions based on intersubjective phenomena that Beatrice Beebe, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) will serve to open up new avenues of exploration in the Suzi Tortora, Ed.D, BC-DMT* clinical situation. (Garrison, NY) Child and Adolescent Two-Day Clinical Workshop This is a two-part session. Part 2 will take place (Part 1) CEC on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Participants are expected Chair: Christine C. Kieffer, Ph.D. (Chicago, IL) to attend both days. Presenter: Gabriel Ruiz, M.A. (Chicago, IL) This two day clinical workshop will introduce Discussant: Alessandra Lemma, DClin Psych.* psychoanalytic clinicians to a novel, ongoing multi-modal (London, UK) treatment that was catalyzed by an impasse during an This is a two-part session. Part 2 will take place intensive psychotherapy of a severely disturbed woman on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Participants are expected with gaze aversion. The insufficient role of an interpretive to attend both days. focus led the analyst (Larry Sandberg) to engage a colleague with expertise in infant research and video This workshop is targeted to those interested in further feedback (Beatrice Beebe) who has used the latter developing their skills in the practice of child and intervention bimonthly to advance the treatment. adolescent analysis. Some specific problems that will In addition, weekly dance movement psychotherapy be targeted in this workshop will include: 1) work with (Suzi Tortora) has provided an additional — largely children who are physically aggressive; 2) developing nonverbal and embodied — strategy to facilitate capacities for mentalization in such children; 3) building deepening psychic growth, integration and an amnesis. a therapeutic alliance with parents who are not familiar The treatment team will present their clinical work. with basic psychoanalytic principles, and helping them develop capacities for mentalization. Clinical material will After attending this session, participants should be able be presented and discussed with an emphasis on both to: 1) Characterize the nature of the clinical situation theory and technique. Technical and theoretical aspects that lead to an impasse; 2) Distinguish unique aspects of the case will be explored with an internationally distinguished “featured” discussant. 16 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 18. DA I LY S C H ED U L E4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued)After attending this session, participants should be to loss and trauma; 2) Interpret the concepts of time andable to: 1) Identify, describe and apply a developmental mourning with patients faced with their own death.perspective to various problems that arise in thetreatment of children and adolescents. In this Discussion Group 30: Effects of the Holocaust onworkshop, particular attention will be paid to applying Survivors and Family Members CEC PSYT SOCthis perspective to the physically aggressive child. Co-chairs: Ira Brenner, M.D. (Bala Cynwyd, PA)2) Generate interventions that based upon a dynamic Dori Laub, M.D. (New Haven, CT)understanding of emotional and cognitive development. Presenter: Gabriele Ast, M.D.* (Munich, Germany)In this case, particular attention will be paid to the Coordinator: Vera M. Paisner* (Stamford, CT)development of a capacity for mentalizing and empathy This discussion group focuses upon the effectsin the child as well as in the parents. of massive psychic trauma upon survivors of genocidal persecution during the Holocaust andDiscussion Group 28: Psychoanalytic Aspects its repercussions in subsequent generations. Theof Assisted Reproductive Technology CEC SOC phenomenon of intergenerational transmission ofChair: Mali A. Mann, M.D. (Palo Alto, CA) trauma, its manifestations in the clinical situationPresenter: Paula J. Hamm, M.A., LPC and the technical challenges of working with this (Centreville, VA) population are emphasized during this group. ClinicalThis discussion group will address the psychological material from analytic treatment is presented in a W E D N E S DAYeffects of the individuals involved in various aspects of collegial and respectful way; participation from thealternative reproduction. It will provide guideline to the attendees is encouraged. Issues related to transference,psychoanalytic treatment of the psychological difficulties countertransference, inter-subjectivity and the uniqueencountered during these procedures. It will attempt nature of each analytic dyad are addressed.to provide understanding of the short and long term After attending this session, participants should be ableeffects on the participants as well as the offspring born to: 1) Identify and work with these issues in treatment;via this technology. 2) Understand the dynamics of intergenerationalAfter attending this session, participants should be transmission of trauma.able to: 1) Recognize psychological difficulties thatparticipants endure during and after an alternative Discussion Group 31: Body and Mind in thereproductive procedure; 2) Describe the long term Consulting Room CECpsychological impact on the parents and children Co-chairs: Malkah T. Notman, M.D. (Brookline, MA)of the process of alternative reproductive technology. Lynn Whisnant Reiser, M.D. (Hamden, CT)Discussion Group 29: Psychoanalysis and Susan A. Bers, Ph.D. (New Haven, CT)the Visual Arts: Time and Timelessness Presenter: Angela Cappiello, M.D. (Glastonbury, CT)in Art and Mourning: Louise Bourgeois This discussion group aims to bring the “real” body ofand Alberto Giacometti CEC the patient into the consulting room with greater clarity.Chair: Laurie Wilson, Ph.D. (New York, NY) The group will consider the influence of actual anatomyPresenter: Esther Dreifuss-Kattan, Ph.D. and physiology on identity, body image and sexual (Beverly Hills, CA) development. An adult patient will be presented whoThis discussion group will focus on the concept of was dealing with the consequences of developmentaltime as it relates to art making and mourning with an disturbances. The implications for technique and analyticemphasis on the change in one’s perception of time process will be discussed.brought about by mourning, the end stage of life or After attending this session, participants should bein trauma. While creating temporalization is no longer able to: 1) Identify the role of the real body in charactermeasured in a linear way, but becomes transformed, formation; 2) Recognize the consequences ofbringing the movement of time towards transcendence developmental disturbancesand infinity. The presenter, Dr. Esther Dreifuss-Kattan,will illustrate this central thesis with a close analysis Discussion Group 32: Lacanian Approachesof examples of the life and art of Alberto Giacometti to Psychosis CECand Louise Bourgeois. Chair: Lewis A. Kirshner, M.D. (Cambridge, MA)After attending this session, participants should be able Presenter: Ronald Abramson, M.D. (Wayland, MA)to: 1) Differentiate the changed sense of time as it relates Discussant: Filip Geerardyn, Ph.D.* (Ghent, Belgium) www.apsa.org 17
  • 19. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued) A case presentation of an ongoing dynamic Discussion Group 35: Psychoanalysis psychotherapy of a psychotic man will be presented and Theater CEC and discussed from a Lacanian perspective. Issues Co-chairs: Phillip S. Freeman, M.D., D.M.H. concerning the nature of the psychotic subject, goals of (Newton Highlands, MA) analytic therapy, and Lacanian concepts and techniques Fred M. Sander, M.D. (New York, NY) with psychotic patients will be the focus. Presenter: Laura Ligouri, M.A.* (Roslindale, MA) After attending this session, participants should be able In response to the ongoing political violence in the to: 1) Use Lacanian concepts to diagnose psychosis; Israeli-Palestinian conflict, there has been a burgeoning 2) Employ techniques based on these concepts to treat of theaters employing drama therapy techniques in the psychotic patients. hope of addressing traumatic experiences sustained by inhabitants on both sides of the conflict. An example Discussion Group 33: Postmodernism Feminism: of these efforts, “The Railway to Damascus,” by Hillel Transgender Analysis: A Case Study CEC Mitelpunkt, currently in production at The Habima Co-chairs: Vivian Blotnick Pender, M.D. Theatre, the national theatre of Israel, will be discussed. (New York, NY) Readings from the play, as well as recent journalism and Arlene K. Richards, Ed.D. (New York, NY) public sentiment on the play, will provide opportunities to Presenter: Ubaldo Leli, M.D. (New York, NY) consider the relation of dramatization to the experience Discussant: Eleanor Schuker, M.D. (New York, NY) of trauma, identity, and healing.W E D N E S DAY This discussion group will explore the analytic process in After attending this session, participants should be able the psychoanalytic treatment of a transgender individual. to: 1) Describe the ways in which theater attempts to A relatively new explicit area of psychoanalysis, some address collective psychological processes; 2) Compare transference and counter-transference dynamics will the relationship between theater and trauma within an be discussed. Case material will be presented. international protracted conflict. After attending this session, participants should be Discussion Group 36: able to: 1) Recognize features of the analytic process Shame Dynamics CEC SOC in a transgender individual; 2) Apply the understanding Chair: Melvin R. Lansky, M.D. (Los Angeles, CA) learned in the group to clinical situations. Co-chair & Presenter: Leon Wurmser, M.D. (Towson, MD) Discussion Group 34: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Views on Masochism CEC Dr. Wurmser, a pioneer in the study of shame both Chair: Nancy Kulish, Ph.D. (Birmingham, MI) theoretically in his many books and articles on the Presenter: Arnold Rothstein, M.D. (New York, NY) subject and in clinical practice, will present “a look back after fifty years of studying the dynamics of shame This discussion group will explore the major conflicts and the cultural importance of shame, with contemporary psychoanalytic approaches to the particular attention to issues of shame in Aristotle, Greek treatment and understanding of masochism. The group tragedy, and perhaps Shakespeare.” The presentation features lively and informative clinical presentations includes, but is not limited to, the domain of applied by the most respected and distinguished thinkers and psychoanalysis. Paying attention to and focus on shame clinicians who have made significant contributions dynamics is vitally important to clinical practice. These to this area. The advantages and disadvantages of great classic works of philosophy and literature provide applying different technical approaches and theoretical us with very important insights applicable to problems frameworks to this difficult condition which characterizes in clinical practice, in which shame dynamics are often a large spectrum of patients will be highlighted. the overlooked hidden dimension necessary for the All clinicians are welcome. understanding of the complete clinical picture. After attending this session, participants should be After attending this session, participants should be able able to: 1) Describe typical diagnostic, dynamic, and to: 1) Relate the history of the development of concepts developmental issues encountered in this patient of shame through Western literature from antiquity to group; 2) Compare different theoretical and technical the use of these shame concepts in clinical practice; approaches to the treatment of this kind of patient. 2) Translate to clinical practice a grasp of the conflicts between values relating to honor and disgrace and values dealing with love and solidarity, between the ethics of shame and the ethics of guilt. 18 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 20. DA I LY S C H ED U L E4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued)Discussion Group 37: Emerging Perspectives After attending this session, participants should beon Gender and Sexuality: Celebrating able to: 1) Identify techniques that build an analyticChange CEC PSYT SOC relationship with reluctant patients; 2) Examine theCo-chairs: Patrick J. Haggard, M.D. (Atlanta, GA) countertransference responses that impede or foster Susan McNamara, M.D.* the creation of an analytic space. (Middletown, CT)Presenter: Robert M. Galatzer-Levy, M.D. Discussion Group 39: Psychoanalysis (Chicago, IL) and Sports CEC PSYT SOC Susan C. Vaughan, M.D. (New York, NY) Co-chairs: James H. Hansell, Ph.D. (Rockville, MD)Discussant: Ralph Roughton, M.D. (Atlanta, GA) Richard Roskos, M.D. (Dallas, TX) Howard Katz, M.D. (Brookline, MA)This discussion group honors the lives and contributionsof Bert Cohler and Richard Isay, both leaders in This discussion group will explore the psychodynamicsexpanding psychoanalytic concepts of gender and of sport in many dimensions — group dynamics in sport,sexuality. The first presenter considers the work of Bert fandom, developmental aspects of athletic involvement,Cohler, a brilliant researcher on the life course of gay, and others — in reference to the many notable events inlesbian, bisexual and trans people, who provided a the world of sport in 2012. The session will involve bothfoundation for rethinking psychoanalytic approaches brief presentations and group discussion.to development. The second presenter will explore the After attending this session, participants should be W E D N E S DAYimplications of the work of Richard Isay, who deserves able to: 1) Describe the relevance of psychoanalysisthe credit for his courage and persistence in getting to sport, in general and with reference to current events;the original APsaA non-discrimination policy adopted 2) Compare different psychodynamic approaches toin 1991 and revised in 1992. The discussant will be involvement with athletes and commentary on sport.Ralph Roughton.After attending this session, participants should be Discussion Group 40: Child Analytic Process CECable to: 1) Characterize current understandings of the Chair: Samuel E. Rubin, M.D. (Birmingham., AL)life courses of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people; Co-chairs: Arthur L. Rosenbaum, M.D.2) Describe the impact of queer theory on psychoanalytic (Cleveland Heights, OH)theories of gender and sexual variance. Lee I. Ascherman, M.D. (Birmingham, AL) The focus of the meeting will be to sharpen our listeningDiscussion Group 38: Candidate to Candidate: skills to enable the identification of the emergence of“Flying the Coop and Feeling Cooped Up”: transference/countertransference conflicts. Both theHow to Establish an Analytic Process When resistance as it emerges and the work with resistanceThere is Tension Between Reluctance and will be identified. The genetic and current factors thatEngagement in the Dyad CEC CND both facilitate and impede the process will be identifiedChair: Sarah L. Lusk, Ph.D. (Cambridge, MA) and discussed. Various interpretive interventions will bePresenter: Donna M. Mathias, M.D. (Brookline, MA) considered and their rationale bearing on the dynamicsDiscussant: Warren Poland, M.D. (Washington, DC) of the particular child.Through listening to clinical material we will explore how After attending this session, participants should beto remain analytic in the face of a patient’s wish to be in able to: 1)Identify the resistance to tranference and theanalysis and not to be in analysis. What is the task of the transference as it emerges and be able to interpret theanalyst when a patient presents with strong avoidance? dynamisms facilitating the analytic process; 2) RecognizeFreud said the first task of the analyst is to help the countertransference and its relation to the analystpatient establish a positive attachment /transference personally and to the particular child and their conflict.to the analyst. This is important as we encounter morepatients who struggle to engage in analysis. The push Discussion Group 41: Psychoanalysis and the Law:for instant gratification and relief versus a need for deep Nonverbal Communication in Forensic Evaluationsengagement and self-reflection is the challenge analysts and in the Courtroom CEC SOCface today. Co-chairs & Presenters: Linda Gunsberg, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Moisy Shopper, M.D. (St. Louis, MO) Presenter: Dana M. Ernst*, Columbia University (New York, NY) www.apsa.org 19
  • 21. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued) Nonverbal communication within the legal and forensic Individuals with ASD have biases toward more local world has been sorely neglected. This group seeks as opposed to global schemas and rigidity in moving to address this lacuna. Ms. Ernst will address the between these. This model can be used to understand importance of, and issues related to, the inclusion of ASD and where we may intervene with psychotherapy. nonverbal communication in the record. Dr. Gunsberg Dr. Gerber will present data supporting this theory, will address the importance of nonverbal communication including his neuroimaging study of social cognition in forensic evaluations and how it is recorded as data in autism, and propose implications for treatment. and entered into the final report. Dr. Shopper will Dr. Sherkow will present the psychoanalytic treatment address the use of nonverbal communication in police of an ASD child. interrogation and in the presentation of the prosecutor’s After attending this session, participants should be case to the court. Discussion among panelists and able to: 1) Explain a social cognitive neuroscience and participants will follow. psychodynamic model for the role of schemas in autism After attending this session, participants should spectrum disorders; 2) Describe the range of current be able to: 1) Identify relevant research on nonverbal empirical evidence supporting this model. communication; 2) Discover the significance and possible meaning of nonverbal communication by all Discussion Group 44: Relational courtroom participants (judge, jury, lawyers, experts, Psychoanalysis CEC and litigating parties). Chairs: Jody Davies, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)W E D N E S DAY Adrienne Harris, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Anthony Bass, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Presenter: Bob Bartlett, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Discussion Group 42: Ethics Behind the Couch CEC This discussion group will begin with a detailed Co-chairs: Ernest Wallwork, Ph.D. (Washington, DC) description of the relational perspective, including Stephen H. Behnke, Ph.D.* the historical context, the development and evolution (Washington, DC) of relational thinking, and the defining aspects of a relational psychoanalysis. Clinical material will be The discussion group will probe the issue of how to think presented and commented upon by the three chairs in ethically about various aspects of our clinical work. The discussion with the presenter. The case will focus upon discussion will be launched by a case presentation and a presentation of the transference/countertransference vignettes that focus on how to think and to respond process and how this process was handled by the ethically as well as technically to challenging problems analyst. The case will then be opened up to the larger in our clinical work. group for discussion. After attending this session, participants should be After attending this session, participants should able to: 1) Recognize commonly unacknowledged be able to: 1) Describe key terms and concepts in moral aspects of analytic treatment; 2) Describe how relational psychoanalysis: multiplicity of self-states, to reason ethically as well as technically about selected co-construction, intersubjectivity and transference and clinical issues. countertransference phenomena and corresponding developments in technique; 2) Integrate these Discussion Group 43: Psychoanalytic Approaches theoretical concepts with clinical work, considering both to Working with Children with Autism Spectrum transference and countertransference effects and the Disorder: Social Cognitive Neuroscience modes of work that characterize relational approaches. and Psychoanalysis CEC Co-chairs: William M. Singletary, M.D. (Ardmore, PA) Discussion Group 45: Psychoanalysis and Susan P. Sherkow, M.D. (New York, NY) Film: The Persistence of Memory: Two Films Presenters: Andrew J. Gerber, M.D., Ph.D. of Alain Resnais CEC PSYT (New York, NY) Chair: Bruce H. Sklarew, M.D. Susan P. Sherkow, M.D. (New York, NY) (Chevy Chase, MD) Contemporary social cognitive neuroscience and Presenter: Lissa Weinstein, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) psychoanalysis are applying the concept of “schema” Discussant: Diana Diamond, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) or “internal working model” as the basic unit for how “Night and Fog” and “Hiroshima Mon Amour” both we nonconsciously learn about social relationships explore the fate of traumatic memory — its apparent and use this knowledge to understand our environment. disappearance through repression and the creation 20 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 22. DA I LY S C H ED U L E7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. (continued)of substitutive representations in consciousness — as This discussion group is intended to initiate discussionwell as its continuing presence as a spur to repetition. of an issue rarely raised in the psychoanalytic literatureThe cinematic techniques (e.g., color vs. black and or in clinical work. It addresses what has beenwhite, the use of voice over narration, the inclusion considered too superficial and/or embarrassing forof archival footage) and documentary versus fictional psychoanalytic consideration. It raises these issues forrepresentations will be compared and contrasted serious consideration. In the tradition of Freud’s dictumand discussed in the context of psychoanalytic and that what cannot be discussed is that which must beneuropsychological understandings of memory. addressed in analysis, it attempts to bring the issues of beauty and body into analytic work. This year weAfter attending this session, participants should be able will be discussing analytic work with beauty addicts.to: 1) Recognize different representations of traumaticmemory; 2) Describe the differential therapeutic value After attending this session, participants should beof narrative versus fictional reconstruction. able to: 1) Characterize issues related to beauty when they appear in clinical material; 2) Evaluate connectionsDiscussion Group 46: On Teaching Psychoanalytic between self-esteem, sexuality, and body image.Views of Mind: Forum for Analysts andAcademic Faculty Teaching and Supervising Discussion Group 48: Psychoanalysisin Psychoanalytic Institutes and Graduate of Adults Previously AnalyzedPsychiatry, Psychology and Social as Children CECWork Programs CEC Chair: Harold Blum, M.D. (Roslyn Estates, NY)Chair & Co-chair: Alan Barry Zients, M.D. (New York, NY) T H U R S DAYPresenter: Stephanie Dee Smith, M.A., LICSW This discussion group will explore the reanalysis of (Brookline, MA) adults who were analysed as children. The group willCo-chair & discuss the persistence of unconscious conflict, andPresenter: Eric M. Marcus, M.D. (New York, NY) of developmental disturbance into adulthood. At theCan we find ways to introduce, understand and teach same time, the group will consider the developmentalqualitative research approaches/methods in a manner transformation and modification of conflict andthat analytic candidates and post graduate trainees unconscious fantasy. The effect of traumatic experiencecould relate to and would find clinically relevant? in both childhood and adult life will also be noted,Qualitative methods capture different data and handle considering cumulative trauma and its mastery indata differently than quantitative methods and with childhood and later life. In addition to the aftermath ofdifferent assumptions about the set and the context. the psychotherapy of childhood, residual pathogenicThis discussion group will focus on understanding influence will be considered as well as progressive andthe basic concepts related to each research approach, creative adult solutions. Character analysis and changethe ways that they are similar and different, and the will be compared in child and adolescent analysis, andways that each approach is similar to and different issues of prediction and outcome will be explored.from psychoanalytic approaches and methods. After attending this session, participants should be ableThe presenters plan to illustrate the ways that to: 1) Discuss the long term outcome and benefit of childmethods and findings from each approach can analysis; 2) Describe the effects of later developmentbe used to enrich psychoanalytic understanding. and life experience on the personality.After attending this session, participants should beable to: 1) Develop skills that will help them developtheir students’ capacities to ‘learn to identify, compare T H U RS DAY, JA N UA RY 17, 2 013and contrast; 2) Consider the technical implicationsfor clinical practice inherent in each of the two 7:45 a.m.-8:15 a.m.research perspectives. Social Event: Breakfast Gathering for Candidate Members CNDDiscussion Group 47: Beauty and Body Join colleagues from around the country for breakfast.in Therapeutic Work CEC All are welcome to stay for the Candidates’ CouncilCo-chairs: Ellen Sinkman, LCSW (New York, NY) meeting immediately following the breakfast. Arelene K. Richards, Ed.D. (New York, NY)Presenter: Janice Lieberman, Ph.D. (New York, NY) www.apsa.org 21
  • 23. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 7:45 a.m.-8:45 a.m. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify the main components of psychoanalytic Social Event: Breakfast Gathering for therapy with couples and families; 2) Formulate elements Current & Former Fellows and Mentors of unconscious structure in conjoint therapy. Please join the Fellowship Committee, 2012-2013 fellows and former fellows for breakfast in appreciation of the Discussion Group 50: Eugene O’Neill’s Fellowship Program mentors. All past and present “Long Day’s Journey into Night”: Multiple mentors are invited to attend. Addictions in a Dysfunctional Family CEC Co-chairs: Eva F. Lichtenberg, Ph.D.* 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (Bethesda, MD) Administrative Meeting: Executive Council Arnold D. Tobin, M.D. (Chicago, IL) APsaA’s Board of Directors, known as the Executive According to O’Neill, this autobiographical masterpiece Council, is responsible for the management of the was “written in tears and blood with deep pity and affairs and business of the association. The Executive understanding and forgiveness for all the four haunted Council is comprised of the association’s officers, eight Tyrones.” The morphine-addicted wife and mother nationally elected Councilors-at-Large, and councilors who has recently returned home from yet another representing each affiliate society of the association, drug-treatment sanitarium is frequently regarded as as well as each affiliate and affiliated study group. The the “identified patient” although her husband and Executive Council meeting is open to any member of the two sons also have emotional problems including association except when there is a need for the council addictions:alcoholism and unsuccessful real estateT H U R S DAY to be in executive session. speculation. The family dynamics will be analyzed to demonstrate how each individual impacts the others; 8:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. as they blame each other it will become apparent that Administrative Meeting: Candidates’ Council CND none of the family members can be helped in isolation. Please join colleagues and candidates from around Please read the play or see one of the filmed versions. the country. In attendance will be various guests After attending this session, participants should including IPSO colleagues. The new Candidates’ be able to: 1) Recognize the need for supportive Council officers will be introduced. All candidate or collaborative treatment for each member of the members are encouraged to participate in the dysfunctional family irrespective of which one is the ‘member connect’ roundtable. identified patient; 2) Identify more clearly the factors involved in addictive behaviors in order to provide 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. the best therapeutic approach. Discussion Group 49: Psychoanalytic Family Therapy CEC Discussion Group 51: Initiating Psychoanalysis: Co-chairs: David E. Scharff, M.D. (Chevy Chase, MD) From Evaluation to Recommendation Richard M. Zeitner, Ph.D. and Beyond CEC CND (Blue Springs, MO) Co-chairs: Aisha Abbasi, M.D. (West Bloomfield, MI) Presenter: Hanni Mann-Shalvi, Ph.D.* Lena T. Ehrlich, Psy.D. (Ann Arbor, MI) (Tel Aviv, Israel) Presenter: Brenda Bauer, Psy.D. (New York, NY) This session will focus on a couple therapy conducted In tough economic times, the leaders of this group have in Israel, a case with several aspects of trauma. We consistently maintained lively analytic practices, with will discuss theoretical issues in couple therapy of only a small percentage of analytic candidates. Their trauma, contrast cultural issues of treatment in Israel developing understanding of their struggles around and the United States, explore implications of the case recommending analysis — even when clinically indicated for individual psychoanalytic therapy and examine — led them to offer this discussion group. Clinical the interweaving of couple and individual dynamics. material, from the beginning up to the moment of a Participants will increase their theoretical understanding recommendation, will be made available to participants of working with family groups and couples analytically, prior to the meetings. Later process material, including with specific reference to national and personal trauma. whether the treatment turned into an analysis or a therapy, will be presented during the group meeting. If you wish to receive the clinical material prior to the meetings (recommended), please make sure to pre-register. 22 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 24. DA I LY S C H ED U L E9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. (continued)After attending this session, participants should be able After attending this session, participants should be ableto: 1) Identify important elements (in the patient, the to: 1) Describe what it means to create a psychoanalyticanalyst, and the analyst-patient dyad) that facilitate or mind; 2) Experience how to create a psychoanalytic mind.impede the beginning of analysis; 2) Recognize differentways of initiating analysis and the advantages and Discussion Group 54: Research Questions aboutdisadvantages of each. the Value of Psychoanalysis: Documenting the “Relational Turn” in Two Analyses 40 Years Apart,Discussion Group 52: Psychoanalytic with Different Results CECExplorations CEC Co-chairs: Sherwood Waldron Jr., M.D.Chair: Merton A. Shill, LLM, Ph.D. (New York, NY) (Ann Arbor, MI) Francesco Gazzillo, Ph.D.* (Rome, Italy)Co-chair: Rogelio Sosnik, M.D. (New York, NY) The co-chairs of this group document differing analyticEvery analyst applies an explicit and/or implicit theory techniques in two recorded analytic cases. One, morein clinical work. This discussion group will penetrate the classical analysis, which took place in the seventies. Thesurface of the clinical process to discern the analyst’s co-chairs contrast both the process and the outcomeunderlying theory of personality thereby revealing the of that analysis with a recent analysis by a muchfundamental assumptions employed in the various more relational analyst. The cases will be describedpsychoanalytic approaches. The intent is to see through clinically, and the different techniques charted using theclinical technique, and process to the underlying theory Analytic Process Scales and the Dynamic Interactionof personality functioning applied clinically, in each of the Scales. Outcomes are measured using the SWAP T H U R S DAYschools. Dr. Sosnik is a Training and Supervising Analyst with the Personality Health Index with a full systematicat the Contemporary Freudian Society, and APDEBA, description of changes from early to late in both cases.the Buenos Aires Psychoanalytic Association. He has Early results of systematic study of another ten casesbeen co-chair of APsaA’s discussion group “The Clinical will be discussed.Value of the Ideas of Wilfred Bion” for 16 years. After attending this session, participants should be ableAfter attending this session, participants should be to: 1) Articulate clearly the aspects of psychoanalyticable to: 1) Recognize the importance of the conscious technique which distinguish the relational turn inand unconscious theory employed by each clinician; psychoanalytic clinical theory; 2) Describe recent reliable2) Analyze clinical material so as to identify and evaluate methods for assessing the changes occurring in thethe theory underlying the analyst’s work. course of a psychoanalysis or psychotherapy.Discussion Group 53: On Creating Discussion Group 55: Issues ina Psychoanalytic Mind CEC CND Child Analysis CECChair: Fred Busch, Ph.D. (Brookline, MA) Co-chairs: Silvia M.V. Bell, Ph.D. (Baltimore, MD)Presenter: Alison Phillips, M.D. (Wellesley, MA) Judith A. Yanof, M.D. (West Newton, MA) Presenter: Wendy Olesker, Ph.D. (New York, NY)What do we hope our patients have developed at theend of a “good enough” psychoanalysis? While we The discussion group will explore the conjoint workhave been taught that knowledge of the unconscious with the parents of children in analysis focusing onis what patients most urgently need to know, there issues specific to children with affective and conductis also another perspective to be considered, which dysregulation. Clinical material of the treatment of a childis the process of knowing is as important as what is and the vicissitudes of the related work with the parentsknown from psychoanalysis. What is accomplished will be presented. The discussion will focus on the rolein a relatively successful psychoanalysis is a way of of the analyst in establishing a working alliance that isknowing, and not simply knowing. Through studying supportive of the parents and safeguards the treatment.psychoanalytic sessions we will examine how After attending this session, participants should be ablepsychoanalytic knowing comes, in part, from analyzing to: 1) Recognize the appropriate role of the analyst inthe process of knowing, which requires a different form working with the parents of a child in analysis; 2) Describeof attention. the management of parent-child issues in child analytic cases with symptoms of affective dysregulation. www.apsa.org 23
  • 25. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. (continued) Discussion Group 56: Psychotherapist Discussion Group 58: The Influence of the Associates Present CEC PSYT Contemporary British Kleinians on Clinical Chair: Mae E. Kastor, M.S.W. (Baltimore, MD) Psychoanalysis CEC Co-chair: Carol Reichenthal, Ph.D.* Chair: Abbot A. Bronstein, Ph.D. (Cambridge, MA) (San Francisco, CA) Presenter: Margo Goldman, M.D.* (Andover, MA) Presenter: Marsha Robertson, LCSW (Nashville, TN) Discussant: Richard Almond, M.D. (Palo Alto, CA) Using material from an ongoing psychoanalysis, Coordinator: Marcia Polansky, M.S.W., Sc.D.* this discussion group will attempt to understand the (Philadelphia, PA) unfolding clinical process from a contemporary British This discussion group, sponsored by the Kleinian viewpoint. In making a comparison between Psychotherapist Associates of the American different clinical methods and theories, the focus will Psychoanalytic Association and open to all registrants, be on such clinical concepts as the total transference will help participants to deepen their understanding situation, clinical transference enactments, and the role of the ways in which psychoanalytic principles inform of projective identification. Particular focus will be on the psychoanalytic psychotherapy and contribute to the manner in which the patient brings to life their internal progress of the treatment. Attendees will join the world in the moment to moment interactions with the presenter and the discussant as they focus on clinical analyst. Interventions and interpretations will be discussed material. In the informal, collegial atmosphere of this with a focus on that which might promote psychic discussion group, there will be opportunity for all change and understanding of the mind of the patient. attendees to join in the discussion.T H U R S DAY After attending this session, participants should be After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Compare their own clinical method with the able to: 1) Describe which attributes of psychoanalytic contemporary Kleinian viewpoint; 2) Recognize how psychotherapy differentiate it from other forms of an analyst might work with transference phenomena psychotherapy and contribute to its effectiveness; in a different way. 2) Recognize the presence of unconscious material, the use of defenses, and the importance of the transference. Discussion Group 59: The Termination Phase of Analysis CEC Discussion Group 57: Therapeutic Action of Chair: Mayer Subrin, M.D. (Bloomfield Hills, MI) Psychoanalytically Informed Work with Children Co-chair: David R. Dietrich, Ph.D. (Birmingham, MI) in a School Setting CEC Presenter: Don Spivak, M.D. (Birmingham, MI) Co-chairs: Phyllis Jean Cath, M.D. This discussion group will examine the qualities that (San Francisco, CA) distinguish the termination phase from the preceding Aimee Nover, Ph.D. (Bethesda, MD) stages of therapy and the developmental tasks that need Presenter: William H. Braun, Psy.D. (New York, NY) to be accomplished during this period. Whether or not Psychoanalysts have worked in schools for decades. there are typical termination fantasies will be considered Each analyst, informed by analytic principles, creates and the issue of resistance to and within termination as his or her own creative approach to consultation and a process and phase will be considered for redefinition. collaboration with educators. Some analysts consult Detailed clinical material will be the basis for these and primarily to staff, some to parents, and some directly other issues. work with children. This discussion group provides an After attending this session, participants should be opportunity to present and discuss clinical material, able to: 1) Classify termination as a distinct phase and to offer guidelines and to encourage analysts to get process; 2) Recognize the unique functions, processes, involved with this kind of work on a local and national sub phases, typical fantasies of a mutually arrived at level. Dr Will Braun, a psychoanalyst and consultant ending determined by internal development. to a prominent high school, will present material for group discussion. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify specific techniques of consultation; 2) Evaluate the effectiveness of the consultation process. 24 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 26. DA I LY S C H ED U L E9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. (continued)Discussion Group 60: Interpretation, Process Discussion Group 62: Parent-Infant Programsand Technique in the Use of Play in the Analysis at Psychoanalytic Institutes: Babies in theof Pre-Oedipal Children CEC Consulting Room CECCo-chairs: Susan P. Sherkow, M.D. (New York, NY Chair: Christine Anzieu-Premmereur, M.D., Ph.D. Alexandra Harrison, M.D. (New York, NY) (Cambridge, MA) Presenter: Jennifer Stuart, Ph.D. (New York, NY)Presenter: Susan P. Sherkow, M.D. (New York, NY) Discussant: Talia Hatzor, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)This discussion group will consider the theory and This discussion group will focus on analytic worktechnique of analytic work with pre-oedipal children, with with an infant in the room, when a parent is bringingan emphasis on close examination of the process of play the baby in his/her analytic treatment, versus dyadicand on the special features of play which reflect a child’s work for the baby with symptoms as the patient.particular development capacities. Clinical material It is targeted towards adult and child psychoanalystsfrom the analytic case of a pre-oedipal boy will be interested in the relevance to psychoanalysis of thepresented by Dr. Sherkow. The case will be discussed motherhood-parenthood process, observation of infantby the group from a number of points of view, including: and child development, parent-infant interaction, andpsychoanalytic theory, interpretation, defense analysis, the countertransference process.transference and countertransference, specific issues After attending this session, participants should be ableof development, and play technique. to: 1) Evaluate a new mother’s mood and anxieties, theAfter attending this session, participants should be mother-young child dyad, the quality of the interactions T H U R S DAYable to: 1) Describe several developmental features and the baby’s psychic functioning; 2) Identify theof preschool children that make play the preferable techniques of intervention and analytic therapytherapeutic technique; 2) Discuss different ways in parent-infant work, and how the contemporaryof making use of play to formulate and deliver psychoanalytic thinking can be applied to this field.interpretations in a play setting, and to elaborate ideasabout the role of developmental issues in child analysis. Discussion Group 63: Psychoanalysis with Twins CECDiscussion Group 61: Intersubjectivity and Co-chairs: Maida Greenberg, Ed.D.Transformative Moments in Psychoanalysis (Newton Centre, MA)and Creative Works CEC Mali A. Mann, M.D. (Palo Alto, CA)Chair: Sandra G. Hershberg, M.D. Coordinator: Lucy Freund, Ph.D.* (Chicago, IL) (Bethesda, MD) This session will explore some of the issues in doingCo-chair: R. Curtis Bristol, M.D. (Washington, DC) analytic work with twins. Evidence suggests thatPresenter: Danielle Knafo, Ph.D.* (Great Neck, NY) although there is a bond between them, twins faceThis discussion group will feature a slide-lecture specific challenges in their relationships to eachpresentation by psychoanalyst and art critic, Danielle other and to other important figures in their lives asKnafo, Ph.D., on her decades-long research into the lives they attempt to develop their separate identities. Theand works of ten pioneering female artists (including discussion group will examine some of the challengesKäthe Kollwitz, Frida Kahlo and Cindy Sherman) over the that may exist for twins in developing a separate senselast century whose self-representational art challenged of their own autonomy. It will highlight the particularthe cultural presuppositions and gender stereotypes challenges that are encountered when doing analyticof their time, while opening up a vista on the feminine work with twins, how the twinship echoes in theexperience. Additionally, each of the artists used her art analytic work, and how it is reflected in the transferenceto overcome personal tragedy and trauma, so her work countertransference phenomena.is in simultaneous and dramatic dialogue with both her After attending this session, participants should besocial world and her personal history. able to: 1) Identify the challenges that exist for a twin inAfter attending this session, participants should be developing his or her own sense of identity; 2) Describeable to: 1) Identify both conscious and unconscious the intra-psychic reality of a twin’s capacity to perceiveprocesses in self-portraiture, the most psychological him or herself as psychologically individuated andof all art forms; 2) Describe ways in which personal differentiated from one’s twin partner along thepsychology and culture informs artmaking as well developmental trajectory.as art spectatorship. www.apsa.org 25
  • 27. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Discuss and assess the advantages Oral History Workshop #75: American of local psychoanalytic fellowships; 2) Determine how Psychoanalytic Journals: Origins to develop or enhance a local psychoanalytic fellowship and Evolution CEC program and identify ways to recruit local fellows and Co-chairs: Erika Schmidt, LCSW (Chicago, IL) select mentors. Nellie L. Thompson, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Sanford Gifford, M.D. (Cambridge, MA) Committee Sponsored Workshop 7: COPE: Presenters: Steve Levy, M.D. (Atlanta, GA) Workshop on Supervision CEC Jay Greenberg, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Chair: Barbara Stimmel, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Lou Rose, Ph.D.* (Westerville, OH) Presenter: Earle W. Baughman, M.D. Alan Barnett, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) (Alexandria, VA) Gina Atkinson, M.A.* (Los Altos, CA) The ongoing interest in this workshop has been in This session will review the historical development of the supervisory experience, from both sides of the several American psychoanalytic journals. The focus room (supervisee and supervisor) and in a variety of of the group will consider how these journals and their contexts: candidate-supervisor, supervisor-supervisee, editors influenced the development of psychoanalysis training analysts in supervision, etc. This meeting will in the United States, and in turn how the journals have focus particularly on the process and complexities of responded to the diverse strands of psychoanalytic discussing supervision cases, problems and successes, thinking that characterize psychoanalysis today. among supervisors within institutes. The group willT H U R S DAY After attending this session, participants should consider the roadblocks to establishing ongoing be able to: 1) Describe the circumstances that led supervision case conferences within institutes, with to the establishment of each journal; 2) Compare an example of a highly successful program that has their respective contributions to the development its members meeting regularly, openly, and helpfully to of psychoanalysis in the United States. discuss important supervision conundra. We hope to have a vignette demonstrating their work and, as always, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. welcome examples from your practices and institutes. Committee Sponsored Workshop 6: After attending this session, participants should be able Local Fellowship Workshop CEC to: 1) Compare models of supervision and supervision Chair: Bruce J. Levin, M.D. education; 2) Describe ways to establish working groups (Plymouth Meeting, PA) on supervision. One of the unanticipated developments of the APsaA Fellowship Program has been the creation and 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon emergence of separate local fellowship programs. CORST Essay Prize Winner in Psychoanalysis Training institutes and societies in major cities and Culture CEC SOC have organized local fellowship programs offering Chair: Robert A. Paul, Ph.D. (Atlanta, GA) mentorships and courses to psychiatrists, psychologists, This annual prize is awarded for essays on social workers and, in some instances, academicians. psychoanalytically informed research in the biobehavioral Local psychoanalytic fellowships can fill an important sciences, social sciences, arts or humanities. The educational and outreach niche within a psychoanalytic winning author will be announced in the late fall and will organization. Their unique role complements existing be presenting his/her essay. The Undergraduate Essay psychotherapy and psychoanalytic training programs. Prize and Courage to Dream Book Prize will also be Several models of local fellowships and the positive awarded during this session. effects on the local psychoanalytic teaching, learning and the organizational morale will be discussed. In addition, the workshop will offer: how to recruit local 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. fellows; how to set up didactic work for fellows; costs Committee Sponsored Workshop 8: Committee and benefits. on Gender and Sexuality Workshop CEC PSYT Chair: Carol Levin, M.D. (Okemos, MI) Co-chairs: Patrick Haggard, M.D. (Atlanta, GA) Susan McNamara, M.D. (Middletown, CT) Don Spivak, M.D. (Birmingham, MI) 26 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 28. DA I LY S C H ED U L E11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. (continued)The thirty-first Committee on Gender and Sexuality 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m.Workshop will present the 2013 Ralph Roughton Paper. PPRS Research Forum: Malignant Self-Regard:The Ralph Roughton Paper Prize was established Accounting for Masochistic, Self-Defeating,in 1998 to honor the founding chairperson of APsaA’s Depressive, and Vulnerably NarcissisticCommittee on LGBT Issues. It is awarded to an Personalities CECunpublished manuscript that in the opinions of the This session is co-organized by the Americanjudges makes an original and outstanding contribution Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamicto the psychoanalytic understanding and/or treatment Psychoanalytic Research Society.of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender individuals.The winning paper will be announced in the fall of 2012. Chair: Steven Huprich, Ph.D.* (Northville, MI) Presenter: Steven Huprich, Ph.D.* (Northville, MI)After attending this session, participants should Discussant: John F. Clarkin, Ph.D.* (White Plains, NY)be able to: 1) Describe the current psychoanalyticthought regarding treatment issues for the LGBT In the history of the DSM, there have been threepopulation by differentiating from current dynamic personality disorders proposed but not acceptedtreatment formulations and those from previous analytic for inclusion in the diagnostic manual: masochistic,approaches explored in the paper; 2) Explain issues that self-defeating, and depressive personality disorders.are unique to LGBT individuals in treatment in contrast Additionally, vulnerable aspects of narcissistic personality,to issues that are familiar and shared by a wide scope such as interpersonal hypersensitivity and threatenedof individuals. self-esteem, have been of interest to researchers and clinicians but remain under-represented in the DSM. T H U R S DAYCommittee Sponsored Workshop 9: Workshop In this research presentation, the construct of malignanton Teaching about Analytic Case Writing CEC self-regard will be presented as a construct whichChair: Stephen B. Bernstein, M.D. may underlie all of these apparently diverse constructs. (Chestnut Hill, MA) Preliminary evidence of the construct’s reliability andCo-chairs: Ellen G. Blumenthal, M.D. (Brookline, MA) validity will be presented, along with implications for Melvin Bornstein, M.D. (Birmingham, MI) assessing these collective personality pathologies. Jonathan Palmer, M.D. (Newton, MA) After attending this presentation, individuals should Arthur L. Rosenbaum, M.D. be able to: 1) Describe the construct of malignant (Cleveland Heights, OH) self-regard; 2) Discuss how malignant self-regard Peggy E. Warren, M.D. (Waban, MA) is theoretically and empirically related to masochistic,This workshop will continue to discuss the teaching of self-defeating, depressive, and narcissistic personalities.analytic case writing. The focus will be on the analyticwriter’s situation when confronted with the blank page. Committee Sponsored Workshop 10: InstituteWorkshop leaders will, themselves, demonstrate a Development Workshop Sponsored by thespecific technique in which the analyst, in dialogue with Committee on New Training Facilities (CNTF)the chair/co-chairs, is helped to find a preliminary outline Chair: Richard M. Zeitner, Ph.D.for the complex interactions of a long analytic process. (Blue Springs, MO)If they choose, attendees can volunteer to participate This workshop is for members and non-membersin this exercise, which requires almost no preparation, of APsaA who are interested in the processby contacting the workshop chair (sbb@massmed.org) of institute development and affiliation with thein advance. No attendees will be called upon without American Psychoanalytic Association. There will bevolunteering. Attendees are often involved in teaching a dialogue among, 1) those belonging to non-affiliatedanalytic writing or are themselves writing about their psychoanalytic groups interested in furthering theiranalytic work. (This workshop is related to Discussion organization’s goal of institute development, 2) membersGroup 94: Writing About Your Analytic Work in a Case of the Committee on New Training Facilities (CNTF) whoReport, Thursday, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.) are tasked with consulting to developing psychoanalyticAfter attending this session, participants should groups and 3) members of new training groups alreadybe able to: 1) Describe a method for teaching how working with CNTF. This workshop is suitable for thoseto find a preliminary structure for writing a case report. interested in learning about the necessary steps in2) Demonstrate how this method is implemented and forming a new institute, or those wanting to learn abouthow it can help the analyst to begin writing. the teaching/consultative resources of APsaA for on-site organizational development. www.apsa.org 27
  • 29. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 12:30 p.m. Scientific Paper Prize for Psychoanalytic Research CEC PSYT Social Event: Candidate Dutch Treat Lunch CND Chair: Barbara Milrod, M.D. (New York, NY) Immediately following the Candidates’ Council meeting, Presenter: Per Andreas Høglend, M.D., Ph.D.* please join the Candidates’ Council for a Dutch treat (Oslo, Norway) lunch. Please sign up on the bulletin board near the Discussant: Kenneth Levy, Ph.D. (University Park, PA) registration desk or at the Candidates’ Council meeting. Title: When, for Whom, and How is Transference Work Useful 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. in Dynamic Psychotherapy Professional Development Workshop 2: The First Experimental Study of Transference Work (FEST) Privacy and Professionalism on the Internet is a dismantling randomized clinical trial specifically Chair: William H. Braun, Psy.D. (New York, NY) designed to study the long-term effects of transference Co-chairs: Lynn V. Friedman, Ph.D. work in dynamic psychotherapy for patients with (Washington, DC) anxiety, depression and personality disorders. One Gail Saltz, M.D. (New York, NY) hundred patients were randomized to one year of Presenter: Sandra DeJong, M.D.* (Cambridge, MA) therapy with transference interpretation (transference Thanks to the Internet, communicating is easier, faster group) and without transference interpretations and more efficient than ever. The first application to (comparison group). The aim of this presentation is to take off was email, and then came Facebook, LinkedIn, explore how several factors such as transference work, Twitter, and YouTube — the platforms for sharing patient characteristics, therapeutic alliance, insight,T H U R S DAY information with others are multiplying as the information and therapist countertransference may work together, superhighway keeps adding lanes. As beneficial as separately, additively, or in interaction to predict long- the Internet can be, it comes with pitfalls, especially term outcome of dynamic psychotherapy. Transference for mental health professionals who are bound by work is illustrated. confidentiality and privacy. This workshop will begin with After attending this session, participants should be able a brief overview of popular social media sites and then to: 1) Describe the typical features of transference work move on to addressing the potential rewards of engaging in dynamic psychotherapy; 2) Evaluate some of the in social media as well as clinical and professionalism contexts for effective use of transference work. concerns for both patient and analyst. Discussion Group 64: Questions You Always Candidates’ Forum: Challenges in Getting Control Wanted to Ask and We Wanted to Answer CEC Cases: “It Only Feels Impossible” CEC CND Chair: Paul H. Ornstein, M.D. (Brookline, MA) Chair: Lena T. Ehrlich, Psy.D. (Ann Arbor, MI) Co-chair & Presenter: M. Carole Drago, LICSW* (Acton, MA) Presenter: Anna Ornstein, M.D. (Brookline, MA) Discussant: Aisha Abbasi, M.D. (West Bloomfield, MI) After a short introduction about the goals and method Candidates face many challenges, both internal and of this discussion group, the chairs will submit to the external, to finding/creating psychoanalytic control participants the questions and their responses that patients, i.e., the presence of the supervisor, very low have been collected whenever they have discussed the fees, the threat of the patient leaving, and the narcissistic treatment process from a self-psychological perspective. vulnerability of “learning” to do analysis, among others. The answers to these questions will attempt to clarify Using clinical material presented by a senior candidate, some of the most frequently misunderstood concepts this panel will identify and explore some of these of self-psychology. The group will be asked to submit challenges and offer possible solutions. It is hoped their own questions and encouraged to present this panel will be useful not only to candidates, but clinical vignettes, which will be discussed from to supervisors and training analysts. a self-psychological perspective. After attending this session, participants should be After attending this session, participants should be able able to: 1) Identify some of the unique challenges to: 1) Utilize the empathetic listening perspective in their candidates face in finding analytic cases and initiating clinical work; 2) Recognize the emerging self-object psychoanalysis; 2) Recognize solutions for addressing transference in the treatment process. some of these challenges. 28 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 30. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued)Discussion Group 65: Clinical Applications to dominate psychoanalytic practice and may lead theof the Ideas of Some Contemporary public to believe that our field is indeed “behind theFrench Psychoanalysts CEC times.” If psychoanalysis intends to sustain its role asCo-chairs: Gail S. Reed, Ph.D. (New York, NY) reflective partner with the contemporary woman, isn’t Francis D. Baudry, M.D. (New York, NY) it time for us to re-examine what we think about power, success, choice, and desire?This discussion group will continue to explore similaritiesand differences between classical psychoanalysis After attending this session, participants shouldas it is practiced in this country with the very different be able to: 1) Describe the relevance of modernapproach as practiced by Andre Green and his gender theories for understanding female patientscolleagues in France. The continued focus will be on in light of their, often, complex reactions to ambitionnon-neurotic pathologies generally including borderline and leadership; 2) Describe how the perpetuationpatients. The clinical consequences of Green’s approach of previous psychoanalytic notions of women’sincluding his management of the transference will be development continue to play a complex role inelaborated on (interpretation in the transference rather shaping analytic understanding and process aroundthan interpretation of the transference). Most of the women’s experiences and concerns about ambitionsession will be an overview of Greens’ vast contributions and leadership.to our field before he passed away a few months ago.Participants are urged to read the following article which Discussion Group 67: Psychoanalytic Perspectivessummarizes Green’s complex thinking: Reed, G. and on the Dissociative Disorders CEC PSYTBaudry, F. (2005) Conflict, Structure and Absence, Andre Chair: Richard P. Kluft, M.D. (Bala Cynwyd, PA) T H U R S DAYGreen on Borderline and Narcissistic Pathology Psa.Q. Co-chair: Ira Brenner, M.D. (Bala Cynwyd, PA)LXXIV, p 121-155. Presenter: Elizabeth Howell, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)After attending session, participants should be able to: This discussion group will explore the interface1) Describe the breadth and scope of Green’s theoretical of psychoanalytic and dissociative disorders theorycontributions particularly as applied to non-neurotic and practice in the study of dissociation and thepathology; 2) Recognize the clinical consequences dissociative disorders. The presentation of a patientof Green’s approach including his management with a dissociative disorder treated in analysis or analyticof the transference. psychotherapy will be followed by the intense study and discussion of transcripts of a series of treatmentDiscussion Group 66: Psychoanalytic Perspectives sessions, allowing the group to track and explore theon Women and their Experience of Competence, ongoing process of the therapeutic work, assess theAmbition and Leadership CEC SOC impact of interventions upon dissociative defensesCo-chairs: Frances Arnold, Ph.D. (Cambridge, MA) and processes, and follow the vicissitudes of memory, Stephanie Brody, Psy.D. (Lexington, MA) transference countertransference reenactments, and enactments across dissociated states.Note: This program is intended to satisfy therequirements of those states that require CE credits After attending this session, participants should be ablein the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, to: 1) Describe manifestation of defensive processesbut the final judgment for such qualification is made in the characteristics, interactions, and switches ofby each state’s board. dissociated aspects of mental structure and function; 2) Appraise the meanings of switch processes occurringThis discussion group will compare psychoanalytic during sessions and their participation in the relationshipperspectives on women through the lens of between the dissociative patient and the analyst.leadership and ambition. As women continue to gainunprecedented prominence and influence in business, Discussion Group 68: Analytic Listening:government, medicine and law, our own field is inspired Reflections on Hypothesis and Evidence CECby postmodern psychoanalytic ideas regarding female Chair: Evelyne Albrecht Schwaber, M.D.ambition and the desire for success. Though these (Brookline, MA)theories have resolved to abandon the notion of women Co-chair: Ralph Beaumont, M.D. (Portland, OR)as unequipped, theoretical rifts and biases continue www.apsa.org 29
  • 31. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued) The focus of this session will be on the centrality of There is increased pressure on child and adolescent the data-gathering process and consideration of the clinicians to provide brief and symptom-focused distinctions between hypotheses — which may derive treatments. Pressures from parents, schools, and from psychoanalytic theories — and the evidence for managed care warrant against the provision of long- them, in listening to the patient. Looking closely at term, in-depth treatment. The combination of societal process notes of single session(s), effort will be made pressures, the child’s or adolescent’s resistances, and to sharpen the view on nuances of communications, parental resistance can present formidable challenges. verbal and nonverbal (e.g., shifts in affect or state, tone This discussion group will provide a forum for discussing of voice, pauses, posture, etc.), as these may provide overt and unconscious obstacles to in-depth treatment entree into experience still unconscious. Attendance for children and adolescents as well as technical issues will be highlighted on cues that may be otherwise designed to facilitate movement towards more depth. overlooked, as we reflect on assumptions and inferences The format will include a brief discussion of conceptual — whatever the espoused theoretical model — to see and technical issues followed by case presentations and how these may or may not hold up or stand in the way group discussion. of opening yet untried paths. A suggested reading list After attending this session, participants should be able will be sent to those who pre-register. to: 1) Identify indicators in children and adolescents of After attending this session, participants should be able the need for in-depth work and the ability to benefit from to: 1) Develop awareness of how one listens, noting psychoanalysis; 2) Develop skills for talking with parents distinctions and their ramifications between hypotheses and with child and adolescent patients about deepening generated, and evidence for them; 2) Detect verbal and intensifying therapeutic work.T H U R S DAY and nonverbal cues that may be otherwise overlooked in considering further implications in the nature of Discussion Group 71: The Analyst’s Experience therapeutic action. of Loss and Death CEC Co-chairs: Anne J. Adelman, Ph.D. (Bethesda, MD) Discussion Group 69: Psychoanalysis and the Sybil Houlding, M.S.W. (New Haven, CT) Humanities and Social Sciences CEC SOC Kerry Malawista, Ph.D.* (Potomac, MD) Chair: Melvin R. Lansky, M.D. (Los Angeles, CA) Presenter: Ellen Pinsky, Psy.D. (Cambridge, MA) Co-chair: Robert A. Paul, Ph.D. (Atlanta, GA) When an analyst experiences a loss, s/he often finds Presenter: Sule Ozler, Ph.D.* (Santa Monica) him or herself in an extraordinary, solitary position. This presentation will be based on four of Adam Smith’s There is little literature that addresses the bereaved works. Smith, known as the father of economics, also analyst. It may be hard to consider the intersection writes on moral philosophy. After a discussion of “The between the private worlds of analyst and patient. Wealth of Nations,” the paper uses the concept of defense This group explores the experience of death, loss, against interdependency to explain Smith’s philosophy. loneliness and isolation in the practice of psychoanalysis. The analysis benefits from attachment theory on the Dr. Ellen Pinsky will discuss the therapist’s experience effects of object loss. Superego analysis of the “Theory of mourning for her analyst. The unexpected loss and of Moral Sentiments” will also be discussed. requisite mourning process colors her subsequent professional development. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Apply psychoanalytic methods to the reading After attending this session, participants should be of important historical texts; 2) Use defense analysis, able to: 1) Examine the complex dynamics that arise attachment theory, and theories of object loss, and in the face of the analyst’s loss; 2) Develop a model for of the superego in analyzing classic works on morality understanding the transference-countertransference and economics. issues inherent in the experience of the analyst’s loss. Discussion Group 70: Deepening Child Discussion Group 72: Impasses Treatment: Extending the Clinical Surface in Psychoanalysis CEC in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy and Chairs: Steven H. Goldberg, M.D. Psychoanalysis CEC PSYT (San Francisco, CA) Co-chairs: Edward I. Kohn, M.D. (Cincinnati, OH) Judy L. Kantrowitz, Ph.D. (Brookline, MA) Sydney Anderson, Ph.D. In this discussion group, participants will study the (Bloomington, IN) factors in both patient and analyst that contribute to Presenter: Denia Barrett, M.S.W. (Chicago, IL) the development of impasses and analytic “failures.” 30 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 32. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued)In particular, using detailed case presentations, material of two or three sessions, the intrapsychic andparticipants will examine the subtle ways in which patient interpersonal knots of such situations will be unraveled.and analyst elicit in each other emotional experiences It is hoped that both the novice and the experiencedthat cannot be adequately processed and understood. clinician will benefit by participating in such an exercise.This discussion group will attempt to normalize the After attending this session, participants should be ableexperience of struggling with such cases. Even though to: 1) Express empathy better with patients strugglingall analysts find themselves dealing with impasses with difficult situations and analysts dealing clinically withand analytic failures, such experiences often become them; 2) Demonstrate an ability to technically handlesources of shame rather than opportunities for learning such situations in a more proficient way.and personal/professional growth.After attending this session, participants should be able Discussion Group 75: A Classic Unvisited: Theto: 1) Differentiate impasses and analytic “failure” from Clinical Value of the Ideas of Wilfred Bion CECmore expectable processes of resistance and working Chair: Irene Cairo, M.D. (New York, NY)through; 2) Recognize contributions of both patient and Co-chair: Rogelio Sosnik, M.D. (New York, NY)analyst to the impasse, as well as greater appreciation Presenter: Beth Steinberg, Ph.D.for the necessity of self-analytic work and/or consultation (San Francisco, CA)in the resolution of the impasse. Wilfred Bion’s model of mental functioning is anchored strongly on Freud’s and Klein’s theories: yet it providesDiscussion Group 73: Trauma and a new and different tool for approaching the process.Mastery Through Art: Egon Schiele: T H U R S DAY For Bion, the encounter of two minds produces anA Self in Creation CEC emotional storm where both participants approachChair: Theodore J. Jacobs, M.D. (New York, NY) the meeting with specific expectations. SessionCo-chair: Bennett Markel, M.D. (Berkeley, CA) material will be presented to show how Bion’s modelPresenter: Danielle Knafo, Ph.D.* (Great Neck, NY) can affect the apprehension of clinical material, withThis discussion group will feature a slide-lecture a particular emphasis on expanding the analyst’spresentation by psychoanalyst and art critic, Danielle capacity for interpretation.Knafo, Ph.D., on the fascinating life and haunting work After attending this session, participants should be ableof fin-de-siècle Austrian Expressionist artist, Egon to: 1) Identify several central theoretical ideas of WilfredSchiele. Knafo’s lecture, based on her book of the artist, Bion; 2) Recognize the specific ways such ideas arewill demonstrate how Schiele’s childhood traumas were used clinically.both exhibited and mastered in his art, and that heemployed his art not only to express himself but also Discussion Group 76: Research on the Relationto create a self. of Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience CECAfter attending this session, participants should Chair: Charles P. Fisher, M.D.be able to: 1) Identify ways in which an artist’s early (San Francisco, CA)life events can become primary determinants of his art; Co-chair: George Fishman, M.D.2) Describe how the creative process can be enlisted (Chestnut Hill, MA)to master trauma. Presenter: Mark Solms, Ph.D.* (Cape Town, South Africa)Discussion Group 74: Disruptions, Dilemmas, Dr. Solms will present a compelling thesis that “turnsand Difficult Decisions CEC the talking cure on its head” while preserving Freud’sCo-chairs: Salman Akhtar, M.D. (Ardmore, PA) fundamental discoveries. Freud saw the ego as the seat Axel Hoffer, M.D. (Brookline, MA) of consciousness and the id as deeply unconscious.Presenter: Maurine Kelly, Ph.D. (Silver Spring, MD) However modern neuroscience suggests thatThis discussion group will focus upon moments of consciousness is generated in primitive brain structuresdifficulty in the analytic process and their technical that mediate instinctual drives, while the higher structureshandling. Such difficulty might arise from variables within that represent the external world are unconscious inthe patient (e.g., strong resistance, shallowness, lying), themselves. Is the id conscious and the ego unconscious?the analyst (e.g., countertransference blocks), the dyad This revision would resolve certain difficulties with(e.g., cultural differences), or the external reality (e.g., Freud’s original formulations, while reinforcing the clinicaljob opportunities outside the town). Utilizing detailed utility of his basic concepts. The group will discuss howhistorical background of a patient and verbatim clinical this revised model clarifies clinical work. www.apsa.org 31
  • 33. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued) After attending this session, participants should be able This group will focus on childhood trauma, including to: 1) Summarize the evidence for a revised model of tragedies involving mass casualties. Dr. Steven Marans consciousness associating consciousness with Freud’s will present new understanding and collaborative id, rather than ego; 2) Present a brief clinical vignette treatment approaches that recognize the key role of and discuss it in relation to this revised model. educators, police and other professionals helping traumatized children and families. Dr. Marans, Harris Discussion Group 77: Psychoanalytic Approaches Professor of Child Psychiatry at Yale, has co-developed to the Seriously Disturbed Patient CEC PSYT interventions for traumatized children, including the Child Chair: Eric M. Marcus, M.D. (New York, NY) Development- Community Policing program and the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI). The discussion group will hear history and process A founding member of the National Child Traumatic material from the intensive psychotherapy or Stress Network, Dr. Marans currently serves as a psychoanalysis of a seriously disturbed patient. member of the U.S. Attorney General’s Task Force Problems inherent in such work will be explored from on Children Exposed to Violence. the point of view of the rationale for using psycho- dynamic technique, supportive and exploratory After attending this session, participants should be principles, and consequences for transference and able to: 1) Summarize current views of acute childhood counter-transference responses. trauma and risk/protective factors that contribute to recovery; 2) Apply psychoanalytic development After attending this session, participants should be able principles to collaborative responses to childhood to: 1) Evaluate, compare and contrast and enhance their trauma by clinicians, police, educators, and otherT H U R S DAY own work with this patient cohort; 2) Summarize the professionals working with children. rationale for using intensive psycho-dynamic techniques. Discussion Group 80: Fatherhood: Discussion Group 78: The Vulnerable Child: As Generations Speak CEC Children Out of Control: Working With Chairs: Wendy Katz, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Unregulated Affect CEC SOC Phillip Blumberg, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Co-chairs: M. Hossein Etezady, M.D. (Malvern, PA) Presenter: Dodi Goldman, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Mary Davis, M.D. (Lancaster, PA) Discussant: Wendy Katz, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Presenters & Discussants: Kerry Novick (Ann Arbor, MI) Generational differences entail oedipal struggle. Jack Novick, Ph.D. (Ann Arbor, MI) While each younger generation must learn to tolerate feelings of rivalry, exclusion and difference, each older This discussion group focuses on children who are generation too is transformed as it chooses whether at risk in various ways, including because of problems to give way generatively or to respond with hostility and with self and affect regulation. The group will discuss destructiveness. Generational dialogue, indispensable working with children with aggressive and violent for both generations, is the process by which shifts in behavior towards others, and with self-destructive and generational relations are unconsciously and mutually self-defeating activities, using a two-system model of negotiated. At various points in individual development, self-regulation. Kerry Novick, and Jack Novick, Ph.D., doubts about the self rekindle a need for generational child analysts will discuss their work with a spectrum dialogue. Clinical examples illustrate the unconscious of techniques for intervention, management, and growth search for generational dialogue with father and how useful in clinical settings and in consultations. it might be engendered or thwarted in analytic work. After attending this session, participants should be After attending this session, participants should be able able to: 1) Recognize ways to think about problems to: 1) Apply the concept of unconscious generational in self and affect regulation in children. 2) Describe the dialogue; 2) Identify the “sorting out” process by which two-system developmental model of self-regulation. doubts about the self are negotiated at various stages of the life cycle. Discussion Group 79: Educators and Analysts Working Together: Helping Child Victims of Violence, Trauma and Tragedy CEC SOC Chair: Stephen D. Kerzner, M.D. (Duxbury, MA) Co-chair: Daniel B. Frank, Ph.D.* (Chicago, IL) Presenter: Steven Marans, M.S.W., Ph.D. (New Haven, CT) 32 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 34. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued)Discussion Group 81: Female Sexual Development Discussion Group 83: PsychoanalysisChild Case Development CEC and the Internet: Is Cyberspace ShiftingCo-chairs: Lester H. Friedman, M.D. Our Paradigms? CEC (Great Barrington, MA) Co-chairs: Nancy C. Winters, M.D. (Portland, OR) Alexander D. Kalogerakis, M.D. Scott M. Murray, M.D. (Portland, OR) (New York, NY) Presenter: Saskia Hostetler-Lippy, M.D. Christian Maetzener, M.D. (New York, NY) (Portland, OR) Mary M. Sickles, M.D. (New York, NY) Discussant: Darlene Ehrenberg, Ph.D.*Presenter: Daniel W. Prezant, Ph.D. (New York, NY) (New York, NY)This discussion group will explore the developmental The Internet is transforming human experience in multipleissues that affect sexual development in girls and spheres, ranging from the political to the personal.women. The group will feature a presentation of an So it goes with psychoanalysis, as “cyber-analysis”analysis of a girl to provide the group with data to via Skype® or iChat becomes more common, e-mailconsider the various theoretical and clinical issues exchanges more prevalent, and information aboutaffecting sexual development. analysts and analysands is readily available in cyberspace. Along with these changes, telephone analysis hasAfter attending this session, participants should be able become more accepted. These new modalitiesto: 1) Describe the major areas of early development; challenge traditional psychoanalytic assumptions about2) Describe internal conflicts that influence sexual identity. analytic frame, anonymity, privacy, and the nature of the intersubjective experience in analysis. A clinical T H U R S DAYDiscussion Group 82: Treating the presentation will serve as a springboard for participantsSuicidal Patient CEC PSYT to explore the Internet’s little understood influencesChair: Joan Wheelis, M.D. (Cambridge, MA) on psychoanalytic practice — and theory.Presenter: Mark J. Goldblatt, M.D.* (Cambridge, MA)Discussants: Elsa Ronningstam., Ph.D. (Belmont, MA) After attending this session, participants should be Mark Schechter, M.D.* (Needham, MA) able to: 1) Describe aspects of psychoanalytic practice that may be shifting with the widespread influence ofThis discussion group is intended for clinicians treating Internet technologies; 2) Describe aspects of the dyadicpatients with acute or chronic suicidality. Suicide has experience in analysis that may be qualitatively differenthistorically been associated with depression and has with the use of Internet technology.been conceptualized as aggression directed towardsthe self. However, advances in psychoanalytic Discussion Group 84: Thinking About Primitivestudies have added important perspectives, such as Mental States CECunderdeveloped mentalization, conflicting ego-ideals, Co-chairs: Lynne Zeavin, Psy.D. (New York, NY)neurobiological vulnerability and the impact of shame. Lindsay Clarkson, M.D.Additionally research in emotional and cognitive (Chevy Chase, MD)dysregulation, has enriched our understanding of Kay Long, Ph.D. (New Haven, CT)suicidality. Treatments such as Mentalization Based Shelley Rockwell, Ph.D.*Therapy (MBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), (Washington, DC)and Transference Focused Psychotherapy (TFP), which Presenter: Robin W. Dean, J.D., Psy.D.*have been extensively studied for the suicidal borderline (Washington, DC)patient, offer new psychotherapeutic considerations fortreating suicidal patients. This discussion group will provide an opportunity to develop an understanding of those primitive mentalAfter attending this session, participants should be states that emerge in all analyses, even with our lessable to: 1) Identify specific experiences and affects disturbed patients. Using Kleinian theory and technique,that contribute to suicidality; 2) Analyze elements of participants will closely follow clinical material in anpsychoanalytical treatment of suicidal preoccupations effort to explore manifestations of early anxieties inand compare with alternative perspectives. the transference/countertransference. The focus will be patients who are difficult to reach; patients who are driven to undo the analytic work; patients whose narcissism makes contact with a live and separate analyst a terrible risk. A group can provide a setting that is essential for the recognition of what is taking place between patient and analyst. www.apsa.org 33
  • 35. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued) After attending this session, participants should be Discussion Group 86: “Facing Death” able to: 1) Distinguish levels of psychic functioning Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic on a continuum from the more organized to the Psychotherapy of Patients more disturbed; 2) Identify and make use of their with Cancer CEC PSYT countertransference responses to inform their Chair: Norman Straker, M.D. (New York, NY) analytic interventions. Presenter: Dan Birger, M.D. (New York, NY) Daniel Birger, M.D is a senior analyst who miraculously 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. recovered from sepsis and aplastic anemia, one year Two-Day Clinical Workshop #1: Workshop ago. He will describe the several weeks he spent in a Series in Analytic Process and Technique Reverse Isolation Unit where he faced death several (Part 2) CEC CND times fully aware that there was no cure for his illness. He describes the anxiety he experienced about dying, Two-Day Clinical Workshop #2: Workshop and the psychological steps he took to manage his Series in Analytic Process and Technique terror. His self-analysis, the coping strategy he found (Part 2) CEC CND most useful, will also be talked about. Issues for discussion will include how a psychoanalyst approaches Two-Day Clinical Workshop #3: Workshop anxiety about death for himself and with his patients. Series in Analytic Process and Technique The discussion group leader is a professor of psychiatry (Part 2) CEC CND at Weill Cornell, and has been a consultant at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for over 35 years.T H U R S DAY Two-Day Clinical Workshop #4: Psychotherapy After attending this session, participants should be Technique and Process (Part 2) CEC CND PSYT able to: 1) Recognize the special treatment parameters required when treating cancer patients and family Two-Day Clinical Workshop #5: Workshop members during times of illness or death; 2) Recognize Series in Analytic Process and Technique counter transference issues when the analyst faces (Part 2) CEC CND illness and death. Child and Adolescent Two-Day Clinical Workshop Discussion Group 87: The Inside Focus: (Part 2) CEC Listening for Affect and Defense Inside the Clinical Hour CEC Discussion Group 85: Trauma in the Transference: Chair: Lawrence Levenson, M.D. Analyzing Pre-mentalistic Thinking in the Area of (New Haven, CT) the Traumatization of an Otherwise Successful Co-chair Joan F. Poll, M.D. (Westport, CT) Survivor of Childhood Trauma CEC Presenter: David Hershey, M.D. (Dallas, TX) Chair: Richard K. Hertel, Ph.D. (Ann Arbor, MI) In this discussion group, the focus will be on the From process notes will be described the analysis of patient’s mind in conflict in the here-and-now of the a fixation involving pre-mentalistic thinking (Fonagy 2004) analytic hour. Identifying moments in a session when in an area of trauma that had remained dissociated from a patient experiences conflict over what he or she is the functioning of an otherwise highly productive survivor revealing to the analyst and responds with unconscious of severe, developmentally early, sexual and attachment defense will be discussed as well as the how and when trauma. Analysis of the three modes of pre-mentalistic (and why) the analyst calls attention to such moments. thinking, teleological, pretend, and psychic equivalence, Detailed process notes from an ongoing analysis led to a gradual containment of previously overwhelming conducted by a senior analyst familiar with this branch affects, and a rechanneling of them into effective of defense analysis will be presented. assertiveness and pleasure seeking activity bringing a greatly increased sense of agency. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify the principles of close process attention After attending this session, participants should be able methodology; 2) Recognize the writings about this to: 1) Identify the three modes of pre-mentalistic thinking; branch of defense analysis; and describe how this 2) Develop treatment strategies for their treatment. methodology differs from traditional analytic approaches. 34 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 36. DA I LY S C H ED U L E4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued)Discussion Group 88: Post-Termination Contact: personality and psychopathology). Colleagues are invitedLooking Back and Planning for Retirement CEC to give feedback on the PDM-2 project so that — unlikeChair: Mary Kay O’Neil, Ph.D* (Montreal, QC) the development of the DSM-5 — the views of corePresenter: Barbara S. Rocah, M.D. (Chicago, IL) constituents may be integrated early in the process.This discussion group will consider the issue of After attending this session participants should be ableretirement and post-termination. At the time of retirement to: 1) Apply the PDM to case formulation and researchan analyst looks back over a lifetime of practice. design; 2) Evaluate the clinical utility of the PDM/PDM2The presenter, a recent retiree, will re-visit a planned for use in descriptive diagnosis, treatment formulation,post-termination contact, supervised by an eminent outcome assessment, and research on personalitysupervisor. Looking back, the presenter will consider and psychopathology.what was learned from this planned post-terminationcontact and how subsequent practice was affected. Discussion Group 90: Helping the HelperThoughts, attitudes and practicalities with regard to Survive the Profession CEC CND PSYTto post-termination at the time of retirement will be Co-chairs: Andrea Celenza, Ph.D. (Lexington, MA)considered. Participants should recognize that the Ronald Fleischmann, M.D. (Dallas, TX)decision to end permanently or to have post-termination Presenter: Paula Moreci, M.S.W., LCSWcontact, possibly long distance, must be based on (Pittsburgh, PA)the vicissitudes of each analytic relationship; and that This discussion group will explore the special problemsearly supervision greatly influences one’s attitude and that psychoanalysts and all mental health professionalspractice in relation to post-termination contact at the T H U R S DAY (MHPs) face in practicing their profession. Thetime of retirement. requirements of the work, especially the “decentering”After attending this session, participants should be able and self-deprivation that abstinence and asymmetryto: 1) Identify the benefit of planned post-termination requires, can result in a psychologically depleted self-contact under supervision both for the patient and for an state. The group will utilize case material; focusinganalytic practice; 2) Summarize the factors that affect the on segments of the treatment that will illustrate thesedecision to end permanently or to have post-termination issues with the elucidation of what internal and externalcontact, possibly long distance. resources are available to struggling practitioners. In particular we will highlight the importance ofDiscussion Group 89: Research in introspection, consultation and periodic return toPsychoanalysis: Creating the Psychodynamic treatment in sustaining a methodology for practionersDiagnostic Manual, Version 2 (PDM-2): to regain a balance between theraputic engagementConceptual and Empirical Issues CEC PSYT and objectivity as opposed to succumbing to ineffectiveThis session is co-organized by the American or self-destructive modes of coping.Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamic After attending this session, participants should bePsychoanalytic Research Society. able to: 1) Identify what factors contribute to all MHPsChair: Robert J. Waldinger, M.D. engaging in ineffective modes of coping with patients (West Newton, MA) they are treating; 2) Apply a humane understandingPresenters: Robert Bornstein, Ph.D. (Garden City, NY) to all MHPs they are treating who are having difficulty Francesco Gazzillo, Ph.D.* (Rome, Italy) in their professional work. Vittorio Lingiardi, M.D.* (Rome, Italy) Robert M. Gordon, Ph.D., ABPP* Discussion Group 91: The Application of (Allentown, PA) Psychoanalytic Thinking to Social Problems:Discussant: Nancy McWilliams, Ph.D. (Flemington, NJ) Frontline Mothers at a Trauma Vortex CEC SOC Chair: Nadia Ramzy, Ph.D. (Saint Louis, MO)This session will focus on discussion for the next step Presenter: Judy S. Roth, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)to make the “Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual” (PDM)more practitioner and researcher friendly. To this end, This discussion group continues in its exploration ofwork has begun developing PDM-2. Faculty will present the Palestinian/Israeli conflict, with clinical psychologistthe conceptual and methodological issues that have and psychoanalyst, Judy Roth, Ph.D, presenting herarisen during this process, and issues related to reliability, psychoanalytical and ethnographic work with Palestinianvalidity, and clinical utility (i.e., ways to make the PDM mothers at the frontline of political violence and terror.more applicable to descriptive diagnosis, treatment Through listening to Dr. Roth’s material, and therebyformulation, outcome assessment, and research on participating in witnessing the trauma into which these www.apsa.org 35
  • 37. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued) mothers are plummeted, participants have an experiental After attending this session, participants should opportunity in the discussion process to deepen be able to: 1) Explain the psychology of addictive empathy for the “other.” In addition, the discussion behavior; 2) Recognize common problems that arise provides an opportunity for building more active in psychoanalytic treatment of such patients, including witnessing by including psychoanalysts and others characteristic countertransference issues. who identify with varying sides of the conflict, and who are dedicated to engaging in a discourse whose aim Discussion Group 94: Writing About Your Analytic is a just peace in the area. Work in a Case Report CEC CND Chair: Stephen B Bernstein, M.D. After attending this session, participants should be (Chestnut Hill, MA) able to: 1) Identify at least two types of traumatogenic Co-chairs: Melvin Bornstein, M.D. (Birmingham., MI) instances affecting Palestinian mothers and children; Jonathan Palmer, M.D. (Newton, MA) 2) Describe at least two dimensions of the “trauma Arthur Rosenbaum, M.D. vortex” and to describe at least two examples of (Cleveland Heights, OH) psychic responses to the “trauma vortex.” Peggy Warren, M.D. (Waban, MA) Presenter: Charis Cladouhos, M.D. (Waban, MA) Discussion Group 92: Conflicting Subjectivities and Self-Interests of the Patient and Analyst: Analysts are often called upon to describe their analytic Analysts’ Vulnerability and Conflict Surrounding work in written form. Clinical psychoanalysis is a the End of Analysis CEC spoken process: however it is through a written process Co-chairs: Margaret Crastnopol, Ph.D. (Seattle, WA) that much of the psychoanalyst’s reflection, learning,T H U R S DAY Irwin Hirsch, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) teaching, transmission of clinical data, and research Presenter: Christopher Bonovitz, Psy.D.* occurs. This discussion group will focus on the (New York, NY) translation of clinical work from spoken to written modes. It is led by analysts who have had significant This discussion group will focus on ways the analyst’s experience in teaching about clinical writing. character structure, preferred or comfortable ways of relating to others, life stresses, and theoretical After attending this session, participants should be able allegiances have significant impact, for better and for to: 1) Organize and write about the analyst’s work in worse, on all clinical engagement. Participants will draw a case report; 2) Communicate the specific experience on the growing body of literature on the interplay of the of both patient and analyst in the clinical account. irreducible subjectivity of analytic participants as analysts face the cumulative effects of these complex and often Discussion Group 95: Advocacy for subtle interactions between analyst and patient. Clinical Psychoanalysis: Implications of Jaffee v. material from the analytic work of the co-chairs and/or Redmond: Federal Psychotherapist-Patient an invited presenter will attempt to illustrate the often Privilege (Sponsored by the Committee enormous influence of the person of the analyst on the on Confidentiality) CEC overall patient-therapist mesh. Co-chairs: Norman A. Clemens, M.D. (Cleveland Heights, OH) After attending this session, participants should be Paul W. Mosher, M.D. (Albany, NY) able to: 1) Evaluate to what degree analyst and patient Discussant: Seth Stein, Esq.* (New York, NY) are working in tandem or at cross-purposes vis-à-vis desired analytic goals; 2) Identify potentially problematic Since 1996, this discussion group has studied the aspects of the clinician’s participation; and modify the Supreme Court decision in Jaffee v. Redmond and quality of the interaction with the aim of optimizing the followed its many consequences with implications for patient’s growth. clinical practice. These include effects on federal and state court proceedings as well as the HIPPAA Privacy Discussion Group 93: The Patient with Addiction Rule. With the push towards widespread use and in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy CEC PSYT transmission of electronic medical records and with Chair: Lance M. Dodes, M.D. (Newton, MA) other prospective changes to the health care system, many new challenges to privacy and confidentiality This discussion group will explore the psychology have arisen. Originally sponsored by the Committee on and treatment in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy Confidentiality, this Discussion Group engages practicing of patients suffering with an addiction. Both the psychoanalysts in learning about these important issues opportunities and challenges in treating these patients and how to deal with them. will be examined. 36 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 38. DA I LY S C H ED U L E4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued)After attending this session, participants should be Discussion Group 98: Psychoanalytic Perspectivesable to: 1) Describe recent developments in the clinical on Opera: Mozart’s Don Giovanni with Specialand legal consequences of the 1996 Jaffee-Redmond Reference to Kierkegaard’s Either/Or CEC PSYTdecision, with particular attention to the dimensions of Co-chairs: N. Lynn Buell, MSSW (Seattle, WI)privacy, confidentiality, and privilege as they apply to the Ralph Beaumont, M.D. (Portland, OR)personal information disclosed in psychotherapy and Presenters: Melvin Lansky, M.D. (Los Angeles, CA)psychoanalysis; 2) Apply this knowledge to protect their Professor John H. Muller (New York, NY)patients and their therapy. Professor John Muller of the Juilliard School and Dr. Melvin Lansky will explore the application ofDiscussion Group 96: The Contributions psychoanalytic concepts in the understanding andto Psychoanalysis of Paul Gray CEC analysis of meanings related to opera. They will exploreChair: R. Curtis Bristol, M.D. (Washington, DC) the latent meanings in the manifest content of operaPresenter: Monroe Pray, M.D. (Bethesda, MD) libretti and music, in the characters portrayed and in theDiscussant: Todd Davison, M.D. (Glendale, WI) narrative structures, and in the biographies and creativeThis discussion group will read selections from Paul processes of the composers and librettists.Gray’s papers and discuss highlighted passages chosen After attending this session, participants should be ableby the chair and co-chairs. In the discussion of these to: 1) Help develop professional competence by helpingpassages the group will be re-acquainted with Paul analysts apply analytic ideas more flexibly and creativelyGray’s salient contributions to psychoanalysis. to operas and their creators, and by analogy to a wide T H U R S DAYAfter attending this session, participants should be able array of artistic and cultural expressions and clinicalto: 1) Identify various self-analytic techniques based situations; 2) Help the clinician understand the relationon Paul Gray’s work; 2) Apply some of his theoretical between expressive content, whether in clinical sessionsand technical suggestions in the treatment of patients or on the opera stage, whether inarticulately non-verbalin psychoanalysis or psychotherapy. or crossing the border from the non-verbal to the verbal and dramatically articulate, and psychoanalyticDiscussion Group 97: Psychodynamic Problems understanding in theoretically cogent form.in Organizations CECChair & Discussion Group 99: Balint Groups and NarrativeDiscussant: Kenneth Settel, M.D. (Brookline, MA) Medicine: The Experience of Training to BecomeCo-chair & a Balint Group Leader CEC SOCDiscussant: Kerry Sulkowicz, M.D. (New York, NY) Co-chairs: Fred L. Griffin, M.D. (Dallas, TX)Presenter: Edward Shapiro, M.D. (Stockbridge, MA) Randall H. Paulsen, M.D. (Lexington, MA) Presenter: Eran Metzger, M.D.* (Brookline, MA)The discussion group will focus on organizationaldynamics and leadership at Austen Riggs during The development of Balint groups in post-WWII EnglandDr. Shapiro’s tenure as leader. The session will look included Tavistock group process and elements ofat the challenges in bringing in outside consultants at psychoanalytic theory and practice. The original groupsperiods of crisis. What is the relevance of organizational were provided for family practice doctors and generaldynamics for psychoanalysis, the role of Riggs as practitioners who were overwhelmed with the mentala psychoanalytic institution, and to Dr. Don Rosen, health needs in their offices. These groups werethe new medical director, in going forward? developed by Michael Balint, and his wife Enid Balint. The American Balint Society has continued to refineAfter attending this session, participants should the basic elements of training Balint group leaders.be able to: 1) Describe the organizational pressures Dr. Metzger, a psychodynamic consultation-liaisonpresent in an institution that uses psychoanalytic psychiatrist, will present aspects of his participationunderstanding for helping emotionally troubled in the training program of the American Balint Society.individuals; 2) Demonstrate the tools needed to workbetter in such an environment to prepare for change After attending this session, participants should be ableand to facilitate transitions in leadership. to: 1) Describe the usefulness of Balint group training for physicians, psychologists, and all clinicians where the relationship with their patients/clients is a central part of their clinical activity; 2) Identify the key elements of Balint group leader training, in particular the role of self-understanding in group process facilitation. www.apsa.org 37
  • 39. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (continued) Discussion Group 100: Psychoanalytic Treatment Discussion Group 102: Creativity from of Eating Disorders and Body Image Concerns the Viewpoint of Psychoanalysis CEC Across the Life Cycle CEC Chair & Chair: Kathryn J. Zerbe, M.D. (Portland, OR) Presenter: Jon Meyer, M.D. (Lutherville, MD) Presenter: Rita K. Teusch, Ph.D. (Cambridge, MA) Discussant: J. David Miller, M.D. (Washington, DC) This discussion group is intended for clinicians treating The group will discuss the identification of, and work patients with eating disorder and body image problems with, the elements of creativity of the analyst and in their practices. Advances in psychoanalytic theory the clinical situation as they contribute to analytic over the past three decades and the refractory syntheses and integrations. Emphasis will be given to nature of eating and body image problems without the analyst’s work in self-analysis, reanalysis, and within psychodynamic work support its application in this range the countertransference as the analyst deals with the of problems. A case in psychoanalysis will be presented patient’s re-experiencing and re-enacting past conflicts to demonstrate how eating disorder patients benefit and traumas. The universal humanity of the analyst’s and from interpretation, are able to dream and to fantasize, patient’s situations in those clinical circumstances will and make use of reconstructing hidden but meaningful be amplified through both classical and modern poetry elements of their personal history. The discussion group and evocative photographic images. The post-analytic will begin by reviewing some literature and new research effects of creativity in clinical work will be outlined. on the topic and then move to process notes of the case After attending this session, participants should be to actively engage the participants. able to: 1) Identify the potential for creativity in the workT H U R S DAY After attending this session, participants should be of psychoanalysis; 2) Apply that technical skill to the able to: 1) List three ways that psychoanalytic principles development of creativity in the clinical dyad. can be useful with this patient population; 2) Apply psychodynamic formulation in a pragmatic way to assist 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. patient care. Clinical Conference #1 for Residents, Psychology and Social Work Trainees, and Students, Discussion Group 101: On Being Supervised: Presented by APsaA Fellows: Psychotherapy Following the Clinical Evidence CEC CND and the Convergence of Race, Sexuality Chair: Hilli Dagony-Clark, Psy.D. (New York, NY) and Religion CEC Presenters: Arthur Lynch, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Chair: Sharmin Ghaznavi, M.D., Ph.D. Melinda Gallagher, M.A.* (New York, NY) (Cambridge, MA) In this in-vivo supervision session featuring the clinical Faculty: Dorothy Holmes, Ph.D. (Bluffton, SC) work of Ms. Melinda Gallagher, renowned analyst Dr. Michael Moskowitz, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Arthur Lynch will demonstrate the utility of the close Presenter: Elizabeth Baumann, Ph.D. process listening approach that characterizes modern (Cambridge, MA) conflict theory. Listening for both derivative and Note: This program is intended to satisfy the transference material, he will elucidate predominate requirements of those states that require CE credits conflicts as they arise in the clinical material, particularly in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, focusing on the inherent distance between intrapsychic but the final judgment for such qualification is made tension and ensuing coping strategies. This discussion by each state’s board. group is intended for both supervisors and trainees interested on sharpening their understanding of modern This presentation will explore a treatment that highlights conflict theory technique. the intersecting dynamics of race, gender, sexual orientation and religion in the patient therapist dyad. In After attending this session, participants should be addition to examining how the treatment shifted along able to: 1) Recognize how to listen for unconscious these multiple axes of identity, the session will also conflict present in clinical material; 2) Identify effective explore the course of the therapy through the lens of the supervision techniques involving modern conflict patient’s diagnostic picture, early attachment history and theory approach. life experiences of marginalization. 38 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 40. DA I LY S C H ED U L E4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. (continued)After attending this session, participants should be able transference/countertransference manifestations fromto: 1) Examine the importance of race, gender, sexual the first telephone contact. The roadblocks on theorientation, and religious identity in the working alliance, journey of psychotherapy and the importance of theand in transference-countertransference manifestations; frame will be discussed.2) Recognize when it is important to discuss issues After attending this session, participants should be ableof minority identity in the treatment room. to: 1) Identity and navigate the roadblocks to intensive psychotherapy; 2) Identify countertransference pressures7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. that interfere with the deepening process.Artist/Scholar-in-Residence: ReadingFreud Today: Questions for the Destiny Discussion Group 104: The Psychoanalyticof Psychoanalytic Education CEC Treatment of Patients with PsychosomaticChair: Dawn Skorczewski, Ph.D.* Symptoms: Suicidal Potential in Eating (Cambridge, MA) Disorders: A Reconsideration of the RoleArtist/Scholar: Deborah Britzman, Distinguished of Psychoanalytic Intervention CEC Research Professor* (Toronto, Canada) Chair: Phyllis L. Sloate, Ph.D. (New Rochelle, NY)Discussant: Paula Salvio, Professor of Education, Presenter: Muriel Gold Morris, M.D. (New York, NY) University of New Hampshire* Since psychoanalytic treatments have enabled many (Durham, NH) patients to resume a normal life, the possibility of a tragicThis session addresses psychoanalytic education today outcome in cases of self-induced eating disorders has T H U R S DAYfrom the vantage point of the concept of education virtually disappeared from our clinical discussions andin Freud’s writing. From Bildung (the bringing up of recent publications. Nevertheless, as the scandalouslyculture and life) to Nacherziehumg (after-education), publicized fatal case of Teresa Schiavo vividly illustrates,Freud forces us to examine the concept, destiny, bulimia is still a dangerous illness. Moreover, theand fate of psychoanalytic approaches to education. efficacy of psychoanalytic approaches for this and otherThroughout his papers, education takes on increasing psychosomatic conditions is not as well known in thesignificance, not only for the child but also for the adult public and medical domains as it needs and deserveswho bears the consequences of authority, love, and to be. Clinical descriptions of severe cases will bethe cultural conflicts surrounding his development. presented for discussion.Freud thought that the practices of education might After attending this session, participants should be ablerepresent an important future for psychoanalysis. Yet to: 1) Recognize and appraise the potential of an eatinghe also proposed a problem with such a future, namely disorder to lead to a suicidal medical emergency andeducation’s obligation to inhibit the drives and involve apply preventive clinical skills; 2) Describe how defectsitself in cultural frustration and neurosis. in the early environment of patients can set in playAfter attending this session, participants should be a psychodynamic with the potential to cause suicidalable to: 1) Describe the development of psychoanalytic self-destructiveness, even where there are many otherapproaches to education; 2) Discuss the ways Freud areas of healthy functioning.handled the question of education for children andadults and why this may be relevant for clinical work. Discussion Group 105: Towards an Understanding of Loneliness and Aloneness CEC PSYTDiscussion Group 103: Deepening Co-chairs: Arelene K. Richards, Ed.D. (New York, NY)the Treatment CEC CND PSYT Lucille Spira, C.S.W., Ph.D.*Co-chairs: Jane S. Hall, LCSW, FIPA (New York, NY) (New York, NY) Elizabeth Fritsch, Ph.D. (McLean, VA) Presenter: Arthur Lynch, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)Presenter: William H. Braun, Psy.D. (New York, NY) Literature provides many theories about loneliness.Many, if not most, of our patients can benefit from It can be seen as longing for a specific person fromintensive psychotherapy. How to engage our patients the past; mirroring; a lost aspect of the self, an intimatein a deeper treatment — rather than the once-a-week other and/or a social group. Dr. Arthur Lynch will presentcounseling they frequently ask for — is the topic of this a clinical case of a patient who suffers from loneliness.group. One focus will be strengthening the therapist’s The discussion will focus on differentiating the variousconviction and fostering his/her skill in allowing the longings. Defenses that produce or mitigate lonelinesspatient to consider the commitment involved in intensive will be addressed.treatment. Another focus will include listening for www.apsa.org 39
  • 41. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. (continued) After attending this session, participants should be The influence of a patient’s culture on his intrapsychic able to: 1) Distinguish between loneliness and solitude; conflicts can be subtle and possibly unrecognized by 2) Distinguish between the longings meant by complaints the analyst. The participation of Western psychoanalysts of loneliness. in the Skype treatment program of mental health professionals in China creates an interface of two Discussion Group 106: Psychoanalytic divergent cultures, which can afford opportunities for a Perspectives on Music: Music and deeper understanding of the interaction of culture and Human Development CEC psychoanalytic processes. Several clinical vignettes will Chair: Julie Jaffee Nagel, Ph.D. (Ann Arbor, MI) be presented by China American Psychoanalytic Alliance Presenter: Sunil Iyengar* (Washington, DC) (CAPA) members to illustrate cultural issues which Discussant: Stuart Twemlow, M.D. (Houston, TX) have arisen in the course of their work. These analytic developments require careful and tactful responses on The National Endowment for the Arts has created an the part of the clinician. Such issues can be extrapolated alliance of 15 federal agencies to promote research to any analytic situation. and information-sharing about the arts in human development. Two outcomes of these partnerships After attending this session, participants should be able are: 1) a National Academy of Sciences workshop to: 1) Describe the cultural and intrapsychic interfaces regarding arts relationship to well-being in older adults pertaining to psychoanalyses in other countries; and 2) an ongoing literature review and gap-analysis 2) Identify the specific cultural parameters to consider to inform research funding at the National Institutes while conducting Skype analyses in China. of Health. Additionally, the NEA is developing a protocolT H U R S DAY for the National Children’s Study to probe long-term Discussion Group 108: How to Write For effects of music exposure in children. Sunil Iyengar, Psychoanalytic Journals CEC CND Director of Research at the National Endowment for the Chairs: Muriel Dimen, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Arts, will discuss these initiatives and encourage input Elliot Jurist, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) from psychoanalysts about priority research questions. This discussion group will explore issues of writing After attending this session, participants should be able articles for publication in psychoanalytic journals. The to: 1) Explain the NEA and NIH initiatives regarding music group welcomes anyone who seeks to write for journals, and the arts; 2) Explore interdisciplinary collaboration both new and experienced authors. We will explore the between psychoanalysts and policy makers which choice of a subject, integrating theory and case material, encourages interdisciplinary research in mental health, and issues of confidentiality. We also will discuss the music, and the arts. choice of journal, how the peer review process works, interacting with editors and working with suggestions Discussion Group 107: Psychoanalysis and China: for revision, and other issues about publication that will Psychoanalysis and Culture CEC be raised by the group’s participants. We will discuss Co-chairs: Elise W. Snyder, M.D. (New York, NY) an example of a manuscript that went through the Lana P. Fishkin, M.D. (Bala Cynwyd, PA) review and revision process. The group will be led Presenters: Judith Eckman-Jadow, Ph.D.* by Muriel Dimen, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of “Studies (New York, NY) in Gender and Sexuality” and Elliot Jurist, JD, Ph.D., Ralph E. Fishkin, D.O. (Philadelphia, PA) editor of “Psychoanalytic Psychology.” Susan Frame, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) After attending this session, participants should Elizabeth Kleber, Ph.D.* (Haverford, PA) be able to: 1) Have a clear sense of how to write a Kristina C. MacGaffin, M.S.W.* psychoanalytic paper and submit it to a psychoanalytic (Tilgham, MD) journal; 2) Integrate editorial suggestions for revision Elizabeth Ronis, LCSW, BCD and see the process through to publication. (New York, NY) Note: This program is intended to satisfy the Discussion Group 109: Love, Sex, and the requirements of those states that require CE credits American Psyche: The Twentieth Century Example in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller CEC but the final judgment for such qualification is made Chair & by each state’s board. Presenter: R. Curtis Bristol, M.D. (Washington, DC) Discussant: Joseph D. Lichtenberg, M.D. (Bethesda, MD) 40 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 42. DA I LY S C H ED U L E7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. (continued)The fiftieth anniversary of Marilyn Monroe’s suicide/ Discussion Group 111: An Innovativemurder/overdose and the continuing popular and Approach to the Psychoanalyticacademic biographies reveal psychoanalytic insights Treatment of Children and Adolescents CECto her self observation: “Marilyn is like a veil I wear Chair &over Norma Jean.” Norma Jean Baker/Marilyn Monroe Presenter: Terrence Owens, Ph.D.attracted men of accomplishment, intellect and power. (San Francisco, CA)I examine her relationship with Arthur Miller who Discussant: Bruce Reis, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)observed that he “lasted longer with her than anyone Recent trends in the psychological treatment ofelse.” Both Norma Jean and Marilyn continued as children and adolescents emphasize rapid diagnosisunacknowledged muses to his creativity, especially and shortened treatment time, while de-emphasizingevident in “After the Fall” and “The Ride Down Mount a more comprehensive and in-depth understandingMorgan. Intermixed with their life together and their of the individual and their family. Social, cultural, andseparate creative works were prominent psychoanalysts fiscal pressures have contributed to an era of pediatricwho influenced the outcome of their relationship that psychological treatment that threatens to leavebecame known in the popular culture as “The Owl and children and adolescents inadequately understood andPussycat,” the tension of intellect and beauty. ineffectually treated. This discussion will describe someAfter attending this session, participants should be of these trends while then turning toward a descriptionable to: 1) Show the value of applied psychoanalysis of a multi-disciplinary treatment model that focusesas explanatory to the lived experiences and conflicted on in-depth, multi-modal assessment, psychodynamicchoices of historical figures as practical examples of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, and family therapy T H U R S DAYclinical work and theory building; 2) Demonstrate by utilized in the treatment of youth and their families.clinical example in autobiography Sigmund Freud’s After attending this session, participants should betheoretical meaning of object choice and the conditions able to: 1) Identify recent trends in the diagnosis andfor loving. treatment of children and adolescents in the U.S.; 2) Compare the benefits of a multi-disciplinary, multi-Discussion Group 110: Core Sexual and Femininity modal, psychoanalytically informed approach to treatingConflicts in Female Analysands: Recovering children and adolescents with current treatments thatan Old Focus CEC emphasize rapid diagnosis and interventions.Chair: Mia W. Biran, Ph.D. (Cincinnati, OH)Presenter: Ruth Rosines, LCSW (Bellaire,TX) 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m.This discussion group focuses on identifying themes of Film Workshop: “The Balcony” CECsexual conflicts and confusions in adult female patients Chair: Bruce Sklarew, M.D. (Chevy Chase, MD)in analysis. Underneath symptoms of depression, Presenters: Jeffrey Berman, Ph.D.* (Albany, NY)anxiety, aggression, self-defeating behaviors, eating Paul W. Mosher, M.D. (Albany, NY)disorders, and others — there often lie unresolved Jonathan House, M.D. (New York, NY)femininity conflicts from early stages of development.Since the days of Freud, there has been a gradual The screenplay for this remarkable 1963 film, partlydecline in the place devoted in the literature to this written by Jean Genet and based on his theater ofimportant topic. This discussion group will start by the absurd play “The Balcony,” addresses themesreviewing some literature on the topic, and then case of reality and fantasy in relation to the power roles inmaterial will be presented by Ruth Rosines for the human organizations and societies. The story unfoldsgroup discussion. This will be a continuation of a case in a brothel in which clients play out their fantasiespresented in the June 2012 discussion group. of dominance and submission in elaborately staged scenes, while the society around them is collapsing asAfter attending this session, participants should be a result of a revolution. The play, which opened in Newable to: 1) Recognize themes relevant to sexual and York in 1960, became the longest running off-Broadwayfemininity conflicts in the material of female analysands; play ever produced in New York up to that time.2) Understand the importance of interpreting thesethemes as they appear in the course of analysis. www.apsa.org 41
  • 43. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. (continued) After attending this session, participants should be able Psychoanalysts are known for their sensitivity to the to: 1) Describe the way in which group loyalties and suffering, conflicts, and inhibitions of their patients. What power relationships intertwine with sexual fantasies; is less well known is that many are also sensitive and 2) Recognize the issues of facade and pretense which talented artists. APsaA is happy to provide a forum for preoccupied influential intellectuals during the preceding that expression and an opportunity for sharing those decade, the 1950s, the time of the so-called “golden visions and talents with others. Come visit APsaA’s show era” of psychoanalysis. of the art of members, candidate members, associates, and IPA and IPSO members. Media will include 8:00 p.m. photography, painting, small sculptures, and jewelry. Images and art will be available for viewing all day. Social Event: Candidates’ Council Annual Winter Bash CND Join fellow candidates and psychotherapy students 9:45 a.m.- 11:15 a.m. for a festive time at this annual party, perfect for Plenary Address: networking and friendship building. Enjoy drinks and Second Century for Psychoanalysis a full dinner with colleagues from across the country. and for APsaA: Their FatesT H U R S DAY- F R I DAY Email navahckaplan@gmail.com for details. May Differ CEC CND PSYT Chair: Mark Smaller, Ph.D. President-Elect (Chicago, IL) FR I DAY, JA N UA RY 18, 2 013 Introducer: Robert Lindsay Pyles, M.D. President (Wellesley Hills, MA) 7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. Speaker: Warren R. Procci, M.D. (Pasadena, CA) Administrative Meeting: Psychoanalysis has entered its second century. Business Meeting of Members The current state of the field is mixed, and somewhat Chair: Robert L. Pyles, President, M.D. bifurcated. Psychoanalysis as a discipline, as a (Wellesley Hills, MA) theoretical corpus, and as an area for academic inquiry The Meeting of Members is an opportunity for all is holding its own if not necessarily thriving. Contrarily, APsaA members to learn about current activities of the psychoanalysis as represented in its institutes, societies, Association. All registrants are encouraged to attend. centers, and especially within APsaA, our major professional organization, is in a serious decline. The 8:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m. complex reasons for these quite different situations will be examined. An inability of the major competing Coffee Hour Sponsored by components of our organization to work towards Mary S. Sigourney Award Trust meaningful compromise is, in the speaker’s view, Everyone is welcome to a coffee hour, generously a major factor. Some thoughts concerning what must sponsored by the Mary S. Sigourney Award Trust. Come be done, and quickly, will be offered. and network with colleagues, enjoy a cup of coffee prior After attending this session, participants will be able to the start of APsaA’s morning plenary, and meet this to: 1) Describe the historical trends that have led to year’s recipients of the prestigious 2012 Sigourney psychoanalysis becoming accepted as an academic Award: Salman Akhtar, Lawrence Friedman, Thomas discipline, and what factors have aided, as well as Ogden and Stuart Twemlow. The Sigourney Award hindered, this evolution; 2) Recognize the factors that (sigourneyaward.org) was established in 1990 to recognize have led to increasing controversy within APsaA over the individuals throughout the world whose work has made a last two decades and appreciate the need to confront significant contribution to the field of psychoanalysis. The these issues. prize is based on work done during the ten years preceding the year of the award and is awarded by geographical region. This year’s recipients are from the United States. 11:15 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Next year’s recipients will be from Western Europe. Poster Session: Research Relevant to Theory and Practice in Psychoanalysis 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Co-chairs: Linda C. Mayes, M.D. (New Haven, CT) Andrew J. Gerber, M.D., Ph.D. Exhibit: The Psychoanalyst as Photographer (New York, NY) and Artist Organizer: Jon Meyer, M.D. (Lutherville, MD) 42 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 44. DA I LY S C H ED U L E11:15 a.m.-4:00 p.m. (continued)The American Psychoanalytic Association and writing process, illustrating how to meet standards forPsychodynamic Psychoanalytic Research Society professional dissemination. Participants will have the(PPRS) jointly sponsor an annual research poster opportunity for discussion in an informal atmosphere.session designed to promote stimulating conversations After attending this session, participants should be ableand mutual learning among psychoanalytic practitioners, to: 1) Develop an idea into a scientific paper meetingtheorists and researchers. Submissions cover criteria for publication; 2) Evaluate papers as readers forconceptual and/or empirical relevance to psychoanalytic the Candidate Scientific Paper Prize and for journals.theory, technique, aspects of practice and effectivenessofpsychoanalysis, and interdisciplinary scholarship Ethics Course: Common Claims Againstaddressing research questions in neighboring fields. Psychoanalysts: A Descriptive AnalysisThis is the twelfth annual poster session at the APsaA and Preventive Strategies CEC CNDNational Meeting. Chair: Gregg Timmons, RN, MA, JD, CPHRM* (San Francisco, CA)11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Presenters: Emily Rhinehart RN, MPH, CIC, CPHQ*Committee Sponsored Workshop 11: Corporate (Atlanta, GA)and Organizational Consultants: The Psychology Anthony Stompanato, Esq.* (Chicago, IL)of Greed and Destructiveness Among CEOs Gregg Timmons, RN, MA, JD, CPHRM*and Bankers CEC PSYT SOC (San Francisco, CA)Co-chairs: Steven S. Rolfe, M.D. (Bryn Mawr, PA) Note: This program is intended to satisfy the Thomas Hoffman, M.D. (Bethesda, MD) requirements of those states that require CME creditsPresenter: William Czander, Ph.D.* (Irvington, NY) in the area of risk management or medical ethics forDiscussants: Jean Claude Noel* (New York, NY) medical license renewal, but the final judgment for such F R I DAY Jane Brandt* (Philadelphia, PA) qualification is made by each state’s medical board.This workshop explores psychodynamic, historical, and Practicing psychoanalysts face numerous risks in theirstructural origins of CEO greed and its consequences. practice. Understanding those risks and understandingCase examples from a variety of industries will be how to prevent them can make your practice and yourexamined in detail. Relevance to the current economic patients safer. In this session the presenters will reviewcrisis and growing income inequality in the U.S. and a descriptive analysis of ten years of closed claimsglobally will be discussed. from the files of Lexington Insurance. In addition, caseAfter attending this session, participants should be able studies of the most common types of claims with riskto: 1) Describe the underpinnings of CEO behavior in the management strategies for prevention will also becontext of self-interest and power dynamics; 2) Apply reviewed. Finally, specific details on how claims arethe principles of ego and self-psychology and object reported and managed will be discussed by a Lexingtonrelations theory to motivations and behaviors of financial Insurance Claims executive.industry leaders. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Articulate the most common types of claims filedThe 2012 Candidates’ Council against psychoanalysts and practical steps to preventScientific Paper Prize CEC CND them in their own practice; 2) Describe the process forChair: Sabina Preter, M.D., Ph.D. (New York, NY) filing a claim with your insurance carrier.Award Winner: Alison C. Phillips, M.D. (Wellesley, MA)The Candidates’ Council Scientific Paper Prize is 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m.awarded based on a competition in which all candidate Committee Sponsored Workshop 12:members are eligible to participate. The award-winning Women’s Committee Workshop on Womenpaper is chosen based on peer review with candidates and Psychoanalytic Training: Continuingserving as readers and judges. This year’s prize winner Unanswered Questions: Women In/Seekingwill describe the highlights of the scientific writing Psychoanalytic Training CEC CNDprocess and subsequently present her paper, entitled Co-chairs: Joanne E. Callan, Ph.D.“A Path to ‘No’”, in which the author examines the (Solana Beach, CA)beneficial paternal “No” implicit in Freud’s 1915 paper Brenda C. Solomon, M.D. (Glencoe, IL)“Observations on Transference-Love” and frames herdiscussion with clinical material. The discussant willcomment on the content of the paper, as well as on the www.apsa.org 43
  • 45. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. (continued) Note: This program is intended to satisfy the The question will be raised, whether replacing the requirements of those states that require CE credits present structure of psychoanalytic institutes and in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, governance of psychoanalytic education may have but the final judgment for such qualification is made a renovating effect on psychoanalytic science and by each state’s board. profession, and on the impact of psychoanalysis on the broader scientific, cultural, and mental health This ongoing workshop focuses on issues of interest environment. One such possible model of modern to women in, or seeking to enter, psychoanalytic transformation of psychoanalytic education will be training. This year’s workshop will address “unanswered presented, its advantages and constraints discussed, questions,” including challenges regarding training and the inevitable resistances to change explored. demands, child-rearing responsibilities, fee-setting, and ethics issues, as related to women. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the characteristics of authoritarian — in After attending this workshop, attendees should be able contrast to functional — educational institutions, and the to: 1) Describe different training options/paths available mechanisms by which an authoritarian structure limits to them; 2) Identify dynamics underlying specific the intellectual pursuits, personal growth, and creativity of challenges (e.g., fee-setting). student body and faculty; 2) Recognize the nature of the conceptual, technical, and institutional work involved in Committee Sponsored Workshop 13: developing objective, reliable, and transparent instruments Psychoanalyst Assistance: For Whom, for the evaluation of psychoanalytic competence. By Whom and How? CEC Chairs: Audrey Kavka, M.D. (Oakland, CA) Research Symposium: Long-term Outcomes Jerome A. Winer, M.D. (Chicago, IL) of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for PersonalityF R I DAY Psychoanalyst Assistance Committees (PACs) face Disorder: Are We Doing Better Than Others? clinical, procedural and legal complexities in the work The Same? Worse? CEC PSYT to assist functionally impaired colleagues. The goal This session is co-organized by the American of this workshop is to raise issues, share experiences, Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamic and promote effective strategies for members and local Psychoanalytic Research Society and supported by a organizations to address the realities of impairment in generous grant from the Robert J. Stoller Foundation. our colleagues and in ourselves. How a PAC promotes Chair: Patrick Luyten, Ph.D.* analyst assistance when the analyst of concern is (Leuven, Belgium/London, UK) resistant/obstructing will be one focus of discussion. The Presenters: John F. Clarkin, Ph.D.* (White Plains, NY) workshop is open to all and may be of especial interest Allan Abbass, M.D.* (Halifax, Nova Scotia) to chairs and members of local assistance committees. Benedicte Lowyck, Ph.D.* Time will be reserved for open discussion of questions (Leuven, Belgium) and issues raised by those attending. There is growing evidence for the efficacy and After attending this session, participants should be effectiveness of psychotherapy in the treatment of able to: 1) Identify and employ psychoanalytic concepts personality disorders (PDs). Yet, at the same time, relevant to PAC work; 2) Apply the experience of other we know little about the long-term effects and the PACs to their own local PAC work. mechanisms of change in these treatments. It is time now to address the hard questions for psychoanalytic Presidential Symposium: The Twilight of the and other treatments. This session therefore focuses Training Analysis System CEC on the following questions: (a) What do we know about Chair: Robert Lindsay Pyles, M.D. President the long-term effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (Wellesley Hills, MA) in PD patients? (b) What are the processes responsible Presenter: Otto F. Kernberg, M.D. (White Plains, NY) for these effects? (c) How do psychodynamic treatments This presentation will summarize the principal analyses compare to other treatment approaches? of the training analysis system formulated over the past After attending this session, participants should be 30 years, pointing to this system’s relevance regarding able to: 1) Compare the long-term effects of different authoritarianism, infantilization, intellectual stultification, treatments for personality disorder; 2) Evaluate the place and institutional corruption in psychoanalytic education. of different treatment modalities in patients with PD. 44 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 46. DA I LY S C H ED U L E12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. (continued)Symposium I: Embodiment and Subjectivity CEC After attending this session, participants should beChair & able to: 1) Describe the original application of BalintPresenter: Andrea Celenza, Ph.D. (Lexington, MA) Groups to train psychiatrists, particularly by usePresenter: John C. Foehl, Ph.D. of counter-transference of the presenting doctor’s (Newton Centre, MA) problem, as it was first undertaken in 1980; 2) ContrastDiscussant: Jessica Benjamin, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) this method, which requires a change in the doctor’s personality for learning to occur (similar to analysis)This symposium addresses the role of the body with supervision in a group setting.through phenomenal experiencing, i.e., embodiment,as conceptualized by philosophical writers and Scientific Paper #2: Myth, Dream, and Meaning:contemporary relational theorists (especially from Reflections on a Comment by Bion CECthe perspective of intersubjectivity). Presymbolic, Chair: Rogelio A. Sosnik, M.D. (New York, NY)unmentalized bodily experience provides a ground of Author: Howard Levine, M.D. (Brookline, MA)skin-contact and rhythmicity from which the capacities Discussant: Richard B. Zimmer, M.D. (New York, NY)of differentiating and integrating experiences arise,especially as these are organized around a variety Bion famously said that psychoanalytic elements and theof binaries: inner/outer, self/other and female/male. objects derived from them should have extension in thePsychopathology is understood as a collapse of dialectical dimensions of sense, myth and passion. In this paper,interplay, causing disruptions in early patterns of the author will examine the analyst’s “personal myths,”interpersonal recognition, flexibility and play. Presenters arguing that they are particularly powerful containers andwill discuss how transcending binarial constraints can conveyers of emotion, reflect the subjectivity, emotionalresult in greater creativity and overall well-being. engagement and therefore “passion” of the analyst, are useful to approximate previously unarticulated aspects F R I DAYAfter attending this session, participants should be able of the non-dynamic unconscious of the patient and mayto: 1) Address the role of the body through phenomenal serve as catalysts of an emotional turbulence, which canexperiencing, i.e., embodiment, and its usefulness make a salutary “demand for work” upon the minds ofof both for clinical practice; 2) Explore the collapse the analytic couple.into complementarity of clinically useful dialectics suchas inside/outside, self/other, and female/male in order After attending this session, participants should be ableto achieve mutual reciprocity and intersubjectivity. to: 1) Describe the role of personal, intuitive, subjective and metaphoric dimensions of interventions, especially in the analysis of unrepresented and weakly represented1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. states; 2) Define the use of catalytic interventionsScientific Paper #1: The Psychoanalyst and the meant to stimulate and facilitate mental growth andClinic: A Balint Group for Psychiatrists CEC awareness of personal experience, to create meaningChair: Ellen R. Golding, Ph.D. (Waban, MA) and experience, as opposed to the more classicalAuthor: Jonathan Sklar, FRCPsych* uncovering interpretations. (London, England)Discussant: Norman V. Kohn, M.D. (Chicago, IL) 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.The paper offers an original description of Balint Group Committee Sponsored Workshop 14:methodology and its relevance for training psychiatrists. Ethics Workshop CECCentral is the understanding that the psychiatrist Chair: Peter Kotcher, M.D. (Cincinnati, OH)presents his clinical problem with the patient. Makingthe doctor’s counter-transference central to the process This workshop is open to all interested members,moves it away from being supervision i.e., the technical although members of the local ethics committeesacquisition of skills. This is key for Balint, for whom are especially encouraged to attend since experienceacquiring psychodynamics “entails a limited, though and familiarity with the complex process of respondingconsiderable change in the doctor’s personality.” This to complaints can minimize the myriad of problemspaper is a tribute to developing Balint’s ideas and that inevitably arise when a fellow member’s conductoffering graphic vignettes of the difficulty and value is questioned.of working with psychiatrists in this way. The author After attending the session, participants should be ableis a Training and Supervising analyst at the British to: 1) List the most frequently occurring ethics violationsPsychoanalytical Society. and implement several educational and organizational interventions; 2) Develop and apply procedures for responding to ethics complaints. www.apsa.org 45
  • 47. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the current shifts which have been Psychoanalysis and Health Care Reform: Impact taking place within American psychoanalytic training in of the Presidential and Congressional Elections response to what has been occurring in the evolution of on Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis CEC PSYT analytic theory and practice over the past few decades; Chair & 2) Articulate current views of psychoanalytic theory and Presenter: James C. Pyles, Esq.* (Washington, DC) clinical practice. Note: This program is intended to satisfy the requirements of those states that require CME credits 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. in the area of risk management or medical ethics for Clinical Conference #2 for Residents, Psychology medical license renewal, but the final judgment for such and Social Work Trainees, and Students, qualification is made by each state medical board. Presented by APsaA Fellows: “Can You See This session is for all members of APsaA and will Me Now?” Psychological Themes of Identity outline the effect the November 2012 elections will have Displacement, Immigrant Sensations of Invisibility on health reform and the practice of psychiatry and and the Role of Phobias in the Treatment of psychoanalysis. The Affordable Care Act was signed into a Young Woman CEC law in March 2011 and was held constitutional by the Chair: Matthew Steinfeld, Ph.D. Supreme Court on June 28, 2012. Republican members (New Haven, CT) of the House and the Republican candidate for president Faculty: Gary Grossman, Ph.D. have pledged to repeal it. APsaA counsel, Jim Pyles has (San Francisco, CA) been closely involved in the health reform debate and Presenter: Danna Bodenheimer, M.S.W., D.S.W. will provide analysis and insight into what the elections (Philadelphia, PA)F R I DAY mean for health reform. This presentation will focus on the treatment of a queer After attending this session, participants should be able identified, biracial woman, able to pass as heterosexual to: 1) Describe and discuss the impact of the recent and Caucasian, who is grappling with the death of her federal elections on the health reform law; 2) Describe father. In the course of treatment, phobias operate as and discuss the impact of those laws on them both symbolic representations of un-metabolized grief and as consumers of health insurance and as mental longing. The patient struggles with a belief that she health practitioners. is ethnically and sexually invisible. She also fears that she cannot securely attach or grieve. In this session, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. we will examine cross-cultural issues, the psychological significance of a fluid identity, and the ramifications Committee Sponsored Workshop 15: of self-disclosure by the therapist. Curriculum and Didactic Training Workshop: Revision of the Didactic Curriculum at Two, After attending this session, participants should be able Long-established Institutes CEC to: 1) Identify the risks and advantages of therapist self- Co-chairs: Martin A. Silverman, M.D. disclosure around complex issues of identity; 2) Attend (Maplewood, NJ) to the latent and manifest content of phobias that may Mary Margaret McClure, DMH symbolize more complicated grieving processes. (Mill Valley, CA) Presenters: Jean O. Roiphe, M.D. (New York, NY) 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Eslee Samberg, M.D. (New York, NY) Panel I: Silence, Now CEC Anne Erreich, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Chair: Melinda Gellman, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Arden Rothstein, Ph.D. (New York, NY) Presenters: Ronald Britton, M.D.* (London, England) Representatives of two institutes (The New York Jody Davies, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Psychoanalytic Institute and The Institute for Salman Akhtar, M.D. (Ardmore, PA) Psychoanalytic Education affiliated with NYU School Virginia Ungar, M.D.* (Buenos Aires) of Medicine) will make a presentation of the changes that have been, and are being made, in their curricula, together with the thinking that has gone into their being put into effect. 46 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 48. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (continued)This panel will explore ideas about silence in the How does poetic form address the psyche? Participantscontext of the evolving and diverse theories that shape will work from prompts including contemporary poemscontemporary psychoanalytic practice. Drs. Ronald by American and other poets, meditation exercises,Britton, Jody Davies, Virginia Ungar and Salman visual images and verbal suggestions, will commentAhktar will offer position papers and clinical vignettes on one another’s poems, and will receive suggestionsreflecting upon silence of the patient and silence in the for revision and further work. Participants mustanalyst. Discussion among the panelists and with the pre-register for this session; limit is 12 participants.audience will illuminate differences and similarities thatcharacterize the panelists’ perspectives. This panel was 2:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.originally proposed by Melinda Gellman, Ph.D. PPRS Research Forum: Treatment Notes:After attending this session, participants should be able Objective Measures of Language Styleto: 1) Identify multiple meanings and functions served by Point to Clinical Insights CECsilence, for both patient and analyst; 2) Develop different This session is co-organized by the Americanways to assess and respond to silences in treatments Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamic Psychoanalytic Research Society.University Forum: Shakespeare’s “Othello” CEC Chair: Leon Hoffman, M.D. (New York, NY)Chair: Stanley J. Coen, M.D. (New York, NY) Presenters: Leon Hoffman, M.D. (New York, NYPresenters: Professor Robert Brustein* (Boston, MA) Jane Algus, M.D. (New York, NY) Professor Michael Wood* (Princeton, NJ) William Braun, Psy.D. (New York, NY)Discussant: Paul Schwaber, Ph.D. (Hamden, CT) Wilma Bucci, Ph.D. (Huntington, NY)Robert Brustein, Professor Emeritus of English at Bernard Maskit, Ph.D.* (Huntington, NY)Harvard; Founder of the Yale Repertory and American Discussant: John Porcerelli, Ph.D., ABPP F R I DAYRepertory Theatres, playwright, author (“The Tainted (Bloomfield Hills, MI)Muse: Prejudice and Presumption in Shakespeare and This session will present the systematic evaluation of theHis Time”), and recipient of the National Medal of Arts, language of treatment notes written by psychoanalyticwill talk about: how easily the forces of good can be candidates for fourteen analyses carried out underoverwhelmed by the forces of evil, Iago as a new kind supervision at the NY Psychoanalytic Institute. Theof image in literature, and the embodiment of a notes were analyzed using computerized measures ofworld without a vigilant God. Michael Wood, Charles the referential process developed by Bucci and Maskit.Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English This session explores how linguistic measures mirrorand Comparative Literature, at Princeton, author the clinical course, comparing one successful with one(“Shakespeare”), critic (New York and London Reviews unsuccessful case. The measures point to nodal periodsof Books), will talk about how language works in in the analytic work, which were clinically examined to“Othello” as a means of seduction and almost becomes ascertain why one case progressed, with a successfula character in its own right. termination, while the other did not, ending with a forcedAfter attending this session, participants should be interruption by the analyst.able to: 1) Find the narcissistic hurt and rage in intense After attending this session, participants should bejealousy; 2) Grasp the complexities of love in this play able to: 1) Describe the use and value of computerizedand in their patients. language measures when applied to treatment notes; 2) Discuss the relevance of language measures to theArtist/Scholar-in-Residence: evaluation of clinical work.Poetry Writing WorkshopChair: Dawn Skorcewski, Ph.D.* (Cambridge, MA) 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.Artist/Scholar: Alicia Ostriker* (Princeton, NJ) Scientific Paper #3: Edith Wharton’s Two Worlds: Overcoming Phobia andAlicia Ostriker is Professor Emeritus of English at Rutgers Sexual Problems CEC PSYTUniversity in Princeton, NJ In this poetry workshop, the Chair: Ellen R. Golding, Ph.D. (Waban, MA)various theories of “what makes a good poem,” the Authors: Deanna Holtzman, Ph.D.value of “killing the censor” and the mantra “write what (Bloomfield Hills, MI)you are afraid to write” will be discussed. What does it Nancy Kulish, Ph.D. (Birmingham, MI)mean to write “for oneself and strangers”? What is therole of poetry in society? Can poetry be therapeutic? www.apsa.org 47
  • 49. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (continued) Edith Wharton, the pre-eminent American writer, left a It would seem that psychoanalysts could never overlook great deal of autobiographical material, letters, diaries, patients’ bodies, given the major role that males, females plus, of course, a vast collection of literary fiction and and sexuality played in Freud’s theories. Yet the body non- fiction. A fascinating theme runs through much has fallen from grace in our field nowadays. To focus of her work — that of living or being trapped between this topic, Dr. Rosemary Balsam will discuss the impact “two worlds.” This theme is critical to understanding of procreativity and the major accomplishment of the Wharton’s psychology and the psychology of women in female body, childbirth, as utterly common, but yet the general. The authors will examine an unusual neurotic least psychoanalytically attended source of both positive phobia suffered by Wharton as it is related to the theme and negative experiences that can shift body image and of two worlds, and link these ideas more broadly to even gender portraiture. Old theory mainly fled it. Newer common sexual conflicts in women. theories, by focusing too exclusively on the mind while largely ignoring the body, risk a similar female erasure. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the multiple functions of a phobic After attending this session, participants should be able symptom; 2) Relate the theme of two worlds to typical to: 1) Recognize how absent is the female body qua female conflicts and sexual difficulties. female, in our current analyses and theories, and learnF R I DAY- S AT U R DAY the history of this longstanding phenomenon; 2) Discuss Scientific Paper #4: Running Head: the importance of procreative awareness in body image, The Translational Metaphor CEC and gender study, including experiences of childbirth, Chair: Rogelio A. Sosnik, M.D. (New York, NY) and gather future analytic data to inform new individualized Author: Lewis Allen Kirshner, M.D. gender theories that include sexed bodies. (Cambridge, MA) Discussant: Filip Geerardyn, Ph.D.* (Ghent, Belgium) 6:45 p.m.-8:30 p.m. The translational metaphor in psychoanalysis refers Social Event: Dutch Treat Cocktail Party PSYT to the traditional method of restating or interpreting Come and network with colleagues from across the verbal and behavioral information in psychodynamic country at the social highlight of the National Meeting. or developmental language that presumably explains All meeting registrants and spouses are welcome. presenting symptoms. The clinical phenomenology A full cash bar will be available. is translated by the analyst to convey its true meaning and origin. More recent concepts of symbolization and 6:45 p.m. mentalization, which relate to the fundamental process Social Event: Cocktail Party for Fellowship of transforming unconscious contents into new forms Program Alumni and Current Fellows of expression, introduce another avenue of therapeutic The Fellowship Committee is pleased to host a action. The paper presents an historical overview with cocktail party in honor of Fellowship Program alumni. clinical illustrations. Former winners of the fellowship and current fellows After attending this session, participants should be able are encouraged to attend to renew old connections to: 1) Explain the limitations of the interpretive method in and develop new ones. psychoanalysis as a technique of treatment; 2) Illustrate the concept of figuration of unsymbolized mental contents as an alternative model of therapeutic action S AT U R DAY, JA N UA RY 19, 2 013 for psychoanalysis. 7:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. 5:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. Discussion with the Committee on Scientific Activities: Cyber-Psychoanalysis: Plenary Address: Why and How CEC (Re)-Membering Co-chairs: Lee Brauer, M.D. (West Hartford, CT) the Female Body in Sheila Hafter Gray, M.D. (Washington, DC) Psychoanalysis CEC CND Presenter: Arthur Lynch, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Chair: Robert Lindsay Pyles, M.D. President (Wellesley Hills, MA) Secure internet videoconferencing makes long-distance Introducer: Katherine Dalsimer, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) analysis possible; but clinicians who may be unfamiliar Speaker: Rosemary H. Balsam, M.D. with the technical aspects of cyber-computing may be (New Haven, CT) reluctant to consider it. The discussion will open with 48 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 50. DA I LY S C H ED U L E7:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. (continued)illustrative case material from analyses conducted on 9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.Skype, focusing on similarities to conventional treatment Clinical Conference #3 for Residents, Psychologyand where adaptation may be required. Clinical and Social Work Trainees, and Students,considerations include transition to cyber-analysis for Presented by APsaA Fellows: Putting ouran established case, beginning treatment de novo on Feelings to Work: CountertransferenceSkype, occasional and regular cyber-sessions. We will and the Trainee CECdemonstrate a variety of formats and technical platforms, Chair: Sarah Juul, MD, MSc (Atlanta, GA)and offer participants an opportunity for an in-vivo role- Faculty: Glen Gabbard, M.D. (Bellaire, TX)play experience using actual equipment. This session Presenters: Kristina Antonson, M.D. (Davis, CA)is intended for practitioners and trainees interested Lisa Valentine, M.D. (Houston, TX)developing or sharpening their cyber-analysis skills. While being with patients, inevitably the therapist’s ownAfter attending this session, participants should feelings and fantasies are brought to the surface. Thebe able to: 1) Use Skype for private and secure early-career therapist questions her ability to serve thevideoconferencing with their patients; 2) Conduct patient, desires closeness, feels alternately competitivecyber-analysis for their own patients. and superior or dismissed, and worries about how these and other feelings intrude on the therapy. These feelings7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. generate excitement and shame in the therapist, but alsoSocial Event: COCAA/COCAP Breakfast for All leave her wondering where she can turn to understandInterested in Work with Children and Adolescents them. In this session, two cases will be presented thatDr. Charles Parks and Dr. Carol Austad, respective underline the significance of using countertransference S AT U R DAYchairs of the Committee on Child and Adolescent to understand the patient in the room and the processAnalysis (COCAA) and the Committee on Child of psychotherapy.and Adolescent Psychoanalysis (COCAP), and their After attending this session, participants should becommittee members are jointly hosting a breakfast. able to: 1) Formulate how countertransference informsAll child analysts, child candidates, and other persons therapeutic work; 2) Recognize outlets for exploringinterested in working with children are cordially invited. and understanding countertransference feelings.7:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noonCoffee with a Distinguished Analyst: Child and Adolescent Panel: Transference in ChildSteven Ellman, Ph.D. CEC CND and Adult Analysis: Current Views CECChair: Hilli Dagony-Clark, Psy.D. (New York, NY) Chair: Thomas F. Barrett, Ph.D (Chicago, IL)Discussant: Steven Ellman, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) Presenters: Anita G. Schmukler, D.O.While the emergence of negative transference is a (Wynnewood, PA)ubiquitous and inevitable aspect of successful analyses, Stephen Seligman, D.M.H.it can often pose an enormous technical obstacle for (San Francisco, CA)the analyst. Renowned analyst, writer, and teacher, Charles E. Parks, Ph.D. (Bethesda, MD)Dr. Steven Ellman, will explore the nature of negative Discussant: Ruth K. Karush, M.D. (New York, NY)transference and outline effective analytic tools to address Is the development of transference and a transferencethis within the clinical context. Dr. Ellman will discuss neurosis a critical part of current thinking about analysis?relevant clinical material illustrating the importance of This panel will examine the deepening of analytictransitional space between analyst and patient that treatment of both child and adult patients and considerallows for the emergence and analysis of aggression. whether and how the development of transferenceAudience members struggling with negative transferences in child patients contrasts with adult patients. Thein their practices are encouraged to attend, and are usefulness of interpretation of the transference inwelcome to share relevant clinical dilemmas. patients of all ages will also be explored. Is interpretationAfter attending this session, participants should be able of the transference a cornerstone of therapeutic actionto: 1) Recognize how to contain negative transference or one of many techniques leading to positive change?without foreclosing its emergence; 2) Formulate This panel was originally proposed by Anita Schmukler,appropriate interventions that allow for exploration D.O. and Ruth K. Karush, M.D.and analysis of negative transference. www.apsa.org 49
  • 51. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon (continued) After attending this session, participants should and BPD group on a variety of clinical dimensions be able to: 1) Identify ways in which transference in including 1) comorbidity with other Axis I and Axis II child cases is similar and/or dissimilar from transference disorders, 2) internal working models of attachment, in adult cases; 2) Compare and contrast the child and 3) the capacity for mentalization. The second paper analyst’s variable roles as a “transference object” will present modifications in the technique of TFP, a and a “developmental object.” psychodynamic treatment based on object relations theory designed originally for the treatment of BPD, for Panel II: Safety for the Analysand, Safety for the patients with significant narcissistic pathology. Analyst, Safety for the Dyad CEC After attending this session, participants should Chair: Joseph Lichtenberg, M.D. (Bethesda, MD) be able to: 1) Describe some of the clinical features Presenters: James Hansell, Ph.D. (Rockville, MD) distinguishing patients with co-morbid BPD/NPD from Evelyne Schwaber, M.D. (Brookline, MA) those with BPD only, along with implications of these Estelle Shane, Ph.D. (Los Angeles, CA) preliminary findings for future research and treatment; Arietta Slade, Ph.D.* (Roxbury, CT) 2) Describe technical difficulties associated with the Reporter: Roger Segalla, Ph.D.* (Bethesda, MD) conduct of psychoanalytic psychotherapy with patients Through conceptual discussion and clinical vignettes, with severe narcissistic disorders (NPD/BPD) and the panelists will attempt to delineate the role of safety modifications thought to enhance therapeutic efficacy. in psychoanalysis. They will consider if safety is an affect, an ambiance, the counterpart to anxiety in every 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. session? Particular consideration will be given to the Community Symposium: Helping Youth in ViolentS AT U R DAY role of safety not only for the analysand, but also for the Communities to Help Themselves: Psychoanalysts analyst. The panel will feature free discussion between at Work in Jamaica and Uganda CEC PSYT SOC the panelists and the moderator. This panel was Chair: Marie Rudden, M.D. originally proposed by Joseph Lichtenberg, M.D. (West Stockbridge, MA) After attending this session, participants should be Presenters: Stuart Twemlow, M.D. (Huston, TX) able to: 1) Recognize the role played by safety as an Martha S. Bragin, Ph.D., LCSW* emotion, as a state of mind, as an ambiance in clinical (Brooklyn, NY) psychoanalysis; 2) Describe the interplay of safety Note: This program is intended to satisfy the for both analysand and analyst as a determinant requirements of those states that require CE credits of the exchanges. in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, but the final judgment for such qualification is made 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon by each state’s board. PPRS Research Forum: Transference-Focused The presenters will describe two different interventions, Psychotherapy (TFP) for Narcissistic Personality based on applied psychoanalytic principles that helped Disorder: Recent Developments in Research adolescents in violent communities. Stuart Twemlow and Treatment CEC PSYT will describe a school project that radically changed This session is co-organized by the American a community and government, using low cost culturally Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamic attuned interventions. Martha Bragin will discuss the Psychoanalytic Research Society. Uganda Ministry of Education and Sports’ initiative Chair: John F. Clarkin, Ph.D.* (White Plains, NY) to use traditional community strengths in supporting Presenter: Diana Diamond, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) war-affected teachers and students. Barry Stern, Ph.D. (New York, NY) After attending this session, participants should be able Discussant: Horst Kachele, M.D.* (Ulm, Germany) to: 1) Apply psychoanalytic understandings of small This research session will involve two component and large group functioning, of mentalization about presentations. The first will report data on patients power dynamics, and of the “second skin” of cultural with co-morbid borderline personality disorder (BPD)/ identification to socio-cultural problems; 2) Devise narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) from three their own projects to assist adolescents in violent international samples of patients with severe personality communities, using local resources. disorders in TFP. The differences between NPD/BPD 50 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 52. DA I LY S C H ED U L E12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. (continued)Educators Symposium: Creating Possibility: After attending this session, participants should be ableThe “Forward Edge” Approach in Schools to: 1) Describe novel neuropsychological and culturaland the Consulting Room CEC SOC evidence pertaining to the functions and uses of dreaming;Chair: Tillie Garfinkel, M.Ed.* (Silver Spring, MD) 2) Make use of this theoretical knowledge to ask newCo-chair: Stephen D. Kerzner, M.D. (Duxbury, MA) questions about patients’ dreams in clinical practice.Presenter: Mark D. Smaller, Ph.D. (Chicago, IL)Discussant: Daniel B. Frank, Ph.D.* (Chicago, IL) Symposium II: The Politics of Psychoanalytic Lexicography: Psychoanalytic Terms andThe application of psychoanalytic concepts in school Concepts CECsettings provides teachers, students, and parents Chairs &an additional resource for educating our children. It Presenters: Elizabeth L. Auchincloss, M.D.also offers psychoanalysts an opportunity to expand (New York, NY)psychoanalytic theory and clinical technique as they Eslee Samberg, M.D. (New York, NY)pertain to adolescent development and treatment. MarkSmaller, Ph.D., Founding Director of Project Realize Drs. Elizabeth Auchincloss and Eslee Samberg,(formerly the Analytic Service to Adolescents Program), co-editors-in-chief of “Psychoanalytic Terms andwill describe the psychoanalytic concept of “the forward Concepts,” a volume co-published by Yale Universityedge” approach to working with troubled adolescents in Press and the American Psychoanalytic Association,schools. He will then outline implications for advancing will present the challenges encountered in editingadolescent developmental theory and treatment in a psychoanalytic dictionary in this age of theoreticalvarious settings. Preliminary findings of Project Realize pluralism and postmodern challenges to “authority.” S AT U R DAYshow that regardless of wide variation in socio-economic The editors will describe the strategies they employedfactors in different schools, adolescent issues regarding in their management of “point of view” and will givelearning, relationships, sexuality, aggression, and specific examples to illustrate the political issues theyambitions do not vary. negotiated in defining terms and concepts. They will also place their project in context by describing the politicalAfter attending this session, participants should be issues that have shaped the history of psychoanalyticable to: 1) Describe the “forward edge” approach lexicography from its beginnings.to working with troubled adolescents in schools andin the treatment setting; 2) Identify new insights about After attending this session, participants should beadolescent development. able to: 1) Describe the political issues involved in defining psychoanalytic terms and concepts and howPsychoanalysis and Neuroscience the editors negotiated them; 2) Describe the historySymposium CEC of psychoanalytic lexicography and the political issuesChair & connected with it.Presenter: Charles P. Fisher, M.D. (San Francisco, CA) 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.Discussant: Mark Solms, Ph.D.* PPRS Research Forum: Methodology for Outcome (Cape Town, South Africa) Studies of Psychoanalysis: The World View CECDr. Charles Fisher will present data and preliminary This session is co-organized by the Americanconclusions from recent research on the uses of Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamicdreaming and dream interpretations in indigenous Psychoanalytic Research Society.societies in the rainforest of Ecuador and in South Africa. Chair: Steven Roose, M.D. (New York, NY)This introduction will raise general questions about the Presenter: Steven Roose, M.D. (New York, NY)uses of dreaming in the mind. Dr. Mark Solms, whose Mark Hilsenroth, Ph.D.* (Garden City, NY)discussion will be central to the symposium, will address Discussant: Andrew J. Gerber, M.D., Ph.D.the function of dreaming as a guardian of sleep, as well (New York, NY)as other functions in relation to wish fulfillment and the Eve Caligor, M.D. (New York, NY)conscious and preconscious concerns of the dreamer. Robert Michels, M.D. (New York, NY)He will amplify these themes in the light of his recentresearch findings on the neuropsychology of dreaming. www.apsa.org 51
  • 53. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. (continued) Given the limited number of psychoanalytic outcome Scientific Paper #6: Religious Imagery, Spiritual studies, pooling data is essential. Meta-analysis Practices, and Personal Destiny in Psychoanalytic has been used extensively to aggregate the results Therapy with Hindu Women CEC of individual studies. The quality of a meta-analysis Author: Alan Roland, Ph.D.* (New York, NY) depends partly on studies having comparable Discussant: Salman Akhtar, M.D. (Ardmore, PA) methodology, especially with respect to patient Note: This program is intended to satisfy the inclusion criteria, treatment standards and primary requirements of those states that require CE credits outcome measures. Researchers must collaborate on in the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, methodology so the impact of their research is more but the final judgment for such qualification is made than the sum of the parts. The intent of this forum is to by each state’s board. attract both researchers and clinicians to an interactive session in which they act as a protocol development While religious imagery entered into the Freudian committee giving feedback to the presenters. opus over thirty years ago, the interface of spiritual practices and experiences with the psychoanalytic After attending this session, participants should be able work on unconscious conflicts is a much more recent to: 1) Discuss adherence measurement in psychoanalytic development. Personal destiny, however, with its and psychotherapeutic outcome studies; 2) Describe the accompaniments of reincarnation, planetary influences, qualities needed in a comparator condition. astrology, and palmistry still remain an unwanted stepchild in psychoanalysis. Yet, they can be central 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. to psychoanalytic therapy with highly educated, Scientific Paper #5: Perverse Female Strategies: professional Hindu women. Two case studies will beS AT U R DAY The Creation of an Objectified Self CEC SOC cited, one seen in three times a week, short-term Chair: Holly F. Houseman, LICSW psychoanalytic therapy in Bombay; the other in three (Cambridge, MA) times a week analysis in New York City over a few years. Author: Andrea Celenza, Ph.D. (Lexington, MA) After attending this session, participants should Discussant: Avgi Saketopoulou, Psy.D. (Bronx, NY) be able to: 1) Describe the relationship of spiritual This paper discusses present-day culturally facilitated practices and experiences with psychoanalytic work fetishizations of the body and how these may be viewed on unconscious emotional conflicts; 2) Describe as perverse strategies. It is proposed that a hallmark of the meaning of personal destiny and reincarnation female perverse relating is self-objectification in an effort in a Hindu woman in psychoanalytic therapy. to control a dangerous subjectivity within. The danger that is often feared by women is localized within and is 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. experienced as an intense, uncontrollable and feared Artist/Scholar-in-Residence: excessive desire, a self-experience of wanting too much, Poetry Writing Workshop desiring too much or becoming or being too big. A Chair: Dawn Skorczewski, Ph.D.* self-structure, the Objectified Self, is offered as a way to (Cambridge, MA) visualize this dissociated, relatively non-affective position. Artist/Scholar: Alicia Ostriker* Professor Emeritus of An unconscious fear of “phallic” power is proposed as English, Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ an unconscious conviction in many women who struggle with assertion, thrust and the dread of being too big or Alicia Ostriker will read from her recent volume of too strong. poems, “The Book of Seventy” (University of Pittsburgh Press 2009). Her fourteenth published volume, The Book After attending this session, participants should be able of Seventy received the National Jewish Book Council to: 1) Discuss the development and clinical relevance Award for Poetry in that year. The poems deal from a of the Objectified Self in female patients; 2) Differentiate variety of angles with aging — memory, family, fear, various meanings of perversion and apply these to relationships, ongoing sexuality and creativity, revised clinical cases. sense of self, relation to society and to nature, etc. Psychological process is explored in all these poems. Following the reading she will be happy to answer questions about the creative process. 52 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 54. DA I LY S C H ED U L E2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Assess the value of obtaining follow up information Innovations: Psychoanalysis about former analytic patient; 2) Determine which by Surprise CEC aspects of analytic theory and technique enhance theChair: Kimberlyn Leary, Ph.D., ABPP therapeutic outcome of analysis and which are less (Cambridge, MA) therapeutically effective.Presenter: Mark Solms, Ph.D.* (Cape Town, South Africa) Meet-the-Author: Dr. Philip M. Bromberg CEC Chair: Melinda Gellman, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)Note: This program is intended to satisfy the Author: Philip M. Bromberg, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)requirements of those states that require CE credits Book: The Shadow of the Tsunamiin the area of cultural diversity for license renewal, Discussant: Christine C. Kieffer, Ph.D. (Chicago, IL)but the final judgment for such qualification is madeby each state’s board. Deepening his inquiry into the nature of what is therapeutic about the psychoanalytic relationshipAfter the end of apartheid, an exiled analyst returned Dr. Bromberg explores the two interlocking rewardsto his native South Africa with the intention to transform of successful treatment — healing and growth. Bysocial conditions on his family’s farm. The level of being an affectively alive partner who is simultaneouslymutual comprehension and trust between himself and attentive to the dissociated impact of his own enactedthe black farm-workers turned out to be far worse than participation, the analyst helps decrease the patient’she anticipated. In desperation, he fell back on basic mistrust of potentially traumatizing “otherness” and itspsychoanalytic principles, such as his understanding of S AT U R DAY dissociated dread of attachment rupture. This in turntransference and countertransference. The result was an leads to both greater confidence in relational affectunplanned community psychoanalysis. This “analysis” regulation and a growing ability to safely contain thewas conducted largely by historians and archaeologists self-state negotiation of otherness inherent to the(not the analyst), with “surprising results.” experience of internal conflict. In its essence, Bromberg’sAfter attending this session, participants should be able portrayal of therapeutic action restores self-state fluidity,to: 1) Recognize the role applied psychoanalysis can liberating the patient’s capacity for trust without vigilanceplay in the hardest and most damaged of psychosocial and permitting life to be lived with greater creativity,contexts; 2) Describe the ethical and practical love and spontaneity.implications of the psychoanalytic injunction to confront After this session, participants should be able to:unwelcome truths. 1) Apply basic understanding of self-states and dissociative processes to how the patient/analyst2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. enactment of developmental trauma and its jointPanel III: Learning from Ourselves CEC processing in the context of affective safety, leads toChair: Theodore Jacobs, M.D. (New York, NY) increased capacity for intersubjectivity as a foundationalPresenters: Richard Almond, M.D. (Palo Alto, CA) organizer of healing and self-growth in treatment; Judy Kantrowitz, Ph.D. (Brookline, MA) 2) Apply basic understanding of self-states and Shelley Orgel, M.D. (New York, NY) dissociative processes as a framework for expandingDiscussant: Warren Poland, M.D. (Washington, DC) the analytic relationship as a relational dialectic betweenReporter: Lori Pellegrino, M.D. (New York, NY) dissociation and the ability to safely experience internal conflict without dread of affective dysregulation.The aim of this panel is to explore a relatively neglectedarea in psychoanalysis: a follow-up of completed Film Workshop: The Life and Work of Sabinaanalyses. Three experienced analysts will report on their Spielrein in Film and Historical Documents CECpost-analytic experiences with former patients who have Chair: Bruce H. Sklarew, M.D.returned for consultation or further treatment. These (Chevy Chase, MD)experiences have provided an opportunity for these Co-chair &analysts to gain information about the previous analytic Presenter: Henry Zvi Lothane, M.D. (New York, NY)work, to assess its strengths and limitations, and to Presenters: Harold P. Blum, M.D. (Roslyn Estates, NY)learn about the long-term effectiveness of the treatment. Lissa Weinstein, Ph.D.* (New York, NY)A senior colleague will discuss the presentations. This Michael Vannoy Adams, D.Phil., L.C.S.W.*panel was originally proposed by Theodore Jacobs, M.D. (New York, NY) www.apsa.org 53
  • 55. DA I LY S C H ED U L E 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (continued) This session will focus on central events in Sabina Scientific Paper #8: Celebrity Objects or: Spielrein’s life and their connection to her career as How I Learned to Stop Interpreting Kanye West a psychoanalyst who made seminal contributions to the and Carrie Bradshaw as Defensive Evasions psychoanalytic literature. From being a footnote in the and Came to Understand Their Multiple “Standard Edition,” she was catapulted to the larger idea Functions CEC PSYT of boundary crossing in the course of therapy, a topic Author: Joseph S. Reynoso, Ph.D.* exploited in plays and films. In the process, the role (New York, NY) of positive transference, or love writ large, has been Discussant: Phillip S. Freeman, M.D., D.M.H. overlooked. The presentations will be accompanied (Newton Highlands, MA) by clips from three films: Elisabeth Marton’s 2002 This paper explores the various uses of popular documentary “My Name was Sabina Spielrein” and two culture figures in the lives of adult patients seen in feature films, Roberto Faenza’s 2002 “Soulseeker” and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Using case vignettes, David Cronenberg’s 2011 “A Dangerous Method.” the author illustrates the ways that “celebrity objects” After attending this session, participants should be can be utilized to maintain, assemble and protect able to: 1) Identify how historical knowledge corrects aspects of one’s identity in the context of threatened misconceptions and myths; 2) Differentiate methods of self-experience. The multiple functions of celebrity preventing and handling boundary crossings in therapy. objects are contextualized using different psychoanalytic theoretical frames. It is argued that increased 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. clinical engagement with patients’ intrapsychic and intersubjective use of celebrity objects provides an Scientific Paper #7: Recovery from ChildhoodS AT U R DAY important view of unconscious attempts by individuals Psychiatric Treatment CEC to elaborate or disavow meaning and create or destroy Chair: Holly F. Houseman, LICSW links to others. (Cambridge, MA) Author: David Mintz, M.D.* (Stockbridge, MA) After attending this session, participants should be able Discussant: Adele Tutter, M.D., Ph.D. (New York, NY) to: 1) Identify, from various theoretical approaches, the unconscious functions that celebrity objects can serve in Increasingly, our patients have been medicated regulating aspects of self-experience; 2) Recognize, from since childhood, with profound consequences for examples of their own clinical work, ways patients use personal identity, becoming a source of deep-rooted celebrity objects to foster or break links of meaning and feelings defect. Other problems arise when pills are facilitate or impede interpersonal connectedness. used defensively to localize a family pathology in the child who receives the prescription. Furthermore, PPRS Research Forum: Effortful Control when medications are used to manage a child’s and Psychopathology CEC feelings, confusions may result about the signal This session is co-organized by the American function of emotions, truncating development. Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychodynamic Cases of young adults, prescribed medications in Psychoanalytic Research Society. childhood, will be reviewed, with particular attention to developmental consequences. This session will Chair: John F. Clarkin, Ph.D.* (White Plains, NY) explore dynamic mechanisms of harm and examples Presenter: Chiara De Panfilis, M.D.* (Parma, Italy) of psychotherapeutic work that can help such patients Nicole M. Cain, Ph.D.* (Brooklyn, NY) seek healthier developmental paths. Kevin B. Meehan, Ph.D.* (Brooklyn, NY) Discussant: John F. Clarkin, Ph.D.* (White Plains, NY) After attending this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe both biological and psychological This research session will present a body of research mechanisms by which pharmacologic treatment in evaluating the relationship between psychopathology childhood can have a negative developmental impact; and effortful control (EC) in young adults. EC is the 2) Diagnose and address developmental fixations that capacity to delay immediate impulses in favor of long- are related to the meanings of medications to promote term goals. In children, poor EC has been associated growth along healthier developmental lines. with impaired social functioning and increased psychopathology, while the relationship of low EC to interpersonal and clinical functioning in early adulthood 54 CEC = Continuing Education Credits CND = Of Interest to Candidates PSYT = Of Interest to Psychotherapists SOC = Focus on Social Issues *Invited Faculty
  • 56. DA I LY S C H ED U L E3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (continued)has not been fully established. These papers will Psychiatry residents spend a significant portion ofevaluate possible mechanisms through which poor EC their training practicing both psychopharmacology andcould contribute to maladaptive outcomes, consistent psychodynamic psychotherapy as discrete modalitieswith developmental and social neuroscience research of treatment — with different patients, and supervisedas well as with psychodynamic theory. by different supervisors. There is little focus in training on how to integrate the two modalities. In this program,After attending this session participants should be able we will explore how psychiatry residents practicingto: 1) Describe effortful control (EC) and its implications psychopharmacology as part of their training learn tofor psychopathology and externalizing behaviors; discern psychodynamic themes in treatment contexts;2) Identify interpersonal styles and problems associated how different theoretical views cast the relationshipwith various levels of EC. between a patient and the prescriber/therapist; and how clinicians trained in multiple modalities might try5:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. to integrate them and to establish what works best forSpecial Symposium: Jargon and Its Discontents: their patients.Psychoanalysis outside the Cathedral CEC S AT U R DAY- S U N DAY After attending this session, participants should be ableChair: Glen O. Gabbard, M.D. (Houston, TX) to: 1) Develop a conceptual framework that permits thePresenter: Daphne Merkin (New York, NY) integration of psychodynamic themes in non-dynamicDaphne Merkin, noted journalist and author, and Glen therapeutic contexts; 2) Discuss the conceptual toolsGabbard, psychoanalyst and writer, will engage in a that help a clinician decide when to consider changingdialogue about the problems that analysts encounter or enhancing the type of treatment offered to the patient.when they attempt to educate the public about theirprofession. Using examples from film and literature, they 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noonwill address the role that jargon plays in the development Panel IV: Mourning, Identity, Creativity CECof an analytic identity and its impact on the public’s Chair: Adele Tutter, M.D., Ph.D. (New York, NY)view of the field. The implications of the translational Presenters: Otto F. Kernberg, M.D. (White Plains, NY)problem from the “cathedral” to the popular media will Anna Ornstein, M.D. (Brookline, MA)be discussed. Leon Wurmser, M.D. (Towson, MD) Discussant: Jeanine M. Vivona, Ph.D.*6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. (Philadelphia, PA)Social Event: Student and Alumni Psychotherapy Reporter: Tehela Nimroody, Ph.D. (New York, NY)Program Cocktail Party PSYT Having come a long way from Freud’s circumscribedSponsored by the Committee on Psychodynamic process of libidinal detachment, mourning is nowPsychotherapy Training Programs, all students currently considered a potentially life-long process that includesenrolled in a 1-year fellowship, 2-3 year psychotherapy not only the grieving of loved ones, but also thetraining program and alumni are invited to attend this grieving of developmental stages (e.g., childhood) andcocktail party. Go to the meetings page on the APsaA components of identity (e.g., ideals and illusions). Atwebsite (apsa.org) for more information. the same time, mourning is increasingly appreciated as a powerful inaugurator of personal growth and creative and vocational productivity. This panel bringsS U N DAY, JA N UA RY 2 0, 2 013 together leading thinkers who have made important recent contributions to this topic. Through interactive9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. dialogue with the discussant and the audience, they willClinical Conference #4 for Residents, Psychology attempt a fresh synthesis of the complex, universal, andand Social Work Trainees, and Students, transformative processes of mourning. This panel wasPresented by APsaA Fellows: Caught Between originally proposed by Adele Tutter, M.D., Ph.D.Two Worlds: Hearing Psychodynamic Themes After attending this session, participants should be ablein Medication-check Sessions and What to do to: 1) Describe recent advances in the conceptualizationAbout Them CEC of mourning; 2) Discuss creative and generative aspectsChair: Andres Barkil-Oteo, M.D. (New York, NY) of mourning.Faculty: Deborah Cabaniss, M.D. (New York, NY)Presenter: Emily Gray, M.D. (Belmont, MA) Ryan Lawrence, M.D. (New York, NY) www.apsa.org 55
  • 57. CO N T I N U I N G P RO FES S I O N A L ED U C AT I O N C R ED I T S TAT E M E N T O F O B J E C T I V E SThe scientific sessions of the American Psychoanalytic Association’s meetings are intended to bridge the practice gaps in the professionalknowledge of attendees by exploring new and recent developments in research, theory, technique, clinical knowledge and by offeringopportunities for the review of essential psychoanalytic knowledge. These sessions are designed for the continuing education of mentalhealth professionals, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, other mental health professionals; professionals-in-training,and master’s level students; as well as post-doctoral mental health clinicians, nurses, teachers, professionals and academics in mentalhealth and non-mental health disciplines.This meeting offers a series of panel discussions, plenaries, symposia, discussion groups, clinical workshops, scientific papers,clinical presentations, and special programs for students including seminars, courses, and forums dedicated to professionals-in-trainingon topics of importance to psychoanalysis that have been designed to increase professional competence. C O N T I N U I N G P R O FE S S I O N A L E D U C AT I O N C R E D I T SPhysiciansThe American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to providecontinuing medical education for physicians.The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 53 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.PsychologistsThe American Psychoanalytic Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing educationfor psychologists. The American Psychoanalytic Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.MCEP Credits for California PsychologistsThe California Psychological Association Accrediting Agency accepts credits earned from American Psychological Association-approvedsponsors (the American Psychoanalytic Association is an APA-approved sponsor). California-licensed psychologists are, however,required to directly report the courses they have taken with APA sponsors. For information about the MCEP Credit Reporting Form,go to the web site at www.calpsychlink.org then click on the Accrediting Agency button.National Association of Social Workers (NASW)This program is Approved by the National Association of Social Workers (Approval #886504845-8856) for 53 Clinical Social Workcontinuing education contact hours.Exceptions to NASWPlease be aware that the following state boards do not accept the NASW National CE Approval Program. Please see the details belowfor approval of continuing education credits for social workers in these states.California Board of Behavioral SciencesThe American Psychoanalytic Association’s 2012 National Meeting meets the qualifications for 53 hours of continuing education creditfor MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (Provider # 4394).Michigan Department of Community Health, Licensing Division (MDCH)Michigan social workers should use approval by the California board to obtain credit from the Michigan Board of Social Work.The following written statement, with the provider number, is required by the Michigan Board for documentation. “The AmericanPsychoanalytic Association’s 2012 National Meeting meets the qualifications for 53 hours of continuing education credit for MFTsand/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (Provider # 4394).”North Carolina Social Work Certification and Licensure Board (NCSWCLB)The Board does not require pre-approval of organized training events attended by the social worker. However, the continuing educationactivity of social workers is subject to audit. Although CEU or attendance certificates should not be attached to the recertification affidavit,social workers will need to be able to provide upon request by the Board, verifiable proof of attendance and credit hours. North Carolinasocial workers should submit contact hours to the State Board for post approval.State of West Virginia Board of Social Work Examiners (WVBSWE)Note: WVBSWE does NOT participate in the NASW’s National CE Approval Program.West Virginia social workers should submit contact hours to the State Board for post-meeting approval. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose unless specifically noted. 56
  • 58. A R E YO U A N ED U C ATO R? PSYC H OT H ER A PI S T? S T U D EN T? R ES I D EN T? If so, advanced registration discounts may be available for you. See below for details.Who’s eligible? Psychoanalytic psychotherapists with Who’s eligible? Research scientists, research-orienteda minimum of a master’s degree and who are licensed clinicians, and others interested in psychoanalyticallyby the state in which they practice. oriented research.Need more information? For additional activities during Need more information? For additional activities duringthe meeting, contact: the meeting, contact:Mae E. Kastor, MSW, Chair, John H. Porcerelli, Ph.D.Committee on Psychotherapist Associates Chair, Committee on Research Associates (RAAPA)(410) 276-5815; maekastor@gmail.com (248) 646-1267; jporcer@med.wayne.eduWho’s eligible? Medical students, psychiatric residents, Who’s eligible? Full-time academics (educators, scholars,psychology, social work, graduate and undergraduate administrators, professors, faculty members, deans,students of all academic disciplines. directors, and school counselors) at all levels of education, preschool through university, who are interested in theNeed more information? For additional activities during integration of psychoanalytic principles and ideas into theirthe meeting, contact: teaching and scholarship.Lisa Madsen, M.D. Need more information? For additional activities duringChair, Committee on Student/Resident Associates the meeting, contact:lisa.madsen@gmail.com Tillie Garfinkel, M.Ed. Chair, Committee on Educator Associates (301) 384-4513; til.g@comcast.net How do I enroll?* Enrollment Forms are available online at: www.apsa.org/Associates (Or click on Associate Programs under Membership) NEW applications cannot be processed at the meeting. In order to take advantage of the reduced registration fee, mail in your enrollment so it arrives by the deadline of December 10, 2012. Call 212-752-0450 ext. 26 for further assistance. *Individuals who meet the qualifications for candidate and active membership in APsaA are not eligible to join the Associates program. 57
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  • 60. 2013 NATIONAL MEETING SESSION REGISTRATION FORM Please check the box to the left of a Session or circle a Discussion Group or Two Day Clinical Workshop CSW = Committee Sponsored Workshop Important: Pre-registration is highly recommended. It Two–Day Clinical Workshops close quickly. The allows APsaA to see which sessions are most popular so best way to register for these workshops is online at we can plan according. Also, many chairs send materials www.apsa.org. If registering by mail, please indicate a to pre-registered participants prior to the conference. second choice (i.e. Discussion Group) in case your first There will be no on-site registration for sessions. The choice of a Clinical Workshop is closed. more popular sessions will reach room capacity quickly and you may wish to plan for an alternative. Tuesday, January 15, 2013 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. q esearch Seminar R Two-Day Clinical Workshop Part I 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon q SW #1: COCAA Workshop C (circle one) 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. q SW #2: Directors of Institutes/ C 1 2 3 4 5 Child Education Committee Chairs you are registering for a Two Day If Clinical Workshop please indicate 7:00 p.m. q ine Around 1: Shun Lee Palace/ D an alternate choice in case the Carol Reichenthal, Ph.D. Workshop has reached capacity q ine Around 2: Má Pêche/ D (either the Research Seminar Brenda Bauer, Psy.D. or a Discussion Group) q ine Around 3: Matisse/ D Dhipthi Mulligan, M.D. 2nd Choice: ___________________________ Discussion Group (circle one) q ine Around 4: Fresco/ D 28 29 30 31 32 33 34  Cathy Beaton, M.S., NCPsyA 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 q ine Around 5: The Four Seasons/ D 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Discussion Group (circle one) Nathan Szajnberg, M.D. 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 Wednesday, January 16, 2013 Thursday, January 17, 2013 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. q rofessional Development P 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. Discussion Group (circle one) Workshop #1 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56  Discussion Group (circle one) 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. q ral History Workshop O 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon q enior Analyst Presentation (Part 1) S 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. q SW #6: Local Fellowship C 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. q SW #3 Psychotherapy Training C q SW #7: Cope: Supervision C 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. q SW #4 Business of Practice C 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon q ORST Essay Prize C q ervice Members and S 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. q SW #8: Gender and Sexuality C Veterans Initiative q SW #9: Teaching Analytic Writing C q SW #5 Child/Adolescent C 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. q PRS Research Forum P Supervisors q SW #10: Institute Development C 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. q enior Analyst Presentation Part 2 S one) Discussion Group (circle 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27I 59
  • 61. Thursday, January 17, 2013 continued 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. q linical Conference #2 C 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. q anel I: Silence, Now P 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. q rofession Development P q niversity Forum U Workshop #2 q rtist/Scholar-in-Residence A q andidates’ Forum C 2:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m. q PRS Research Forum P q cientific Paper Prize S for Psa. Research 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. q cientific Paper #3: S Discussion Group (circle one) Edith Wharton’s Two Worlds 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 q cientific Paper #4: Running Head S 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 5:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. q lenary Address: Rosemary Balsam P 78 79 80 81 82 83 844:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. n wo-Day Clinical Workshops T Saturday, January 19, 2013 and Child Workshop: Part 2. You are automatically registered 7:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. q iscussion w/ Committee D when you register for Part I on Sci Activities Discussion Group (circle one) 7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. q OCAA/COCAP Breakfast C 85 86 87 88 89 90 91  92 93 94 95 96 97 98  7:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. q offee with a Distinguished Analyst C 99 100 101 102 9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. q linical Conference #3 C 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. q linical Conference #1 C 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon q hild and Adolescent Panel C 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. q rtist/Scholar-in-Residence A q anel II: Safety for the Analysand P Discussion Group (circle one) 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon q PRS Research Forum P 103 104 105 106 107  12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. q ommunity Symposium C 108 109 110 111 q ducators Symposium E 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. q ilm Workshop (The Balcony) F q sa and Neuroscience Symposium P Friday, January 18, 2013 q ymposium II: The Politics S of Psa Lexicograpy9:45 a.m.-11:15 a.m. q lenary Address: Warren Procci P 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. q PRS Research Forum P 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. q SW #11: Corporate and C 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. q cientific Paper #5: S Organizational Consultants Perverse Female Strategies q andidates’ Council Paper Prize C q cientific Paper #6: S q thics Course E Religious Imagery12:00 noon-1:30 p.m. q SW #12: Women and Psa Training C 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. q rtist/Scholar-in-Residence A q SW #13: Psychoanalyst Assistance C 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Innovations q q residential Symposium P 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. q anel III: Learning from Ourselves P q esearch Symposium R q eet-the-Author: Dr. Philip Bromberg M q ymposium I: Embodiment S q ilm Workshop (Sabina Spielrein) F 1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. q cientific Paper #1: S 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. q cientific Paper #7: Recovery S Psychoanalyst and the Clinic q cientific Paper #8: Celebrity Objects S q cientific Paper #2: S q PRS Research Forum P Myth, Dream and Meaning 5:15 p.m.-6:45 p.m. q pecial Symposium S 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. q SW #14: Ethics Workshop C 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. q sa and Health Care Reform P Sunday, January 20, 20132:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. q SW #15: Curriculum and C Didactic Training 9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. q linical Conference #4 C 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon q anel IV: Mourning, Idenity, Creativity P Name:____________________________________________________________________________________It is important to print your name here. The Session Registration form and the Meeting Registration form can get separated. 60
  • 62. Serving theProfessional Liability Insurance needs of the American Psychoanalytic Association since 1972 • Professional Liability • Admitted (A+) Paper • Business Insurance • Personal Insurance including Homeowners/Automobile • Directors Officers • Employment Practices Liability Program Administrator Margaret Church 201.356.3422 mchurch@frenkel.com Frenkel Company Harborside Financial Center 601 Plaza 3 6th Floor Jersey City, NJ 07311 201.356.3400
  • 63. Read JAPA Online at japa.sagepub.com! APsaA Members receive preferred subscription rates that include online access. Subscribe today by calling (212) 752-0450, Ext 15. EDITOR T he Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association (JAPA) is the preeminent North American psychoanalytic scholarly journal. It is an invaluable, peer-reviewed resource for psychoanalysts, Steven T. Levy, M.D. psychologists, psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals that publishes original articles, research, plenary presentations, panel reports, abstracts, commentaries, editorials and correspondence. In addition, the JAPA Review of Books provides in-depth reviews of recent literature.JAPA is available online through the SAGE Journals platform. Your member subscription includes free onlineaccess with the following features: • Full-text access back to Volume 1, Issue 1 • Free alerting services, including contents alerts, citation alerts, and RSS feeds • Early online access to JAPA articles through Online First • Monthly updates to the Most-Read and Most-Cited articles • Free inter-journal reference linking • JAPA Prize articlesThomson Scientific Journal Citation Reports2011 Ranking: 5/13 in Psychology/Psychoanalysis • 95/117 in PsychiatryImpact Factor: 0.787Source: 2011 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters, 2012)www.sagepub.com w w w.a p sa .org

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