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American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine(AOSSM) 2013 Annual Meeting

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  • 1. JULY 11 – 14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013Preliminary ProgramPreliminary Program
  • 2. JULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013Christopher D. Harner MDPresidentMark D. Miller MDProgram ChairmanChristopher D. Harner MDPresidentMark D. Miller MDProgram ChairmanCopyright © 2013 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. All rights reserved.The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is heading to Chicago forthe 2013 Annual Meeting, July 11th – 14th! We invite you and your family to this bustling,energetic, midwestern city that will provide you with an amazing educational experience, aswell as countless opportunities for dining and entertainment.Mark Miller MD, 2013 Program Chair, has constructed a meeting that will engage attendeesand provide the latest in sports medicine education and research. A few key programhighlights include: A wide variety of workshops, from live surgical demonstrations on upper extremityinjuries, to reviewing for AJSM, to beginning your own practice as a young sportsmedicine specialist Special Saturday afternoon Research Workshop on Graft Healing and Failure afterACL Reconstruction Presidential Guest Speaker, Tony Dungy, former NFL player, Super Bowl winning coach,sports analyst and children and adult book author 23 instructional courses and approximately 65 e-posters More than 50 podium presentations covering surgical and nonsurgical management ofathletic injuries Symposia, including Improving Your Game – Surgeons Coaching Surgeons, Case-BasedClavicle Fractures, Post-operative Rehabilitation and Patellar Instability to name just a fewIn addition to all of the unique educational opportunities, Chicago offers one-of-a-kind familyentertainment with historic Wrigley Field, Navy Pier, The Field Museum, Shedd Aquarium andAdler Planetarium, not to mention swimming in Lake Michigan and world-class shoppingalong the Magnificent Mile. Our half-day educational format is especially designed to allowattendees and their families the opportunity to enjoy afternoons together and discover allthat Chicago has to offer.Our Thursday opening reception on the patio deck of the Sheraton Hotel will be an event forthe whole family. The reception is always a great beginning to the meeting and will allow youto connect with friends and colleagues. Even more exciting will be our family dinner cruiseon Saturday night aboard the Odyssey. Enjoy skyline views of the city from Lake Michigan,complete with a DJ, dancing, entertainment for the kids, and culminating with a spectacularfireworks display!Join us in Chicago and experience all the food, fun and fellowship of AOSSM’sworld-class orthopaedic sports medicine meeting! For more information and to register, visitwww.sportsmed.org. See you there!
  • 3. Welcome to Chicago
  • 4. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 1Christopher D. Harner MDPresidentJo A. Hannafin MD, PhDPresident-ElectRobert A. Arciero MDVice PresidentJames P. Bradley MDSecretaryAnnunziato Amendola MDTreasurerPeter A. Indelicato MDPast PresidentRobert A. Stanton MDPast PresidentMatthew Provencher MDMember at LargeDarren L. Johnson MDMember at LargeJon K. Sekiya MDMember at LargeMarc R. Safran MDCouncil Of Delegates Chair(Ex Officio)Bruce Reider MDExec. Editor, Med. Pub./Editor-In-Chief AJSM(Ex Officio Non-Voting)Council ChairsDaniel J. Solomon MDCommunicationsAndrew J. Cosgarea MDEducationConstance R. Chu MDResearchElizabeth A. Arendt MDSteven P. Arnoczky DVMAsheesh Bedi MDRobert T. Burks MDSteven B. Cohen MDDiane Lynn Dahm MDThomas M. DeBerardino MDAaron John Krych MDBradley J. Nelson MDMatthew Provencher MDAnthony A. Romeo MDFelix H. Savoie III, MDMark D. Miller MD, Program ChairMarlene DeMaio MDDarren L. Johnson MDAugustus D. Mazzocca MD, MSBeth E. Shubin Stein MDDaniel C. Wascher MD, Instructional Course ChairAOSSM Corporate PartnersAOSSM gratefully acknowledges the followingcompanies for their 2013 commitments, as ofMarch 1, 2013 (program print date):Arthrex Inc.Biomet Sports MedicineBioMimetic TherapeuticsBregConMed LinvatecDePuy MitekDJO Global Inc.Flexion TherapeuticsJoint Restoration FoundationOssur AmericasRTI BiologicsSanofi U.S.Smith & NephewStrykerTo learn more about corporate partnerships, pleasecontact Judy Sherr at judy@aossm.org or 847 / 655 – 8651.Table of ContentsMeeting Format..............................................................2WorkshopsSPTS-AOSSM Pre-Conference Program.....................3Upper Extremity Live SurgicalDemonstrations Workshop.......................................4AJSM and Sports Health Reviewers’ Workshop........5Young Sports Medicine Specialists’ Workshop.........6Research Workshop..................................................7Conference Agenda.................................................8 – 17Presidential Guest Speaker.......................................... 14Posters................................................................. 18 – 24Instructional Courses...........................................25 – 34General Information.............................................35 – 38Social Functions and Daily Activities...........................39Upcoming AOSSM Meetings....................................... 40AOSSM Abstract Submission...................................... 40AOSSM Advance Registration Form.....................42 – 432012 – 2013 Board of DirectorsOther AOSSM Leadership2013 Abstract Panel ReviewersProgram Committee
  • 5. MEETINGFORMATMEETING FORMATDESCRIPTIONThis live activity is designed to highlight areas of recentresearch in the field of orthopaedic sports medicine relevantto practicing physicians, surgeons, and allied healthprofessionals. This information is provided through scientificpaper presentations, hot topics, updates, question andanswer sessions, surgical video demonstrations, spotlightson surgical techniques, symposia, current concepts,overviews, clinical insights and/or debates.MEETING OBJECTIVESUpon completion of this live educational activity, learnersshould be able to: Implement an effective evaluation algorithm, basedon recent research, for musculoskeletal and sportsmedicine conditions Assess and apply surgical and non-surgical treatmentrecommendations and rehabilitation protocols for themanagement of essential musculoskeletal and medicalconditions germane to the practice of orthopaedicsports medicine Integrate prevention strategies with their health careteam(s) to improve musculoskeletal and medical health intheir patient population Devise a strategy to integrate relevant ABOS Maintenanceof Certification procedures Synthesize applicable management concepts intoclinicians’ practices to enhance patient servicesTARGET AUDIENCEThis program is directed toward orthopaedic surgeons,physicians and allied health professionals in the field ofsports medicine or related fields of practice.PROGRAMAOSSM attests that the people responsible for thedevelopment of this live activity did so independently andwere not influenced by commercial supporters.STATEMENT OF NEEDA need for this live activity has been determined basedon identifying professional practice gaps, previous courseevaluations, the AOSSM Self Assessment and the AOSSMEducational Curriculum. The content of this live activity wasbased on current issues and hot topics provided by AOSSMmembership and leadership.PREREQUISITESA basic understanding of the mechanics of sports injuries,as well as a familiarity with the pertinent anatomy andphysiology of the upper and lower extremities and thespine, is suggested.AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 2
  • 6. 2013 AOSSM/ SPTS Pre-Conference ProgramBringing the Team Approach toSports MedicineAll are invited to attend this complimentary courseLocation: Michigan AB 11:50am – 12:00pm WelcomeKevin E. Wilk PT, DPT, Program Chair 12:00 – 12:30pm Recent Advances in the Reconstructionof the Athlete with an ACL InjuryWalter R. Lowe MD 12:30 – 1:00pm Recent Advances in the Rehabilitationof the Athlete following ACL SurgeryRussell M. Paine PT 1:00 – 1:30pm Case Studies: Return to Play andInteraction of SPT and SurgeonChamp L. Baker Jr, MD 1:30 – 2:00pm Tab A. Blackburn PT, ATC 2:00 – 2:30pm Evaluation of Scapular Pathology:3D MRI etc.W. Ben Kibler MD 2:30 – 3:00pm What’s New in Scapular RehabTodd S. Ellenbecker PT 3:00 – 3:30pm Recent Advances in the Surgical Treatmentof Rotator Cuff TearsAnthony A. Romeo MD 3:30 – 4:00pm SLAP: When to do Surgery andWhen to RehabBrian J. Cole MD 4:00 – 4:30pm What’s New in the Rehabilitation of theOverhead AthleteKevin E. Wilk PT, DPT 4:30 – 5:00pm Emerging Concepts in the Treatment ofShoulder Instability: Bone Loss, Soft Tissueand Rotator Cuff IntervalMatthew Provencher MDWorkshops2013AOSSM/SPTSPre-ConferenceProgramAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 3Wednesday, July 10, 2013 12:00 – 5:15pmAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 7. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 4UpperExtremityLiveSurgicalDemonstrationsThis workshop is a great value for the sports medicine community.Plan now to attend this exceptional live surgical demonstrationworkshop with world class faculty!AOSSM Co-Chairs:William N. Levine MD (New York, NY)Matthew Provencher MD (San Diego, CA)Time: 1:00 – 5:15pmLocation: Sheraton Ballroom II and IIIProgram Cost: $225 NM $175 M $150 Allied Health $125 Resident/FellowRegister for this workshop via the Advance Registration Formincluded in this program or online.A boxed lunch is included with the registration fee.Statement of Need:A need for this live educational activity has been determinedbased on identifying professional practice gaps, previouscourse evaluations, the AOSSM Self Assessment and the AOSSMEducational Curriculum.Target Audience:This workshop has been designed for practicing orthopaedicsurgeons, physicians and allied health professionals in the field ofsports medicine or related fields of practice.Workshop Objectives:Upon completion of this Live Surgical Demonstration Workshop,learners should be able to: Evaluate the optimal use of diverse techniques for the six upperextremity procedures Formulate surgical protocols for the upper extremityprocedures that integrate strategies designed to avoidpotential complicationsProgram Information:AOSSM attests that the people responsible for the development ofthis live activity did so independently and were not influenced bycommercial supporters.Accreditation/AMA/PRA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine isaccredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing MedicalEducation to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine designatesthis live educational activity for a maximum of 4.25 AMA PRACategory 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.Accreditation/NATA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for SportsMedicine is recognized by the Board of Certification,Inc. to offer continuing education for CertifiedAthletic Trainers.This program has been approved for a maximum of 4.25 hours ofCategory A Continuing Education. This continuing education courseis considered to be an Essential Level program.BOC Approved Provider Number: P460Program Description:SHOULDER PROCEDURES 1: 1:00 – 1:45pm Open LatarjetModerator: Edward G. McFarland MDSurgeon: Laurence D. Higgins MD 1:45 – 2:30pm Arthroscopic Labrum:Around the World in 80 DaysModerator: Robert A. Arciero MDSurgeon: Christopher D. Ahmad MDELBOW PROCEDURES: 2:30 – 3:15pm UCL ReconstructionModerator: Neal S. ElAttrache MDSurgeon: James R. Andrews MD 3:15 – 4:00pm Arthroscopic Elbow: Basic to AdvancedModerator: Marc R. Safran MDSurgeon: Felix H. Savoie III, MDSHOULDER PROCEDURES 2: 4:00 – 4:45pm Arthroscopic Rotator CuffModerator: Augustus D. Mazzocca MD, MSSurgeon: Nicholas A. Sgaglione MD 4:45 – 5:15pm Arthroscopic Suprascapular Nerve ReleaseModerator: Jon J.P. Warner MDSurgeon: Sumant G. Krishnan MD, MSc, FRCSTHURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013Upper Extremity Live Surgical Demonstrations WorkshopThinking of inviting yourfellows, colleagues ormedical team members?Registration will be available onsitefor this workshop.
  • 8. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 5AmericanJournalofSportsMedicineandSportsHealthReviewers’SeminarThis year’s Reviewers’ Workshop will update the audience on twodiverse topics. Epidemiological studies often appear in our journals,but few of us have the background needed to evaluate themcritically. James L Carey MD, a member of the AJSM editorial board,will explain the important points in terms that a non-epidemiologistcan understand. In addition, Marc R Safran MD, another member ofthe AJSM editorial board, will discuss the current state of knowledgein the rapidly expanding field of hip arthroscopy.Program Planners:Bruce Reider MDJames L Carey MDMarc R Safran MDTime: 1:00 – 2:30pmLocation: Michigan ABProgram Cost:All meeting attendees are eligible to participate. Complimentary for AJSM and Sports Health reviewers $45.00 for non-reviewersRegister for this workshop via the Advance Registration Formincluded in this program or online.A boxed lunch is provided.Statement of Need:The need for this live educational activity is based on AJSMmanuscript reviewer evaluations and requests of attendees frompast workshops.Target Audience:This workshop has been designed for practicing orthopaedicsurgeons, physicians, and allied health professionals in the field ofsports medicine or related fields of practice would like to improvetheir ability to evaluate critically the orthopaedic sports medicineliterature.Workshop Objectives:Upon completion of this live educational activity, learnersshould be able to: Improve the skills of attendees at critically evaluatingepidemiological studies in orthopaedic sports medicine,with special emphasis on whether the proper study designand statistical analysis have been employed in anepidemiological study. Furnish attendees with a discriminating understanding of thecurrent literature about femoroacetabular impingement and togive them the skills to judge future research critically and in thecontext of prior evidence.Program Information:AOSSM attests that the people responsible for the developmentof this live educational activity did so independently and were notinfluenced by commercial supporters.Accreditation/AMA/PRA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine is accreditedby the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education toprovide continuing medical education for physicians.The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine designatesthis live educational activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRACategory 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.Accreditation/NATA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicineis recognized by the Board of Certification, Inc.to offer continuing education for Certified AthleticTrainers.This program has been approved for a maximum of 1.5 hours ofCategory A Continuing Education. This continuing educationcourse is considered to be an Essential Level program.BOC Approved Provider Number: P460Program Description:How to Evaluate Epidemiology Studies in Sports MedicineJames L Carey MD, MPHDepartment of Orthopaedic SurgeryPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaThe purpose of this seminar is to discuss the evaluation and reviewof epidemiology studies in orthopaedic sports medicine. Specialemphasis will be placed on proper study design and statisticalanalysis. Some specific statistical issues that will be reviewedinclude Poisson regression modeling and correcting significancelevels for testing multiple hypotheses. Examples taken directly fromthe orthopaedic sports medicine literature will be used to highlightkey principles.Program Description:Sorting Out the Literature on FemoroacetabularImpingement: An Evidence Based UpdateMarc R Safran MDProfessor, Orthopaedic SurgeryTeam Physician, Stanford UniveristyChief Orthopaedic Consultant, WTA TourThe literature on femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has grownat an exponential rate since 1999, reflecting the growing interestin this clinical entity, as well as basic and clinical research into itsetiology, prevalence pathophysiology and treatment.Femoroacetabular impingement is increasingly recognized as asignificant source of pain and disability in the general population,and particularly in athletes. It is hypothesized that FAI is a cause ofpremature or idiopathic arthritis. The prevalence of the anatomy ofFAI approximates 30% of the general population, while in athletes itappears to occur much more commonly. Studies have demonstrateda high prevalence of radiographic anatomy consistent with FAI inmany sports: it occurs in approximately 90% of basketball andAmerican football players, and more than 70% of male (and 50%of female) soccer players.This presentation is meant to provide an evidence based overview ofwhat is known and not known about FAI, its etiology and treatment.American Journal of Sports Medicine andSports Health Reviewers’ WorkshopThursday, July 11, 2013
  • 9. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 6YoungSportsMedicineSpecialists’WorkshopA Sports Medicine Practice:Trending UpwardFaculty:Mary Lloyd Ireland MD, Lexington, KY, Course ChairJeff Brand MD, Alexandria, MN, Course ChairElizabeth A. Arendt MD, Minneapolis, MNArthur L. Boland MD, Boston, MARobert H. Brophy IV, MD, Chesterfield, MOLeigh Ann Curl MD, Baltimore, MDJulie A. Dodds MD, East Lansing, MIJohn A. Feagin Jr, MD, Vail, COKeith Kenter MD, Cincinnati, OHChristopher M. Larson MD, Edina, MNJ. Martin Leland III, MD, Chicago, ILGeorge A. Paletta Jr, MD, Chesterfield, MOTime: 1:30 – 3:30pmLocation: TBDProgram Cost:$70 per personRegister online for this program or via the Advance RegistrationForm included in this program.A light lunch/snack is included with the registration fee.Statement of Need:AOSSM has determined a need for this live educational activitybased on previous course evaluations, AOSSM surveys, AOSSMEducational Curriculum, Self Assessment and topics provided byAOSSM membership and leadership.Target Audience:Sports medicine physicians who would like to sustain a modernsports medicine practice and are within approximately five years oftheir fellowship.Workshop Objectives:Upon completion of this workshop, learners should be able to: Use social media to raise your practice profile Use your leadership ability to advance your practice Understand provider-based billing and implications foryour practice Provide advantages /disadvantages of hospital-basedemployment Show examples of how to be positive and adapt in the faceof changeProgram Information:AOSSM attests that the people responsible for the development ofthis live activity did so independently and were not influenced bycommercial supporters.Accreditation/AMA/PRA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing MedicalEducation to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine designatesthis live educational activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRACategory 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.Program Description:This program has been designed so that attendees will have agenuine opportunity to discuss meaningful practical issues – somethat short presentations have generated and others that naturallyarise. Come, listen and interact with some top authorities in theirfield give perspectives on the practice of sports medicine. We hopeto offer you some alternative thinking on topics of current interest. Enhancing Your Practice by Raising Your (Digital) Profile J. Martin Leland III, MD How to Embrace the Game of Change  Mary Lloyd Ireland MD Hospital Based Employment: A Physicians Perspective Jeff Brand MD Leadership in a Sports Medicine Practice John A. Feagin MDThe informal small groups give everyone involved an opportunityto benefit from shared universal experiences and proven solutions.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges an educational grant fromSmith & Nephew for this workshop.Young Sports Medicine Specialists’ WorkshopFriday, July 12, 2013JULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 10. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 72013AOSSMResearchWorkshopGraft Healing and Failure After ACLReconstructionTime: 1:30 – 5:30pmLocation: Ballroom II & IIIProgram Cost:There is no cost for this program. However, please register online for thisprogram or via the Advance Registration Form included in this program.A light lunch/snack will be provided.Statement of Need:A need for this live activity has been determined based onidentifying professional practice gaps, previous course evaluations,the AOSSM Self Assessment and the AOSSM Educational curriculum.Target Audience:This workshop has been designed for orthopaedic surgeons, otherphysicians and allied health professionals in the field of sportsmedicine.Workshop Objectives:Upon completion of this workshop, learners should be able to: Describe the biological and biomechanical processes involved ingraft healing Articulate the effects of processing on graft healing Compare and contrast the methods used to assess graft strain,strength, and healing after ACLR Understand how graft healing biology affects return to sportProgram Information:AOSSM attests that the people responsible for the development ofthis live activity did so independently and were not influenced bycommercial supporters.Accreditation/AMA/PRA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing MedicalEducation to provide continuing medical educationfor physicians.The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine designatesthis live educational activity for a maximum of 3.75 AMA PRACategory 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.Accreditation/NATA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicineis recognized by the Board of Certification, Inc.to offer continuing education for Certified AthleticTrainers.This program has been approved for a maximum of 3.75 hours ofCategory A Continuing Education. This continuing education courseis considered to be an Essential Level program.BOC Approved Provider Number: P460Purpose: The purpose of this workshop is to review the latestscientific evidence from both animal and human studies regardingfactors thought to be important in graft healing and performancefollowing ACL reconstruction. The workshop will focus on informationfrom high-quality research studies.Program Description: 1:30 – 1:35pm Welcome and IntroductionConstance R. Chu MD, ChairAOSSM Research Committee (Palo Alto, CA) 1:35 – 1:55pm Autograft vs. Allograft Healing and IncorporationSteven P. Arnoczky DVM(East Lansing, MI) 1:55 – 2:15pm Autograft vs. Allograft and the Success orFailure of ACL ReconstructionRick W. Wright MD (St. Louis, MO)Session 1: Biological Aspects of Graft HealingModerator: Jason L. Dragoo MD(Palo Alto, CA) 2:15 – 2:30pm Contributions of Graft Type and Fixation toMidsubstance vs Bone Tunnel Interface FailureScott A. Rodeo MD(New York, NY) 2:30 – 2:45pm The Effects of Allograft Processing on InfectionRisk and HealingC. Thomas Vangsness MD(Los Angeles, CA) 2:45 – 3:00pm Augmenting ACL Graft HealingMartha Murray MD(Boston, MA) 3:00 – 3:10pm General Discussion 3:10 – 3:25pm BREAKSession 2: Methods to Assess Healing/Functional Capacityof the GraftModerator: Robert F. LaPrade MD, PhD(Vail, CO) 3:25 – 3:40pm Measuring Graft Strain and Joint Loadingafter ACL ReconstructionThomas P. Andriacchi PhD (Palo Alto, CA) 3:40 – 3:55pm MRI Assessment of Graft Strain/HealingHollis G. Potter MD(New York, NY) 3:55 – 4:10pm Clinical Measures of Graft StrengthStefano Zaffagnini MD(Bologna, Italy) 4:10 – 4:20pm General DiscussionSession 3: Implications of Graft Healing on Return to SportModerator: Steven J. Svoboda MD(West Point, NY) 4:20 – 4:35pm Current Status of Return to Sport andMeasurement of Return to SportJames J. Irrgang PhD, PT, ATC(Pittsburgh, PA) 4:35 – 4:50pm Should I Use Allografts in Athletes? NO.What About Weekend Warriors?Darren L. Johnson MD (Lexington, KY) 4:50 – 5:05pm Should I Use Allografts in Athletes? YES.What About Weekend Warriors?Peter A. Indelicato MD (Gainesville, FL) 5:05 – 5:15pm General Discussion 5:15 – 5:30pm Conclusions and Future DirectionsConstance R. Chu MD (Palo Alto, CA) 5:30pm MEETING ADJOURNEDAOSSM gratefully acknowledges Joint Restoration Foundation,RTI, Smith & Nephew and Stryker for providing educationalgrants for this workshop.2013 AOSSM Research WorkshopSaturday, July 13, 2013
  • 11. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 8ConferenceAgendaAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 12. conferenceagendaAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 9THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013Conference Agenda 6:15am Continental Breakfast – River Exhibition Hall 6:45 – 8:15am Instructional Courses 7:30am – 12:30pm Exhibits – River Exhibition Hall General Session – Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV – X 8:30 – 8:35pm Welcome Christopher D. Harner MD,AOSSM President, (Pittsburgh, PA) Mark D. Miller MD, AOSSM 2013 Program Chair,(Charlottesville, VA) 8:36 – 9:01am Scientific Session: Knee – ACL I Moderator: Philippe N. Neyret MD (Lyon, France) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Discuss outcomes for ACL reconstruction Describe ACL reinjury rates Compare benefits and risks of various ACL graft choices 8:36 – 8:41am Paper 1: The Effect of Post-operative KT-1000 Scoreon Long-term Outcome in Anterior Cruciate LigamentReconstruction Andrew D. Goodwillie1, Malachy P. McHugh PhD2,Stephen J. Nicholas MD2 1Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY 2Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma,New York, NY 8:42 – 8:47am Paper 2: Incidence of Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament(ACL) Injury 2 Years after Primary ACL Reconstructionand Return to Sport Mark V. Paterno PhD, PT, ATC1,Mitchell Rauh PhD, PT, MPH, FACSM2,Laura C. Schmitt PhD, PT3, Kevin R. Ford MS4,Timothy E. Hewett PhD, FACSM3 1Sports Medicine Biodynamics Ctr, Cincinnati, OH 2San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 3The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 4High Point University, High Point, NC 8:48 – 8:53am Paper 3: Return to Sports and Subsequent ACL InjuryRates after Revision ACL reconstruction with PatellarTendon Autograft K. Donald Shelbourne MD1, Rodney W. Benner MD1,Tinker Gray MA1,1ELS Shelbourne Knee Center, Indianapolis, IN 8:54 – 9:01am Q&A 9:02 – 9:12am Debate: Allograft vs Autograft 9:02 – 9:07am Allograft C. Thomas Vangsness Jr, MD (Los Angeles, CA) 9:07 – 9:12am Autograft Darren L. Johnson MD (Lexington, KY) 9:13 – 9:44am Scientific Session: Critical Issues in Sports Medicine Moderator: Edward M. Wojtys MD (Ann Arbor, MI) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Explain how coaching really works Identify areas in your practice where coaching may bebeneficial Describe how you can adopt the AAOS Safety Initiative intoyour practice 9:13 – 9:33am Symposium: Improving Your Game – Surgeons CoachingSurgeons Atul Gawande MD (Boston, MA) (via video) Dean C. Taylor MD (Durham, NC) Walton Curl MD (Winston Salem, NC) Jesse C. DeLee MD (San Antonio, TX) Brad S. Tolin MD (San Antonio, TX) 9:34 – 9:44am Update: AAOS Safety Initiative Laurence D. Higgins MD (Boston, MA) 9:45 – 9:49am Poster Awards 9:50 – 9:55am Hughston Award Presentation 9:56 – 10:06am Cabaud Memorial Award Presentation Use of a Bioactive Scaffold to Stimulate Healing AlsoMinimizes Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis After Surgery Martha M. Murray MD1, Braden C. Fleming PhD2 1Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA 2Brown University, Providence, RI 10:07 – 10:27am Traveling Fellows Presentation 10:28 – 10:33am OREF Presentation 10:34 – 10:49am First Business Meeting (MEMBERS ONLY) 10:50 – 11:20am BREAKConcurrent Session A Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV - X 11:21 – 11:38am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Knee – Multiple Ligament Injuries Moderator: Bruce A. Levy MD (Rochester, MN) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Define Ultra Low Velocity knee dislocation Outline Posterolateral Corner knee repair andreconstruction options Differentiate various treatment options for knee multipleligament injuries 11:21 – 11:26am Paper 4: Ultra-Low Velocity Knee Dislocations:A Challenging Population of Multiligament Knee Injuries Brian C. Werner MD1, Frank W. Gwathmey MD2,Carl J. Gilmore MD1, Mark D. Miller MD1 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 2Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 11:27 – 11:32am Paper 5: Posterolateral Knee Repair VersusReconstruction Mark A. McCarthy MD1, Matthew Bollier MD1,Brian R. Wolf MD, MS1, Annunziato Amendola MD1 1University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 11:33 – 1:38am Q&A 11:39am – 12:15pm Case-Based Symposium: Multiple Ligament Knee Moderator: Robert G.Marx MD,MSc,FRCSC (NewYork,NY) Panelists: David R. McAllister MD (Los Angeles, CA) Robert F. LaPrade MD, PhD (Vail, CO) Robert C. Schenck Jr, MD (Albuquerque, New Mexico)Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 13. conferenceagendaAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 10THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013JULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.Concurrent Session B Sheraton Ballroom II and III 11:21 – 11:51am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Sports Hip Moderator: Valverde Victor M. Ilizaliturri MD(Mexico City, Mexico) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session, learnersshould be able to: Discuss effects of hip capsulectomy on mechanics Evaluate effects of capsular repair versus leaving open Identify factors that lead to THR after hip arthroscopy forimpingement lesions Identify CAM lesions with accuracy on plain radiographs 11:21 – 11:26am Paper 6: Hip Arthroscopy for FAI: Predictors of PatientSatisfaction and Conversion to Total Hip Arthroplasty5 to 7 years Following Arthroscopy Marc J. Philippon MD1, Jack G. Skendzel MD1,Mackenzie Herzog BA1, Peter Goljan MD1,Karen K. Briggs, MPH, MBA11Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO 11:27 – 11:32am Paper 7: Identifying Cam Lesions on the FalseProfile View Michael D. Hellman MD1, Yale A. Fillingham MD1,Anil K. Gupta MD, MBA1, Rachel Frank BS, BA1,Bryan D. Haughom1, Shane Jay Nho MD, MS1 1Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 11:33 – 11:38am Paper 8: The Effect of Capsulectomy on Hip JointBiomechanics Jennifer L. Bayer MD1, Erin Bigelow MS2,Omar Jameel, MBBS2, Jon K. Sekiya MD21University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 11:39 – 11:44am Paper 9: Two-Year Outcome of Arthroscopic CapsularRepair of the Hip: A Prospective Matched-PairControlled Study Benjamin G. Domb MD1, Christine E. Stake MA1,Zachary John Finley BA1, Ryan A. Baise BS3,Itamar Botser MD2 1Hinsdale Orthopaedics Associates, Westmont, IL 2Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 11:45 – 11:51am Q&A 11:52am – 12:07pm Symposium: Capsulotomy for Hip Arthroscopy – Big or Small 11:52 – 11:59am Big Bryan T. Kelly MD (New York, NY) 12:00 – 12:07pm Small Christopher M. Larson MD (Edina, MD) 12:08 – 12:17pm Update: Hip Arthroscopy – New Frontiers Marc R. Safran MD (Palo Alto, CA)
  • 14. conferenceagenda 6:15am Continental Breakfast – River Exhibition Hall 6:45 – 8:15am Instructional Courses 7:30am – 12:30pm Exhibits – River Exhibition Hall General Session – Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV – X 8:30 – 8:55am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Shoulder Instability I Moderator: Winston J. Warme MD (Seattle, WA) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Identify risk factors associated with shoulder instability Examine the role of glenoid version and glenoid deficiencyin instability Compare treatment options for shoulder instability incontact athletes 8:30 – 8:35am Paper 10: Risk Factors for Anterior GlenohumeralInstability Brett D. Owens MD1, Scot Campbell MD2,Kenneth L. Cameron PhD, MPH, ATC1 1Keller Army Hospital, West Point, NY 2Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, TX 8:36 – 8:41am Paper 11: The Effect of Glenoid Version and Width onOutcomes of Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Stabilization Craig S. Mauro MD1, Michael P. McClincy MD1,James P. Bradley MD1 1University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 8:42 – 8:47am Paper 12: Conjoined Tendon Transfer vs Modified Bristowin a Glenoid Bone Loss Model: A Biomechanical Study Anand P. Panchal DO1, Daryl C. Osbahr MD2,Wiemi Douoguih MD3, Brent G. Parks MSC2 1Triangle Orthopaedic Associates, PA, Durham, NC 2MedStarUnion Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, MD 3Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 8:48 – 8:55am Q&A 8:56 – 9:16am Case-Based Symposium: Shoulder Instability in aCollision Athlete Moderator: Augustus D. Mazzocca MD, MS (Farmington, CT) 8:56 – 9:02am Arthroscopic Treatment Brian J. Cole MD, MBA (Chicago, IL) 9:03 – 9:09am Open Soft Tissue Repair Michael J. Pagnani MD (Nashville, TN) 9:10 – 9:16am Coracoid Transfer Robert A. Arciero MD (Farmington, CT)] 9:17 – 9:37am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Rotator Cuff Moderator: John E. Kuhn MD (Nashville, TN) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session, learnersshould be able to: Apply treatment alternatives and algorithms for failedprimary RTC repairs including: Arthroscopic treatment approaches Tendon transfers Biologic augmentation choices 9:17 – 9:37am Symposium: Revision Rotator Cuff 9:17 – 9:23am Arthroscopic Treatment Matthew Provencher MD (San Diego, CA) 9:24 – 9:30am Tendon Transfer Bassem T. Elhassan MD (Rochester, MN) 9:31 – 9:37am Biologic Augmentation William N. Levine MD (New York, NY) 9:38 – 9:53am AMSSM Exchange Lecture Sports Cardiology: Matters of the Heart Matthew Gammons MD (Rutland, VT) 9:54 – 9:59am Thomas A. Brady Award 10:00 – 10:06am Hall of Fame Awards 10:07 – 10:13am Introduction to Presidential Address 10:14 – 10:44am Presidential Address 10:45 – 11:15am BREAKFrIDAY, JULY 12, 2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 11
  • 15. conferenceagendaAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 12Concurrent Session A Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV – X 11:16 – 11:33am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Shoulder Instability II Moderator: Steven B. Cohen MD (Philadelphia, PA) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Analyze epidemiological factors in shoulder instability Describe cost effectiveness of shoulder instability Evaluate treatment options for engaging Hill Sachs defects 11:16 – 11:21am Paper 13: Shoulder Dislocation in Ontario, Canada from1994 To 2011: The Incidence, Rate And Risk Factors forRecurrence. Timothy Leroux MD1, David Wasserstein MD1,Tim Dwyer MD1, Christian Veillette1, Amir Khoshbin MD1,Rajiv Gandhi MD, FRCSC1, Peter Austin PhD2,Nizar Mahomed MD1, Darrell Ogilvie-Harris MD, FRCSC31University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 2Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada 3Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 11:22 – 11:27am Paper 14: The Cost-Effectiveness of Arthroscopic BankartRepair Versus Non-Operative Treatment For First-time,Traumatic, Anterior Shoulder Dislocations Ryan Patrick Donegan MD1, Garrett Davis MD1,James Genuario MD2, John Bell MD11Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, 2Steadman Hawkins Clinic, Denver, CO 11:28 – 11:33am Q&A 11:34 – 11:54am Symposium: Engaging Hill Sachs Defect Moderator: Russell F. Warren MD (New York, NY) 11:34 – 11:40am Remplissage Felix H. Savoie III, MD (New Orleans, LA) 11:41 – 11:47am Bone Grafting Defect Anthony Miniaci MD (Cleveland, OH) 11:48 – 11:54am Coracoid Transfer James E. Tibone MD (Los Angeles, CA) 11:55am – 12:20pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Elbow Moderator: Christopher S. Ahmad MD (New York, NY) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Describe risk factors for conservative treatment of UCLinjuries Discuss key components of the UCL Analyze the effect of shoulder range of motion on elbowinjuries in baseball pitchers Identify common elbow conditions and their treatment 11:55am – 12:00pm Paper 15: What are the Risk Factors for Failure afterConservative Treatment of Ulnar Collateral LigamentInjuries of the Elbow in Baseball Players? Kozo Furushima MD, PhD1, Yoshiyasu Itoh MD, PhD1,Shohei Iwabu MD,PhD1 1Keiyu Orthopedic Hospital, Tatebayashi, Gunma, Japan 12:01 – 12:06pm Paper 16: Sequential Sectioning of the UlnarCollateral Ligament of the Elbow in Cadaveric Armswith Ulnohumeral Laxity Assessed by DynamicUltrasonography Christopher C. Dodson MD1, Levon Nazarian MD2,Michael G. Ciccotti MD1, Steven B. Cohen MD1,Sommer Hammoud MD1, Michael C. Ciccotti BA31Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, PA 2Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 3Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA 12:07 – 12:12pm Paper 17: Glenohumeral Passive Range of Motion andthe Correlation to Elbow Injuries in Professional BaseballPitchers Kevin E. Wilk PT, DPT1, Leonard Macrina1,Glenn S. Fleisig PhD2, Kyle Aune, MPH2, Ron Porterfield3,Paul Harker3, James R. Andrews MD41Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL 2American Sports Medicine Institute, Birmingham, AL 3Tampa Bay Rays, St. Petersburg, FL 4The Andrews Institute, Gulf Breeze, FL 12:13 – 12:20pm Q&A 12:21 – 12:28pm Update: Elbow Surgery Michael G. Ciccotti MD (Philadelphia, PA) 12:29 – 1:02pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Shoulder – Proximal Biceps Moderator: Craig R. Bottoni MD (Honolulu, HI) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Demonstrate key features of the examination of patientswith proximal biceps pathology Explain proximal biceps injuries Compare various treatment options for biceps tenodesis 12:29 – 12:34pm Paper 18: The Accurate Diagnosis of Biceps-LabralComplex Lesions with MRI and “3-Pack” PhysicalExamination: A Retrospective Analysis with ProspectiveValidation Stephen J. O’Brien MD, MBA1, Ashley M. Newman BS1,Samuel Taylor MD1, Courtney Dawson MD2,Kelli Ann Gallagher, PA-C1, Andrea Bowers MD3,Joseph Nguyen, MPH1, Nikolas Baret11Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 2Norwood Hospital, Norwood, MA 3Burlington County Orthopaedic Specialists, Mount Laurel, NJ 12:35 – 12:53pm Symposium: Biceps Tenodesis 12:35 – 12:41pm Proximal (High) Mark W. Rodosky MD (Pittsburgh, PA) 12:42 – 12:48pm Arthroscopic Suprapectoral (Low) Stephen F. Brockmeier MD (Charlottesville, VA) 12:49 – 12:55pm Open Subpectoral (Really Low) Anthony A. Romeo MD (Chicago, IL) 12:56 – 1:02pm Q&AFrIDAY, JULY 12, 2013JULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 16. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 13conferenceagendaConcurrent Session B Sheraton Ballroom II and III 11:16 – 11:33am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Lower Extremity – Other Moderator: Edward R. McDevitt MD (Annapolis, MD) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Identify risk factors for lower extremity stress fractures Describe the most common lower extremity stressfractures and their treatment Discuss the diagnosis and management of Fifth Metatarsalfractures in elite football players 11:16 – 11:21am Paper 19: Biomechanical Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Stress Fracture Kenneth L. Cameron PhD, MPH, ATC1,Karen Y. Peck, MEd, ATC1, Brett D. Owens MD1,Steven J. Svoboda MD1, Darin A. Padua PhD, ATC2,Lindsay J. DiStefano PhD, ATC3, Anthony I. Beutler MD4,Stephen W. Marshall BSc, DAgrSc, PhD21Keller Army Hospital, West Point, NY 2University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 3University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 4Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD 11:22 – 11:27am Paper 20: The Elite Football Players witha Fifth Metatarsal Fracture James R. Ross MD1, Robert H. Brophy MD2,Rick W. Wright MD21University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 2Washington University, St. Louis, MO 11:28 – 11:33am Q&A 11:34 – 11:59am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Foot/Ankle Moderator: Christopher C. Kaeding MD (Columbus, OH) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Illustrate the procedure and results for ATFL and CFLfibular advancement Analyze the benefits and risks of non-operative treatmentoptions for ankle sprains Discuss current treatment options for various foot andankle injuries 11:34 – 11:39am Paper 21: Treatment of Chronic Lateral Ankle Instabilitywith ATFL and CFL Fibular Advancement: SurgicalTechnique and Clinical Outcome Tim Dwyer MD1, Massimo Petrera MD2,Darrell Ogilvie-Harris MD, FRCSC31University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 2Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 3Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 11:40 – 11:45am Paper 22: Diclofenac Sodium Topical Gel (DSG) 1%Reduces Swelling and Tenderness and Improves AnkleJoint Function in Subjects with Acute Ankle Sprain:A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial Hans-Georg Predel MD1, Bruno Giannetti MD, PhD2 1German Sports University, Cologne, Germany 2CRM, Rheinbach, Germany 11:46 – 11:51am Paper 23: Corticosteroid Injections Hasten Return to Playof National Football League Players Following StableAnkle Syndesmosis Sprains Alfred A. Mansour MD1, David A. Porter MD, PhD2,Jason Paul Young MD3, Dave Hammer ATC4,Martin Boublik MD5, Theodore F. Schlegel MD51University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, Houston,TX 2Methodist Sports Medicine Center, Indianapolis, IN 3Orthopedic Associates, LLC, St Louis, MO 4Indianapolis Colts, Indianapolis, IN 5Steadman Hawkins Clinic, Denver, CO 11:52 – 11:59am Q&A 12:00 – 12:07pm Update: Foot/Ankle Surgery Gino M.M.J. Kerkhoffs MD, PhD (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 12:08 – 12:42pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Pediatric Sports Moderator: Carl W. Nissen MD (Farmington, CT) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Describe common OCD lesions in children Evaluate the risk for growth plate injury in pediatricACL reconstruction Discuss common pediatric upper extremity sports injuries 12:08 – 12:13pm Paper 24: The Demographics and Epidemiology ofOsteochondritis Dissecans of the Ankle, Elbow, Foot, andShoulder in Children Jeffrey I. Kessler MD1, Hooman Nikizad1,Kevin G. Shea MD3, John C. Jacobs BS3,Jennifer Weiss MD11Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 3St. Luke’s Health System, Boise, ID 12:14 – 12:19pm Paper 25: Physeal-Specific MRI Analysis of GrowthPlate Disturbance Following All-Inside Anterior CruciateLigament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients:Does a Physeal-Sparing Technique Offerany Advantage? Danyal H. Nawabi MD1, Kristofer J. Jones MD1,Brett Lurie1, Hollis G. Potter MD1, Daniel W. Green MD1,Frank A. Cordasco MD, MS11Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 12:20 – 12:25pm Paper 26: ACL Reconstruction in Prepubescent Youths:A Retrospective Outcomes Study S. Clifton Willimon MD1, Christopher Robert Jones MD1,Keith May, DPT3, Mackenzie Herzog BA3, Melissa Leake, ATC3,Michael T. Busch MD11Children’s Orthopaedics of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 2Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 12:26 – 12:33pm Update: Pediatric Upper Extremity Sports Injuries Theodore J. Ganley MD (Philadelphia, PA) 12:34 – 12:42pm Q&A 12:43 – 1:00pm Debate: Pediatric ACL Moderator: Mininder S. Kocher MD, MPH (Boston, MA) 12:43 – 12:51pm All Epiphyseal Frank A. Cordasco MD, MS (New York, NY) 12:52 – 1:00pm Trans-physeal George A. Paletta Jr, MD (St. Louis, MO)FrIDAY, JULY 12, 2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 17. conferenceagenda 6:15am Continental Breakfast – River Exhibition Hall 6:45 – 8:15am Instructional Courses 7:30am – 2:00pm Exhibits – River Exhibition Hall General Session – Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV – X 8:30 – 8:47am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Concussion Moderator: Barry P. Boden MD (Rockville, MD) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session, learnersshould be able to: Describe how football helmet and mouth guards affectconcussion risks Analyze how sleep affects neurocognitive test results Apply current return to play guidelines for athletes whosuffer a concussion 8:30 – 8:35am Paper 27: The Association of the Type of Football Helmetand Mouth Guard with the Incidence of Sport RelatedConcussion in High School Football Players Timothy McGuine PhD1, Alison Brooks MD1,Scott Hetzel MS1, Jessica Rasmussen1,Michael McCrea PhD21University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI,2Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 8:36 – 8:41am Paper 28: Baseline Neurocognitive Test Results in Non-concussed Athletes: Does Sleep Matter? D. Jake McClure BS1, Scott L. Zuckerman MD1,Scott J. Kutscher1, Andrew Gregory MD1,Gary S. Solomon MD1 1Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 8:42 – 8:47am Q&A 8:48  – 9:03am NATA Exchange Lecture Concussion Management - Heads Up! Jason Peter Mihalik PhD, ATC (Chapel Hill, NC) 9:04 – 9:28am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Knee – Cartilage/Meniscus Moderator: Thomas M. DeBerardino MD (Farmington, CT) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Define MACI Compare and contrast different articular cartilagetreatment options Evaluate which meniscal tears should be repaired 9:04 – 9:09am Paper 29: SUMMIT Prospective, Randomized, ControlledTrial: Response Rates to Matrix-induced AutologousChondrocyte Implant (MACI) Versus Microfracture (MFX)by Lesion Characteristics Daniel Saris MD, PhD1, Andrew Price MD2,Jon Olav Drogset MD, PhD3, Ales Podškubka MD4,Anika Tsuchida MD1, Mauritz Bezuidenhoudt MSc5,Sven Kili MD5, David W. Levine MD, MPH6,Mats Brittberg MD, PhD71University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands 2University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom 3Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway 4University of Prague, Bulovka Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic 5Sanofi Europe (formerly Genzyme), Naarden, Netherlands 6Sanofi Biosurgery (formerly Genzyme Biosurgery),Cambridge, MA 7Region Halland Orthopaedics, Kungsbacka Hospital,Kungsbacka, Sweden 9:10 – 9:15am Paper 30: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and ClinicalEvaluation of Chondral lesions treated with AllograftsJuvenile Cells Cecilia Pascual-Garrido MD1, Stephanie L. Gold MS1,Jaclyn Snikeris BS1, Alissa Burge MD1,Joseph Nguyen, MPH1, Hollis G. Potter MD1,Russell F. Warren MD1,Riley J. Williams MD1,Scott A. Rodeo MD11Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 9:16 – 9:21am Paper 31: Are Articular Cartilage Lesions and MeniscusTears Predictive of IKDC, KOOS, and Marx Activity LevelOutcomes after ACL Reconstruction? A 6-Year MOONCohort Study Charles L. Cox MD1, Laura J. Huston MS1,Warren R. Dunn MD, MPH1,Richard D. Parker MD2,Rick W. Wright MD3, Christopher C. Kaeding MD4,Robert G. Marx MD, MSc, FRCSC4,Annunziato Amendola MD6, Eric C. McCarty MD7,Kurt P. Spindler MD11Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 2Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 3Washington University, St. Louis, MO 4Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 6University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, Iowa City, IA 7CU Sports Medicine, Boulder, CO 9:22 – 9:28am Q&A 9:29 – 9:39am Rapid Fire Case-Based Symposium: Meniscal Treatment Moderator: Frank R. Noyes MD (Cincinnati, OH) Panelists: Nicholas A. Sgaglione MD (Great Neck, NY) John C. Richmond MD (Boston, MA) Brett D. Owens MD (West Point, NY) 9:40 – 9:45am Introduction to Presidential Guest Speaker Christopher D. Harner MD (Pittsburgh, PA) 9:46 – 10:16am Presidential Guest Speaker Tony Dungy (Tampa, FL) 10:17 – 10:26am Robert E. Leach MD Mr. Sports Medicine Award 10:27 – 10:33am Presidential Medallion Exchange 10:34 – 10:49am Second Business Meeting (MEMBERS ONLY) 10:50 – 11:20am BREAK SATURDAY, JULY 13, 2013AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 14Presidential GuestSpeakerTony Dungy, former professional footballplayer and Super Bowl winning headcoach, will be the 2013 Annual Meeting’sPresidential Guest Speaker. Dungy led theIndianapolis Colts to a Super Bowl victory on February 4,2007, the first such win for an African-American coach.Dungy established another NFL first by leading his teamsto the playoffs for ten consecutive years. Dungy joinedthe Colts in 2002 after serving as the most successfulhead coach in Tampa Bay Buccaneers history. He has alsoheld assistant coaching positions with the University ofMinnesota, Pittsburgh Steelers, Kansas City Chiefs andMinnesota Vikings. Before becoming a coach, Dungyplayed three seasons in the NFL.Dungy is also the #1 New York Times bestselling authorof Quiet Strength and Uncommon.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges DJO Global for theirsupport of the Presidential Guest Speaker presentation.Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 18. conferenceagendaAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 15Concurrent Session A Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV – X 11:21 – 11:38am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Knee – ACL II Moderator: Freddie H. Fu MD (Pittsburgh, PA) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Describe ACL and MCL loading during landing Analyze “indirect” femoral insertion and its implications inACL reconstruction Discuss “anatomic” ACL reconstruction principles Identify which MCL injuries should be addressed incombined ACL/MCL-injured knees 11:21 – 11:26am Paper 32: Preferential Loading of the ACL Comparedto the MCL during Landing: A Novel in Sim ApproachYields the Multi-Planar Mechanism of Dynamic Valgusduring ACL Injury Carmen E. Quatman MD, PhD1, Ata Kiapour MS2,Constantine K. Demetropoulos PhD3, Ali Kiapour MS2,Samuel Clayton Wordeman BS4, Jason W. Levine MD5,Vijay K. Goel PhD2, Timothy E. Hewett PhD, FACSM11Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 2University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 3William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oaks, MI 4University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 5Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH 11:27 – 11:32am Paper 33: The Role of the Indirect Femoral Insertionof the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Restraining TibialTranslation and Rotation: Implications for AnatomicFemoral Tunnel Placement Neil P. Pathare MD1, Stephen J. Nicholas MD1,Rob Colbrunn MS2, Malachy P. McHugh PhD11Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma,New York, NY 2Cleveland Clinic Foundation Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH 11:33 – 11:38am Q&A 11:39 – 11:46am Update: What Does “Anatomic” Really Mean and How Do YouGet There? Charles H. Brown Jr, MD (Wellesley, MA) 11:47am – 12:02pm Symposium: Case-Based ACL/MCL Injury Moderator: Thomas L. Wickiewicz MD (New York, NY) 11:47 – 11:54am Operate Eric C. McCarty MD (Boulder, CO) 11:55am – 12:02pm Do Not Operate Peter A. Indelicato MD (Gainesville, FL) 12:03 – 12:34pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Articular Cartilage Moderator: Anil Ranawat MD (New York, NY) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Define the role of gender in articular cartilage restoration Discuss the results of the Osteoarthritis andEARTH initiatives Evaluate upper tibial osteotomy versusunicompartmental knee replacement Describe return to sport guidelines following TKAand THA 12:03 – 12:08pm Paper 34: Does Sex Matter? Analysis of Results at 5Years after Matrix-assisted Autologous ChondrocyteTransplantation in a Large Cohort of Patients Elizaveta Kon MD1, Silvio Patella MD PhD1,Giuseppe Filardo MD1, Alessandro Di Martino MD1,Francesco Perdisa MD1, Berardo Di Matteo MD1,Maria Letizia Merli MD1, Maurilio Marcacci11Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Biomechanics Lab, Bologna, Italy 12:09 – 12:14pm Paper 35: Joint Space Loss after Arthroscopic PartialMeniscectomy: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative Alexander Rothy MS1, Steven Cherney MD2,Stephen D. Fening PhD3, Jeffrey Duryea PhD4,Carl S. Winalski MD1, Morgan H. Jones MD1,Anthony Miniaci MD11Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 2Washington University, St. Louis, MO, 3Austen BioInnovation Institute, Akron, OH 4Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 12:15 – 12:20pm Update: EARTH Constance R. Chu MD (Palo Alto, CA) 12:21 – 12:26pm Paper 36: Comparable Maintenance of Tibial Slope in TwoHigh Tibial Osteotomy Techniques Stephen Christopher Hamilton MD1,Grant Whitby Bennett MD2, Curtis Anderson Bush MD3,Douglas J. Wyland MD11Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas, Spartanburg, SC 2Conway Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Clinic,Conway, AR 3Orthopedic Specialty Associates, Fort Worth, TX 12:27 – 12:34pm Q&A 12:35 – 12:50pm Debate: Upper Tibial Osteotomy vs. Uni-compartmental KneeReplacement Scenario: 50+ year-old recreational athlete with isolatedmedial compartment and axial aligment well into medialcompartment 12:35 – 12:42pm Upper Tibial Osteotomy Annunziato Amendola MD (Iowa City, IA) 12:43 – 12:50pm Uni-compartmental Knee Replacement David R. Diduch MD (Charlottesville, VA) 12:51 – 1:10pm Update: Return to Sport Following TKA or THA John J. Callaghan MD (Iowa City, IA) SATURDAY, JULY 13, 2013JULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 19. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 16conferenceagendaConcurrent Session B | Sheraton Ballroom II and III 11:21 – 11:36pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Shoulder – Subscapularis Moderator: Benjamin S. Shaffer MD (Washington, DC) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Identify which subscapularis tears should be fixed Describe operative treatment options for subscapularisrepair Discuss non-operative and post-operative management ofsubscapularis injuries Symposium: Subscapularis Tears – When and How to Fix Panelists: Warren R. Kadrmas MD (Lackland AFB, TX) Christian Lattermann MD (Lexington, KY) Richard J. Hawkins MD, FRSCS (Greenville, SC) 11:37am-12:02pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Clavicle Moderator: Claude T. Moorman III, MD (Durham, NC) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Analyze treatment options for clavicle fractures Discuss trends in the treatment of clavicle fractures Evaluate which clavicle fractures require surgical treatment 11:37 – 11:42am Paper 37: Locked Intramedullary Fixation vs AnatomicallyContoured Locked Plating Of Clavicle Shaft Fractures:A Prospective Randomised Controlled Trial Reggie Paul King, MB,ChB1 1Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa 11:43 – 11:48am Paper 38: Intra- and Inter- Observer Agreement inthe Classification and Treatment of Midshaft ClavicleFractures Grant L. Jones MD1, Julie Bishop MD1, Brian Lewis MD1,Angela Pedroza1, Shoulder Group MOON2 1Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 2Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 11:49 – 11:54am Paper 39: Trends in the Volume of Operatively TreatedMid-shaft Clavicle Fractures in Children and Adolescents Benton E. Heyworth MD1, Catherine A. Suppan BA1,Mininder S. Kocher MD, MPH1, Donald S. Bae MD1 1Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 11:55am – 12:02pm Q&A 12:03 – 12:23pm Symposium: Case-Based Clavicle Fractures Moderator: Nikhil N. Verma MD (Chicago, IL) Panelists: John M. Tokish MD (Hickham Air Force Base, HI) Peter J. Millett MD, MSc (Vail, CO) Andreas B. Imhoff MD (Munich, Germany) 12:24 – 12:49pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Patellofemoral Instability Moderator: Daniel C. Wascher MD (Albuquerque, NM) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Discuss MRI findings and landmarks in skeletally immatureknees Compare TT and TG differences in measurement Evaluate different treatment options for patellar instability 12:24 – 12:29pm Paper 40: Normal Parameters of Skeletally ImmatureKnees: Developmental Changes on Magnetic ResonanceImaging Mary Bathen MD1, Tracey P. Bastrom MA2,Eric W. Edmonds MD2 1University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 2Rady Children’s Specialists, San Diego, CA 12:30 – 12:35pm Paper 41: Does One Size Fit All? Variation in TibialTubercle Trochlear Groove (TTTG) Measurements as aFunction of Age, Size, and Patellar Instability Andrew T. Pennock MD1, Milad Alam BS2,Tracey P. Bastrom MA1 1Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA 2University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 12:36 – 12:41pm Paper 42: CT and MRI Measurements of Tibial Tubercle toTrochlear Groove Distances (TT-TG) are Not Equivalent Christopher L. Camp BS1, Jeffrey R. Bond MD1,Mark S. Collins MD1, Michael J. Stuart MD1,Aaron John Krych MD1, Bruce A. Levy MD1,Diane Lynn Dahm MD1 1Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 12:42 – 12:49pm Q&A 12:50 – 1:10pm Case-Based Symposium – Patellar Instability Moderator: Beth E. Shubin Stein MD (New York, NY) Panelists: Robert A. Teitge MD (Dearborn, MI) John P. Fulkerson MD (Farmington, CT) Elizabeth A. Arendt MD (Minneapolis, MN) SATURDAY, JULY 13, 2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 20. conferenceagendaAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 17 6:15am Continental Breakfast – River Exhibition Hall General Session – Sheraton Chicago Ballroom IV – X 8:00 – 8:05am George D. Rovere Award 8:06 – 8:13am Systematic Review Awards 8:14 – 8:21am T. David Sisk Award for Excellence 8:22 – 8:41am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: COI Moderator: Thomas J. Gill IV, MD (Boston, MA) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Describe how conflict of interest can affect judgment Outline AAOS and AOSSM conflict of interest initiatives Discuss future implications for conflict of interest 8:22 – 8:27am Paper 43: Conflict of Interest in Sports Medicine: Does itAffect Our Judgement? Fotios P. Tjoumakaris MD1, Bradford S. Tucker MD1,Matthew D. Pepe MD1, Sommer Hammoud MD1,Steven B. Cohen MD1, Michael C. Ciccotti BA1 1The Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, PA 8:28 – 8:35am Watch Your Back: COI in our Universe Thomas J. Gill IV, MD (Boston, MA) 8:36 – 8:41am Q&A 8:42 – 8:54am Update: Affordable Care – A Look Into the Future John Cherf MD, MPH, MBA (Chicago, IL) 8:55 – 9:20am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Complications Moderator: Marlene DeMaio MD (Portsmouth, VA) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session,learners should be able to: Identify the common complications of arthroscopicknee surgery Describe complications in hip arthroscopy Discuss the incidence of suprascular nerve injury inSLAP repair 8:55 – 9:00am Paper 44: Complications following ArthroscopicKnee Surgery Matthew J. Salzler MD1, Chealon Dain Miller MD1,Albert Lin MD1, Sara Herold MS1,James J. Irrgang PhD, PT, ATC1, Christopher D. Harner MD1 1University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 9:01 – 9:06am Paper 45: Complications after Hip Arthroscopy:A Prospective, Multicenter, Study Using a ValidatedGrading Classification Christopher M. Larson MD1, John C. Clohisy MD2,Paul Beaule MD3, Bryan T. Kelly MD4, Russell Giveans PhD1,Rebecca M. Stone MS, ATC1, Kathryn M. Samuelson BS1 1Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute, Edina, MN 2Washington University, St. Louis, MO 3University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada 4Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 9:07 – 9:12am Paper 46: Injury to the Suprascapular Nerve during SLAPRepair: A Rotator Interval Portal is Not Safer than anAnterosuperior Portal Ryan Morgan MD1, James C. Dreese MD1,Ralph Frank Henn MD1 1University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 9:13 – 9:20am Q&A 9:21– –  – 9:31am Research Award for Excellence Presentation Development and Validation of a Pediatric SportsActivity Rating Scale Peter D. Fabricant MD, MPH1, Alex Robles BS1,Timothy Downey-Zayas BS1, Huong T. Do MA1,Robert G. Marx MD, MSc1, Roger F. Widmann MD1,Daniel W. Green MD, MS1 1Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 9:32 – 9:49am SCIENTIFIC SESSION: Hip Moderator: Marc J. Philippon MD (Vail, CO) Objectives: Upon completion of this scientific session, learnersshould be able to: Compare and contrast arthroscopic and open treatment forFAI Discuss the impact of age on hip arthroscopy outcomes Identify correct surgical indications for hip arthroscopy 9:32 – 9:37am Paper 47: Surgical Dislocation of the Hip vs. ArthroscopicTreatment of Femoro-acetabular Impingment:A Prospective Comparative Studywith 2-Year Follow-up Timothy J. Jackson MD1, Christine E. Stake, MA2,Youssef El Bitar MD2, Dror Lindner MD2, Itamar Botser MD3,Benjamin G. Domb MD2 1Congress Medical Associates, Pasadena, CA 2Hinsdale Orthopaedics Associates, Westmont, IL 3Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 9:38 – 9:43am Paper 48: Two Year Follow-up of Hip Arthroscopies:A Match-controlled Study Comparing Patients Over 50Years to Under 30 Years Dror Lindner MD1, Christine E. Stake MA1,Timothy J. Jackson MD2, Youssef El Bitar MD1,Austin Chen3, Benjamin G. Domb MD1 1Hinsdale Orthopaedics Associates, Westmont, IL 2Congress Medical Associates, Pasadena, CA 9:44 – 9:49am Q&A 9:50 – 10:00am Update: Who Doesn’t Need a Hip Scope? J.W. Thomas Byrd MD (Nashville, TN) 10:01 – 10:16am ACSM Exchange Lecture Update: Return to Play for Common Medical Conditions Carrie Jaworski MD, FACSM (Chicago, IL) 10:17 – 10:27am O’Donoghue Research Award Presentation Long-Term Outcomes After Ulnar Collateral LigamentReconstruction in Competitive Baseball Players: Follow-Upwith a Minimum of 10 Years Daryl C. Osbahr MD1, E. Lyle Cain Jr, MD2,B. Todd Raines MA, ATC3, Dave Fortenbaugh PhD2,Jeffrey R. Dugas MD2, James R. Andrews MD2 1MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore,MD 2American Sports Medicine Institute, Birmingham, AL 3University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL 10:28 – 10:43am Update: Hand/Wrist Injuries in Sports Kevin D. Plancher MD (Cos Cob, CT) 10:43 – 11:15am Symposium: Case-Based Current Concepts and Controversiesin Knee Rehabilitation Moderator: Joseph M. Hart PhD (Charlottesville, VA)Kevin E. Wilk PT, DPT (Birmingham, AL) James J. Irrgang PhD, PT, ATC (Pittsburgh, PA) Lynn Snyder-Mackler, PhD (Newark, DE) 11:15am CONFERENCE ADJOURNS SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013Presenters are in bold.Presenters are in bold.
  • 21. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 18PostersAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 22. postersAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 19PostersHIP1 Understanding the Pincer: The Importanceof Reference Plane Orientation onAcetabular Rim Evaluation Anil K. Gupta MD, MBA1, Nozomu Inoue MD, PhD1,Michael David Hellman BS2, Joshua D. Harris MD1,Francis McCormick MD1, Shane Jay Nho MD, MS1. 1Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 2Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA2 Can Bracing Affect Altered Gait Patterns inFemoroacetabular Impingement Marc R. Safran MD1, Jonathan Rylander MS1,Beatrice Shu MD3, Thomas P. Andriacchi PhD2 1Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 2Atlanta Sports Medicine & Cartilage Reconstruction, Atlanta, GA3 The Association of Femoral Neck StressFractures with Femoral AcetabularImpingement Marc R. Safran MD1, Michael Goldin MD2,Christian Anderson MD1, Michael Fredericson MD1,Kathryn J. Stevens MD1 1Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 2University of Medicine and Dentistry, Newark, NJ4 Arthroscopic Hip Revision Surgery forResidual FAI: Surgical Outcomes Christopher M. Larson MD1, Russell Giveans PhD1,Asheesh Bedi MD2, Kathryn M. Samuelson BS1,Rebecca M. Stone MS, ATC1 1Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute, Edina, MN 2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI5 Radiographic Evaluation of Pincer-typeFAI: Do Coxa Profunda and the CrossoverSign Guarantee Acetabular Overcoverage? Jack G. Skendzel MD1, Peter Goljan MD1,Karen K. Briggs, MPH, MBA1, Marc J. Philippon MD1 1Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO6 Symptomatic FemoroacetabularImpingement: Are There Gender-SpecificDisease Characteristics? John C. Clohisy MD1, Jeffrey J. Nepple MD2 1Washington University, St Louis, MO 2Steadman Philippon Research Institute Program, Vail, CO7 Dynamic Clinical Assessment of FemoralAcetabular Impingement Travis Maak MD1, Andrew Kraszewski MS2,Anil S. Ranawat MD2, Sherry I. Backus PT2,Erin Magennis BA2, Howard Hillstrom2, Bryan T. Kelly MD2 1University of Utah Orthopaedics, Salt Lake City, UT 2Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY8 In vitro Evaluation of Labral Seal afterLabrum Reconstruction Patrick Birmingham MD1, Mark W. Bowers BS2,Linda McGrady BS2, Matthew Carpenter MD2,Mei Wang PhD2 1Northshore Orthopaedics, Chicago, IL 2Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI9 Hip Labral Tears among AsymptomaticProfessional Hockey Players Identified onMRI: Four-year Follow-up Study Robert A. Gallo MD1, Matthew Silvis MD1,Brandon Smetana BA1, Timothy Mosher MD1, Dan Stuck1,Scott A. Lynch MD1, Kevin P. Black MD1 1Penn State University, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA10 Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block in HipArthroscopy: A Retrospective Review of108 Consecutive Cases Andrew P. Dold MD1, Michael Lucas Murnaghan MD1,Richard Brull MD2, Daniel B. Whelan MD3 1University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 2Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 3St. Michael’s Orthopedic Assoc, Toronto, ON, Canada11 The Demographics of High-level andRecreational Athletes with Intra-articularHip Injury: A Sports-specific Analysis Lisa M. Tibor MD1, Asheesh Bedi MD2,Hanna N. Oltean MS2, Joel Joseph Gagnier, ND, PhD2,Bryan T. Kelly MD3 1William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI 2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 3Hospital for Special New York, NY12 Comparison of the Amount of IliopsoasTendon Lengthening That Occurs afterArthroscopicLabral-Level and LesserTrochanteric Tenotomies Jennifer L. Bayer MD1, James S. Keene MD1 1University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI13 Functional Outcomes Following SurgicalRepair of Acute and Chronic Ruptures ofthe Proximal Hamstring Tendons Christopher M. Larson MD1, David Rust MD1,Kathryn M. Samuelson BS1, Russell Giveans PhD1,Rebecca M. Stone MS, ATC1 1Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute, Edina, MNJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 23. postersAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 20Posters (cont.)KNEE14 Restriction in Hip Internal Rotation isAssociated with an Increased Risk of ACLInjury in NFL Combine Athletes: A Clinicaland Biomechanical Study Asheesh Bedi MD1, Russell F. Warren, MD2,Youkeun K. Oh, PhD1, Edward M. Wojtys, MD1,Hanna N. Oltean, MS1, James A. Ashton-Miller, PhD1,Bryan T. Kelly, MD1 1University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 2Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY15 Diagnostic Value of Knee Arthrometryin the Prediction of ACL StrainDuring Landing Ata Kiapour MS1, Samuel Clayton Wordeman BS2,Mark V. Paterno PhD, PT, ATC3, Carmen E. Quatman MD, PhD4,Jason W. Levine MD5, Vijay K. Goel PhD1,Timothy E. Hewett PhD, FACSM4 1University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 2University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 3Sports Medicine Biodynamics Ctr, Cincinnati, OH 4Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 5Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, OH16 Risk factors for Recurrent Anterior CruciateLigament Reconstruction: A PopulationStudy in Ontario, Canada with 5-YearFollow-up David Wasserstein MD, MSc, FRCSC1, Amir Khoshbin MD1,Tim Dwyer MD1, Jaskarndip Chahal MD, FRCSC1,Rajiv Gandhi MD, FRCSC1, Nizar Mahomed MD1,Darrell Ogilvie-Harris MD, FRCSC2 1University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 2Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada17 Landing on an Unstable Surface DecreasesACL Biomechanical Risk Factors Rebecca Shultz PhD1, Maria Malone BS1, Kat Swank1,Rob Andrews1, Hillary J. Braun BA1, Amy Slider1,Jason L. Dragoo MD1 1Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA18 How To Improve The Prediction ofQuadruple Semitendinosus and GracilisAutograft Sizes with Magnetic ResonanceImaging and Ultrasonography Pablo E. Gelber MD, PhD1 1Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain19 Gadolinium Enhanced MRI Assessment ofBone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft Harveston Patellar Vascularity Kristofer J. Jones MD1, Lionel E. Lazaro MD1,Samuel Taylor MD1, Nadine C. Pardee BS1,Jonathan P. Dyke PhD2, Jo A. Hannafin MD, PhD1,Russell F. Warren MD1, Dean G. Lorich MD1 1Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 2Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY20 Early Complications with FemoralTranscondylar Pin Fixation forACL Reconstruction Cynthia A. Kahlenberg BA1, Prashant Deshmane MD1,Brian S. Han BA1, Sara L. Edwards MD1 1Northwestern University, Chicago, IL21 Defining Patient Acceptable SymptomState Thresholds for the IKDC SubjectiveKnee Form and KOOS for PatientsUndergoing ACL Reconstruction Bart Muller MD1, Mohammad A. Yabroudi PT,MS2,Chung-Liang Lai MD3, Andrew Lynch, DPT1,Christopher D. Harner MD1, C. Niek Van Dijk PhD2,Freddie H. Fu MD1, James J. Irrgang PhD PT ATC1 1University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, 2AMC Hospital University, Amsterdam, Netherlands22 Factors Associated with Excellent 6 MonthFunctional and Isokinetic Test ResultsFollowing ACL Reconstruction Aaron John Krych MD1, Jessica Woodcock MD2,Joseph Morgan MD2, Bruce A. Levy MD1,Michael J. Stuart MD1, Diane Lynn Dahm MD1. 1Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 2Lanier Memorial Hospital, Kinston, NC23 Comparison of Two Methods to MeasureReturn to Sports after Anterior CruciateLigament (ACL) Reconstruction Mohammad A. Yabroudi PT, MSc1, Bart Muller MD1,Chung-Liang Lai MD1, Andrew Lynch, DPT1,Alicia Oostdyk, MPH1, Freddie H. Fu MD1,Christopher D. Harner MD1, James J. Irrgang PhD, PT, ATC1 1University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA24 ACL Revision Reconstruction: Results ofa Novel Single Stage Approach UsingAllograft Dowel Bonegrafting Carl Jan Gilmore MD1, Joshua C. Hamann MD1,Cree M. Gaskin MD1, John Joseph Carroll1,Joseph M. Hart PhD1, Mark D. Miller MD1 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
  • 24. postersAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 21Posters (cont.)25 Biomechanical Evaluation of KneeKinematics After ACL Reconstructions inAnatomic SB and DB – Technique withAdditional Medial Meniscus Suture Olaf Lorbach MD1, Mirco Herbort MD2, Martin Engelhardt MD3,Matthias Kieb MD4 1Saarland University, Homburg (Saar), Germany 2Münster University, Munster, Germany 3Klinikum Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany 4Rostock University, Rostock, Germany26 Reliability of the ROCK OsteochondritisDissecans Knee Arthroscopy ClassificationSystem: Multi-center Validation Study James L. Carey MD1, Eric J. Wall MD2,Kevin G. Shea MD3, Nathan L. Grimm BS4,Allen F. Anderson MD5, Eric W. Edmonds MD6,Henry G. Chambers MD6, Benton E. Heyworth MD7,Mininder S. Kocher MD, MPH7, Roger M. Lyon MD8,Michael Lucas Murnaghan MD9, Carl W. Nissen MD10,John Polousky MD11, Jennifer Weiss MD12, Rick W. Wright MD13 1Penn Sports Medicine Center, Philadelphia, PA 2Cinncinati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 3St. Luke’s Health System, Boise, ID 4University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 5Tennessee Orthopaedic Alliance, Nashville, TN 6Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA 7Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA 8Children’s Hospital Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 9The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada 10Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Farmington, CT 11Rocky Mountain Youth Sports Medicine Institute,Centennial, CO 12Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 13Washington University, Saint Louis, MO27 The Demographics, Epidemiology, andIncidence of Progression to Surgery ofOsteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee inChildren and Adolescents Jeffrey I. Kessler MD1, Hooman Nikizad2, Kevin G. Shea MD3,John C. Jacobs BS3, Rita M. Ishkhanian MD1,Jennifer Weiss MD1 1Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 2University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, IL 3St. Luke’s Health System, Boise, ID28 Osteochondral Allografting for KneeLesions in the Pediatric andAdolescent Population Andrew T. Pennock MD1, Ryan T. Murphy BA2,William Bugbee MD3. 1Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA 2Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA 3University of California San Diego OrthoMed, La Jolla, CA29 A Predictive Factor in OsteochondritisDissecans: A Radiographic Analysis Robby Singh Sikka MD1, John Francis Wechter MD2,Mujtaba Alwan BA1, Marc Tompkins MD1 1TRIA Orthopaedic Center, Bloomington, MN 2University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MA30 Acute Complications of Pediatric andAdolescent Knee Arthroscopy Ali Ashraf MD1, Christy Marie Christophersen MS1,Lindsay Hunter BA1, Diane Lynn Dahm MD1,Amy L. McIntosh MD1 1Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN31 Anatomical Dissection and CT Imagingof the Anterior Cruciate and MedialCollateral Ligaments in SkeletallyImmature Cadaver Knees Kevin G. Shea MD1, John Polousky MD2, John C. Jacobs BS1,Theodore J. Ganley MD3 1St. Luke’s Health System, Boise, ID 2Rocky Mountain Youth Sports Medicine Institute,Centennial, CO 3Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA32 Peroneal Nerve Injury after MultiligamentKnee Injury: A 12 Year Experience with aFocus on Outcomes after Posterior TibialTendon Transfer Brian C. Werner MD1, Frank W. Gwathmey MD2,Matthew L. Lyons MD1, Mark D. Miller MD1. 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 2Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA33 Knee Dislocation From Minor Trauma inMorbidly Obese Patients Rahul Vaidya MD1, Dhiren Nanavati MD1,Matthew Prince MD1, Anil Sethi MD1 1Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI34 Clinical and Functional Outcomes afterMultiligament Knee Injury with AssociatedPeroneal Nerve Palsy: Comparison with aMatched Control Group at 2 – 18 Years Aaron John Krych MD1, Steven Giuseffi MD1, Scott A. Kuzma1,Joshua L. Hudgens MD2, Michael J. Stuart MD1,Bruce A. Levy MD1 1Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MIJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 25. postersAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 22Posters (cont.)35 Matching of Articular Surface Shape ofSelected Donor and Recipient Sites forCylindrical Osteochondral Grafts of theFemur– Quantitative Evaluation using aThree Dimensional Laser Scanner Yuichiro Nishizawa1, Tomoyuki Matsumoto1,Takehiko Matsushita MD, PhD1, Koki Nagamune PhD2,Yuichi Hoshino3, Daisuke Araki1, Shinya Oka1,Tokio Matsuzaki1, Masahiro kurosaka1, Ryosuke Kuroda1 1Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan 2University of Fukui Graduate School of Engineering,Fukui-City, Japan 3Kobe Kaisei Hospital, Kobe, Japan36 Tibial Tuberosity Realignment Alters inVivo Patellar Tracking Andrew J. Cosgarea MD1, John A. Carrino MD1,Archana Saranathan2, Loredana M. Guseila2,Miho Jean Tanaka MD1, John J. Elias PhD2 1Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD 2Akron General Medical Center, Akron, OHFOOT37 Could Low Total and Free TestosteroneLevels be Risk Factor for Achilles TendonRuptures in Males Ermias Shawel Abebe MD1, Ivan Tarkin MD1, Victor Prisk MD2 1University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 2Highmark WPAHS, McMurray, PASHOULDER38 Anatomic and Radiographic Comparisonof Arthroscopic and Open BicepsTenodesis Site Adam Morgan Johannsen, BS1, Jeffrey A. Macalena MD1,Marc Tompkins MD1 1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN39 Biceps Tenodesis: How Low do YouGo? A Comparison of Location betweenArthroscopic Suprapectoral and OpenSubpectoral Techniques Brian C. Werner MD1, Mark D. Miller MD1,Matthew L. Lyons MD1, Eric W. Carson MD1,Cody L. Evans, BS1, David R. Diduch MD1,Stephen F. Brockmeier MD1 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA40 Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis for FailedType II SLAP Repair Anil K. Gupta MD, MBA1, Benjamin Bruce2,Emma Klosterman BS1, Francis McCormick MD1,Joshua D. Harris MD1, Anthony A. Romeo MD1 1Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 2Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI41 Demographic Trends in Arthroscopic andOpen Biceps Tenodesis in New York State Catherine Noelle Laible MD1, Michael DiBenedetto BA2,Eric Jason Strauss MD1, Laith M. Jazrawi MD1 1NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY, 2NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY42 Arthroscopic Transfer of the Long Head ofthe Biceps Tendon: 2 – 10 Year FunctionalOutcome and Clinical Results Samuel Taylor MD1, Nikolas J. Baret, Research Coordinator1,Ashley Newman BS2, Demetris Delos MD1, Mark Drakos MD3,Zachary M. Copple BA1, James R. DiPietro BS1,Stephen J. O’Brien MD, MBA1 1Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 2SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 3Brown University, Warwick, RI43 Topographic Analysis of The Glenoid andProximal Medial Tibial Articular Surfaces:A Search for the Ideal Match for GlenoidResurfacing Anil K. Gupta MD, MBA1, Brian Forsythe MD1,Andrew S. Lee MD1, Joshua D. Harris MD1,Francis McCormick MD4, Geoff D. Abrams MD1,Nikhil N. Verma MD1, Nozomu Inoue MD, PhD1,Brian J. Cole MD, MBA1 1Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL44 Normal Glenoid Relationships Used forUnilateral Quantification of Glenoid BoneLoss in Glenohumeral Instability Aaron J. Bois MD, MSc, FRCSC1, Alexander Rothy BS2,Anish Ghodadra MD2, Morgan H. Jones MD2,Anthony Miniaci MD2 1University of Calgary, Calgary, AB 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH45 Professional Pitchers with GIRD DisplayGreater Dominant Humeral Retrotorsionthan Pitchers with Normal ROM Thomas J. Noonan MD1, Ellen Shanley PT, PhD, OSC2,Lane Brooks Bailey, DPT3, Douglas J. Wyland MD2,Michael Kissenberth MD2, Richard J. Hawkins MD, FRCSC2,Charles A. Thigpen PT, PhD, ATC2 1Steadman Hawkins Clinic Denver, Englewood, CO 2Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas, Spartanburg, SC 3Proaxis Therapy, Greenville, SC46 Shoulder and Scapular Kinematics duringthe Windmill Softball Pitch: The Effectof Fatigue Sherry I. Backus PT1, Andrew Kraszewski1,Andreas Kontaxis PhD1, Mandi Gibbons1, Jennifer Bido1,Jessica Graziano3, Jocelyn Hafer1, Kristofer J. Jones MD1,Howard Hillstrom1, Stephen Fealy MD1 1Hospital For Special Surgery, New York, NY
  • 26. postersAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 23Posters (cont.)47 Analysis of Subjective and ObjectiveFatigue in Fast-pitch Softball PitchersDuring a Single Season Justin Shu Yang MD1, Jeffrey G. Stepan BS1, Lucas Dvoracek1,Rick W. Wright MD1, Randi Davis, DC2, Robert H. Brophy MD1,Matthew V. Smith MD1 1Washington University, St. Louis, MO 2Performance Healthcare, St. Louis, MO48 Glenohumeral Passive Range of Motionand The Correlation to Shoulder Injuriesin Professional Baseball Pitchers Kevin E. Wilk PT, DPT1, Leonard Macrina1,Glenn S. Fleisig PhD2, Kyle Aune, MPH2, Ron Porterfield3,Paul Harker3, James R. Andrews MD4. 1Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL 2American Sports Medicine Institute, Birmingham, AL 3Tampa Bay Rays, St. Petersburg, FL 4The Andrews Institute, Gulf Breeze, FL49 Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in FemaleProfessional Tennis Players: Ability andTiming to Return to Play Simon W. Young, MBChB1, Marc R. Safran MD1,Jodie Dakic, PHTY(Hon)2, Michael L. Nguyen MD1,Kathleen Stroia PT, ATC2 1Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 2Women’s Tennis Association, St. Petersburg, FL50 Return to Sport Following ArthroscopicAnterior Shoulder Stabilization: HighOutcome Scores Despite Moderate Rateof Return to Play Matthew John Kraeutler BS1, Nick Aberle II, MD2, Cyndi Long2,Eric C. McCarty MD2 1Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, PA, 2CU Sports Medicine, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO51 Reduction in Muscle Fiber ForceProduction, Disruption of Muscle CellArchitecture and Accumulation of FattyMacrophages in Patients with ChronicRotator Cuff Tears Asheesh Bedi MD1, Stuart M. Roche BS1, Evan B. Lynch BS,Max Davis BS1, Julie A. Harning BS1,Elizabeth R. Sibilsky Enselman, MEd, ATC1,Christopher Mendias PhD, ATC1 1University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI52 A Prospective Follow-up of PatientsTreated Surgically or Non-Surgically forFull-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Joel Joseph Gagnier, ND, PhD1, Hanna N. Oltean MS1, AsheeshBedi MD1, James E. Carpenter MD1,Bruce S. Miller MD, MS1 1University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI53 A Prospective Randomized Trialof Functional Outcomes followingRotator Cuff Repair With and WithoutAcromioplasty: Minimum 2-Year Follow-up Elizabeth Tetteh MD1, Kristen Elizabeth Hussey BS2,Geoffrey D. Abrams MD1, Anil K. Gupta MD, MBA1,Aman Dhawan MD2, Vasili Karas BS1, Brian J. Cole MD, MBA1,Anthony A. Romeo MD1, Nikhil N. Verma MD1 1Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 2University Orthopaedic Associates, Wall, NJ54 Kinesiology Tape Compared to NSAIDSin the Treatment of Rotator CuffImpingement Moira Devereaux1, Kinny Quan Velanoski1,Amanda Pennings MScPT1, Amr ElMaraghy MD1 1St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada55 Outcome Compartison of ConcomitantArthroscopic SLAP / Anterior Bankart Repairwith SLAP / Posterior Bankart Repair Ralph Frank Henn MD1, Kaitlin M. Carroll BS2,Thomas J. Gill MD2 1University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 2Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA56 Obstructive Sleep Apnea as a Risk Factorfor Postoperative Complications afterShoulder Arthroplasty Justin W. Griffin MD1, James A. Browne MD1,Stephen F. Brockmeier MD1. 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA57 The Accuracy of the Physical Examversus Arthroscopy in the Detection ofSubscapularis Tendon Injury Sami Faruqui BS1, Coen A. Wijdicks PhD2, Abdullah Foad MD3 1University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 2Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO 3Foad Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, PC,Clinton, IA58 Shoulder Range of Motion: Validationof an Innovative Measurement MethodUsing a Smartphone Brian C. Werner MD1, Chris M. Kuenze MA1,Justin W. Griffin MD1, Matthew L. Lyons MD1,Joseph M. Hart PhD1, Stephen F. Brockmeier MD1. 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
  • 27. postersAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 24Posters (cont.)59 Spectrum of Childhood Intra-articularShoulder Pathology Eric W. Edmonds MD1, Joanna Helena Roocroft MA1,Shital Parikh MD2 1Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA 2Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OHELBOW60 Operative Management of Elbow UCLInsufficiency in Adolescent AthletesAge 18 Years and Younger Kristofer J. Jones MD1, Brian J. Rebolledo MD1,Kenneth Weeks MD1, David M. Dines MD1,Joshua S. Dines MD1, David W. Altchek MD1 1Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY61 Origin of the Medial Ulnar CollateralLigament on the Pediatric Elbow Michael Alan Zell1, Jerry R. Dwek MD1, Eric W. Edmonds MD1 1Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CASPORTS - GENERAL62 The Effect of Immediate and DelayedInjection of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP)on Muscle Contusion Healing in the Rat Demetris Delos MD1, Matthew Leineweber MS2,Salma Chaudhury MD, PhD, MRCS1, Saif Alzoobaee BS3,Yingxin Gao PhD2, Scott A. Rodeo MD3. 1Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 2Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 3Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY63 Effect of Athletic Activity on HormoneLevels in High School Female Athletes Edward M. Wojtys MD1, Mary L. Jannausch1,Jennifer L. Kreinbrink BS1, Maryfran R. Sowers1 1University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI64 The Role of Magnetic ResonanceImaging in a Division I UniversitySports Medicine Program Kellen L. Huston MD1, Adnan Cutuk MD, Scott G. Kaar MD1 1St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO65 Cost Benefit Analysis of Sports MedicineTeam Coverage: Is it Worth Our While? Fotios P. Tjoumakaris MD1, Brandon Eck1,Kevin B. Freedman MD2, Matthew D. Pepe MD1,Luke Austin MD1, Bradford S. Tucker MD1 1The Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, PA 2Orthopaedic Specialists, Bryn Mawr, PAJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 28. InstructionalCoursesAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 25THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amFriday, July 12, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amSATURday, July 13, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 29. instructionalcourselistAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 26IC101CASE-BASED: Knee – MCL/LCLMatthew Bollier MD, Robert A. Arciero MD,Robert F. LaPrade MD, PhD, Patrick A. Smith MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Determine if a case of acute and chronic MCL andposterolateral corner knee injury is non-operativeor operative Recognize non-operative return to play decisions forisolated injuries Understand when and why a surgical technique foracute and chronic MCL and posterolateral corner injuriesbecomes necessaryThe management of acute and chronic collateral kneeinjuries has been debated. Although non-operative treatmentis recommended for most acute isolated injuries, return toplay protocols vary among team physicians. When surgery isindicated, there are different thoughts on timing of surgery,surgical technique and repair vs. reconstruction. This case-based course will focus on treatment options and the decisionmaking process for these injuries.IC102CASE-BASED: Articular CartilageJack Farr II, MD, Scott D. Gillogly MD, Eric C. McCarty MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Develop a working treatment plan through didactics andcase-based learning with supplemental didactics for themanagement of symptomatic articular cartilage disease Recognize and understand how to manage co-morbiditiesassociated with chondral disease such as malalignment,meniscal deficiency and ligament deficiency Understand the existing limitations of contemporarytreatment options and the landscape of emergingtechnologyA concise overview of the decision-making and availabletreatment options for cartilage disease in 2013 will bepresented. The evaluation and treatment of patients whopresent with a number of co-morbidities who are typicallyconsidered salvage candidates will also be provided. Asummary of the clinically relevant treatment options thatare on the two to five year horizon will be presented.Approximately half of the IC will focus on case-based learningto allow the panel and participants to weigh in on thedecision making related to patients presenting with articularcartilage disease and co-morbidities.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Stryker for the educationalgrant in support of this activity.IC103Shoulder InstabilityLaurence D. Higgins MD, James P. Bradley MD,James E. Carpenter MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Develop a logical, evidence-based algorithm to evaluatepatients with acute and chronic shoulder instability Understand the appropriate clinical and radiographicevaluations necessary to formulate a strategictreatment plan Identify critical clinical and radiographic factors thatinfluence treatment of shoulder instability including,but not limited to, glenoid and humeral bone loss,proprioceptive factors and the role of the scapula inshoulder instabilityThrough the use of illustrative cases demonstrating each ofthe above, the faculty will expand upon the importance of acomprehensive evaluation both clinically and radiographicallyto arrive at the correct diagnosis. While there is debate aboutthe management of subtle and moderate bone loss, anin-depth analysis of outcomes will be presented with particularemphasis on failed instability operations. The audience willbe engaged in the decision-making process as the casesand lectures unfold to demonstrate where critical factorsmay influence the operative and non-operative decisionmaking process.THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amInstructional CoursesJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 30. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 27instructionalcourselistIC104Ankle Arthroscopy: What are the Limits?Gino M.M.J. Kerkhoffs MD, PhD, Annunziato Amendola MD,Pau Golano MD, Fernando Pena MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss ankle and hindfoot anatomy, with respect to safelyperforming anterior and posterior ankle arthroscopy Identify range of indications for anterior and posteriorankle arthroscopy Discuss the limits of anterior and posteriorankle arthroscopy Understand the standard after treatment regimen afteranterior and posterior ankle arthroscopy proceduresTreatment modalities of sports injuries of the ankle joint havebeen developing over the years. The arthroscopic treatmentmodalities obviously have advantages for the athletes. Forankle and hindfoot injuries, the anterior and posterior anklearthroscopy provide a unique treatment modality with lowoverall complication rate and growing number of indications.Faculty will present anterior and posterior ankle andhindfoot anatomy, with special emphasis on the surgicalanatomy. This knowledge provides a healthy basis tounderstand the advantages of this type of surgery. With theanatomy as a starting point a number of indications willbe highlighted ranging from soft tissue and bony posteriorimpingement, to osteochondral defects of the talus and tibia,as well as subtalar and ankle degenerative joint diseasein sports.IC105Social Media 101: Why You Should Join theConversation and How to Get StartedC. David Geier Jr, MD, Kevin Marberry MD,J. Martin Leland III, MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Use social media for personal and practice branding,marketing and educating the public Use Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms asa physician Recognize technology and other applications available toorthopaedic surgeons for communication, collaborationand education Determine issues and concerns for surgeons as socialmedia grows in use and importanceThis instructional course, a collaboration of the AOSSM PublicRelations and Technology Committees, intends to educateorthopaedic surgeons and other sports medicine providersabout social media. Orthopaedic surgeons will discuss how itcan be incorporated into an effective marketing strategy andhow it can be used to educate athletes, coaches and parents.We will also introduce the most popular social media sites,especially Twitter and Facebook, and demonstrate the basicsto get started.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Stryker for the educationalgrant in support of this activity.Instructional Courses(cont.)THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 6:45 – 8:15am
  • 31. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 28instructionalcourselistInstructional Courses(cont.)IC106Performance-Enhancing DrugsJohn A. Lombardo MD, Edward R. McDevitt MD,Daniel Eichner PhDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Identify the performance enhancing drugs used byathletes, the reasons for their use and their adverseeffects Understand the components of a deterrence program forperformance enhancing drugs Discuss the types of testing available to detectperformance enhancing drug use by athletes Understand the role of the team physician in theperformance enhancing drug use in sportsAthletes have utilized the latest training techniques, dietarymeasures and equipment to gain an advantage and optimizetheir performance. Some athletes have accepted the win at allcosts credo and taken performance enhancing drugs to chasethe win, the title, the medal. The extreme measures that havebeen used by athletes have been chronicled since the deathsof two cyclists in the ‘60s through the Olympics, professionalsports and the latest cycling exposé. Physicians have beenon all sides of the performance enhancing drug problem.Physicians who care for athletes must be knowledgeableabout the drugs being used, the reasons that they are usedand the adverse effects of these drugs. Physicians should beable to educate the athletes about these drugs and be awareof the deterrence methods available through drug testingand passport programs. The drugs that are being used, thedetection methods available and the role of the team physicianwill be presented in this course.IC107CASE-BASED: Game Day Decisions – How toKeep Them in the Game and Off The Sideline!Darren L. Johnson MD, Russell F. Warren MD,Daniel E. Cooper MD, Walter R. Lowe MD,Ronnie P. Barnes MS, ATCObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss the commonly seen injuries one encounters asan orthopaedic team physician, and complete use of allmodalities to accurately make an effective diagnosis in atimely manner Apply the diagnostic techniques and principles for themost effective efficient treatment that allows for treatment,rehabilitation and return to play as soon as possible Evaluate the effectiveness and risks of these treatmentstrategies and modalities as they apply to safeparticipation in sports and re-injuryThis case-based course will focus on real-world examples ofthe treatment of “in-season” injuries and how we treat them.Presenters will stress decision-making and treatment strategiesof commonly seen orthopaedic injuries encountered as anorthopaedic team physician at the high school, collegiate, andprofessional levels. Cutting edge treatment strategies will bediscussed that enable an athlete to safely return to competitionin a timely manner when “no play” or season ending surgeryis not an option.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Smith & Nephew for theeducational grant in support of this activity.THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 32. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 29instructionalcourselistInstructional Courses(cont.)IC201Revision ACL Surgery – Why and How?David R. Diduch MD, Claude T. Moorman III, MD,Gehron Treme MD, Asheesh Bedi MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Determine the cause of ACL graft failure Identify revision strategies and understand techniques thatoptimize success Understand expected outcomes to counsel patientsA failed ACL reconstruction is an emotional problem forboth patients and surgeons with major consequences forcompetitive athletes. We will cover the common reasons ACLreconstructions fail and how to best perform revision ACLsurgery using a case-based approach.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Stryker for the educationalgrant in support of this activity.IC202CASE-BASED: Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain,Chondrosis, and ArthritisElizabeth A. Arendt MD, Christian Lattermann MD,David DeJour MD, Karl F. Almqvist MD, PhDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Develop a treatment algorithm for the management ofspecific clinical scenarios related to symptomatic articularcartilage disease in the patellofemoral joint, includingphysical therapy Identify the imaging tests that aide in the diagnosis andsurgical planning for these PF conditions Compare and contrast the limitations and benefits ofcontemporary treatment options for isolated chondralinjury within the landscape of emerging technologyFaculty will provide an overview of the spectrum of treatmentoptions for patella pain due to early patellofemoralosteoarthritis in the knee joint. Evaluation and managementof isolated chondral lesions of the patella/trochlea will bepresented. We will discuss the limitations of patellofemoraltreatment for early osteoarthritis and appraisal of outcomes.The future trends in treatment of patellofemoral cartilage injuryand arthritis will be assessed.Friday, July 12, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amInstructionalCourses
  • 33. instructionalcourselistAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 30IC203Rotator Cuff ControversiesRichard J. Hawkins MD, FRCSC, Theodore F. Schlegel MD,John E. Kuhn MD, Neal S. ElAttrache MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Apply an approach to dealing with these controversialissues, when and who to fix, and what technique Discuss the cost implications and the outcomeexpectations Identify future areas of concern for cuff problemsControversial issues surrounding rotator cuff tears will beaddressed during this course. The speakers will addressbiology of cuff healing past, present and future, including therole of PRP, stem cells and scaffolding. When not to operate,when to operate and the options comparing techniques suchas single vs. double row along with outcomes also included.The work up with history, physical exam and imaging willhelp the participant appreciate their influence on cuff problemdecision making. Case presentations will address controversiesrelated to the biceps, decompression, SLAPs, dislocations andinclude cost issues. The AAOS guidelines for cuff problems willalso be discussed.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Stryker for the educationalgrant in support of this activity.IC204Elbow Injuries in Throwing AthletesChristopher S. Ahmad MD, Michael G. Ciccotti MD,Jeffrey R. Dugas MD, George A. Paletta Jr, MD,Felix H. Savoie III, MDObjectives:Upon completion of this instructional course, learners shouldbe able to: Understand the unique biomechanics affecting elbowinjuries in throwing athletes Accurately diagnose elbow MCL injuries, valgus extensionoverload, olecranon stress fractures, capitellar OCD andradiocapitellar plica Understand standard and modified MCL reconstructiontechniques Treat olecranon stress fractures, capitellar OCD andradiocapitellar plica Diagnose and treat MCL injuries in youth athletes Diagnose and manage complications associated with MCLreconstructionThis course will address the spectrum of elbow injuriescommon to the throwing athlete. Emphasis will be placedon biomechanics of injury, diagnosis, and treatment. MCLreconstruction techniques will be presented including thedocking and alternative fixation techniques. Valgus extensionoverload and olecranon stress fractures will be covered.Management of capitellar osteochondritis dissecans andradiocapitellar plica will be presented with arthroscopictechnical pearls. Lastly, complex issues such as boneavulsion injuries in young athletes and complications of MCLreconstruction such as evaluation and management of painduring the MCL reconstruction rehabilitation process will becovered. Each presenter will provide their “Top 5 Pearls.”Several simple and challenging cases will be presentedto the faculty to illustrate and provide essential practicalinformation to attendees.IC205CodingWilliam R. Beach MD, John Cherf MD, MPH, MBA,Louis McIntyre MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Understand and be able to correctly identify and documentspecific levels of E&M services Understand specific coding rationales and bundlingpackages (GSD vs. NCCI) Appreciate the current climate of regulatory decisionsaffecting orthopaedic surgeonsThe purpose of this course is to teach/update physicians onE&M and surgical coding. This course introduces new codesand reviews the bundling packages associated with them.Instructional Courses(cont.)Friday, July 12, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 34. instructionalcourselistFriday, July 12, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amInstructional Courses(cont.)AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 31IC206Prevention and Management of Life-Threatening Conditions in AthletesJames Kinderknecht MD, Matthew Gammons MD,Dennis Wen MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Understand the current guidelines and strategies to screenathletes for the causes of sudden death Understand the components of an emergency action plan Understand the differential diagnosis and initialmanagement of the medically distressed or collapsedathleteThis course will review the prevention strategies toinclude recommended medical screening and the creationof an emergency action plan as it relates to the care ofathletes. Additionally the course will discuss the evaluationand management of the medically distressed or collapsedathlete in various settings to include the atraumatic and thetraumatized athlete.IC207CASE-BASED: Troublesome Stress FracturesChristopher C. Kaeding MD, Richard D. Parker MD,Rick W. Wright MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss the pathophysiology and classification ofstress fractures Identify high-risk stress fractures Apply treatment considerations for problematicstress fracturesStress fractures are often troublesome overuse injuries thatare challenging for both the athlete and the treating clinician.This course will provide an overview of the pathophysiologyand classification of stress fractures. Using a case-basedapproach, evaluation strategies and treatment options of themore common troublesome stress fractures will be discussed.IC208UltrasoundBernard F. Morrey MD, Jay Smith MD, Jonathan T. Finnoff DOObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss the current utility of US in the diagnosis ofsports injuries Identify the current application and techniques ofultrasound guided therapy in the athlete Appreciate the status of a recent innovation usingultrasound energy as treatment for tendinopathyThis course will provide a concise but comprehensive statusof ultrasound as a diagnostic and therapeutic modality.The content is designed to demonstrate the growing utilityof ultrasound in the management of acute and chronicmusculoskeletal conditions.
  • 35. instructionalcourselistAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 32IC301Management of Early Arthritis in theMiddle-Aged PatientSteven B. Cohen MD, Thomas M. DeBerardino MD,Jack Farr II, MD, Andrew Pearle MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss the rationale for each of the different treatmentoptions available for patients with early osteoarthritis of theknee Develop a treatment plan through didactics and case-basedlearning for the management of early osteoarthritis of theknee Discuss how to manage patients with chondral diseaseassociated with malalignment, bone marrow edema andbony degenerative changes Analyze the limitations of treatment options and potentialemerging technologiesThis course will review the options for treatment of earlyosteoarthritis in the middle-aged patient. The treatmentoptions specifically discussed will include: cartilage procedures(osteochondral autograft and allograft, microfracture, chondrocyteimplantation and use of scaffolds), osteotomy, managementof bone marrow edema and unicompartmental arthroplasty.A summary of the clinical results of all treatment options willalso be presented. The course will conclude with a case-baseddiscussion.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Flexion Therapeutics for theeducational grant in support of this activity.InstructionalCoursesInstructional Courses(cont.)Saturday, July 13, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 36. instructionalcourselistAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 33IC302CASE-BASED: Are SLAP Repairs Going the Wayof the Dinosaur?William N. Levine MD, Christopher S. Ahmad MD,Matthew Provencher MD, Anthony A. Romeo MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Identify the key features in identifying SLAP tears andanatomic variants Discuss the keys to successfully manage SLAP lesionsnon-operatively and operatively Analyze the alternative surgical options for managingSLAP lesionsNo topic in shoulder surgery may be more controversial andever-changing than the management of SLAP tears. After awave of enthusiasm for surgical treatment in the late 1990’sand early 2000’s, poor surgical results have led to increasedhesitation and trepidation for orthopaedic surgeons managingthese complex injuries. The goals of this course are to helpclarify the keys to accurate diagnosis, appropriate treatment,and surgical alternatives to repair, leading to enhanced patientoutcome with SLAP tears. This course will also allow you toshare your own personal challenges in managing of SLAP tearswith the experienced faculty.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Smith & Nephew for theeducational grant in support of this activity.IC303CASE-BASED: AC Joint and Clavicle FractureControversiesBenjamin S. Shaffer MD, Jonas R. Rudzki MD, MSc,Carl J. Basamania MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Identify indications and become aware of surgicaltechniques for fixation of different types of claviclefractures in athletes Evaluate the management considerations involvedin repairing the acute AC joint injury in the pediatric,recreational and elite athlete. Discuss the clinical decision making involved in chronic ACjoint injury management.This course will review current trends and controversies inthe management of acute clavicle fractures, as well as acuteand chronic injuries to the AC joint. Indications for operativeintervention, particularly in the overhead versus contact/collisionsport athlete, will be emphasized. Discussion of evolvingoperative techniques will facilitate better understanding ofrepair and reconstructive alternatives in the athlete, both forreturn to play and the controversy of hardware removal forsport participation. The format of this ICL will be via case-based presentations complemented by didactic instruction.IC304CASE-BASED: The Sport-specific Evaluation ofHip Pain – Scope or Stay Away?Christopher M. Larson MD, Asheesh Bedi MD,Bryan T. Kelly MD, John C. Clohisy MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss the typical sport-specific patterns of hip injuriesand principles of surgical treatment for hip pathology inthe contact, pivoting, dancing and overhead athlete Identify the unique preoperative diagnostic andintraoperative technical considerations in the treatment ofhip pain in the athlete with sport-specific demands Recognize symptomatic extra-articular impingement andcompensatory injuries of the peri-articular musculaturein athletes with symptomatic hip impingement andunderstand current and evolving treatment options Evaluate the current limitations and relative contra-indications to arthroscopic hip surgery and the role foropen surgical treatment of pre-arthritic hip pathology inthe athleteThis course will provide a case-based, sports-specific reviewof the surgical treatment of hip pain in the contact, pivoting,dancing and overhead athlete. With the significant advancesin arthroscopic hip surgery in recent years, the technicalcomplexity and limits of the intra-articular and extra-articularhip pathology that can be treated have expanded. This growth,however, has been accompanied by parallel challenges ofaccurate diagnosis and appropriate indications for thetreatment of mechanical hip pathology in the athlete. Uniquepreoperative, intraoperative and rehabilitation considerationswill be discussed for the in-season and post-season athlete.The treatment of symptomatic extra-articular pathology andcompensatory injuries of the spine, pelvis, and peri-articularmusculature in athletes with hip disorders will also be reviewed.Contraindications to arthroscopic surgical treatment and rolefor open surgical treatment will also be discussed.AOSSM gratefully acknowledges Smith & Nephew for theeducational grant in support of this activity.JULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013SATURday, July 13, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amInstructional Courses(cont.)
  • 37. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 34instructionalcourselistIC305Diagnosis and Management of MSK Injuriesand Concussion in Mixed Martial Arts andBoxing: Guidelines for the Ringside PhysicianJohn A. Bergfeld MD, Robert C. Cantu MD, MA,Joseph J. Estwanik III, MD, Richard N. Weinstein MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Define the etiology, diagnosis and treatment ofmusculoskeletal injuries unique to boxing and mixedmartial arts Define concussion, and “choke-out”, its management inthe unique setting of boxing, and mixed martial arts Define the role and responsibilities and provide guidelinesfor the ringside physician/surgeonThis course will provide the attendee with an update onconcussion diagnosis and management in the uniqueenvironment of boxing and mixed martial arts and describethe etiology, diagnosis and management of musculoskeletalinjuries unique to boxing and mixed martial arts. Additionally,this course will define the role and responsibilities and provideguidelines for the ringside physician/surgeon.IC306MRI – Arthroscopy CorrelationMarc R. Safran MD, Russell F. Warren MD,Stephen F. Brockmeier MD, Hollis G. Potter MD, Garry Gold MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Recognize MRI findings of common injuries and conditionsof the knee, shoulder, hip and elbow Optimize their utilization of MRI imaging to improvepatient outcomes Identify essential knowledge and tools to enhancecommunication between the orthopaedist andradiologist populationsThis course presents the basics of MRI and arthroscopy ofeach major joint, using illustrative cases to compare MRIand arthroscopic images and correlate them. The course isstructured anatomically, focusing on the shoulder, knee, hipand elbow, with emphasis on potential “pitfalls” and MRIinterpretation “pearls.” It employs an educational model thatis predictive in nature and encourages audience interactionsupported by a format that is largely case-based. For each casethat is introduced, faculty present the specific MRI findings,with the focus on providing the surgeon a “road map” forwhat he or she will need to look for during arthroscopy.Course attendees are asked to evaluate the range of possiblediagnoses and how they are aligned to the two physicianpopulations – orthopaedists and radiologists. Concludingdiscussion focuses on the arthroscopic findings and anevaluation as to how they correlate to the findings predicatedon the reading of the MRI.IC307Hand and Wrist Injuries in the Athlete: Whatthe Team Physician Needs to KnowTimothy R. McAdams MD, Arthur C. Rettig MD,Steven Shin MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology of commonhand and wrist injuries in the athlete Evaluate when to refer a hand or wrist case to a specialistor to manage the case him/herself Develop educated return to play decisions in the bestinterest of the athleteCommon hand and wrist injury clinical cases will be presentedby faculty. We will include injuries encountered by the generalsports medicine team physician. Decisions regarding return toplay and when to refer to a hand specialist will be discussed.Clinical cases will be reviewed by the speakers all of whom arecurrently involved in the care of professional athletes.IC308Adolescent KneeMininder S. Kocher MD, MPH, Matthew J. Matava MD,Theodore J. Ganley MDObjectives:Upon completion of this course, learners should be able to: Discuss traditional treatment concepts, as well as thebasis for emerging trends in the treatment of ACL injury,patellar instability, osteochondritis dissecans, and meniscalpathology in growing athletes Recognize the pathoanatomy of these conditions and thebasis for emerging surgical algorithms Implement treatment strategies in one’s practice that areconsistent with contemporary treatment protocolsThe purpose of this course is to equip the clinician withcontemporary algorithms that can be utilized to treat thecommon knee injuries encountered in growing athletes.This course will examine the pathoanatomy, diagnosis andtreatment of commonly encountered conditions includingACL injury, patellar instability, osteochondritis dissecans,and meniscal pathology unique to this immature populationof athletes.SATURday, July 13, 2013 6:45 – 8:15amInstructional Courses(cont.)
  • 38. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 35AOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013GeneralInformation,Social Functionsand Daily Activities
  • 39. GENERALINFORMATIONLocationCome to the AOSSM 2013 Annual Meeting and see whyChicago made Forbes list of “America’s Best Downtowns.”With more than 26 miles of lakefront, beaches and an18-mile bike path, attendees can take advantage of allthe numerous outdoor opportunities the city has to offer.In addition, Chicago has more than 40 museums, world-class shopping, a thriving theater district, nightlife withmusic for every style and famous Wrigley Field, home ofthe Chicago Cubs who will be in town during the meeting.The meeting’s home at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel &Towers is ideally located on the Chicago River, withinwalking distance of Navy Pier, Magnificent Mile shopping,Millennium Park and all of the other local favorites thatmake Chicago a one-of-a-kind destination. For moreinformation or to help develop an itinerary for your visitgo to choosechicago.comHotel ParkingSelf Parking Overnight is $45Valet Overnight is $52Spouse/Family HospitalityA hospitality room with light refreshments will be locatedin the Mayfair Room at the Sheraton Chicago. The hoursare from 8:00am – noon Thursday through Saturday and8:00am – 11:00am on Sunday.Official Housing InformationA block of rooms has been reserved at the SheratonChicago Hotel & Towers at a group rate of $249 singleand double occupancy.Reservations may be made by calling 800 / 233 – 4100or 312 / 329 – 7000. Specify that you are attending theAOSSM Annual Meeting.You can also book directly at www.sportsmed.org.Reservation deadline is June 8, 2013. Rooms areguaranteed until this date pending availability. Attendeesare encouraged to book early.TravelCorpTrav is the official travel agency of AOSSM.Reservations can be made by calling 800 / 770 – 6697,24 hours a day. Service fees may apply.METHODS OF REGISTRATIONVia the Internet: Visit www.sportsmed.orgBy Fax: If you are paying by credit card, complete theregistration form at the end of this program, and faxto 847 / 292 – 4905.By Mail: Send your completed registration form to thedesignated address on the registration form.Advance registration deadline is June 14, 2013.After this date registrations are subject to a $100surcharge added to the registration fees.Every AOSSM Annual Meeting attendee needs to presentphoto identification to pick-up registration materials.REGISTRATIONWednesday, July 10 2:00pm – 6:00pmThursday, July 11 6:15am – 1:00pmFriday, July 12 6:15am – 1:00pmSaturday, July 13 6:15am – 1:00pmSunday, July 14 7:30am – 11:30amLate/On-Site RegistrationOn-site registration is available for an additional chargeof $100 plus the pre-registration fee.AttireMeeting attire is casual, including all social events.ExhibitsExhibits will be located in River Exhibit Hall on the LowerLevel of the Sheraton Chicago. A complete listing ofcommercial exhibitors, including exhibit hours, will beprinted in the final program. Continental breakfast andcoffee breaks will be held in the exhibit hall. Admission tothe exhibit hall requires a badge. Children under 16 arenot permitted into the exhibit hall. The AOSSM attendeeraffle will be located in the exhibit hall.General SessionThe General Session and Concurrent Session A will beheld in The Sheraton Ballroom IV – X on Level 4 at theSheraton Chicago.Concurrent SessionConcurrent Session B will be held in The SheratonBallroom II – III on Level 4 at the Sheraton Chicago.Refund PolicyRefunds will be subject to a non-refundable $150processing fee. Requests for refunds must be received inwriting in the Society office by June 14, 2013.NO REFUNDS WILL BE ISSUED AFTERJUNE 14, 2013 FOR REGISTRATION FEES,INSTRUCTIONAL COURSES ORSOCIAL EVENTS.AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 36General InformationJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 40. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 37General Information(cont.)Accreditation AMA/PRA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine(AOSSM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council forContinuing Medical Education to provide continuingmedical education for physicians. Scientific Sessions: AOSSM designates this liveactivity for a maximum of 13.75 AMA PRA Category1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation inthe activity. Instructional Courses: AOSSM designates this liveactivity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation inthe activity. Upper Extremity Live Surgical DemonstrationsWorkshop: AOSSM designates this live activity fora maximum of 4.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.Physicians should claim only the credit commensuratewith the extent of their participation in the activity. Young Sports Medicine Specialists’ Workshop: ASports Medicine Practice: Trending Upward: AOSSMdesignates this live activity for a maximum of 2 AMAPRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claimonly the credit commensurate with the extent of theirparticipation in the activity. Research Workshop: Graft Healing and Failure AfterACL Reconstruction: The American OrthopaedicSociety for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) designates thislive activity for a maximum of 3.75 AMA PRA Category1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation inthe activity. 2013 American Journal of Sports Medicine and SportsHealth Reviewers’ Workshop: AOSSM designates thislive activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the creditcommensurate with the extent of their participation inthe activity.Accreditation NATA Credits:The American Orthopaedic Society for SportsMedicine is recognized by the Board ofCertification, Inc. to offer continuing educationfor Certified Athletic Trainers. Scientific Sessions: This program has been approvedfor a maximum of 13.75 hours of Category AContinuing Education. This continuing educationcourse is considered to be an Essential Level program. Provider Number: P460 Instructional Courses: This program has beenapproved for a maximum of 1.5 hours of CategoryA Continuing Education. This continuing educationcourse is considered to be an Essential Level program. Provider Number: P460 Upper Extremity Live Surgical DemonstrationsWorkshop: This program has been approved for amaximum of 4.25 hours of Category A ContinuingEducation. This continuing education course isconsidered to be an Essential Level program. Provider Number: P460 Research Workshop: Graft Healing and Failure AfterACL Reconstruction: This program has been approvedfor a maximum of 3.75 hours of Category A ContinuingEducation. This continuing education course isconsidered to be an Essential Level program. Provider Number: P460 2013 American Journal of Sports Medicine and SportsHealth Reviewers’ Workshop: This program has beenapproved for a maximum of 1.5 hours of CategoryA Continuing Education. This continuing educationcourse is considered to be an Essential Level program. Provider Number: P460Program InformationAOSSM attests that the person(s) responsible for thedevelopment of this live activity did so independently andwere not influenced by commercial supporters.GENERALINFORMATIONJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 41. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 38GeneralInformationJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013General Information(cont.)DISCLAIMERThe material presented in this continuing medicaleducation program is being made available by the AOSSMfor educational purposes only. This material is not intendedto represent the only methods or procedures appropriatefor the medical situation discussed.AOSSM is not responsible for expenses incurred by anindividual who is not confirmed and for whom spaceis not available at the meeting. Costs incurred by theregistrant, such as airline or hotel fees or penalties, are theresponsibility of the registrant.DISCLOSURE STATEMENTIn accordance with the standards of the AccreditationCouncil for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it isthe policy of the AOSSM that faculty and planners discloseto the learners all financial relationships during the pasttwelve months with any commercial interest (any entityproducing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health caregoods or services consumed by, or used on, patients).Any and all disclosures will be provided in the finalprogram that is distributed at the meeting to programparticipants. In accordance with AOSSM policy, facultyparticipation in this educational activity is predicatedupon timely submission and review of AOSSM disclosures.Non-compliance results in faculty being stricken from theprogram.CONCURRENT SESSIONANNUAL MEETING ONLINE – 2013AOSSM features selected plenary sessions from theAOSSM 2013 Annual Meeting through its website. For $70,participants receive online access to education sessionscontaining slide presentations and speakers’ voicescaptured at the Baltimore meeting. This added service is aneconomical way to review presentations, hear missed talks,and reference sessions at a later point during the year. Toregister for this service, check the Annual Meeting Onlinebox on the registration form in this program.INSTRUCTIONAL COURSESConcurrent Instructional Courses are offeredThursday, July 11, 2013 through Saturday, July 13, 2013from 6:45 – 8:15am. Locations are included in the finalprogram, as well as on tickets received at the time ofregistration. Attendance in Instructional Courses is byticket only. The Instructional Course Fee is $70. One mustregister and pay the fee in order to enroll. This fee isapplicable to ALL registrants. The Instructional Course FinalProgram is available in electronic format only at a priceof $70. Those who chose not to purchase one will beprovided faculty handouts for each Instructional Course forwhich they register. Some Instructional Courses may havelimited capacity, and space is assigned as registrations arereceived. NO REFUNDS FOR INSTRUCTIONAL COURSES WILLBE ISSUED.
  • 42. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 39SocialFunctionsandDailyActivitiesTHURSDAY, JULY 11, 20136:30 – 8:00pmWELCOME RECEPTIONJoin us in the Exhibit Hall and on the adjacent outdoor patiofor this year’s Welcome Reception. Everyone and their familiesare welcome to attend.NO FEEAOSSM gratefully acknowledges Breg for their support of theWelcome Reception.FRIDAY, JULY 12, 201310am – noonPRIVATE ARCHITECTUAL CRUISEThe cool mist off the lake, the magnificence of the cityskyline and the tranquility of lapping waves set the moodfor a wistful private AOSSM morning cruise on the ChicagoRiver. Visitors and Chicagoans alike say that the best way toreally see the city’s profile is on architectural cruise. The tourprovides an overview of historic and modern architecturalstyles, plus many stories about the people who designed andbuilt the city. An architectural docent will provide live narrationfeaturing an overview of architecture and history. Guestswill find out little known facts about the history of Chicago’sbuildings, without the omission of the juicier details-scandal,corruption, conflict: all the material that makes for greatentertainment. This cruise is limited to 40 people and allages are welcome.Cost: $95.00SATURDAY, JULY 13, 20136:30 – 10:30pmFIREWORKS DINNER CRUISE ON THE ODYSSEYCome aboard the Odyssey for the AOSSM private party cruisedown beautiful Lake Michigan. You’ll have front row seatsfor amazing city scenery and the best views of the fireworkstaking place at 10:00pm. In addition, you’ll have your pickof entertainment on the various ship decks, including a DJ,live band and children’s entertainment, including a strollingmagician. In addition, you can have a keepsake of theevening’s memories via our photo booth. A buffet dinnerand full bar will be offered throughout the evening. TheOdyssey will cruise for approximately 1.5 hours and returnto dock prior to the fireworks for those that want to exit theboat earlier. Pick up and drop off is at Navy Pier, which isapproximately a 10 minute walk from the Sheraton Chicago.Tickets are limited so please register in advance and onlyregister if in fact you know you are able to attend.Additional tickets will be available on site, space permitting.Please indicate the number of adults and children on theregistration form.NO FEEAOSSM gratefully acknowledges DJO Global for their supportof the Fireworks Dinner Cruise on the Odyssey.SocialFunctions andDaily ActivitiesQuestionsContact the AOSSM Society office at847 / 292 – 4900toll free at 877 / 321 – 3500or fax 847 / 292 – 4905or e-mail at aossm@aossm.orgALL FEES ARE IN US DOLLARSPhoto Credit: © Choose Chicago
  • 43. conferenceagendaAOSSM 2013 annual meeting 402013August 9 – 11, 2013AOSSM & AAOSSports Medicine Review Coursefor Subspecialty Certification andMaintenance of CertificationThe Westin Chicago River North, Chicago, ILDecember 5 – 8, 20132013 Advanced TeamPhysician CourseCosmopolitan of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV2014Saturday, March 15, 2014AOSSM 2014 Specialty DayNew Orleans, LA*All registrations will be handled by AAOSAugust 8 – 10, 2014AOSSM & AAOSSports Medicine Review Coursefor Subspecialty Certification andMaintenance of CertificationFairmont Chicago Millenium Park, Chicago, IL2015August 10 – 12, 2015AOSSM & AAOSSports Medicine Review Coursefor Subspecialty Certification andMaintenance of CertificationFairmont Chicago Millenium Park, Chicago, ILJuly 10 – 13, 2014AOSSM 2014 Annual MeetingWashington State Convention & Trade CenterSeattle, WAJuly 9 – 12, 2015AOSSM 2015 Annual MeetingHilton Orlando Bonnet CreekOrlando, FLJuly 7 – 10, 2016AOSSM 2016 Annual MeetingThe BroadmoorColorado Springs, COAOSSM Upcoming Annual MeetingsOther Upcoming MeetingsAOSSM ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS DEADLINEAOSSM 2014 Specialty DaySaturday, March 15, 2014To submit an abstract for the AOSSM 2014 Specialty Day program,please visit the AOSSM website at www.sportsmed.org.Deadline for submission is May 15, 2013. Abstracts will only beaccepted via the website.No exceptions will be made for late abstracts.Photo Credit: Colorado Springs CVB
  • 44. AOSSM 2013 annual meeting 41IndustrysponsoredSymposiaChoose from a variety of industry sponsored symposiums taking place on Friday afternoon. These symposiums will giveyou a unique, first hand opportunity to learn from expert faculty on products or services. The following symposiums are notpresented, endorsed, or otherwise sanctioned by the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine and NO CME CREDITWILL BE AWARDED for participation. The view and techniques presented are not necessarily those of AOSSM or its members.AOSSM assumes no responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of any information, materials, or techniques described,and it makes not warranty, guarantee or representation as to the absolute validity or sufficiency of any information provided.IS01 Breg, Inc. HuronIn-House Orthotics and Bracing: Maximizing Patient care,Understanding Ancillary Revenue, and Managing MedicareComplianceFaculty: TBDIS02 Pivot Medical MississippiPivot Medical invites you to participate in a special hippreservation symposium.  Listen to our distinguished surgeonpanel and gain valuable peer to peer insights into currenttopics surrounding hip preservation. This symposium will alsoinclude a hands on opportunity to use the innovative hipproducts developed by Pivot Medical.Faculty: TBDIS03 Smith & Nephew OntarioComplex Knee Ligament ReconstructionFaculty: Christopher Wahl MDLabral Preservation StrategiesFaculty: TBDIS04 Zimmer, Inc. ErieInnovative Solutions for Joint Preservation with Denovo®NTNatural Graft and Chondrofix®Osteochondral AllograftLearn about state-of-the-art innovative products and technicalstrategies to enhance biologic healing for soft tissue andarticular cartilage problems.Faculty: TBDIS05 Arthrex MississippiRevolutionizing Knee Preservation: Biocartilage, Graftlink ACLand iBalance HTOBiocartilage UpdateFaculty: Brian Cole MDGraftlink ACLFaculty: Kyle Anderson MDIBalance HTOFaculty: Tom Deberardino MDFRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013 1:30 – 4:30pmIndustry Sponsored SymposiaJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 45. AdvanceRegistrationForm________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________NAME PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT CLEARLY DEGREE(S)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________SPOUSE/GUEST NAME IF ATTENDING________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________CHILDREN (NAMES AND AGES) IF ATTENDING________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________CITY STATE ZIP ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________OFFICE PHONE OFFICE FAX ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________E-MAIL Registration Categories & FeesAll fees below are listed in US Dollars (The cost of meeting registration does not include hotel)SIDE 1COMPLETE REVERSE SIDE AND MAIL OR FAX BOTH SIDES OF THIS REGISTRATION FORMA) Meeting Registration OFFICIAL HOUSING **OTHER HOTEL Member $100 $150 Non-Member MD $750 $900 Resident/Fellow $350 $500 Military $300 $450 Allied Health $350 $500 Faculty N/C $150 A) Registration Subtotal B) Educational Resource Materials*  Instructional Course Materials(online access only) (Complete set of all IC handouts) x $70 Annual Meeting Online–2013 x $70B) Educational Resource Materials Subtotal * IC Faculty will be contacted directly regarding their complimentary IC Materials.** Note on Fee Differential: Registration costs are predicated on attendees stayingat official meeting hotel. A $150 differential is assessed to registrants staying atother hotels to offset expenses incurred. Meeting registrants will be confirmedwith hotel master list.No refunds after June 14, 2013 on any of the above registrationfees. All refunds are subject to a $150 non-refundableprocessing fee.C) Instructional Courses and WorkshopsInstructional CoursesIC registrations are non-refundable. On-Site registration is subject to availability. IC NUMBER Thursday, July 11, 2013 1st Choice x $70 6:45 – 8:15am AlternateFriday, July 12, 2013 1st Choice x $70 6:45 – 8:15am AlternateSaturday, July 13, 2013 1st Choice x $70 6:45 – 8:15am AlternateWorkshops Upper Extremity Live Surgical Demonstration Workshop Non-Member $225  Member $175 Military $175  Allied Health $150  Resident/Fellow $125  Faculty N/C AJSM Reviewers’ Workshop AJSM Reviewers  N/C Non-AJSM Reviewers $45Young Sports Medicine Specialists’ Workshop:A Sports Medicine Practice:Trending Upward $70 AOSSM Research Workshop: Graft Healing and Failure N/C After ACL ReconstructionIndustry Sponsored Symposia 1st Choice N/C AlternateC) Instructional Courses and Workshops Subtotal N/CN/CN/CN/COnline Registration available at www.sportsmed.org/AnnualMeetingAdvance Registration closes June 14, 2013.After June 14th, only online and on-site registrations will be accepted and a $100 surcharge will be assessed.www.sportsmed.org/AnnualMeetingPhone: 847 / 292 – 4900Fax: 847 / 292 – 4905Advance Registration FormAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 46. SIDE 2No refunds after June 14, 2013 on any of the above registration fees.D) Social FunctionsFriday, July 12, 2013 Private Architectural Cruise x $95 Saturday, July 13, 2013Fireworks Dinner Cruise on the Odyssey ADULTS (AGES 12 AND UP) N/C CHILDREN 4–11 N/C UNDER 4 N/C D) Social Functions Subtotal Payment is Required with the Submission of the Registration FormMail form and payment to AOSSM, 2884 Momentum Place, Chicago, Il 60689-5328. Make check payable in U.S. Dollars to American Orthopaedic Society for SportsMedicine (AOSSM) or provide credit card information and fax form to 847 / 292 – 4905. Your canceled check is your receipt.Check Enclosed    Visa    Mastercard    American Express__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ CARD NUMBER CCV CODE EXP. DATE__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME (AS IT APPEARS ON CARD)__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SIGNATURE (I AGREE TO PAY ACCORDING TO THE CREDIT CARD ISSUER AGREEMENT) DATEAOSSM Image/Likeness/Voice ReleaseI understand and agree that, as a result of participating in an AOSSM educational conference or meeting, my image, likeness or voice may be photographed and/or recorded. If family members are attendingthe meeting with me, their image, likeness and voice may also be photographed and/or recorded. I hereby grant irrevocable and unrestricted permission to AOSSM and its staff to use my or my family’simage, likeness or performance in any medium and for any purpose they deem appropriate. I hereby waive any right to inspect or approve such use of materials. Submission of this form for meetingregistration acknowledges acceptance of these terms._________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________NAME PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT CLEARLYFees EnclosedA) Registration Subtotal (FROM SIDE 1) B) Educational Resource Materials (FROM SIDE 1) C) Instructional Courses and Workshops Subtotal (FROM SIDE 1) D) Social Functions Subtotal (FROM SIDE 2) TOTAL ENCLOSED All fees are in US dollars TearformsattheperforationandreturnviafaxormailN/CN/CN/COnline Registration available at www.sportsmed.org/AnnualMeetingAdvance Registration closes June 14, 2013.After June 14th, only online and on-site registrations will be accepted and a $100 surcharge will be assessed.advance registration formAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013
  • 47. www.sportsmed.org/AnnualMeeting/Scan with your smartphoneand get all the details now!QUESTIONSContact the AOSSM Societyoffice at 847 / 292 – 4900toll free at 877 / 321 – 3500,or e-mail us at aossm@aossm.orgJULY 11–14, 2013Sheraton Chicago Hotel & TowersChicago, IllinoisAOSSMANNUAL MEETING2013Breeze into Chicago