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69th American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Annual Meeting 2013

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  • 1. First Preliminary ProgramTransforming Reproductive Medicine Worldwide OCTOBER 12 - 17, 2013 Photographs courtesy of the Greater Boston Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • 2. Welcome to Boston!Boston is more vibrant than ever! New green spaces are sprouting up all over, and a revitalized waterfront has added to the city’salready dynamic downtown neighborhoods. These developments are thanks in part to the city’s Big Dig project, which is nowcomplete. Additionally, Logan International Airport’s recent upgrades are making it easier than ever to get in and out of the city, andnew sights and attractions are providing more for everyone to see and do while in Boston.Boston’s Waterfront has become an idyllic setting for watching sailboats and ferries glide in and out of the harbor and an excellentdestination for classic New England seafood restaurants.Boston’s Rose Kennedy Greenway consists of three parks and a total of 30 acres of beautiful, tree-lined corridors. Visitors will findmore than 900 trees, public art, fountains and great places for exercise or contemplation. In the works for the Greenway are the BostonMuseum Project, which will focus on the last 200 years of Boston history, and The New Center for Arts and Culture, which willpresent a variety of dance performances, films, music, lectures and art.The new 44-mile Boston HarborWalk includes the downtown Boston waterfront and continues north and south along wharves, piers,museums, historic forts, bridges, beaches and shoreline from Chelsea Creek to the Neponset River. The HarborWalk also connects tonew and existing trails: The Freedom Trail, the new Walk To The Sea, the Emerald Necklace, the Charles River Esplanade, the RoseKennedy Greenway, and in the future, the South Bay Harbor Trail.The one-mile Walk To The Sea is a Beacon Hill-to-the-waterfront marked walkway. Beginning at the Massachusetts State House, thevisitor learns about the four centuries of maritime history from Beacon Hill to State Street to the 18th century Long Wharf.Constructed from dirt excavated from the Big Dig’s extensive network of tunnels, Spectacle Island in Boston Harbor features amarina, visitor center, sandy beaches and five miles of walking trails that lead to the crest of a 157-foot hill offering panoramic viewsof the harbor and the city. Visitors are welcome from dawn to dusk during the summer months. Passenger ferry service is availablefrom Boston.Chinatown Park, a beautiful parcel of land in Chinatown, is populated by bamboo trees, azaleas, stones and a peaceful stream. Thenew park is situated at the south end of the Greenway and is the perfect place to experience the Chinese ideal of Feng Shui, followedby an authentic dim sum meal.History around every corner, and so much more! Boston’s rich art, music and dance institutions, theatre and cultural attractions,distinguished dining and nightlife venues, world-class shopping and championship sports teams make it a unique place for travelers tovisit. The city’s downtown neighborhoods offer endless unique experiences and its proximity to other must-see sites all around NewEngland make it one of the country’s most diverse and exciting locales.Here in Boston, visitors are never at a loss for things to do. The many museums, concert halls, theaters and nightclubs are alwaysshowcasing great talent and events. There’s the internationally acclaimed Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Science, New EnglandAquarium and the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum. Beyond the museum scene, there’s the world-famous BostonSymphony Orchestra and Boston Pops, local and pre-Broadway theater, distinctive dining, endless opportunities for shopping andsightseeing, and a year-round calendar of special events and celebrations.Boston is home to a grand tradition of sporting excellence. This is where storied franchises such as the Red Sox (2004 and 2007World Series Champions), the Celtics (2008 World Champions), the Bruins, and the New England Patriots (2001, 2003 and 2004Super Bowl champions) all play their games. Visiting sports fans can’t help getting caught up in the enthusiasm.In addition to everything within the city limits, some of Massachusetts’ most scenic and historic towns are just a short distance fromthe city center. There are sights to see at every turn. Cambridge is often referred to as “Boston’s Left Bank” with an atmosphere —and attitude — all its own. It’s the spirited, slightly mischievous side of Boston, just a bridge away on the other side of the CharlesRiver. Packed with youthful vitality and international flair, it’s a city where Old World meets New Age in a mesmerizing blend ofhistory and technology. As the East Coast’s leading hub for high tech and biotech, Cambridge has a creative, entrepreneurial spirit. Itis also the birthplace of higher education in America. Harvard College was founded in 1636, and across town, Massachusetts Instituteof Technology (MIT) is known as the epicenter of cyberculture. Both universities house renowned museum collections and toursthat are open to the public. As a captivating, offbeat alternative to Boston’s urban center, the “squares” of Cambridge are charmingneighborhoods rich in eclectic shopping, theaters, museums and historic sites. Cambridge also offers a tantalizing array of diningoptions for the visitor with a sophisticated palate. Information on Boston provided by the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau 2
  • 3. NIGHT MUSEUM AT THE OF SCIENCE BOSTON • MA MIX, MINGLE & BE BLINDED BY SCIENCE! Wednesday, October 16, 2013 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Tickets $125 Explore Bostons Museum of Science Heavy hors doeuvres • Beer • Wine Transportation will be provided.
  • 4. Exciting events coming your way in 2013!Get a step ahead! Make plans now to participate in the 4th annual ASRM 5k Run & 1 mile Walk Monday •October 14, 2013 Boston, MA
  • 5. IFFS/ASRM WELCOME Dear Colleagues, INSIDE I write as President of the International Federation of Fertility Societies (IFFS) to invite you to our 21st World Congress to be held conjointly with the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), one of our very senior member societies, in Boston on October 12-17, 2013. It is a pleasure for IFFS to thank Dr. Linda Giudice and the ASRM WELCOME TO BOSTON . . . . . . . . . . . 2 staff for their co-operation and help to IFFS over the past three years. MUSEUM NIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Building on the strong foundation of the 2010 IFFS World Congress in Munich, our last Triennial Congress, features such as OPENING CEREMONY & regional sessions and live surgery have been incorporated into the NETWORKING EVENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2013 program. The Regional Sessions are planned and presented by ASRM 5K RUN INFORMATION . . . . . . 4 David Healy, M.D., Ph.D. IFFS member societies, most often in the language of their country. IFFS President 2010-2013 IFFS/ASRM WELCOME . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 For those who are unfamiliar with IFFS, the Federation wasfounded in 1951 with an educational mission. Each year IFFS conducts workshops in selected cities IFFS/ASRM CONJOINTin underdeveloped countries, sponsors a Symposium in its International Series on topics of regional MEETING PROGRAMconcern, and every three years holds a World Congress. Today more than 70 national societies from PLANNING COMMITTEE . . . . . . . . . . . 6around the globe are members of the Federation. Our 2013 Program Chair, Dr. Basil Tarlatzis, and his colleagues, have crafted an exciting program IFFS OFFICERS ANDfor Boston using the trilogy structure, the hallmark of past IFFS World Congresses. BOARD OF DIRECTORS . . . . . . . . . . . 7So mark October 12 -17, 2013, in all your diaries and electronic devices now - you will never, ASRM OFFICERS ANDnever know how good Boston is if you never, never go! BOARD OF DIRECTORS . . . . . . . . . . . 7Sincerely, IFFS/ASRM ANNUAL MEETING POLICIES & DISCLAIMERS . . . . . . . . . 8Dr. David Healy, FRANZCOG, FRCOG, Ph.D. REGISTRATION & MEETINGIFFS President 2010 -2013 INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11 As President-elect of the American Society for Reproductive HOUSING INFORMATION . . . . . . 12-13 Medicine (President 2012-2013), I enthusiastically welcome you to the 69th Annual Meeting of the ASRM conjoint with the 21st DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS & Meeting of the International Federation of Fertility Societies (IFFS) CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY . . .14 in Boston, Massachusetts, October 12-17, 2013. Serdar Bulun and POSTGRADUATE the ASRM Scientific Program Committee along with Basil Tarlatzis PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-30 and the IFFS Scientific Committee have put together a phenomenal program, along with Anuja Dokras for the Postgraduate Program FUTURE ASRM MEETING DATES . . . 30 and Steven Palter for the Video Program. NEEDS ASSESSMENT & As a conjoint meeting, we have extended the program by one LEARNING OBJECTIVES . . . . . . . . . 31 day to accommodate additional interactive poster sessions, the traditional IFFS trilogies, and regional meetings for our international IFFS/ASRM 2013 societies. The theme of our conjoint meeting is “Transforming CONJOINT MEETING GRID . . . . . . . 32Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D. Reproductive Medicine Worldwide,” and we have planned plenaryASRM President 2012-2013 lectures by international luminaries addressing state-of-the-art issues SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMin reproductive medicine and science. DAILY SCHEDULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-38 We shall continue to have roundtables, videos, interactive sessions, symposia, and the popular MENOPAUSE DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39sessions focused on menopause and contraception. During the 2013 meeting, we also plan hands-onrobotic and other surgical intensives, and to focus more broadly on global applications of infertility SURGERY DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40therapies and reproductive health in low resource settings. CONTRACEPTION DAY . . . . . . . . . . . 41 As a conjoint meeting, our U.S. and international members will join the membership of theIFFS in reaching out to specialists in reproductive medicine worldwide to learn from each other SPOUSE/GUEST PROGRAM . . . . . . . 41about issues that are unique in different parts of the world and those that are common to us all. PLENARY SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . 42-43This conjoint meeting provides an opportunity to learn the latest research in the oral and posterpresentations and other venues. Our many special interest and professional groups within ASRM TRILOGIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-49will be presenting data that can be considered by all. ASRM MORNING SYMPOSIA . . . . . . . 50 The Conjoint meeting of the IFFS/ASRM in Boston 2013 will provide an opportunity to learn,to see old friends, meet new friends, and see the world of reproductive medicine through a new ASRM AFTERNOONlens. We are developing a social program for all in Boston, a vibrant city with great historical SYMPOSIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51-52significance in the U.S. and globally. I look forward to seeing you in Boston in 2013, as we allparticipating in the process of “Transforming Reproductive Medicine Worldwide!” INTERACTIVE SESSIONS . . . . . . 53-56 SMRU MINI-SYMPOSIA . . . . . . . . . . . 56Sincerely, VIDEO SESSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D. WRITE THE NEXT CHAPTERASRM President 2012-2013 CONTRIBUTION OPPORTUNITIES . . 59 5
  • 6. IFFS/ASRM CONJOINT MEETING PROGRAM PLANNING COMMITTEE IFFS SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Basil Tarlatzis (Greece), Chair Joe Leigh Simpson (USA), President Elect Liselotte Mettler (Germany), 2010 Chair Local SC Linda Giudice (USA), 2013 Congress Chair Serdar Bulun (USA), 2013 Chair Local SC Dhiraj Gada (India), 2016 Congress Chair Narendra Malhotra (India), 2016 Chair Local SC Richard Kennedy (UK), Secretary General, ex officio member Paul Devroey (Belgium), Director of Medical Education, ex officio member David Healy, IFFS President IFFS SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE MEMBER SOCIETIES Brazilian Society of Human Reproduction Artur Dzik British Fertility Society Sue Avery Finnish Gynecological Association Antti Perheentupa Japan Society of Reproductive Medicine Minoru Irahara Fertility Society of Australia Cynthia Farquhar Korean Society for Reproductive Medicine Seok Hyun Kim American Society for Reproductive Medicine Alan DeCherney (ex officio) American Society for Reproductive Medicine Andrew La Barbera (ex officio) American Society for Reproductive Medicine Robert Rebar (ex officio) ASRM SCIENTIFIC AND POSTGRADUATE PLANNING COMMITTEES Linda C. Giudice, M.D., M.S., M.Sc., Ph.D., ASRM President Serdar E. Bulun, M.D., Scientific Program Chair Lawrence C. Layman, M.D., Interactive Sessions Chair Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D., Roundtable Program Chair Anuja Dokras, M.D., Ph.D., Postgraduate Program Chair Lisa M. Halvorson, M.D., Postgraduate Program Co-Chair Bradley J. Van Voorhis, M.D., Postgraduate Program Coordinating Chair G. David Ball, Ph.D., Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Program Chair Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D., Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Program Chair Paul J. Turek, M.D., Society for Male Reproduction and Urology Program Chair Grace M. Janik, M.D., Society of Reproductive Surgeons Program Chair Nidhi Desai, J.D., Legal Professional Group Program Chair Claudia Pascale, Ph.D., Mental Health Professional Group Program Chair Deborah L. Jaffe, B.S.N., Nurses’ Professional Group Program Chair Thomas G. Turner, M.S., Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists Program Chair Joseph J. Travia, Jr., B.S., M.B.A., Association of Reproductive Managers Program Chair Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D., Ad Hoc Member Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D., Ad Hoc Member Robert E. Brannigan, M.D., Ad Hoc Member Robert W. Rebar, M.D., ASRM Executive Director Andrew R. La Barbera, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., ASRM Scientific Director C. Lee Hutchison, M.A., ASRM Scientific Program Coordinator Penelope Fenton, M.A., ASRM Postgraduate Program Coordinator ASRM VIDEO COMMITTEE Steven F. Palter, M.D., Chair Tien-cheng A. Chang, Ph.D. Marius Meintjes, D.V.M., Ph.D. Tommaso Falcone, M.D. Dana A. Ohl, M.D. Emilio Fernandez, M.D. David L. Olive, M.D. Antonio R. Gargiulo, M.D. Marc P. Portmann, M.T. Arik Kahane, M.D. Togas Tulandi, M.D. Philip S. Li, M.D. Paul J. Turek, M.D. Stephen R. Lindheim, M.D. 6
  • 7. IFFS OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2010 - 2013 IFFS OFFICERS David Healy (Australia), President Joe Leigh Simpson (USA), President Elect Richard Kennedy (UK), Secretary General Gabriel de Candolle (Switzerland), Assistant Secretary General Edgar Mocanu (Ireland), Treasurer Mauricio Abrao (Brazil), Assistant Treasurer Basil Tarlatzis (Greece), Past President Paul Devroey (Belgium), Director of Medical Education IFFS BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND THEIR MEMBER SOCIETIES American Society for Reproductive Medicine G. David Adamson 2007-2016 Argentine Society for Reproductive Medicine Marcos Horton 2010-2019 Colombian Association of Fertility and Jose Ignacio Madero 2004-2013 Reproductive Medicine Fertility Society of Australia Ossie Petrucco 2004-2013 German Society of Reproductive Medicine Tina Buchholz 2004-2013 Indian Society of Assisted Reproduction Dhiraj Gada 2010-2019 Japan Society of Reproductive Medicine Minoru Irahara 2007-2016 Jordanian Society for Fertility and Genetics Mazen El-Zibdeh 2010-2019 Swedish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology Pietro Gambadauro 2007-2016 ASRM OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2012 - 2013 ASRM OFFICERS Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D., President Richard H. Reindollar, M.D., President-Elect Dolores J. Lamb, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., Immediate Past President Roger A. Lobo, M.D., Past President Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., Secretary Stuart S. Howards, M.D., Treasurer ASRM BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND THEIR MEMBER SOCIETIES Marc Fritz, M.D. Nancy Brackett, Ph.D. Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D. Christos Coutifaris, M.D., Ph.D. Roger A. Lobo, M.D. Dolores J. Lamb, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. Steven Nakajima, M.D. (SREI) Grace Janik, M.D. (SRS) Grace Centola, Ph.D., , H.C.L.D. (SMRU) Thomas Turner, Jr., E.L.D., M.S. (SRBT) David Ball, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. (SART) ASRM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Robert W. Rebar, M.D. ASRM SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR Andrew R. La Barbera, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. 7
  • 8. IFFS/ASRM Annual Meeting Policies and DisclaimersCANCELLATION POLICYThe International Federation of Fertility Societies and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine reserve the rightto cancel this activity due to unforeseen circumstances. In the event of such cancellation, the full enrollment fee will bereturned to the registrant.REFUND/NON-ATTENDANCE POLICYCancellations received before or by September 12th will receive a full refund minus a $50 processing fee. Cancellationsreceived after September 12th will not be eligible for a refund.ADA STATEMENTThe International Federation of Fertility Societies and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine fully complywith the legal requirements of the ADA and the rules and regulations thereof. Accommodations for Disabilities: Pleasenotify the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, 1209 Montgomery Highway, Birmingham, Alabama, USA 35216,telephone 1-205-978-5000, a minimum of 10 working days in advance of the event if a reasonable accommodation for adisability is needed.EQUAL OPPORTUNITY STATEMENTThe International Federation of Fertility Societies and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine value and promotediversity among its members, officers and staff. The Societies prohibit discrimination toward any member or employee dueto race, color, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, citizenship, disability, military status or other basisprohibited by law. IFFS and ASRM strive to achieve gender, racial and ethnic balance in hiring and governance. IFFS andASRM maintain policies, procedures and personnel actions that conform to the letter and spirit of all laws and regulationspertaining to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in employment, appointments and elections to office.DISCLAIMER STATEMENTThe content and views presented in this educational activity are those of the faculty/authors and do not necessarily reflectthose of the International Federation of Fertility Societies and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Thismaterial is prepared based upon a review of multiple sources of information, but it is not exhaustive of the subject matter.Therefore, healthcare professionals and other individuals should review and consider other publications and materialson the subject matter before relying solely upon the information contained within this educational activity to make clinicaldecisions about individual patients. 8
  • 9. Registration & Meeting Information How to Register 8 Register online @ www.asrm.org and receive immediate confirmation! ! On-site in Boston, MA Choices may be limited on-site. Pre-registration is recommended. On-Site Registration Desk: Boston Convention and Exposition Center Friday, October 11 . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Saturday, October 12 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Sunday, October 13 . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Monday, October 14 . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 15 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 16 . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Thursday, October 17 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Be Sure to Visit the Exhibit Hall Sunday, October 13 . . . . . . . . . 7:30 p.m.- 9:30 p.m. Monday, October 14 . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 15 . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 16 . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Thursday, October 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. For the safety of your child and in order to maintain the scientific nature of the display, no children under the age of 16 (except infants under 6 months of age carried in arms at all times) will be allowed in the Exhibit Hall. Strollers and infants in backpacks are not permitted in the Exhibit Hall or Poster Hall at anytime. 9
  • 10. Registration Information Book in the IFFS/ASRM Housing Block and save $50 off Registration fees! Individual Registration for the 2013 IFFS/ASRM Annual Meeting opens April 30, 2012. Group Registration for the 2013 IFFS/ASRM Annual Meeting opens April 30, 2012. To register, visit: www.asrm.org and click on “Annual Meeting” and then “Register for 2013 Annual Meeting.” Use your 2013 IFFS/ASRM First Program as a guide in registering for the courses you wish to attend. For questions, please call (866) 471-7224 or (703) 449-6418 or email asrmregistration@jspargo.com. Register early to take advantage of discounted rates! Early Bird Deadline 7/12/2013 • Advanced Deadline 9/14/2013 Cancellations received before or by September 12, 2013 will receive a full refund minus a $50 processing fee. Cancellations received after September 12, 2013 will not be eligible for a refund.CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCEProof of attendance is available on request from J. Spargo at the registration desk. Continuing Education Credit informationis located in the front of the Postgraduate Course syllabi, and the Final Program and online.ADMISSION BADGESName badges will be issued for the Postgraduate and Scientific Programs and are required for admission. Spouse/guestbadges will be issued and are required for admission to spouse/guest activities and the Exhibit Hall.PHOTO/AUDIO/VIDEO RECORDINGPhotographing or audio/video recording of any session for personal or commercial purposes without permission isprohibited. 10
  • 11. Registration InformationPOSTGRADUATE COURSE REGISTRATION FEES SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM REGISTRATION FEES Early Bird Advanced Onsite Early Bird Advanced Onsite By By After By By After 7/11/2013 9/12/2013 9/12/2013 7/11/2013 9/12/2013 9/12/2013ASRM Member (Doctoral) ASRM Member $595 $695 $795One 1-day course $320 $350 $380 (Doctoral) ASRM Member $495 $545 $595Two 1-day courses $580 $640 $700 (Non-Doctoral) ASRM Life Member $495 $545 $595One 2-day course $540 $600 $660 Fellow $495 $545 $595 (proof of status letter from chair/dept. head required)ASRM Member (Non-Doctoral)One 1-day course $220 $240 $260 Non- ASRM Member $795 $895 $995 (Doctoral)Two 1-day courses $400 $440 $480 Non- ASRM Member $495 $545 $595 (Non-Doctoral)One 2-day course $380 $420 $460 Team Member from $495 $545 $595 your Office/PracticeNon-ASRM Member (Doctoral)One 1-day course $380 $420 $460 Medical $250 $250 $250 Resident-In-TrainingTwo 1-day courses $680 $750 $820 Full-time Student $250 $250 $250 (Full-time medical students and full-time graduate students working toward first doctorate; Documentation required)One 2-day course $650 $720 $790 Developing Countries** $545 $620 $695Non- ASRM Member (Non-Doctoral) Spouse/Guest Program $100 $100 $100One 1-day course $270 $300 $330 (Spouse/Guest registration includes Opening Reception, Exhibit Hall, Plenary Sessions & Hospitality)Two 1-day courses $480 $530 $580 TICKETED EVENTSOne 2-day course $450 $500 $550 Roundtable Luncheons $50/day You may attend only one Roundtable Luncheon per day.Medical Resident-In-Training, Fellow, Team Member Women’s $30from your office/practice Council BreakfastOne 1-day course $220 $240 $260 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at 7:30 a.m. Museum Night $125Two 1-day courses $400 $440 $480 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.One 2-day course $380 $420 $460 **Individuals from the following countries will receive a discounted rate on registration: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros,SRS Hands-on Postgraduate Courses Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, $300 additional charge will apply Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kenya, Democratic Republic of Korea, Kyrgyz Republic, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda and Zimbabwe Morning Poster Sessions Poster Sessions will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday mornings from 7:00 a.m. until 9:00 a.m. Complimentary continental breakfast will be available. No reservation is required. 11
  • 12. Housing Information Book in the IFFS/ASRM Housing Block and SAVE $50 off Registration fees! To book housing for the 2013 IFFS/ASRM Annual Meeting, visit www.asrm.org Click on “Annual Meeting” and then the appropriate housing link. For questions, please call (866) 471-7224 or (703) 449-6418 or email asrmhousing@jspargo.com1. Boston Park Plaza 5. Hilton Boston Financial District 9. Seaport Hotel$285.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $275.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $299.00 Single (1 person/1 bed)$285.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) $275.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) $299.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) Double/Double Double/Double Double/Double$285.00 $275.00 $299.00 (2 people/2 beds) (2 people/2 beds) (2 people/2 beds)$305.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $295.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $324.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds)$325.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $315.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $349.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds)2. Boston Marriott Copley Place 6. Hyatt Regency Boston 10. Sheraton Boston$289.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $275.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $299.00 Single (1 person/1 bed)$289.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) $275.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) $299.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) Double/Double Double/Double Double/Double$289.00 $275.00 (2 people/2 beds) (2 people/2 beds) $299.00 (2 people/2 beds)$309.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $300.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $319.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds)$329.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $325.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $339.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds)3. Courtyard Boston Downtown/Tremont 7. Omni Parker House Hotel 11. Westin Boston Waterfront (Headquarters Hotel)$219.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $249.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $319.00 Single (1 person/1 bed)$219.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) $249.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) Double/Double $319.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) Double/Double$239.00 $249.00 (2 people/2 beds) (2 people/2 beds) Double/Double $319.00 (2 people/2 beds)$259.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $279.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $339.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds)$279.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $309.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $359.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds)4. Fairmont Copley Plaza 8. Renaissance Boston Waterfront 12. Westin Copley Plaza$297.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $309.00 Single (1 person/1 bed) $319.00 Single (1 person/1 bed)$297.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) $309.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) Double/Double $319.00 Double (2 people/1 bed) Double/Double$297.00 $309.00 (2 people/2 beds) (2 people/2 beds) Double/Double $319.00 (2 people/2 beds)$327.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $329.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds) $339.00 Triple (3 people/2 beds)$357.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $349.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) $359.00 Quad (4 people/2 beds) 12
  • 13. 2013 IFFS/ASRM CONJOINT MEETING13 Boston Hotel Map
  • 14. Disclosure Statements/Conflict of Interest Policy 2013 IFFS/ASRM Conflict of InterestHonorariaThe following speakers may receive Policy for Invited Speakershonoraria and/or discounted or free As a provider of continuing medical education (CME) accredited by theregistration: Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the • Plenary Speakers American Society for Reproductive Medicine must ensure balance, • Postgraduate Course Faculty independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational activities. • Trilogy Speakers All presenters must disclose to the learners any commercial or financial • Symposia Speakers interests and/or other relationships with manufacturers of pharmaceuticals, • Interactive Session Speakers laboratory supplies and/or medical devices. All relationships, whether or not they directly apply to this CME event, must be disclosed. All non-FDAThe following speakers do not approved uses of products must be clearly identified. Disclosures may bereceive honoraria: made in the form of a slide, printed material, or oral statement. • Roundtable Presenters • Abstract Presenters The intent of this disclosure is not to prevent a speaker with a commercial or • Video Presenters financial interest from making a presentation. The intent is to assist ASRM in resolving conflicts of interest and to provide learners with information onDisclosure Statements which they can make their own judgments regarding any bias. AlthoughPostgraduate Faculty, Symposia ASRM reviews and resolves potential conflicts of interest, it remains for theSpeakers, Plenary Lecturers, Abstract audience to determine whether the speaker’s interests or relationships mayAuthors, Abstract Graders, Round- influence the presentationtable Presenters, Video Presenters, with regard to exposition or conclusion.and Interactive Speakers arerequired to disclose commercial Disclosures will be revealed to the learners. For postgraduate courses,relationships or other activities that disclosure information will be provided in the syllabus. For other activities,might be perceived as potential where no syllabus or other similar printed material is available, disclosuresconflicts of interest. must be made verbally to the audience by the speakers, preferably with the visual aid of a slide.Postgraduate course facultydisclosures will be listed in the course For those situations where there is no potential for conflict of interest, thesyllabi. portion of the form that so states should be completed. In those situations where a speaker does not complete a form or refuses to complete a form, theSymposium speakers’ disclosures will individual is ineligible to participate as a speaker in the CME activity.be presented in handout materials,as well as on slides.Disclosures from speakers in the Speakers should also reveal to the audience any “off label” usesPlenary Sessions, Interactive Sessions, (not approved by the FDA) of any drugs or products discussed.Roundtables, Videos and Symposiawill be published in the Final Program.Abstract authors’ disclosures will bepublished in the 2013 ProgramSupplement. Abstract authors’ disclosures are listed in the 2013 Program Supplement. Speakers in the Symposia and Interactive, Video, Roundtable and AbstractEach presenter should reveal his/her Sessions have also complied with ASRM policies and their disclosures are printeddisclosure information during his/her in the ASRM Final Program. The speaker should reveal this information duringpresentation, preferably with the his/her presentation, preferably with the visual aid of a slide.visual aid of a slide.Roundtable presenters shouldprovide a copy of their disclosureforms to the participants at their Continuing Medical Education andtable. Continuing Education Credits will be available. 14
  • 15. Postgraduate Program One-Day Courses Saturday, October 12, 2013 46TH ANNUAL GLOBAL APPROACHES TO PREVENTING INFECTIONSPOSTGRADUATE IN THE ART LABORATORY: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE Course PG1 (Saturday) PROGRAM Developed in Cooperation with the International Federation of Fertility Societies COMMITTEE FACULTY Deborah J. Anderson, Ph.D., Chair NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION Different regions of the world have different infections in the population that impact the CHAIR practice of assisted reproductive technologies. The challenge for laboratory and clinical staff Anuja Dokras, M.D., Ph.D. of ART clinics is to prevent transmission of infectious agents to the mother or gestational carrier and to the offspring of ART procedures. The objective of this live course is to train all CO-CHAIR members of the professional ART team to implement clinical and laboratory procedures to reduce the risk of transmission of infectious agents. Lisa M. Halvorson, M.D., Ph.D. ACGME Competency COORDINATING CHAIR Patient care Bradley J. Van Voorhis, M.D. LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 1. Summarize the prevalence and characteristics of concern in different populations around the world. WEEKEND COURSES 2. Design and implement practices to prevent infection in ART clinics in developed Dates: countries. Saturday, October 12TH 3. Discuss implementation of procedures to prevent infection in ART clinics in Sunday, October 13ST developing countries. Hours: 8:15 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CODING FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE PRACTICES 2013 Lunch is from Noon-1:00 p.m. Course PG2 (Saturday) Developed in Cooperation with the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Coding CommitteeCourses PG1-PG12 are one-day FACULTY courses on Saturday. John T. Queenan Jr., M.D., ChairCourses PG13-PG26 are one-day NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTION courses on Sunday. Every reproductive medicine practice has a legal and ethical obligation to follow a specific set of rules and regulations that determine how reimbursements are calculated. Failure toCourse PG27 is a two-day course follow these rules can result in unfair practices to patients and/or legal consequences from government or third-party payers. The problem is those rules and regulations have become on Saturday and Sunday. so complex that most people cannot understand them without receiving special training. This live course, designed for physicians, practice managers, billers, office managers, sonographers, laboratory managers, and physician assistants, will include didactic lectures, panel discussions, case presentations and interactive question and answer sessions. Postgraduate Course The correct way to report diagnostic codes and select the appropriate procedure codes will be explained, with a focus on quality improvement and minimizing errors. Systems- Syllabi will be posted based resources available to aid in improving patient billing accuracy will be addressed, as will information technology resources that provide participants with the ability to continue online in updating their knowledge of correct coding in the future. Special attention will be given to September 2013. the upcoming changes in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), 10th Revision. Printed copies will be distributed on-site. ACGME Competency Systems-based practice LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to: 15
  • 16. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM1. Demonstrate correct coding of diagnostic conditions that are typically encountered in the practice of reproductive endocrinology.2. Identify the correct Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code for surgical procedures encountered in the practice of reproductive endocrinology and list additional resources available to aid with correct coding procedures in the future.3. Summarize the rules and regulations required by third-party payers regarding documentation guidelines to verify that physician services were rendered according to medical necessity and in accordance with the requirements of CPT.4. Describe the proper steps for successful verification or negotiation of coverage in obtaining third-party payer coverage for fertility services. COMPLICATIONS OF ART: IN SEARCH OF A HAPPY ENDING Course PG3 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Nurses’ Professional GroupFACULTYAngela Smith, N.P., ChairTamara M. Tobias, A.R.N.P., Co-ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe successful outcome of fertility treatment brings joy to many couples. Unfortunately, some treatments result in complications thatpresent complex issues and require special management strategies. These may include ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS),ectopic pregnancy, pregnancy loss, multiple pregnancy and treatment failure. The decision to use third-party reproduction may be difficultand other psychological complications such as depression, isolation and relationship strain may add additional obstacles. Healthcareproviders must understand the problems that may occur, discuss treatment and management strategies, and recognize when referralsor other resources are needed. The factors that may prevent or reduce the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and managementstrategies for ectopic and multifetal pregnancy will be addressed in this course. The psychological complications of pregnancy loss andtreatment failure will be examined. In addition, the psychosocial issues of third-party reproduction, depression, isolation and relationshipstressors will be explored. The goal of this live course is to increase the ability of nursing professionals to avoid potential complications offertility treatment and to provide patients with strategies to navigate their fertility journeys.      ACGME CompetencyPractice-based learning and improvementLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Discuss OHSS and various strategies to prevent this syndrome and the effectiveness of those strategies.2. Review the management and impact of an ectopic pregnancy.3. Explore the emotional influence of treatment failure and pregnancy loss. 4. Explain the unique issues confronting multifetal pregnancies and current treatment strategies.5. Examine the psychological implications of third-party reproduction, depression, isolation and relationship stressors which may ensue from fertility treatment. 16
  • 17. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM CRYOPRESERVATION OF REPRODUCTIVE CELLS AND TISSUES: REAL WORLD APPROACHES AND LABORATORY PEARLS Course PG4 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society of Reproductive Biologists and TechnologistsFACULTYMarybeth Gerrity, Ph.D., M.B.A., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONCryopreservation of reproductive cells and tissues has been practiced for more than half a century. However, lack of consensus onbest practices has led to variable cryopreservation success rates that may hamper clinical utilization. While human sperm has beencryopreserved for decades, techniques such as oocyte vitrification are relatively recent technology breakthroughs. The learning curve forsome of these techniques can be steep and best practices for how to determine a laboratory’s competence to perform the procedures arestill evolving. As the types of patients who are candidates for cryopreservation procedures expand beyond fertility patients to include thosewith chronic diseases, it may not be feasible to mount multiple attempts at cryopreservation. Optimizing outcomes from the outset will becritical. Review of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) outcome statistics indicate the outcomes with cryopreservationof embryos vary by center, and strategies for assessing the cause of the variability must be developed before the technique is offered topatients who may have only one chance for a successful outcome (e.g., cancer patients). At the same time, long-term storage of thesefrozen cells and tissues presents challenges to long-term success. Cells formerly stored for several years may now be stored for decades.As frozen egg banks become more common, the lessons learned from years of sperm banking should not be lost and good tissue-bankingpractices must be implemented. Finally, experimental techniques that broaden the types of tissues that can be cryopreserved are in use atsome centers. Knowledge of these methods, including their strengths, weaknesses and limitations, is essential in determining if they aresafe and efficacious and ready to move into widespread use or should be reserved for specialized centers. This live course for laboratoryclinicians will cover current cryopreservation techniques and their application outside of infertility treatment, instituting competency-basedtraining in laboratories, and issues of long-term storage of cells and tissues.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Describe the scope of the clinical use of cryopreservation of reproductive tissues and cells outside of infertility treatment.2. Assess the best methods for cryopreservation according to tissue type, including factors that can limit success.3. Design a plan for competency-based training that can be instituted for each cell or tissue type.4. Discuss the unique technical, financial, logistical and regulatory challenges of long-term storage of reproductive cells and tissues.5. Compare and contrast the practice of long-term banking of anonymous sperm donors with that of egg donors and answer the question, “What can egg banks learn from sperm banks?” A SIMPLIFIED RISK-FREE IVF WITHOUT COMPROMISING OUTCOME Course PG5 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Middle East Fertility SocietyFACULTYMohamed Aboulghar, M.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe success of in vitro fertilization (IVF) is affected by patients’ reproductive status, the stimulation protocol and the quality of gametesand embryos. These parameters can vary greatly among IVF clinics. It is necessary to optimize the clinical and laboratory proceduresto ensure the highest quality embryos. This live course for physicians, nurses and laboratory staff of IVF clinics is designed to highlightthe latest medical evidence in assisted reproductive technology. The course will describe how to simplify the IVF procedure beginningwith stimulation protocols. The faculty will address minimal monitoring, newer options for triggering ovulation, assuring safety of IVF byprevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and multiple pregnancy, and simplifying the laboratory and freezing procedureswithout reducing the pregnancy rate.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Perform natural- and clomiphene-cycle IVF.2. Describe the soft protocols for ovarian stimulation in IVF.3. Explore newer options for triggering ovulation with minimum risk.4. Avoid OHSS in performing IVF.5. Discuss the benefits and risks of single-embryo transfer and cryopreservation. 17
  • 18. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN SCIENCE AND CLINICAL CARE IN ENDOMETRIOSIS-RELATED INFERTILITY Course PG6 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Endometriosis Special Interest GroupFACULTYHugh S. Taylor, M.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONEndometriosis is a highly prevalent disease. However, there are many gaps in physicians’ competence to diagnose patients withendometriosis. This disease places a tremendous burden on society, both economically and related to quality of life. The principalmanifestations of this disease, which causes both infertility and chronic pain, mandate that all general gynecologists and subspecialistsbe involved in the care of these patients. This live course is designed to improve physicians’ competence in the medical and surgicalmanagement of endometriosis. Topics to be discussed include: pathophysiology of endometriosis-associated pain syndromes;pathophysiology of endometriosis-associated infertility; choosing an appropriate medical or surgical therapy; technical aspects of surgicalapproaches; in vitro fertilization (IVF) approaches, including pre-IVF optimization; and new genetic etiologies of endometriosis. Coherentsummaries with key learning points will be provided and reinforced during the session of case reports.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Discuss clinical implications of the pathophysiology of endometriosis in patients with infertility.2. Explain the new genetic etiologies for endometriosis and ways to identify those at risk.3. Describe the options for managing endometriosis before an IVF cycle.4. Summarize the optimal approach for an IVF cycle in a woman with endometriosis. ULTRASOUND IMAGING IN ART Course PG7 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine and the Imaging in Reproductive Medicine Special Interest GroupFACULTYLaurel A. Stadtmauer, M.D., Ph.D., ChairTodd Deutch, M.D., Co-ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONUltrasound has become the most widely used and important tool in diagnosis and treatment of infertility. Ultrasound and ultrasound-guided procedures have become integral components not just of assisted reproductive technology (ART), but also in the day-to-daypractice of reproductive medicine, infertility and gynecology. 3-D ultrasound allows better imaging, as well as more accurate volumerendering. It has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of uterine anomalies, and may assist in more accurate follicular monitoringmeasurements. In 2009, new practice guidelines for ultrasound in reproductive medicine were published by the American Institute ofUltrasound in Medicine (AIUM) and in collaboration with the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). Surveys of membersof the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the Imaging Special Interest Group and ASRM have revealed a strong desirefor CME credits in ultrasonography that would prepare reproductive medicine professionals and gynecologists for accreditation by AIUM.In addition, there is an interest in training and credentialing reproductive nurses and nurse practitioners to perform limited ultrasounds inthe office. This live one-day course, designed to meet the needs of physicians and other healthcare providers who use gynecologic sonography,will fulfill CME requirements for AIUM credentialing. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive survey of the use ofultrasonography in the female pelvis for physicians, nurses and ultrasonographers actively involved in reproductive medicine, infertilityand gynecology. This course will emphasize the use of ultrasound in maximizing ART success and including follicular monitoring with 3-D sonographicautomatic volume calculation, assessment of the uterine lining during retrieval and embryo transfer in an evidence-based manner. Newertechnologies, such as 3-D ultrasound, Doppler and the use of CT- and MRI-guided procedures, will also be discussed, along with cost-effective current or potential applications. Participants will be encouraged to actively take part in case presentations and discussions ofcontroversies. Practical applications of the technology will be addressed along with case presentations, and participants will have theopportunity to manipulate 3-D images. 18
  • 19. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Summarize the appropriate use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of infertility, uterine abnormalities and the pathology of the reproductive tract.2. Describe the proper assessment of early pregnancy and list findings on early pregnancy assessments that are associated with poor outcome.3. Discuss the importance of 3-D ultrasonography in reproductive medicine, and the importance of Doppler blood-flow assessment in reproductive medicine and gynecology.4. Evaluate the use of fallopian tube patency with ultrasound.5. Critically evaluate how ultrasound can maximize the success of ART. CRITERIA FOR WORLD-CLASS PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE Course PG8 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Association of Reproductive ManagersFACULTYJoseph J. Travia, Jr., B.S., M.B.A., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONReproductive medicine facilities are confronted with more challenges than ever before from patients expecting world-class service andresults. With slower annual growth and a competing global economy, being good is no longer an option; patients want the best. Patientsare well informed through social media and other Internet resources, and their expectations for good outcomes continue to rise. Theirinitial selection of a clinic will be based on cutting-edge technology and published results. If patients remain with their initial selection,that decision will be based on the level of service they received during their first visit. Scientific breakthroughs continue to provide newopportunities for meeting the needs of assisted reproductive technology (ART) patients world-wide. This live course is designed for practitioners wanting to create a world-class experience for their patients through performance excellenceat every level of their organization. From creative leadership, strategic planning, patient focus, measurement, analysis and knowledgemanagement to work environment and employee engagement, this course will enable every participant to contribute significantly to theirpractices reach for excellence.ACGME CompetencySystems-based practiceLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Formulate the critical logistics of strategic planning and implementation, with a focus on patient recruitment and retention.2. Convert strategic objectives into action plans, along with key action plan indicators to measure competency and performance results in the practice.3. Provide a world-class work environment that promotes creative leadership and employee engagement.4. Determine the best, most competitive healthcare service offerings for the practice, and the most effective patient and stakeholder communication vehicles to market those opportunities.5. Measure, analyze, review and improve performance at all levels of the organization through the information already available in clinical, laboratory, and operations databases. 19
  • 20. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM THE ART OF GENETICS: REPRODUCTIVE GENETICS IN THE ART SETTING Course PG9 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Genetic Counseling Special Interest GroupFACULTYJill M. Fischer, M.S., C.G.C., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONReproductive genetics is an increasing part of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) practice. Daily, ART centers use geneticinformation when couples undergo ethnicity screening, when donors are screened and chosen for recipient couples, to determine thecause of infertility or recurrent pregnancy loss, and when utilizing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) and preimplantation geneticdiagnosis (PGD). However, the application of genetic information and genetic testing is often limited due to lack of knowledge by themedical providers in the ART practice. Education of these medical providers is incomplete and most ART centers do not have a geneticcounselor on staff. This live course serves to provide basic to complex genetic information to help such practices start to fill this education gap andcompetently apply genetic information to improve patient care. The course will provide both basic genetics education and review of realtime application. The faculty will address current knowledge of the genetic causes of male infertility not limited to cystic fibrosis and geneticcauses of female infertility, including the latest research on and testing for fragile X syndrome. As high throughput carrier testing optionsbecome more readily available, current American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), American College of Obstetricians andGynecologists (ACOG) and American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) carrier testing guidelines will be outlined and the applicationof such testing discussed. Current PGS/PGD test techniques and applications will be examined. Overall, this course should educate theART medical professionals on current genetic information and test options so they can improve patient care in their practices.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Explain genetic inheritance patterns, risk assessment and ethnicity screening.2. Describe genetic and chromosomal causes of male and female infertility and infertility test options.3. Define genetic and chromosomal test options for recurrent pregnancy-loss patients.4. Outline donor carrier screening guidelines by ASRM, ACOG and ACMG and their application to current practice.5. Evaluate the value of high throughput carrier screening in the ART setting and review current test techniques and applications of PGD. NEW FAMILIES ON TRIAL Course PG10 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Mental Health Professional GroupFACULTYAndrea Mechanick Braverman, Ph.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe idea of Mommy and Daddy and baby makes three as depicted in the 1950s “Leave it to Beaver” representation of the family has beenput into rerun by the new American family of “Modern Family” and “Two and a Half Men.” Many of the new families are made possibleonly by assisted reproductive technology (ART). Single mothers by choice and single fathers by choice are emerging as “choice” families.Co-in vitro fertilization (IVF) with lesbian partners sharing the genetic and gestational contribution to their children is now a commonprocedure. On the horizon are families where Mom freezes her eggs in her 20s or 30s but is now ready to fertilize an egg and get pregnantin her 40s and 50s. This live course will increase mental health professionals’ understanding of the many new ART families. This course will provideparticipants with the current research and theories explaining the needs and challenges for these families. Utilizing an interactive formatof a mock trial, participants will have the opportunity to hear “testimony” and be “the jury” to identify the issues and concerns of these ARTfamilies. This course will equip mental health professionals in providing competent understanding and sensitivity to the ever-expandingAll-American family.ACGME CompetencyInterpersonal and communication skillsLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Describe the different types of families made possible by ART.2. Discuss the current literature on the new ART families.3. Explain the challenges to providers in counseling these new ART families. 20
  • 21. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM THIRD PARTY REPRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES: LEGAL, MEDICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL/ETHICAL ASPECTS Course PG11 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Assisted Reproductive TechnologyFACULTYJames M. Goldfarb, M.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThird-party reproduction, particularly oocyte donation (OD) and gestational surrogacy (GS), has received much professional and publicattention recently. Both of these procedures have been utilized since the mid-1980s, but as they have evolved, the medical, legal andpsychological/ethical complexities have all increased. It is imperative that individuals involved with these procedures be aware of all thecomplex issues involved. Embryo donation (ED) and sperm donor insemination (DI) have attracted less attention and are medically notas complex as OD and GS. However, they, too, are associated with significant legal and psychological/ethical issues. This live course, designed for medical professionals involved in assisted reproductive technology (ART), examines the medical, legaland psychological/ethical issues involved in OD and GS, and to a lesser extent, ED and DI. Medical topics to be discussed include: safetyconsiderations and inclusion/exclusion criteria for egg and sperm donors and gestational surrogates, number of embryos to transfer inegg and embryo donor and gestational surrogate cycles, and role of oocyte cryopreservation in OD cycles. Legal topics will include:model legislation by the American Bar Association, variation in regulation of third-party reproduction in different states, new legislativeproposals to regulate third-party reproduction, informed consent and legal pitfalls. Psychological/ethical issues will include: egg donorand gestational surrogate payment, participant coercion, shared egg donation, divulging to offspring, and psychological aspects andscreening tools of third-party reproduction.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Explain the legal issues regarding OD, GS, ED and DI, particularly regarding state legislative efforts to regulate third-party reproduction.2. Discuss issues with egg donation, including establishment of a national egg donor registry, differences between anonymous and directed egg donation, and guidelines for payment of egg donors.3. Summarize the status of cross-border reproductive care as it relates to OD and GS. ENDOMETRIUM AND EMBRYO CROSS-TALK: HOW TO PREDICT AND ACHIEVE IMPLANTATION SUCCESS Course PG12 (Saturday)Developed in Cooperation with the European Society of Human Reproduction and EmbryologyFACULTYAntonis Makrigiannakis, M.D., Ph.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONDuring implantation, the cross-talk between the embryo and the endometrium remains largely unknown. Local and systemic playersinteract for the achievement of human pregnancy. Impaired implantation is currently considered the most important limiting factor for theestablishment of viable pregnancies in assisted reproduction. It is expected that elucidating the molecular background of the processwill enable accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of implantation failure and/or miscarriages. The purpose of this live course forembryologists and clinical reproductive medicine specialists is to identify factors that predict implantation success and investigate potentialtreatment modalities to manage implantation failure and/or miscarriages.ACGME CompetencyMedical knowledgeLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Summarize the physiology and pathophysiology of implantation.2. Describe local and systemic factors leading to miscarriages and/or implantation failure.3. Discuss the challenges of predicting and achieving implantation success. 21
  • 22. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM One-Day Courses Sunday, October 13, 2013 PCOS: CARING FOR A WOMAN OVER HER LIFETIME Course PG13 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and InfertilityFACULTYKurt T. Barnhart, M.D., M.S.C.E., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in females of reproductive age and is highly prevalent. Theetiology of this heterogeneous condition remains obscure and its phenotype expression varies. PCOS affects many aspects of a woman’slife and this live course will supply the reproductive endocrinologist and general gynecologist with the latest information on PCOS inorder to provide up-to-date recommendations for patient care. Topics to be covered will include how PCOS affects reproductive healthover a woman’s lifespan, hirsutism and acne, contraception, fertility, menstrual cycle abnormalities, quality of life, ethnicity, pregnancycomplications, long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health and, finally, cancer risk. Information will include material from The Consensuson Women’s Health Aspects of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.ACGME CompetencyPractice-based learning and improvementLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Contrast the signs and symptoms of PCOS in women of different ages and ethnicities.2. Interpret how aspects of the phenotype of PCOS correlate with risk factors for insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus (DM) type II and cardiovascular health.3. Develop a practical approach to testing for precursors of DM and cardiovascular disease in women with PCOS.4. Distinguish the medical and reproductive needs of a women with PCOS based on where she is in her lifetime. CROSSING BORDERS AND OTHER HOT LEGAL ISSUES FOR THE HEALTHCARE PROVIDER AND LEGAL PRACTITIONER Course PG14 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Legal Professional GroupFACULTYNidhi Desai, J.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe involvement of third parties in assisted reproduction as gamete and embryo donors and as gestational carriers has produced aplethora of legal issues for the reproductive healthcare professional. Confronted with the complicated relationships among intendedparents, gamete donors and gestational surrogates, the medical team often does not appreciate the legal implications of treating patientsfrom different countries. While medical practitioners should not offer legal advice, awareness of the legal complexities and possiblelandmines their patients may encounter with respect to immigration, contract enfoceability and parentage will help better serve practicesand patients. Recognition of those arrangements that require a partnership of legal and medical experts is essential in the creationof legally-secure families. The medical practitioner often has a lack of understanding of legal issues related to developments in newtechnologies and the interaction of the laws of various jurisdictions when treating or advising international clients. This live course will provide guidance to the healthcare practitioner and lawyer advising patients who are traveling from other countries aswell as those patients traveling out of the United States for treatment. Topics will include treatment, parentage, immigration, and contractenforceability given the intersection of multiple jurisdictions. The course will further explore current hot topics in assisted reproductivetechnology such as egg freezing and international regulations. This presentation is designed to review commonly-encountered situationsthat are subject to legal scrutiny, define the legal issues and potential pitfalls, provide practical solutions to roadblocks in assistedreproductive technology arrangements and explore the legal significance of treating clients from other countries. The various speakerswill further address issues emerging as a result of newer technology based on legal precedent and principles. Each presenter will fieldquestions from attendees that will allow for discussion of particular clinical conundrums, with the opportunity to develop usable solutionsfor clinical practice. This program will feature a practical approach to help lawyers and physicians better field situations as they arise.ACGME CompetencySystems-based practice 22
  • 23. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Explain problematic issues arising out of cross-border care.2. Construct specific steps for clinics to take to protect their programs and patients.3. Discuss some of the emerging legal challenges brought on by newer assisted reproductive technologies.4. Formulate practical methods of dealing with these emerging issues. LEIOMYOMATA: CLINICAL UPDATES, RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS AND DISPARITIES IN DISEASE, OUTCOMES AND ACCESS TO CARE Course PG15 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Fibroid Special Interest Group and the Health Disparities Special Interest GroupFACULTYGloria Richard-Davis, M.D., ChairAyman Al-Hendy, M.D., Ph.D., Co-ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONUterine leiomyomata (fibroids), benign estrogen-dependent tumors of the uterine wall, are a common cause of acute and chronic pelvicpain in women. Uterine fibroids affect 40-80% of women of reproductive age and are the leading indication for hysterectomy in African-American women. More than 600,000 hysterectomies were done in the United States in 2000 because of leiomyomata. At a mean costof $8 billion per year, African-American women are particularly affected as the prevalence of uterine fibroids is about three times higher inthat ethnic group compared with Caucasians. Currently there is no effective medical treatment for this common disease, and the impactof uterine fibroids on fertility remains controversial. Treatment options for the management of fibroids have largely focused on surgicaloptions with few focusing on reproductive-sparing procedures. Healthcare providers show no agreement on the best management option,partially because of their lack of current evidence-based knowledge (including the cause), of uterine fibroids. This live course, designedfor gynecologists, will provide a clear and meaningful overview of the problem, discuss current fibroid treatment options and their effecton fertility, and probe the future of these treatments.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Explain the developmental origin of uterine fibroids.2. Describe non-surgical, reproductive-sparing approach for treatment of uterine leiomyomata.3. Summarize the scientific data on why uterine leiomyomata are more common in African Americans.4. Discuss the role of myomectomy in the outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies. CRYOBIOLOGY, CRYOPHYSICS AND QUALITY CONTROL CONCERNS OF GAMETE, EMBRYO AND TISSUE VITRIFICATION Course PG16 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society of Reproductive Biologists and TechnologistsFACULTYCharles L. Bormann, Ph.D., ChairMarybeth Gerrity, Ph.D., M.B.A., Co-ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe presentation of vitrification (VTF) to in vitro fertilization (IVF) laboratories and practices is often unscientific and chaotic. The majorityof demonstration and training in VTF techniques has come through workshops sponsored by industry, which are inherently biasedtoward the media and storage vessels that the company presenting the training has developed. With increasing pressures to conformto human cells, tissue and tissue products (HCT/P) and current good tissue practice (CGTP) standards, set forth by the Food and DrugAdministration (FDA), most laboratories are compelled to use devices that are FDA-approved or pending FDA approval. There is greatconcern surrounding the “technical signature” of using a published VTF method, questioning the simplicity, reliability and repeatability ofa given technique. There are growing concerns over the safety of VTF solutions used, cryo-security, and accepting VTF eggs/embryos inunfamiliar VTF devices. We are entering a new era of cryobiology where we are faced with serious quality control challenges. Alternative approaches presented in this live demonstration and hands-on workshop can offer universal uniformity in safety, simplicity,sterility, security and success. To by-pass commercial propaganda and technical signature issues, a hands-on demonstration andworkshop of three simple, practical devices currently in use will be used to emphasize the quality control nightmare we will be facingif alternative universal technique(s) are not adopted. Selection of these devices (0.25 mL straw, Hemi straw, and microSecure) fordemonstration was based on proven simplicity, low cost, safety and effectiveness of each device without vested commercial interest. Thiscourse will provide a solid background in the theories and basic science that has led to the current state of VTF in human systems. Wewill evaluate the various VTF methods by rating the pros and cons after hands-on experience. We will demonstrate good tissue practices(GTPs) and discuss quality control concerns. 23
  • 24. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Participate in the cryobiological/cryophysical principles behind VTF technology via a “hands-on” workshop and contrast VTF to standard slow-freeze preservation.2. Evaluate, demonstrate and practice various non-commercial VTF methods that have been developed and applied, and assess the pros and cons in establishing a VTF program.3. Demonstrate laboratory GTPs and quality control concerns of VTF, and show how they influence intra- and inter-laboratory success within the methods and devices used in the hands-on workshop.4. Discuss overall quality management in striving to develop a standard global VTF technique (that minimizes “technical signature”) by participating in the use of various VTF techniques. MODERN MANAGEMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME IN ADOLESCENTS Course PG17 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Special Interest GroupFACULTYJennifer E. Dietrich, M.S., M.Sc., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects an estimated 5-7% of women of reproductive age. True estimates are difficult to define inadolescents, but have been postulated to be higher. Because PCOS is associated with comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus type II,hypertension, non-alcoholic steatosis and obesity as well as other health problems, it is critical to establish an early diagnosis to avoidsignificant health problems later in life. This live course designed for clinicians who care for adolescent females will cover current scientific papers and new areas of researchthat focus on adolescent needs and screening. Through a lecture/audience participation format, participants will discuss early warningsigns such as precocious adrenarche that help providers determine the best time to screen adolescents for PCOS, which should resultin improved patient lifelong health.ACGME CompetencyMedical knowledgeLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Confidently perform an evaluation for PCOS on an adolescent female.2. Differentiate adult criteria from adolescent criteria in making the diagnosis of PCOS.3. Detect early warning signs indicating a possible diagnosis of PCOS in the adolescent and evaluate the need for early screening and early intervention.4. Discuss the available treatment options for adolescents with PCOS. EARLY LIFE TOXICANT EXPOSURES AND ADULT REPRODUCTIVE DISORDERS: A POTENTIAL ROLE FOR NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION IN BOTH SEXES Course PG18 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Environment and Reproduction Special Interest Group and the Nutrition Special Interest GroupFACULTYKevin G. Osteen, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONFetal programming is a normal component of developmental processes leading to appropriate organ system function in adults. However,early life programming processes can be negatively impacted by various environmental factors, including maternal stress, poor nutritionand exposure to various toxicants. Emerging evidence implies that disruption of fetal and neonatal programming may significantly affectan individual’s risk of adult disease, including reproductive failure. This concept, known as Developmental Origins of Health and Disease(DOHaD), requires clinical providers of reproductive medicine to examine the potential role of fetal/neonatal programming on adultpathology affecting fertility. This live course will present experimental evidence and clinical observations linking developmental toxicant exposure to reproductivedisorders. Additionally, the faculty will discuss the significance of epigenetic programming on the heritability of toxicant-associateddisorders and will describe the influence of nutrition on reducing the impact of a previous toxicant exposure. Finally, this course willpresent the emerging evidence that environmental toxicant exposure of animals and humans impacts adult reproductive function formultiple generations and will provide specific recommendations for providers to optimize patient care in fertility clinics. 24
  • 25. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMACGME CompetencyMedical knowledgeLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Evaluate the evidence implicating environmental toxicant exposure at different stages of life to disruption of adult reproductive tract function and development of disease.2. List specific toxicants, their routes of exposure and mechanisms of action which may negatively impact reproductive processes in humans.3. Describe the DOHaD hypothesis and its relevance to reproductive medicine.4. Discuss how nutrition may modify the negative impact of a prior toxicant exposure and improve reproductive outcomes.5. Develop improved strategies for ascertaining a couple’s exposure history relevant to infertility treatment. ULTRASOUND IMAGING IN REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE: A PRACTICAL APPROACH Course PG19 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine and the Imaging in Reproductive Medicine Special Interest GroupFACULTYLaurel A. Stadtmauer, M.D., Ph.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONUltrasound and ultrasound-guided procedures have become integral components, not just of assisted reproductive technology (ART),but also in the day-to-day practice of reproductive medicine, infertility and gynecology. In 2009, new practice guidelines for ultrasound inreproductive medicine were published by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) and in collaboration with the AmericanSociety for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). Surveys of members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the ImagingSpecial Interest Group and ASRM have revealed a strong desire for CME credits in ultrasonography that would prepare reproductivemedicine professionals and gynecologists for accreditation by the AIUM. In addition, there is an interest in training and credentialingreproductive nurses and nurse practitioners to perform limited ultrasounds in the office. The objective of this course is to provide comprehensive survey of the use of ultrasonography in the female pelvis for physicians andother healthcare providers who use gynecologic ultrasonography. A practical problem-solving approach will be implemented with casepresentations. The faculty will critically review the application of ultrasonography to the infertility evaluation, diagnosis, treatments andcomplications as a way to maximize ART success. Ultrasound has helped in the early pregnancy evaluation and monitoring as well asin assessing pregnancy complications. Many other gynecologic findings on ultrasound such as congenital uterine anomalies, ovarianmasses, tubal disease and other uterine pathologies will be discussed along with their impact on fertility and the decision for surgery.A variety of reproductive problems throughout the reproductive lifespan, from puberty through menopause, will be addressed from anultrasound perspective. Newer technologies with current or potential applications, such as 3-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound, Doppler, andcost-effective use of CT- and MRI-guided procedures will also be covered. There will be interactive discussion of cases and controversies,and participants will also have the opportunity to learn practical applications and manipulate 3-D images. This course will fulfill CMErequirements for AIUM credentialing.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Summarize the appropriate use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of infertility, uterine abnormalities and the pathology of the reproductive tract.2. Describe the proper assessment of early pregnancy and list findings on early pregnancy assessments that are associated with poor outcome.3. Discuss the importance of 3-D ultrasonography in reproductive medicine, and the importance of Doppler blood flow assessment in reproductive medicine and gynecology.4. Evaluate patients with pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding and adnexal masses using a practical approach.5. Evaluate when surgical intervention is needed, when cancer is suspected and when imaging procedures can be performed to treat abnormalities on ultrasound. 25
  • 26. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM GLOBAL FAMILY PLANNING: THE KEY TO ACHIEVING MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS Course PG20 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Contraception Special Interest GroupFACULTYAlison Edelman, M.D., M.P.H., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONUnintended pregnancies continue to be at epidemic levels in the United States and worldwide. Unsafe abortion continues to be one ofthe top killers of women worldwide. The use of long-acting, reversible and permanent contraceptive methods prevent both pregnanciesand abortions. One important barrier to contraceptive use is lack of knowledge and hands-on experience among healthcare providers on“best practices” for contraceptive care. In addition, providers lack the skills for safe abortion care including postabortion and miscarriagemanagement. The Contraception Special Interest Group determined that a postgraduate course with a hands-on component would benefit reproductiveendocrinologists, general obstetrician-gynecologists, general internists, family medicine providers, and nurse practitioners. The topics tobe covered in this live course include: achieving millennium development goals (MDG) in the current world situation; family planning andthe environment; postpartum/postabortion contraception; transcervical and minilaparotomy sterilization; natural family planning; medicalmanagement of spontaneous abortions, postabortion care, and safe abortion care; manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) from biopsies,retained placentas, to abortions; resources for the clinician; medical eligibility criteria from the World Health Organization and the Centersfor Disease Control; and novel, developing contraception methods. The hands-on component will allow participants to improve clinicalskills in postpartum/postabortion intrauterine device (ppIUD) insertion, Essure/Adiana, MVA, transcervical and minilaparotomy permanentcontraception, and dilatation and evacuation.ACGME CompetencyMedical knowledgeLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Analyze the current world situation, MDG goals and environmental issues related to population and family planning and recommend resources that aid the clinician in the provision of contraceptive care.2. Explain family-planning methods with the greatest impact for reducing maternal morbidity and mortality (use of ppIUD, permanent contraception, and novel methods being developed).3. Apply the acquired skills to perform ppIUD insertion and transcervical and minilaparotomy permanent contraception.4. Describe safe and standardized regimens for the medical management of incomplete abortion, miscarriage or undesired pregnancy.5. Describe and demonstrate the use of manual vacuum aspirator for gynecologic, obstetric and family planning indications. SAFE IN VITRO FERTILIZATION Course PG21 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Assisted Reproductive TechnologyFACULTYValerie L. Baker, M.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONAlthough assisted reproductive technology (ART) is a widely-used treatment that often leads to the birth of healthy children withoutserious maternal complications, concerns have been raised about increased risk of certain adverse outcomes for both the mother andthe offspring. ART has been associated with higher rates of compromised fetal growth, preterm delivery, maternal complications such aspreeclampsia, and possibly congenital anomalies and epigenetic disorders. Some risks of adverse outcomes associated with ART arelikely attributable to the underlying infertility. However, it is important for clinicians to be aware of ART risks that may be associated withthe treatment itself. Some adverse outcomes associated with ART may be attributable to multiple gestation, laboratory practices, or theunphysiologic maternal state in which pregnancy typically begins with ART. This live course will equip clinicians to better inform patients about the risks and benefits of various aspects of ART. Faculty will providerecommendations on how to mitigate the risks, including optimization of ovulation induction, and maximize the safety of ART. Other topicscovered include an up-to-date understanding of the benefits and risks of various laboratory procedures and ART treatment for patientswith medical problems.ACGME CompetencyPatient care 26
  • 27. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Choose individualized ovulation stimulation protocols with consideration given to both potential short-term and long-term consequences for the mother and fetus.2. Explain the risks and benefits of laboratory practices such as extended culture, embryo biopsy at different stages, oocyte cryopreservation and open versus closed vitrification.3. Provide recommendations that will reduce the risk of multiple gestation while still maintaining a high live-birth rate.4. Advise patients at increased risk of pregnancy complications. THE SIGNIFICANCE, IMPLICATIONS AND HERITABILITY OF MALE INFERTILITY AS A DISEASE Course PG22 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society for Male Reproduction and UrologyFACULTYPaul J. Turek, M.D., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe clinical significance of the male factor infertility evaluation has been underestimated to date. Given the well-described associationsbetween male infertility and a) underlying concurrent medical conditions, b) genetic anomalies, c) environmental exposures and d) futurecancers, male factor infertility is clearly a disease of clinical and epidemiological significance. However, it is estimated that less than onein four infertile males in the United States receives the recommended male factor evaluation as part of the couple infertility assessment.Educating clinicians about the implications of male factor infertility is the first step in changing clinical behavior that incorporates the malefactor evaluation into every couple’s assessment. Through a thorough discussion of our current understanding of the medical, genetic and epidemiologic issues associated with male factorinfertility, this course seeks to raise awareness and change practice patterns of clinicians who care for infertile couples. By emphasizingthat male infertility is a window into both current and future health of the individual (i.e., is a biomarker of health), this course will:improve clinicians’ level of understanding and knowledge of relevant lifestyle issues and behaviors that are associated with infertility, helpclinicians precisely identify those individuals at risk for genetic infertility, and enable clinicians to better educate their patients regarding thehealth risks associated with a male infertility diagnosis. It is our hope that this course will enlighten clinicians, laboratory technicians andresearchers alike of the full impact of male infertility on the health, quality of life and longevity of affected individuals.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Describe three metabolic or hormonal disorders that are associated with male factor infertility.2. List the clinical criteria that define men at risk for genetic infertility due to Y chromosome deletions or karyotype anomalies.3. Delineate four lifestyle, occupational or exposure risk factors linked to male factor infertility.4. List two cancers that are more likely to occur in infertile men than otherwise healthy men AFTER a diagnosis of male factor infertility.5. Explain two genetic or medical conditions in offspring that are associated with severe male factor infertility or older paternal age. 27
  • 28. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM TRAINING PEOPLE IN LOW-COST INFERTILITY AND ART TREATMENT Course PG23 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the International Federation of Fertility SocietiesFACULTYIan D. Cooke, M.B., FRCOG, F.Med.Sci., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONAccess to infertility diagnosis and treatment is extremely poor in the developing world. There are too few clinics or private doctors interestedin and competent to manage infertility problems, no adequate referral systems, and few trained staff. National health services provide fewtreatments as many countries struggle with major disease, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malaria and tuberculosis (TB).Available private services are usually too costly for the average patient and can result in catastrophic expense. The most common causeof infertility in developing nations is tubal obstruction from infection, either chlamydia, gonorrhea or postpartum or postabortion sepsis,where the only realistic management plan includes in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, public health education on reproduction is minimaland infertility is surrounded by fear and superstition and compounded by local religious attitudes. Treatment options are not widely knownand sophisticated methods, such as assisted reproductive technology (ART), are not available. Management of infertility needs to be conducted within a framework of adequate reproductive health services, so that preparation forpregnancy, the pregnancy and the delivery are competently managed, in places where skilled attendance at delivery may not be standardpractice. Health professionals, either nationals of low resource economies or altruistic academics from developed countries, wanting toimplement infertility treatments and ART in the developing world must understand the problems and acquire the competence to approachthem in ways that are cost-effective for their region and not simply attempt to transfer systems developed for more-affluent environments. This live course will describe how to develop assisted-conception services in low-resource environments. Discussion will cover howto find suitable laboratory space, provide robust equipment and maintain it in working order, maintain lab records with a view to qualitycontrol, trouble shoot, and use the laboratory data to develop the service. Identifying potential patients, patient screening, meeting withboth partners, and treatment prior to ART will be emphasized as well as the principles of preparation for pregnancy and obstetric care.The indications for intra-uterine insemination (IUI) and IVF (and the need for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection [ICSI]) will be elaborated inthe context of education about reproductive biology, pathology and specific treatment for the couple and the implications for public healtheducation. Minimal ovarian stimulation will be discussed in the context of avoiding hyperstimulation and multifetal pregnancy. The criticalrole of ultrasound will be presented with technical details of appropriate apparatus and the skill requirements and methods for acquiringthem will be presented. The role of various staff members will be elaborated and include quality standards. Finally, an appraisal of the financial viability of developing an assisted-conception clinic and the use of data obtained from such a clinicwill be detailed. Data can be reported to national and international registries and used to attract patients and influence policy related toservice provision at a national level, thus helping to extend local health service to a greater proportion of the population in accordancewith the World Health Organization rubric of appropriately-stratified healthcare.ACGME CompetencySystems-based practiceLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Explain the rationale for providing assisted-conception services in low-resource environments.2. Develop a clinic offering suitable ART services and competently manage patients in such a setting.3. Specify the steps required for financial viability and for quality data retention and reporting.4. Develop educational programs suitable for patients, the general public and health service administrators. 28
  • 29. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM PGD IMPACT ON ART EFFICIENCY WITH INTRODUCTION OF MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY FOR 24 CHROMOSOME ANEUPLOIDY TESTING Course PG24 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Special Interest GroupFACULTYAnver Kuliev, M.D., Ph.D., ChairSantiago Munné, Ph.D., Co-ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONAt least 50% of oocytes and embryos from in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients of advanced reproductive age are chromosomally abnormal,contributing significantly to infertility and pregnancy loss. Because of the present controversy on the impact of preimplantation genetictesting (PGT) for aneuploidies on the improvement of assisted reproductive technology (ART), there is a need for the development ofefficient and robust methods for preselection of aneuploidy-free embryos for transfer. The available methods based on morphologicalcriteria are not sufficient for selection of embryos with the highest developmental potential. The previous methods for aneuploidy testingwere based on the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, which has an important limitation of not detecting abnormalities ofall the chromosomes. In addition, the procedure is predominantly applied at the cleavage stage, which is compromised by the high risk ofmosaicism that may contribute to false positive and false negative results. This live course is aimed at increasing the knowledge and competence of fertility specialists and laboratory professionals, but will also beof interest to a wider audience, taking into consideration the recent controversy regarding preimplantation aneuploidy testing. Faculty willintroduce microarray technology, which tests for all 24 chromosomes, and the application of this technology to different biopsy materials,including polar bodies, blastomeres and blastocysts. Participants will analyze the different platforms for 24 chromosome aneuploidytesting and review data on the clinical outcome of the application of this methodology.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Evaluate the contribution of the FISH technique to the false positive and false negative results and the impact on the clinical outcome data.2. Describe the practical application of preimplantation 24 chromosome testing to PGD for chromosomal disorders.3. Explain the importance of selection of the optimal biopsy procedure for the highest accuracy of preimplantation 24 chromosome aneuploidy testing.4. Discuss the expected efficiency of 24 chromosome aneuploidy testing, depending on the type of microarray technique used and the differences of the applied biopsy procedures. MANAGING MENOPAUSE...WITH FINGERS ON THE PULSE AND EYES ON THE FUTURE Course PG25 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Menopause Special Interest GroupFACULTYLubna Pal, M.B.B.S., M.S., ChairNEEDS ASSESSMENT AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONMenopausal management has transformed over the past decade, with an obvious shift from a relatively liberal use of exogenoushormones in the pre-Women’s Health Initiative era, to a more cautious stance regarding the place of menopausal hormone therapy inthe management of menopause-related symptoms. Concerns regarding long-term implications of menopausal hormone therapy appearto underlie this change in clinical practice. Although today’s clinicians are sensitized to the unique needs of an individual menopausalwoman, and are better aware of the expanding spectrum of therapeutic options, the management paradigms still remain ambiguous formany and the dichotomy of findings from observational studies and randomized trials continue to confuse patients and providers alike.Easy access to “proverbial” and “anecdotal” information via the Internet has magnified the complexity of clinician-patient discussions andfrequently influences patient choices and decisions related to menopause management. Early diagnosis and advances in the field of oncology are contributing to increasing numbers of relatively young cancer survivors who areexperiencing premature ovarian insufficiency after chemo-radiation therapy. Clinical evidence suggests that the health burden attributableto premature cessation of ovarian function in this population may not be adequately appreciated or addressed. It is thus essential forclinicians who care for young female cancer survivors to understand the needs and concerns relating to iatrogenic menopause in thisunique population. Today’s targeted approach to clinical practice may restrict a clinician’s ability to explore an individual patient’s non-verbalized concerns,an aspect that is of particular relevance for women transgressing the spectrum of peri and early menopause. In addition to being cognizantof climacteric symptoms and the available strategies for symptom control, providers should also be prepared to treat the needs ofperimenopausal and early menopausal women, including preventive care, risk quantification and risk reduction, and contraceptive andprocreative preferences. The future of menopausal management, driven by concepts of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs),tissue selective estrogen complexes (TSECs) and stem cell therapy, promises a dynamic terrain that is likely to redefine how we care forthe perimenopausal and menopausal woman. 29
  • 30. 46TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM The decision to offer a particular management strategy is dictated by the patient’s clinical presentation and a thorough evaluation of theindividualized risk versus benefit profile. Large gaps exist between patient expectations and provider competency to help guide patientdecision making. Consistent with the literature, surveys conducted by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) in 2009and 2011 members identified personal practice gaps in the treatment of menopause-related issues, and requested educational activitiesto specifically address their understanding of individualized treatment approaches. The goal of this live course is to offer a critical reviewof evidence-based recommendations that will give clinicians the skill set to provide comprehensive, competent care to women makingthe transition into menopause.ACGME CompetencyPatient careLEARNING OBJECTIVESAt the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:1. Individualize risk assessment and recommend risk reduction strategies for peri and postmenopausal women, and develop optimal, individualized management strategies of contraceptive and procreative needs in the perimenopausal population.2. Compare and contrast the efficacy, safety and side effects of available therapies (hormonal and non-hormonal) for common menopausal disorders, and design treatment plans for women with diverse disease states and of different ages with menopausal symptoms and/or osteoporosis.3. Distinguish the unique needs and risks of women experiencing unnatural menopause (premature, surgical or following chemo-radiation), and develop individualized management strategies.4. Explain emerging concepts in menopausal medicine (e.g., SERMs, TSECs and stem cell). HYSTEROSCOPY Course PG26 (Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the Society of Reproductive SurgeonsFACULTYSteven F. Palter, M.D., Chair Two-Day Course Saturday, October 12, 2013 - Sunday, October 13, 2013 CLINICAL EMBRYOLOGY AND ANDROLOGY FOR PHYSICIANS Course PG27 (Saturday & Sunday)Developed in Cooperation with the American Association of BioanalystsFACULTYTammie Schalue, Ph.D., H.C.L.D., E.L.D., Chair FUTURE ASRM ANNUAL MEETINGS October 18-22, 2014 Honolulu, HI Hawaii Convention Center October 17-21, 2015 Baltimore, MD Baltimore Convention Center 30
  • 31. IFFS/ASRM 2013 Scientific ProgramNeeds Assessment and DescriptionThe field of reproductive medicine is evolving rapidly with advances reflecting the multicultural contributions of the globalcommunity of healthcare professionals. The IFFS Scientific Committee and the ASRM Scientific Program Committee se-lected as their theme for the 2013 conjoint meeting “Transforming Reproductive Medicine Worldwide” to emphasize inter-national collaborative efforts to improve every patient’s ability to fulfill his or her reproductive destiny. Reproductive health-care is challenged globally by technology, ethics, clinical skill, social customs, religious beliefs, emotions, legal restrictionsand cost. Clinicians, scientists and allied health professionals must improve their ability to navigate these uncharted ter-ritories in order to provide optimal care for their patients. The educational activities of the 2013 postgraduate and scientificprograms are designed to enhance the medical and scientific knowledge, clinical and laboratory competence and profes-sional performance of the healthcare team in helping patients achieve their goals with regards to reproduction. The program committees have designed postgraduate courses, plenary lectures, symposia, interactive sessions,debates, roundtable discussions and oral and poster free-communication sessions to provide participants with a varietyof formats and venues to teach and learn, discuss and debate, and give and receive new information, insight and skill.New to ASRM will be the popular IFFS trilogy format in which three speakers discuss the basic, translational and clinicalaspects of a particular topic. The educational and program committees have identified educational needs through gapanalyses for education in the areas of male and female infertility, assisted reproductive technology, andrology, endome-triosis, reproductive perturbations by environmental toxicants, sexuality, menopause, contraception, gamete and embryobiology, polycystic ovary syndrome, fibroids, regenerative medicine and stem cell biology, and access to reproductivecare in low-resource regions. Experts from around the world will present the most recent cutting-edge evidence regardingdiagnosis and treatment of reproductive problems. The 2013 IFFS/ASRM conjoint meeting will provide abundant educational opportunities for reproductive endocrinolo-gists, gynecologists, urologists, family practitioners, internists, embryologists, andrologists, nurses, psychologists, socialworkers, geneticists, and practice managers. Both the postgraduate and scientific programs will include mentored, hands-on training for those reproductive surgeons wishing to enhance their skills in minimally invasive and robotic surgery. Thegoal is for every professional in the field of reproductive medicine and biology to leave the meeting as a better practitionerstimulated to make new discoveries that will advance reproductive healthcare.Learning ObjectivesAt the conclusion of the postgraduate and scientific programs, participants should be able to: 1. Compare and contrast clinical approaches to fertility care in resource-rich and low-resource regions. 2. Summarize the latest scientific advances in the biology of gamete and embryo development, fibroids, endometrio- sis, stem cells and polycystic ovary syndrome. 3. Discuss optimal methods for producing, culturing, assessing, selecting and cryopreserving human embryos. 4. Design evidence-based interventions to treat male reproductive disorders. 5. Implement protocols for preimplantation genetic testing to prevent propagation of genetic diseases in assisted reproductive technologies. 6. Counsel infertile patients regarding the costs, both emotional and financial, of using the latest medical therapies to build a family. 7. Assist postmenopausal women in coping with vasomotor symptoms, bone loss, mood disorders and sleep distur- bances. 8. Recommend the most appropriate contraceptive methods for patients in different physiological, cultural and finan- cial circumstances. 31
  • 32. IFFS/ASRM 2013 Conjoint Meeting Grid IFFS/ASRM 2013 DATE SAT SUN MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY TIME TIME 12-Oct 13-Oct 14-Oct 15-Oct 16-Oct 17-Oct 0700 Poster Setup Regional Meetings Posters Regional Meetings Commercially Posters Regional Meetings Commercially Posters Regional Meetings Commercially 0700 0715 Supported Supported Supported 0715 Symposia Symposia Symposia 0730 0730 0745 0745 0800 ASRM Members Meetings 0800 0815 0815 0830 0830 0845 0845 0900 Plenary Lecure 1: ASRM Presidents Guest Lecture Plenary Lecture 4: IFFS Jean CohenLecture Plenary Lecture 7: American Urological Association Plenary Lecture 10: IFFS/ASRM Joint Lecture 0900 0915 Bruce Stewart Memorial Lecture 0915 0930 0930 0945 Plenary Lecutre 2: IFFS De Watteville Lecture Plenary Lecture 5: Camran Nezhat M.D. Lecture Plenary Lelcture 8: Society for the Study of Reproduction ASRM Members Meeting 0945 1000 Exchange Lecture 1000 1015 1015 1030 Break/Exhibits Surgical Instrument Demonstration Break/Exhibits Break/Exhibits Break/Exhibits 1030 1045 1045 1100 1100 1115 Trilogies Symposia (NPG, Telesurgery Prize Paper Trilogies Symposia (NPG, Videos Prize Paper Trilogies Symposia (NPG, Videos Prize Paper Trilogies IFFS Surveillance Videos Special Research 1115 1130 MHPG, ARM) Abstract MHPG, ARM) Abstract MHPG, ARM) Abstract Presentations 1130 Presentations Presentations Presentations Session 1145 1145 1200 1200 1215 1215 Postgraduate courses Postgraduate courses 1230 1230 1245 Lunch Interactive Sessions Roundtables Lunch Interactive Sessions Roundtables Lunch Interactive Sessions Roundtables Break 124532 1300 Plenary Lecture 11: IFFS/ASRM Joint Lecture 1300 1315 1315 1330 1330 1345 Summary of Meeting 1345 1400 Awards/Closing Ceremony 1400 1415 1415 1430 Plenary Lecture 3: Society of Reproductive Surgeons Lecture Plenary Lecture 6: IFFS/ASRM Joint Lecture Plenary Lecture 9: Herbert H. Thomas Lecture 1430 1445 1445 1500 1500 1515 Break/Exhibits Surgical Instrument Demonstration IFFS General Break/Exhibits Break/Exhibits IFFS General 1515 1530 Assembly Assembly 1530 1545 1545 1600 Free Symposia Free Symposia Free Symposia 1600 1615 Communication Communication Communication 1615 Sessions Sessions Sessions 1630 1630 1645 1645 1700 1700 s s 1715 1715 Meeting Member 1730 1730 1745 1745 1800 ASRM Members Meetings ASRM Members Meetings ASRM Members Meetings 1800 1815 1815 1830 1830 1845 1845 1900 IFFS/ASRM Gala IFFS/ASRM Presidents Dinner 1900 2000 2000 Opening 2100 2100 Ceremony/Gala 2200 2200
  • 33. 2013 Scientific Program Daily Schedule 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Innovative Laboratory Practice for Sunday, October 13, 2013 Menopause Day Symposium Developing Countries Focus on Psychological Well-being in To Be Determined12:00 pm - 5:00 pm • Poster Set-up Aging Women Lubna Pal, M.B.B.S., M.Sc. (Chair) 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium5:00 pm - 5:45 pm • Members’ Meetings Yale University Association of Reproductive Managers JoAnn E. Manson, M.D., M.P.H. Symposium Harvard School of Public Health6:30 PM • Opening Ceremony and Delivery of Outstanding Service: What We Nanette F. Santoro, M.D. Opening Reception in Exhibit University of Colorado, Denver Can Learn from Corporate America Hall Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D. Joseph J. Travia, Jr., B.S., M.B.A. (Chair) IntegraMed University of California San Francisco Center for Reproductive Health Monday, October 14, 2013 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy Mental Health Professional Group7:00 am - 12:00 pm • Poster Set-up Endometriosis Symposium Genetics and Epigenetics of Endometriosis Challenges and Controversies in Providing7:00 am - 9:00 am Grant Montgomery, M.D. Fertility Preservation to Cancer Patients IFFS Regional Meetings Queensland Institute of Medical Research Elizabeth A. Grill, Psy.D. (Chair) The Center for Reproductive Medicine andJapan Society for Reproductive Medicine Clinical Applications of Stem Cells Infertility(JSRM) - Recent Progress and New Hugh S. Taylor, M.D. Melissa B. Brisman, J.D.Trends of ART in Japan Yale University Surrogate Fund Management, LLC The Management of Pelvic Pain with Glenn L. Schattman, M.D.7:00 am - 9:00 am Infertility Weill Medical College of Cornell UniversityIFFS Regional Meetings Mauricio S. Abrao, M.D.Italian Society of Fertility - Factors São Paulo University 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • SymposiumInfluencing Embryos Implantation and their Nurses’ Professional Group SymposiumUse in Clinical Practice 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy Research and the Nurse Female Fertility Preservation Cynthia F. Willson, B.S.N. (Chair) Pacific Fertility7:00 am - 9:00 am Fundamentals of CryobiologyIFFS Regional Meetings Patricia Herschberger, Ph.D. Claus Yding Andersen, M.Sc., D.M.Sc. University of Illinois at ChicagoTurkish German Gynecological Education University Hospital of Copenhagen Monica R. Benson, B.S.N., R.N.and Research Foundation - Implantation Contemporary Approaches to Ovarian Reproductive Medicine Associates of NewProblems in an IVF Patient Tissue and Oocyte Cryopreservation Jersey To Be Determined7:00 am - 9:00 am 11:15 am - 12:45 pmHands-on Robotic Surgery Intensive Clinical Application of Fertility Preservation Society of Reproductive Surgeons Mitchell P. Rosen, M.D. Telesurgery University of California San Francisco Center for8:00 am - 9:00 am • Members’ Meetings Reproductive Health Complex Endometriosis Surgery9:00 - 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 1 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy 1:00 pm - 2:45 pm • Surgical TutorialEndowed by a 1987 grant from Ortho Women’s Health Interactive Video: Tubal and Adnexal ContraceptionAmerican Society for Reproductive Surgery Male ContraceptionMedicine President’s Guest Lecture To Be Determined Regine L. Sitruk-Ware, M.D.Chromosome Ends: Why We Care About The Population CouncilThem 12:45 pm - 2:30 pm • Lunch Break Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D. Evaluation of New Approaches to Female University of California, San Francisco Contraception 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Narendra Malhotra, M.D. Malhotra Hospitals Surgery Day Debate9:45 am - 10:30 am • Plenary Lecture 2 Pros and Cons of Robotics in BenignInternational Federation of Fertility Global Perspectives on Contraception GynecologySocieties - DeWatteville Lecture To Be Determined Jeffrey M. Goldberg, M.D. (Chair) To Be Determined Cleveland Clinic 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy10:30 am - 11:15 am ART in the Developing World 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Interactive SessionSurgical Instrument Demonstration Access to Reproductive Medicine in the Menopause Day Interactive Session Developing World Cognitive Issues and Sleep Concerns:10:30 am - 11:15 am • Breaks/Exhibits Willem Ombelet, M.D., Ph.D. Hormones, Aging, or Both? University of Genk Melissa Wellons, M.D. (Chair)11:15 am - 12:45 pm University of Alabama at Birmingham Cost Effective Protocol in IVFScientific Program Prize Paper Abstract Pauline Maki, Ph.D. Korula George, M.D. University of Illinois at ChicagoSession 1 Bangalore Baptist Hospital Hadine Joffe, M.D., M.Sc. Harvard Medical School 33 Continued on Next Page...
  • 34. 2013 Scientific Program Daily Schedule1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Plenary Lecture 3 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • SymposiumEnvironment and Reproduction Special Endowed by a 1999 grant from Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Endowed by a 2011 Gift from the Asia-Pacific Inc. Biomedical Research FoundationInterest Group Interactive Session Society of Reproductive Surgeons Lecture KY Cha Symposium in Stem CellReproductive Health Issues in the Modern Hysteroscopy Technology and Reproductive Medicine -Environment Keith B. Isaacson, M.D. Uterine Stem Cells Susan H. Benoff, Ph.D. (Chair) Newton Wellesley Hospital North Shore-Long Island Jewish Research Carlos A. Simon, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair) Institute Fundacion IVI, University of Valencia 3:15 pm - 4:00 pm • Breaks/Exhibits Erin F. Wolff, M.D. National Institutes of Health1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session 3:15 pm - 6:00 pm Robert J. Casper, M.D.Androgen Excess Special Interest Group Toronto Centre for Advanced ReproductiveInteractive Session IFFS General Assembly TechnologyHirsutism Treatment Frank Gonzalez, M.D. (Chair) 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Indiana University School of Medicine Free Communication/Oral Abstract Mexican Association of Reproductive Daniel A. Dumesic, M.D. Sessions Medicine Symposium University of California, Los Angeles To Be Determined 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Menopause Day Symposium 5:30 pm - 6:00 pmNurses’ Professional Group and the Mental Aging and Sexuality Society for Male Reproduction andHealth Professional Group Interactive Sandra A. Carson, M.D. (Chair) Urology MinisymposiumSession Women and Infants Hospital How to Get a Walrus Pregnant: A ProvenNursing and Mental Health Care for the RecipeInfertile Male 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Holley Muraco, B.S. Dana A. Ohl, M.D. (Chair) Surgery Day Symposium Vallejo Six Flags Discovery Kingdom University of Michigan Congenital Müllerian Anomalies Susanne Quallich, N.P. Samantha M. Pfeifer, M.D. (Chair) University of Michigan 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm • Members Meetings University of Pennsylvania William D. Petok, Ph.D. Sara Y. Brucker, M.D. Private Practice, Baltimore Turbingen University Hospital Marjan Attaran, M.D.1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Cleveland ClinicSociety for Assisted Reproductive Assia A. Stepanian, M.D.Technology Interactive Session Center for Women’s Core and Reproductive SurgeryMultiple Pregnancies: Risks and Benefits Glenn L. Schattman, M.D. (Chair) Weill Medical College of Cornell University 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Eric S. Surrey, M.D. Uterine Function and Dysfunction Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine Hilary O.D. Critchley, M.D. (Chair) University of Edinburgh1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive SessionRegenerative Medicine and Stem Cell 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • SymposiumBiology Special Interest Group Interactive Lifestyle Factors and Reproductive Health:Session What Matters?Biology of Male Germ Cell Differentiation Stacey A. Missmer, D.Sc. (Chair) Harvard Medical School Sherman J. Silber, M.D. (Chair) Infertility Center of St. Louis Ans M. M. van Pelt, Ph.D. 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium University of Amsterdam Empiric Medical Therapy for the Infertile Sjoerd Repping, M.D. Male: A Critical Assessment University of Amsterdam Edmund S. Sabanegh, M.D. (Chair) Cleveland Clinic1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive SessionSociety for Male Reproduction and Urology 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • SymposiumInteractive Session Chinese Society of Reproductive MedicineAdvanced Paternal Age: Cause for SymposiumConcern? Female Fertility Preservation in China Paul J. Turek, M.D. (Chair) Zi-Jiang Chen, M.D. (Chair) Turek Clinic Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong Rebecca Z. Sokol, M.D., M.P.H. University Keck School of Medicine - University of Xiang Wang Southern California Huashan Hospital Jie Qiao, M.D., Ph.D.1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Peking University Third HospitalRoundtable Luncheons Zi-Jiang Chen, M.D. Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University Continued on Next Page... 34
  • 35. 2013 Scientific Program Daily Schedule 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Obesity and Reproduction Nurses’ Professional Group and the Pathophysiological Effects of Obesity on Society of Reproductive Biologists and Reproduction Technologists Joint Symposium7:00 am - 9:00 am To Be Determined A Review of Multi-Cell EmbryoPoster Abstract Session and Blastocyst Grading Systems: Continental Breakfast Reproductive Outcomes After Bariatric Stages, Methods, and Timing of their Surgery7:00 am - 9:00 am Cryopreservation To Be DeterminedIFFS Regional Meetings Carli W. Chapman, M.S. (Chair) Weight Management to Improve Outcomes The Rinehart Center for Reproductive MedicineIndian Society for Assisted Reproduction in Infertility Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D. Brigham and Women’s Hospital ART Center To Be Determined7:00 am - 9:00 am Barry R. Behr, Ph.D.IFFS Regional Meetings Stanford Fertility and Reproductive Medicine 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy CenterPolish Gynaecological Association Section Premature Ovarian Failure and Holly A. Hughes, B.S.N.of Fertility and Sterility Perimenopause Brigham and Women’s Hospital ART CenterReproductive Law and Art Genetic Studies in POF and Early Menopause 11:15 am - 12:45 pm9:00 am- 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 4 Joe Leigh Simpson, M.D. Scientific Program Prize Paper AbstractInternational Federation of Fertility March of Dimes Session 2Societies Jean Cohen Lecture To Be Determined Health Risks in POF and Early Menopause Bart C. Fauser, M.D., Ph.D. 11:15 am - 12:45 pm University Medical Center, Utrecht ASRM Video Session 19:45 am - 10:30 am • Plenary Lecture 5Endowed by a 2011 Gift from Camran Nezhat, M.D. Reproductive Aging and Fertility TherapyCamran Nezhat, M.D. Lecture 12:45 pm - 2:30 pm • Lunch Break Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D.Small RNAs, Stem Cells, and Self- University of California San Francisco Center forRenewal Reproductive Health 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Haifin Lin, Ph.D. (Chair) Fertility Preservation Special Interest Yale Stem Cell Center 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium Group Interactive Session Contraception Day Special Session IUDs Ovarian Stimulation Protocols in the10:30 am - 11:15 am • Breaks/Exhibits in Nulliparous Women Cancer Population Rebecca H. Allen, M.D. (Chair) Lynn M. Westphal, M.D. (Chair)11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy Brown University Stanford University IVF/ART ProgramAdhesions and Reproductive Surgery Katharine O’Connell White, M.D., Nicole L. Noyes, M.D. M.P.H. New York University School of MedicinePathophysiology and Prevention of Tufts University School of MedicineAdhesions 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Michael P. Diamond, M.D. Wayne State University 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium Society of Reproductive Biologists and Association of Reproductive Managers Technologists and the Society for MaleDecision Making in Reproductive Surgery Symposium Reproduction and Urology Interactive Luk Rombauts, Ph.D. The Integration of Mental Health Session World Endometriosis Research Foundation Professionals in the REI Practice Merits of the WHO 5th Edition SemenNew Technologies in Reproductive Surgery Andrea M. Braverman, Ph.D. (Chair) Analysis Parameters and their Predictive To Be Determined Braverman Center for Health Journeys Value for IVF Success. Thomas G. Turner, M.S. (Chair)11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium Texas Fertility Center/Austin IVFEndometrial Receptivity Mental Health Professional Group Kristen Ivani, Ph.D. Symposium Reproductive Science CenterScience of Implantation Jan Brosens, M.D., Ph.D. What’s Good for the Goose Should Also Imperial College be Good for the Gander: A Medical and 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Psychological Discussion of Differences Pediatric and Adolescent GynecologyTrophoblasts and Implantation in Donor Oocyte and Donor Sperm Special Interest Group Interactive Session Christos Coutifaris, M.D., Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania Screening, Compensation, and Matching Sexual Abuse of Children/Adolescents Linda D. Applegarth, Ed.D. (Chair) Michael J. Heard, M.D. (Chair)Hormonal Conditioning of the Endometrium Weill Medical College of Cornell University Heard Clinic Claire Bourgain, M.D. Rene Almeling, Ph.D. Vrije Universiteit Brussel Yale University 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Alice H. Ruby, M.P.H. Chinese Special Interest Group Interactive The Sperm Bank of California Session Natural Cycle and Minimal Stimulation IVF and IVM Ri-Cheng Chian, Ph.D. (Chair) McGill University Frank D. Yelian, M.D., Ph.D. Life IVF Center Continued on Next Page... 35
  • 36. 2013 Scientific Program Daily Schedule1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • SymposiumSociety for Male Reproduction and Urology Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Wednesday, October 16, 2013Interactive Session Richard S. Legro, M.D. (Chair)Physiologic Sperm Selection for ICSI: Pennsylvania State University 7:00 am - 9:00 amWhat Is It and Why Do It? 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Poster Abstract Session Denny Sakkas, Ph.D. (Chair) Continental Breakfast Yale University IVF Program Health Policy and ART Gianpiero Palermo, M.D., Ph.D. Alan H. DeCherney, M.D. (Chair) Weill Cornell Medical College National Institutes of Health 7:00 am - 9:00 am Erma Z. Drobnis, Ph.D. 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium IFFS Regional Meetings University of Missouri-Columbia Asia Pacific Initiative on Reproduction Turkish German Gynecological Education Symposium and Research Foundation1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Strategies for Implantation Disorder in ART Endometriosis Related Pain: FromImaging in Reproductive Medicine Special Bruno Lunenfeld, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair) Pathophysiology to the New TreatmentInterest Group Interactive Session Prof Emeritus Bar Ilan University, National Options University of SingaporeTo Doppler or Not to Doppler for Adnexal Yoshiharu Morimoto, M.D.Masses Center for Reproductive Medicine & Infertility 7:00 am - 9:00 am Elizabeth E. Puscheck, M.D. (Chair) Robert J. Norman, M.D. IFFS Regional Meetings Wayne State University School Of Medicine University of Adelaide The Philippine Society of Reproductive Andon Hestiantoro, M.D. Endocrinology and Infertility (PSREI)1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Division of Reproductive Immunoendocrinology REI in the Phillipine SettingSociety of Reproductive Surgeons 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Endowed by 2010 Gifts from EMD Serono, Inc., andInteractive Session the TALOFA Foundation 9:00 am - 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 7Management of Ectopic Pregnancy Howard and Georgeanna Jones American Urological Association Bruce Togus Tulandi, M.D. (Chair) Symposium on ART Stewart Memorial Lecture McGill University The Gamete and Infertility To Be Determined Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D. University of Pennsylvania Marco Conti, M.D. (Chair) University of California, San Francisco 9:45 am - 10:30 am • Plenary Lecture 81:00 pm - 2:00 pm Society for the Study of ReproductionRoundtable Luncheons 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Exchange Lecture Indian Society of Assisted Reproduction To Be Determined2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Plenary Lecture 6 SymposiumEndowed by a 1992 grant from Wyeth Optimizing ART Results: Step By Step 10:30 am - 11:15 am • Breaks/ExhibitsAmerican Society for Reproductive Hrishikesh D. Pai, M.D. (Chair) Lilavati Hospital 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • TrilogyMedicine/International Federation ofFertility Societies Plenary Joint Lecture Rishma Dhillion Pai, M.D. Fibroids Lilavati HospitalHormone Therapy During Menopause and The Science of Fibroids (Pathobiology of Jaideep Malhotra, M. D.Its Relation to Breast Cancer and Bone Malhotra Hospitals Uterine Fibroids)Health Nandita P. Palshetkar, M.D. Erica E. Marsh, M.D. Richard J. Santen, M.D. Lilavati Hospital Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University of Virginia Health System University 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Natural History of Fibroids2:30 pm - 3:15 pm Middle East Fertility Society Symposium Suresh Nair, M.D.Contraception Day Keynote Lecture High Dose Gonadotropin Stimulation for Gynecology Consultants Clinic & SurgeryHigh Hopes versus Harsh Realities: IVF: Is it Necessary and Does it have a Treatment OptionsThe Public-Health Impact of Emergency Negative Effect or Outcome? Michal Mara, M.D.Contraceptive Pills Suheil J. Muasher, M.D. (Chair) Centre for Gynaecological Endoscopy and James Trussell, M.D. Duke University Minimally Invasive Surgery Princeton University Johnny T. Awwad, M.D. American University of Beirut 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy3:15 pm - 4:00 pm • Breaks/Exhibits Fady I. Sharara, M.D. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Virginia Center for Reproductive Medicine Meiotic Errors and Polar Body Diagnosis4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Anver Kuliev, M.D.Free Communication/Oral Abstract 5:30 pm - 6:00 pm Reproductive Genetics InstituteSessions Society for Male Reproduction and Urology Minisymposium Array CGH Can Sperm Contribute to Poor Embryo Dagan Wells, Ph.D.4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Reprogenetics-UKEndometriosis Quality? The Role of Sperm RNA Robert N. Taylor, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair) Steven Krawetz, Ph.D. Does PGD Improve Live Birth Rates? Emory University Wayne State University Luca Gianaroli, M.D. Società Italiana Studi di Medicina della 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm • Members’ Meetings Riproduzione Continued on Next Page... 36
  • 37. 2013 Scientific Program Daily Schedule11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 1:00 pm - 2:00 pmMultiple Pregnancy (Evidence-based Scientific Program Prize Paper Session 3 Roundtable LuncheonsPractice)Embryo Selection 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Plenary Lecture 9 Arne Sunde, M.D. ASRM Video Session 2 Endowed by a 1990 grant from TAP Pharmaceutical St. Olav’s Hospital Herbert H. Thomas Lecture 12:45 pm - 2:30 pm • Lunch Break The Effect of ART and IVF on EpigeneticSingle-Blastocyst Transfer Programming in the Embryo Osamu Ishihara, M.D., Ph.D. Saitama Medical University 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Renee A. Reijo Pera, Ph.D. Stanford University Regenerative Medicine and Stem CellEconomics in the Development of Embryo Biology Special Interest Group InteractiveTransfer Policies 3:15 pm - 4:00 pm • Breaks/Exhibits Session G. David Adamson, M.D. Fertility Physicians of Northern California Properties of Spermatogonial Stem Cells 3:15 pm - 6:00 pm To Be Determined IFFS General Assembly11:15 am - 12:45 pm • TrilogySafety in ART 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session 4:00 pm - 6:00 pmTowards an Ovarian Hyperstimulation Nutrition Special Interest Group Interactive Free Communication/Oral AbstractSyndrome-free Clinic Session Sessions Edgar V. Mocanu, M.D. Interactive Roles of Nutrition and Medicine Hari Unit Rotunda Hospital and the Importance of Taking Into Account 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium a Patient’s Nutritional Status Prior toLaboratory Procedures Confounding European Society for Human Reproduction Medical Management of DiseaseSafety Analysis and Embryology Symposium Kaylon L. Bruner-Tran, Ph.D. (Chair) Markus Montag, M.D. Vanderbilt University Medical Center To Be Determined University of Bonn Dian Shepperson-Mills, M.A.The Outcomes for Children Following Endometriosis and Fertility Clinic 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • SymposiumInfertility Management Latin American Association for Richard Kennedy, M.D. 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Reproductive Medicine Symposium University Hospital Society of Reproductive Surgeons To Be Determined Interactive Session11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium To Be Determined 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • SymposiumAssociation of Reproductive Managers Peter Chan, M.D. (Chair) Fertility PreservationSymposium McGill University Teresa K. Woodruff, Ph.D. (Chair)The Best Defense is a Strong Offense: Northwestern UniversityPrevention 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session Kutluk Oktay, M.D. Health Disparities Special Interest Group New York Medical College Rita Gruber, B.A. (Chair) Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Interactive Session Johan E. Smitz, M.D. Jersey Laboratory for Hormonology and Clinical Biological, Social and Environmental Chemistry Disparities in Reproduction11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium Gloria Richard-Davis, M.D. (Chair)Mental Health Professional Group 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Meharry Medical CollegeSymposium Assessment of Embryo and Blastocyst Ayman Al-Hendy, M.D., Ph.D.Developments in Egg Freezing: Medical, Meharry Medical College QualityPsychological and Ethical Perspectives Victor Y. Fujimoto, M.D. Barry R. Behr, Ph.D. (Chair) University of California, San Francisco Stanford Fertility and Reproductive Medicine Julianne E. Zweifel, Ph.D. (Chair) Center University of Wisconsin Lisa Schuman, L.C.S.W. 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive Session 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York Contraception Special Interest Group Alan B. Copperman, M.D. Ken Ryan Ethics Symposium Interactive Session Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York Moving Innovations to Practice Hormonal Contraception and Thrombosis Andrea M. Braverman, M.D. To Be Determined Risk: A Debate Braverman Center for Health Journeys Michael A. Thomas, M.D. (Chair) Center for Reproductive Health11:15 am - 12:45 pm • SymposiumNurses’ Professional Group Symposium 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm • Interactive SessionRisk Management for Nurses: Don’t Make Nurses’ Professional Group Interactiveit Risky Session Jeanette Rodriquez, M.S., R.N.C. Current Trends with Endometriosis (Chair) Management Cornell University Tamara M. Tobias, N.P. (Chair) Margaret Swain, R.N., J.D. Seattle Reproductive Medicine Private Practice, Baltimore Paul C. Lin, M.D. Sharon G. Edwards, R.N. Seattle Reproductive Medicine Boston IVF Continued on Next Page... 37
  • 38. 2013 Scientific Program Daily Schedule4:00 pm - 6:00 pm • Symposium 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • TrilogyPhysiology of the Oocyte and Embryo: Thursday, October 17, 2013 Optimizing ART Outcomes / Evidence-From Reproductive Biology to based MedicineReproductive Medicine Chasing the Holy Grail of Pregnancy Rates 7:00 am - 9:00 amA Celebration of Professor John D. - at the Expense of Safety? Poster Abstract SessionBiggers Continental Breakfast Paul Devroey, M.D., Ph.D. Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D. (Chair) UZ Brussel Brigham and Women’s Hospital ART Center 7:00 am - 9:00 am Systemic Reviews: Building Blocks for the John Eppig, Ph.D. Jackson Laboratory IFFS Regional Meetings Best Practice of ART David Whittingham, Ph.D. Asociación LatinoAmericana de Medicina Cynthia Farquhar, M.D., M.P.H. Reproductive (ALMER) and Sociedad Auckland Gynaecology Group St. George’s, University of London Ginny Papaioannou, Ph.D. Argentina de Medicina Reproductiva Translating Evidence into Practice Columbia University (SAMeR) Sudhindra M. Bhattacharya, M.B.B.S. Jay Baltz, Ph.D. Men and ART, What is New? KPC Medical College Ottawa Hospital Research Institute 7:00 am - 9:00 am 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • IFFS Surveillance5:30 pm - 6:00 pm IFFS Regional MeetingsSociety for Male Reproduction and Arab Associations of OBGYN Societies 11:15 am - 12:45 pmUrology Minisymposium Pan Arab Fertility Meeting AAGL Film Festival Video SessionWhere Are We With Germ Line (Spermand Eggs) Stem Cells? 9:00 am - 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 10 12:45 pm - 1:00 pm • Break Amander Clark, Ph.D. Endowed by a 1990 grant from Astra-Zeneca University of California, Los Angeles Stem Cells in Endometrium and 1:00 pm - 1:45 pm • Plenary Lecture 11 Endometriosis Endowed by a 1992 grant from EMD Serono, Inc.6:00 pm - 7:00 pm • Members’ Meetings Hugh S. Taylor, M.D. Mechanisms of Energy Expenditure in Yale University School of Medicine Embryos7:00 pm - 11:00 pm • IFFS/ASRM Gala Kelle H. Moley, M.D.Museum Night at the Museum of Science 9:45 am - 10:30 am Washington University ASRM Members’ Meeting 1:45 pm - 2:30 pm Summary of Meeting 10:30 am - 11:15 am • Breaks/Exhibits Awards/Closing Ceremony 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy Toxicants and Reproduction The Testis Jorma Toppari, M.D., Ph.D. University of Turku The Ovary Robert F. Casper, M.D. Toronto Centre for Advanced Reproductive Technology Toxicants in Pregnancy and Neonatal Outcome Tracey Woodruff, M.D., M.P.H. University of California, San Francisco 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Trilogy Contemporary Approaches to PCOS Management (PCOS Update) Genetics of PCOS Zi-Jiang Chen, M.D. Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University Global Differences in Presentation of PCOS Fahrettin Kelestimur, M.D. Erciyes University Medical School Management of PCOS Basil C. Tarlatzis, M.D., Ph.D. University of Thessaloniki 38
  • 39. MENOPAUSE DAYMONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Lubna Pal, M.B.B.S., M.Sc. (Chair) Menopause Day Symposium - Focus on Psychological Well-being in Aging Women JoAnn E. Manson, M.D., M.P.H. Yale University Nanette F. Santoro, M.D. Harvard School of Public Health Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D. University of Colorado, Denver University of California San Francisco Center for Reproductive Health 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Menopause Day Interactive Session - Cognitive Issues and Sleep Concerns: Melissa Wellons, M.D. (Chair) Hormones, Aging, or Both? Pauline Maki, Ph.D. University of Alabama at Birmingham Hadine Joffe, M.D., M.Sc. University of Illinois at Chicago Harvard Medical School 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Sandra A. Carson, M.D. (Chair) Menopause Day Symposium - Aging and Sexuality Women and Infants Hospital 39
  • 40. SURGERY DAYMONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 7:00 am - 9:00 am Hands-on Robotic Surgery Intensive 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Society of Reproductive Surgeons Telesurgery Complex Endometriosis Surgery 1:00 pm - 2:45 pm Surgical Tutorial Interactive Video: Tubal and Adnexal Surgery 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Surgery Day Debate Jeffrey M. Goldberg, M.D. (Chair) Pros and Cons of Robotics in Benign Gynecology Cleveland Clinic 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm Plenary Lecture 3 Keith B. Isaacson, M.D. Society of Reproductive Surgeons Lecture - Modern Hysteroscopy Newton Wellesley Hospital 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Symposium Samantha M. Pfeifer, M.D. (Chair) Surgery Day Symposium - Congenital Müllerian Anomalies Sara Y. Brucker, M.D. University of Pennsylvania Marjan Attaran, M.D. Turbingen University Hospital Assia A. Stepanian, M.D. Cleveland Clinic Center for Women’s Core and Reproductive Surgery 40
  • 41. CONTRACEPTION DAYTUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2013 11:15 am - 12:45 pm • Symposium Contraception Day Special Session Rebecca H. Allen, M.D. (Chair) IUDs in Nulliparous Women Katharine O’Connell White, M.D., M.P.H. Brown University Tufts University School of Medicine 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Contraception Day Keynote Lecture High Hopes versus Harsh Realities: James Trussell, M.D. The Public-Health Impact of Emergency Contraceptive Pills Princeton University Check in at www.asrm.org for upcoming 2013Spouse/Guest Program Announcements! 41
  • 42. Plenary Sessions Monday, October 14, 2013 9:00 - 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 1 Endowed by a 1987 grant from Ortho Women’s Health American Society for Reproductive Medicine President’s Guest Lecture Chromosome Ends: Why We Care About Them Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco 9:45 am - 10:30 am • Plenary Lecture 2 International Federation of Fertility Societies DeWatteville Lecture To Be Determined 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Plenary Lecture 3 Endowed by a 1999 grant from Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Society of Reproductive Surgeons Lecture Modern Hysteroscopy Keith B. Isaacson, M.D. Newton Wellesley Hospital Tuesday, October 15, 2013 9:00 am- 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 4 International Federation of Fertility Societies Jean Cohen Lecture To Be Determined 9:45 am - 10:30 am • Plenary Lecture 5 Endowed by a 2011 Gift from Camran Nezhat, M.D. Camran Nezhat, M.D., Lecture Small RNAs, Stem Cells, and Self-Renewal Haifin Lin, Ph.D. (Chair) Yale Stem Cell Center 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Plenary Lecture 6 Endowed by a 1992 grant from WyethAmerican Society for Reproductive Medicine/International Federation of Fertility Societies Joint Plenary LectureHormone Therapy During Menopause and Its Relation to Breast Cancer and Bone Health Richard J. Santen, M.D. University of Virginia Health System 42
  • 43. Plenary Sessions Wednesday, October 16, 2013 9:00 am - 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 7 American Urological Association Bruce Stewart Memorial Lecture To Be Determined 9:45 am - 10:30 am • Plenary Lecture 8 Society for the Study of Reproduction Exchange Lecture To Be Determined 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm • Plenary Lecture 9 Endowed by a 1990 grant from TAP Pharmaceutical Herbert H. Thomas LectureThe Effect of ART and IVF on Epigenetic Programming in the Embryo Renee A. Reijo Pera, Ph.D. Stanford University Thursday, October 17, 2013 9:00 am - 9:45 am • Plenary Lecture 10 Endowed by a 1990 grant from Astra-Zeneca Stem Cells in Endometrium and Endometriosis Hugh S. Taylor, M.D. Yale University School of Medicine 1:00 pm - 1:45 pm • Plenary Lecture 11 Endowed by a 1992 grant from EMD Serono, Inc. Mechanisms of Energy Expenditure in Embryos Kelle H. Moley, M.D. Washington University 43
  • 44. Trilogies Monday, October 14, 2013 Endometriosis 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Genetics and Epigenetics of Endometriosis Grant Montgomery, M.D. Queensland Institute of Medical Research Clinical Applications of Stem Cells Hugh S. Taylor, M.D. Yale University The Management of Pelvic Pain with Infertility Mauricio S. Abrao, M.D. São Paulo University Female Fertility Preservation 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Fundamentals of Cryobiology Claus Yding Andersen, M.Sc., D.M.Sc. University Hospital of CopenhagenContemporary Approaches to Ovarian Tissue and Oocyte Cryopreservation Jacques G. Donnez, M.D. Université Catholique de Lourain Clinical Application of Fertility Preservation Mitchell P. Rosen, M.D. University of California San Francisco Center for Reproductive Health Contraception 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Male Contraception Regine L. Sitruk-Ware, M.D. The Population Council Evaluation of New Approaches to Female Contraception Narendra Malhotra, M.D. Malhotra Hospitals Global Perspectives on Contraception To Be Determined 44
  • 45. Trilogies Monday, October 14, 2013 ART in the Developing World 11:15 am - 12:45 pmAccess to Reproductive Medicine in the Developing World Willem Ombelet, M.D., Ph.D. University of Genk Cost Effective Protocol in IVF Korula George, M.D. Bangalore Baptist HospitalInnovative Laboratory Practice for Developing Countries To Be Determined Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Adhesions and Reproductive Surgery 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Pathophysiology and Prevention of Adhesions Michael P. Diamond, M.D. Wayne State University Decision Making in Reproductive Surgery Luk Rombauts, Ph.D. World Endometriosis Research Foundation New Technologies in Reproductive Surgery To Be Determined Endometrial Receptivity 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Science of Implantation Jan Brosens, M.D., Ph.D. Imperial College Trophoblasts and Implantation Christos Coutifaris, M.D., Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania Hormonal Conditioning of the Endometrium Claire Bourgain, M.D. Vrije Universiteit Brussel 45
  • 46. Trilogies Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Obesity and Reproduction 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Pathophysiological Effects of Obesity on Reproduction To Be Determined Reproductive Outcomes After Bariatric Surgery To Be Determined Weight Management to Improve Outcomes in Infertility Lisa Moran, Ph.D. University of Adelaide Premature Ovarian Failure and Perimenopause 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Genetic Studies in POF and Early Menopause Joe Leigh Simpson, M.D. March of Dimes Health Risks in POF and Early Menopause Bart C. Fauser, M.D., Ph.D. University Medical Center, Utrecht Reproductive Aging and Fertility Therapy Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D.University of California San Francisco Center for Reproductive Health 46
  • 47. Trilogies Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Fibroids 11:15 am - 12:45 pm The Science of Fibroids (Pathobiology of Uterine Fibroids) Erica E. Marsh, M.D. Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University Natural History of Fibroids Suresh Nair, M.D. Gynecology Consultants Clinic & Surgery Treatment Options Michal Mara, M.D.Centre for Gynaecological Endoscopy and Minimally Invasive Surgery Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Meiotic Errors and Polar Body Diagnosis Anver Kuliev, M.D. Reproductive Genetics Institute Array CGH Dagan Wells, Ph.D. Reprogenetics-UK Does PGD Improve Live Birth Rates? Luca Gianaroli, M.D. Società Italiana Studi di Medicina della Riproduzione Multiple Pregnancy (Evidence-based Practice) 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Embryo Selection Arne Sunde, M.D. St. Olav’s Hospital Single-Blastocyst Transfer Osamu Ishihara, M.D., Ph.D. Saitama Medical University Economics in the Development of Embryo Transfer Policies G. David Adamson, M.D. Fertility Physicians of Northern California 47
  • 48. Trilogies Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Safety in ART 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Towards an Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome-free Clinic Edgar V. Mocanu, M.D. Hari Unit Rotunda Hospital Laboratory Procedures Confounding Safety Analysis Markus Montag, M.D. University of Bonn The Outcomes for Children Following Infertility Management Richard Kennedy, M.D. University Hospital Thursday, October 17, 2013 Toxicants and Reproduction 11:15 am - 12:45 pm The Testis Jorma Toppari, M.D., Ph.D. University of Turku The Ovary Robert F. Casper, M.D. Toronto Centre for Advanced Reproductive Technology Toxicants in Pregnancy and Neonatal Outcome Tracey Woodruff, M.D., M.P.H. University of California, San FranciscoContemporary Approaches to PCOS Management (PCOS Update) 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Genetics of PCOS Zi-Jiang Chen, M.D. Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University Global Differences in Presentation of PCOS Fahrettin Kelestimur, M.D. Erciyes University Medical School Management of PCOS Basil C. Tarlatzis, M.D., Ph.D. University of Thessaloniki 48
  • 49. Trilogies Thursday, October 17, 2013 Optimizing ART Outcomes / Evidence-based Medicine 11:15 am - 12:45 pmChasing the Holy Grail of Pregnancy Rates - at the Expense of Safety? Paul Devroey, M.D., Ph.D. UZ Brussel Systemic Reviews: Building Blocks for the Best Practice of ART Cynthia Farquhar, M.D., M.P.H. Auckland Gynaecology Group Translating Evidence into Practice Sudhindra M. Bhattacharya, M.B.B.S. KPC Medical College 49
  • 50. ASRM Morning Symposia Monday Tuesday Wednesday, October 14, 2013 October 15, 2013 October 16, 2013 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Menopause Day Symposium Contraception Day Special Session Association of ReproductiveFocus on Psychological Well-being IUDs in Nulliparous Women Managers Symposium in Aging Women Rebecca H. Allen, M.D. (Chair) The Best Defense is a Strong Lubna Pal, M.B.B.S., M.Sc. (Chair) Brown University Offense: Prevention Yale University Katharine O’Connell White, M.D., Rita Gruber, B.A. (Chair) JoAnn E. Manson, M.D., M.P.H. M.P.H. Reproductive Medicine Associates of Harvard School of Public Health Tufts University School of Medicine New Jersey Nanette F. Santoro, M.D. University of Colorado, Denver 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D. Association of Reproductive Mental Health Professional Group University of CaliforniaSan Francisco Center for Reproductive Health Managers Symposium Symposium The Integration of Mental Health Developments in Egg Freezing: 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Professionals in the REI Practice Medical, Psychological and Ethical Association of Reproductive Andrea M. Braverman, Ph.D. (Chair) Perspectives Braverman Center for Health Journeys Julianne E. Zweifel, Ph.D. (Chair) Managers Symposium University of Wisconsin Delivery of Outstanding Service: 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Lisa Schuman, L.C.S.W. What We Can Learn from Mental Health Professional Group Reproductive Medicine Associates of Corporate America Symposium New York Joseph J. Travia, Jr., B.S., M.B.A. What’s Good for the Goose Should Alan B. Copperman, M.D. (Chair) Reproductive Medicine Associates of Also be Good for the Gander: New York IntegraMed A Medical and Psychological Andrea M. Braverman, M.D. Discussion of Differences in Braverman Center for Health Journeys 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Donor Oocyte and Donor Sperm Mental Health Professional Screening, Compensation, and 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Group Symposium Matching Nurses’ Professional GroupChallenges and Controversies in Linda D. Applegarth, Ed.D. (Chair) SymposiumProviding Fertility Preservation to Weill Medical College of Cornell University Risk Management for Nurses: Cancer Patients Rene Almeling, Ph.D. Don’t Make it Risky Elizabeth A. Grill, Psy.D. (Chair) Yale University Jeanette Rodriquez, M.S., R.N.C. The Center for Reproductive Medicine and Alice H. Ruby, M.P.H. Infertility (Chair) The Sperm Bank of California Cornell University Melissa B. Brisman, J.D. Surrogate Fund Management, LLC Margaret Swain, R.N., J.D. 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Private Practice, Baltimore Glenn L. Schattman, M.D. Nurses’ Professional Group and Weill Medical College of Sharon G. Edwards, R.N. the Society of Reproductive Boston IVF Cornell University Biologists and Technologists Joint 11:15 am - 12:45 pm Symposium A Review of Multi-Cell Nurses’ Professional Group Embryo and Blastocyst Grading Symposium Systems: Stages, Methods, and Research and the Nurse Timing of their Cryopreservation Cynthia F. Willson, B.S.N. (Chair) Carli W. Chapman, M.S. (Chair) Pacific Fertility The Rinehart Center for Reproductive Medicine Patricia Herschberger, Ph.D. Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Chicago Brigham and Women’s Hospital ART Center Monica R. Benson, B.S.N., R.N. Barry R. Behr, Ph.D. (Chair) Reproductive Medicine Associates of Stanford Fertility and Reproductive Medicine New Jersey Center Holly A. Hughes, B.S.N. Brigham and Women’s Hospital ART Center 50
  • 51. ASRM Afternoon Symposia 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Monday Endowed by a 2011 Gift from the Asia-Pacific Tuesday Biomedical Research Foundation October 14, 2013 KY Cha Symposium in Stem Cell October 15, 2013 Technology and Reproductive 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Medicine 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Menopause Day Symposium Uterine Stem Cells Symposium Aging and Sexuality Carlos A. Simon, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair) Endometriosis Sandra A. Carson, M.D. (Chair) Fundacion IVI, University of Valencia Robert N. Taylor, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair) Women and Infants Hospital Erin F. Wolff, M.D. Emory University National Institutes of Health 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Robert J. Casper, M.D. 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Surgery Day Symposium Toronto Centre for Advanced Reproductive Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Technology Congenital Müllerian Anomalies Richard S. Legro, M.D. (Chair) Samantha M. Pfeifer, M.D. (Chair) Pennsylvania State University University of Pennsylvania 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Sara Y. Brucker, M.D. Mexican Association of 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Turbingen University Hospital Reproductive Medicine Symposium Health Policy and ART Marjan Attaran, M.D. To Be Determined Alan H. DeCherney, M.D. (Chair) Cleveland Clinic National Institutes of Health Assia A. Stepanian, M.D. Center for Women’s Core and Reproductive Surgery 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Asia Pacific Initiative on 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Reproduction Symposium Uterine Function and Dysfunction Strategies for Implantation Hilary O.D. Critchley, M.D. (Chair) Disorder in ART University of Edinburgh Bruno Lunenfeld, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair) Prof Emeritus Bar Ilan University, National University of Singapore 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Yoshiharu Morimoto, M.D.Lifestyle Factors and Reproductive Center for Reproductive Medicine Health: What Matters? & Infertility Stacey A. Missmer, D.Sc. (Chair) Robert J. Norman, M.D. Harvard Medical School University of Adelaide Andon Hestiantoro, M.D. 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Division of Reproductive Immunoendocrinology Empiric Medical Therapy for theInfertile Male: A Critical Assessment 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Endowed by 2010 Gifts from EMD Serono, Inc., Edmund S. Sabanegh, M.D. (Chair) and the TALOFA Foundation Cleveland Clinic Howard and Georgeanna Jones 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Symposium on ART Chinese Society of Reproductive The Gamete and Infertility Medicine Symposium Marco Conti, M.D. (Chair) University of California, San Francisco Female Fertility Preservation in China 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Zi-Jiang Chen, M.D. (Chair) Indian Society of Assisted Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University Reproduction Symposium Xiang Wang Optimizing ART Results: Step By Huashan Hospital Step Jie Qiao, M.D., Ph.D. Hrishikesh D. Pai, M.D. (Chair) Peking University Third Hospital Lilavati Hospital Rishma Dhillion Pai, M.D. Lilavati Hospital Jaideep Malhotra, M. D. Malhotra Hospitals Continued on Next Page... 51
  • 52. ASRM Afternoon Symposia 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Middle East Fertility Society Wednesday Symposium October 16, 2013 High Dose GonadotropinStimulation for IVF: Is it Necessary 4:00 pm - 6:00 pmand Does it have a Negative Effect European Society for Human or Outcome? Reproduction and Embryology Suheil J. Muasher, M.D. (Chair) Duke University Symposium Johnny T. Awwad, M.D. To Be Determined American University of Beirut Fady I. Sharara, M.D. 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Virginia Center for Reproductive Medicine Latin American Association for Reproductive Medicine Symposium To Be Determined 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Fertility Preservation Teresa K. Woodruff, Ph.D. (Chair) Northwestern University Johan E. Smitz, M.D. Laboratory for Hormonology and Clinical Chemistry 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Assessment of Embryo and Blastocyst Quality Barry R. Behr, Ph.D. (Chair) Stanford Fertility and Reproductive Medicine Center 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Ken Ryan Ethics Symposium Moving Innovations to Practice To Be Determined 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Physiology of the Oocyte and Embryo: From Reproductive Biology to Reproductive Medicine A Celebration of Professor John D. Biggers Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D. (Chair) Brigham and Women’s Hospital ART Center John Eppig, Ph.D. Jackson Laboratory David Whittingham, Ph.D. St. George’s, University of London Ginny Papaioannou, Ph.D. Columbia University Jay Baltz, Ph.D. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute 52
  • 53. Interactive Sessions Monday, October 14, 2013 g 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Menopause Day Interactive Session Cognitive Issues and Sleep Concerns: Hormones, Aging, or Both? Melissa Wellons, M.D. (Chair) University of Alabama at Birmingham Pauline Maki, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Chicago Hadine Joffe, M.D., M.Sc. Harvard Medical School Environment and Reproduction Special Interest Group Interactive Session Reproductive Health Issues in the Environment Susan H. Benoff, Ph.D. (Chair) North Shore-Long Island Jewish Research Institute Androgen Excess Special Interest Group Interactive Session Hirsutism Treatment Frank Gonzalez, M.D. (Chair) Indiana University School of Medicine Daniel A. Dumesic, M.D. University of California, Los AngelesNurses’ Professional Group and the Mental Health Professional Group Interactive Session Nursing and Mental Health Care for the Infertile Male Dana A. Ohl, M.D. (Chair) University of Michigan Susanne Quallich, N.P. University of Michigan William D. Petok, Ph.D. Private Practice, Baltimore Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Interactive Session Multiple Pregnancies: Risks and Benefits Glenn L. Schattman, M.D. (Chair) Weill Medical College of Cornell University Eric S. Surrey, M.D. Colorado Center for Reproductive MedicineRegenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology Special Interest Group Interactive Session Biology of Male Germ Cell Differentiation Sherman J. Silber, M.D. (Chair) Infertility Center of St. Louis Ans M. M. van Pelt, Ph.D. University of Amsterdam Sjoerd Repping, M.D. University of Amsterdam 53
  • 54. Interactive Sessions Monday, October 14, 2013 g 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Society for Male Reproduction and Urology Interactive Session Advanced Paternal Age: Cause for Concern? Paul J. Turek, M.D. (Chair) Turek Clinic Rebecca Z. Sokol, M.D., M.P.H. Keck School of Medicine - University of Southern California Tuesday, October 15, 2013 g 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Fertility Preservation Special Interest Group Interactive Session Ovarian Stimulation Protocols in the Cancer Population Lynn M. Westphal, M.D. (Chair) Stanford University IVF/ART Program Nicole L. Noyes, M.D. New York University School of Medicine Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists and the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology Interactive Session Merits of the WHO 5th Edition Semen Analysis Parameters and their Predictive Value for IVF Success. Thomas G. Turner, M.S. (Chair) Texas Fertility Center/Austin IVF Kristen Ivani, Ph.D. Reproductive Science CenterPediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Special Interest Group Interactive Session Sexual Abuse of Children/Adolescents Michael J. Heard, M.D. (Chair) Heard Clinic Chinese Special Interest Group Interactive Session Natural Cycle and Minimal Stimulation IVF and IVM Ri-Cheng Chian, Ph.D. (Chair) McGill University Frank D. Yelian, M.D., Ph.D. Life IVF Center Society for Male Reproduction and Urology Interactive Session Physiologic Sperm Selection for ICSI: What Is It and Why Do It? Denny Sakkas, Ph.D. (Chair) Yale University IVF Program Gianpiero Palermo, M.D., Ph.D. Weill Cornell Medical College Erma Z. Drobnis, Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia 54
  • 55. Interactive Sessions Tuesday, October 15, 2013 g 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Imaging in Reproductive Medicine Special Interest Group Interactive Session To Doppler or Not to Doppler for Adnexal Masses Elizabeth E. Puscheck, M.D. (Chair) Wayne State University School Of Medicine Society of Reproductive Surgeons Interactive Session Management of Ectopic Pregnancy Togus Tulandi, M.D. (Chair) McGill University Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D. University of Pennsylvania Wednesday, October 16, 2013 g 1:00 pm - 2:00 pmRegenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology Special Interest Group Interactive Session Properties of Spermatogonial Stem Cells To Be Determined Nutrition Special Interest Group Interactive Session Interactive Roles of Nutrition and Medicine and the Importance of Taking Into Account a Patient’s Nutritional Status Prior to Medical Management of Disease Kaylon L. Bruner-Tran, Ph.D. (Chair) Vanderbilt University Medical Center Dian Shepperson-Mills, M.A. Endometriosis and Fertility Clinic Society of Reproductive Surgeons Interactive Session To Be Determined Peter Chan, M.D. (Chair) McGill University Health Disparities Special Interest Group Interactive Session Biological, Social and Environmental Disparities in Reproduction Gloria Richard-Davis, M.D. (Chair) Meharry Medical College Ayman Al-Hendy, M.D., Ph.D. Meharry Medical College Victor Y. Fujimoto, M.D. University of California, San Francisco Contraception Special Interest Group Interactive Session Hormonal Contraception and Thrombosis Risk: A Debate Michael A. Thomas, M.D. (Chair) University of Cincinnati 55
  • 56. Interactive Sessions Wednesday, October 16, 2013 g 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Nurses’ Professional Group Interactive Session Current Trends with Endometriosis Management Tamara M. Tobias, N.P. (Chair) Seattle Reproductive Medicine Paul C. Lin, M.D. Seattle Reproductive Medicine SOCIETY FOR MALE REPRODUCTION AND UROLOGY MINISYMPOSIA Monday, October 14, 2013 Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 5:30 pm - 6:00 pm 5:30 pm - 6:00 pm 5:30 pm - 6:00 pm How to Get a Walrus Can Sperm Contribute to Where Are We With GermPregnant: A Proven Recipe Poor Embryo Quality? Line (Sperm and Eggs) Stem Holley Muraco, B.S. The Role of Sperm RNA Cells?Vallejo Six Flags Discovery Kingdom Steven Krawetz, Ph.D. Amander Clark, Ph.D. Wayne State University University of California, Los Angeles VIDEO SESSIONS Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Thursday, October 17, 2013 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 11:15 am - 12:45 pm 11:15 am - 12:45 pm ASRM Video Session 1 ASRM Video Session 2 AAGL Film Festival Video Session 56
  • 57. T HE DATES & JOIN VE US SA A joint meeting of the European Society of Human ! Reproduction and Embryology and the American Society for Reproductive MedicineTHE BEST OF ESHRE & ASRM March 6-10, 2013 Atlantis, Paradise Island, Bahamas Registration and program details available in July 2012 at www.asrm.org
  • 58. 15 Reasons to Join ASRM Today T housands of doctors, nurses, and other professionals in the field of reproductive medicine are enjoying the benefits of ASRM membership. If you want to advance your career with the latest news, continuing education, discounts, and networking opportunities, here are some of the reasons you should join: News and Education Specials and Discounts• Access to cutting-edge research in the • Savings of at least $200 at the ASRM Society’s peer-reviewed journals, Fertility Annual Meeting and Sterility and the Journal of Assisted • Discounts on CME, CE, and PEER credits Reproduction and Genetics through ASRM eLearn™• Electronic bulletins from our Washington • Promotional rates on products and services D.C. office that help you stay up to date on for ASRM members only the latest reproductive health policy news• Access to printable Practice Guidelines and Online Resources Ethics Statements for Members Only Professional Development • A one-stop ASRM member profile to and Recognition help you track meetings, activities, learning, and financial transactions• Opportunities for continuing medical • Full access to the ASRM Membership education in-person and online Directory• Input into shaping policies and protocols • Access to ASRM’s Career Center to help you through Affiliated Societies, Special Interest find qualified job candidates while enjoying Groups, and Professional Groups member discounts on job postings—or to• Networking opportunities including online help you find that perfect job! listservs and small group meetings • Full text access to ASRM journals and• Eligibility to receive ASRM research grants newsletters online and awards • Answers to CPT coding questions at the Coding Corner Join ASRM today! • Visit us online at www.asrm.org. • Phone us at + 1-205-978-5000. • Email us at asrm@asrm.org. • Or visit us at the ASRM booth during our Annual Meeting or at other selected meetings throughout the year.
  • 59. American Society for Reproductive Medicine For more information on Writing the Next Chapter funding opportunities, please contact: Write the Next Chapter Pam Nagel O ur Fund Development Initiative is a great ASRM Director of Society Advancement 1209 Montgomery Highway opportunity for you to step up and become a Birmingham, AL 35216 donor and a Champion for the American Society for 205-978-5000 Ext 121 • pnagel@asrm.org Reproductive Medicine. As remarkable as the advances in reproductive medicine have been over the last 68 years, we believe the Next Chapter has the potential to yield even more innovation. Advancing reproductive medicine through education, research and advocacy ASRM Membership Pays for Itself! With the savings and benefits ASRM members receive, it’s only a matter of time before your membership pays for itself. Member discounts on meetings, subscriptions, and continuing education credits can add up to more than $1,000 a year.Free print and online subscriptions to Fertility and Sterility Up to $578Member discount on ASRM eLearn™ Up to $200Member discount on ASRM Annual Meeting Scientific Program Up to $275Member discount on ASRM Annual Meeting Postgraduate Courses Up to $80 per courseMember discount rate for posting positions on the ASRM Career Center Up to $113 per postingTotal Value More than $1,000 annually Membership also offers savings on patient forms and booklets, ASRM-branded keepsakes, and much more. Given all this value, ASRM membership is an easy financial decision to make. Join online at www.asrm.org. 59
  • 60. AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE Non-Profit Org.1209 MONTGOMERY HIGHWAY U.S. PostageBIRMINGHAM, AL 35216-2809 PAID Permit No. 1547 Birmingham, AL 60