Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
2013 CNS Annual Meeting
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

2013 CNS Annual Meeting

1,778

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,778
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PRELIMINARY PROGRAM Advance Registration Deadline: September 19, 2013
  • 2. PRESIDENT’SMESSAGE TABLE OF CONTENTS annual Meeting at-a-glance 2 Continuing Medical education 4 Honored guests 8 Featured speakers 11 annual Meeting leadership 16 Committees 18 scientific program innovation & technology symposia 20 saturday 24 sunday 28 Monday 34 tuesday 44 Wednesday 54 registration information 62 Hotel information 63 general information 66 exhibitors 68 Welcome to our colleagues from the chinese Neurosurgical Society, a branch of the chinese Medical Association – our international partner for the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting! The purpose of the 2013 Annual Meeting of the congress of Neurological Surgeons is to address neurosurgery’s practice gaps and underlying educational needs in multiple areas, including Spine, cerebrovascular, Pediatrics, Tumor, Trauma, Stereotactic and functional and Pain. The program reflects the diversity of these subspecialities as well as other general neurosurgery needs and interests. Who Should Attend Neurological surgeons, neurosurgery nurses, physician assistants, orthopedic surgeons, primary care physicians, gerontologists, radiologists, hospital administrators, oncologists, neurologists, pediatricians, physiatrists, and infectious disease specialists are welcome and encouraged to attend the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting. PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE On behalf of the congress of Neurological Surgeons Executive committee; the Scientific Program committee; and our 2013 cNS honored guests Dr. l. Nelson hopkins, Dr. Johannes Schramm, and Dr. Andrew kaye, i invite you to join us for this year’s cNS Annual Meeting in San francisco, california, October 19-23. Our theme for the meeting is the Evolution of Neurosurgery. focusing on exploring the past, present, and future of neurosurgery, our theme takes an in-depth look at how far we have come, where we are, and what is to come next. Our daily general Scientific Sessions have been restructured, delivering a more dynamic format that features an anatomy lesson, platform debates on controversial topics, and talks by authors of some of the top papers published in Neurosurgery® in the past year. We will also be recognizing the contributions and achievements of our three honored guests, in addition to enjoying presentations by our outstanding lineup of featured speakers. The cNS Annual Meeting provides a venue to reconnect and share knowledge with colleagues and friends from around the world, as well as explore opportunities to enhance your skill set, help your practice, and improve patient care. We anticipate that this year’s Annual Meeting will be one of the largest cNS gatherings in history as we host our colleagues from the chinese Neurosurgical Society, our 2013 international partner organization. With its new and evolved format, the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting will be unlike any other neurosurgical conference. This is one meeting you won’t want to miss! i invite you to join me in ‘The city by the bay’ for the Evolution of Neurosurgery. Registration is available online at www.cns.org – be sure to reserve your spot soon for this outstanding neurosurgical event. Sincerely, Ali r. rezai, MD cNS President some of the top papers published in Neurosurgery® in the past year. We will also be recognizing theNeurosurgery® in the past year. We will also be recognizing theNeurosurgery contributions and achievements of our three honored guests, in addition to enjoying presentations by our outstanding lineup of featured speakers. The cNS Annual Meeting provides a venue to reconnect and share knowledge with colleagues and friends from around the world, as well as explore opportunities to enhance your skill set, help your practice, and improve patient care. We anticipate that this year’s Annual Meeting will be one of the largest cNS gatherings in history as we host our colleagues from the chinese Neurosurgical Society, our 2013 international partner organization. With its new and evolved format, the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting will be unlike any other neurosurgical conference. This is one meeting you won’t want to miss! i invite you to join me in Evolution of Neurosurgery. Registration is available online at www.cns.org – be sure to reserve your spot soon for this outstanding neurosurgical event. Ali r. rezai, MD cNS President Ali r. rezai, MDAli r. rezai, MD 1Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 3. 2013AT-A-GLANCE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:00 aM–5:00 pM syM01: neurosurgery innovations syM02: traumatic Head injury 8:00 aM–4:00 pM full Day Practical courses (Pc01–Pc03) 8:00–11:30 aM Morning Practical courses (Pc04–Pc08) 12:30–4:00 pM Afternoon Practical courses (Pc09–Pc14) 5:30–8:00 pM Dinner Seminar 1: brain Metastases guidelines Dinner Seminar 2: Working with your hospital SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 7:00 aM–4:00 pM syM03: neuromodulation 2013: What every neurosurgeon needs to Know syM04: stroke 2014 8:00 aM–4:00 pM full Day Practical courses (Pc15–Pc16) 8:00–11:30 aM Morning Practical courses (Pc17–Pc23) 12:30–4:00 pM Afternoon Practical courses (Pc24–Pc28) 1:00–3:00 pM cNS resident SANS challenge Preliminary rounds 1:30–4:00 pM cNS Original Science Program–Multidisciplinary Oral Presentations i 4:30–6:30 pM general Scientific Session i 4:35–4:55 pM Dennis Spencer the evolution of Functional anatomy, the Face as paradigm 5:00–5:20 pM L. Nelson Hopkins, III Honored guest lecture: breaking Down the silos of Medicine: the Future of vascular neurosurgery 5:23–5:44 pM Charles Elachi special lecture: evolution of space Discovery 5:47–6:07 pM Allan I. Basbaum special lecture: evolving science of pain 6:10–6:30 pM Steven Johnson john thompson lecture: Where good ideas Come From 6:30–8:30 pM Cns opening reception san Francisco Marriott Marquis MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 7:00–11:30 aM general Scientific Session ii 9:00 aM–3:30 pM Exhibit hall Open 9:00–10:00 aM Exhibit hall break 10:03–10:23 aM Johannes Schramm Honored guest: epilepsy surgery and the evolution of Clinical and translational science 10:26–10:51 aM Ali R. Rezai presidential address 10:54–11:30 aM Itzhak Perlman 14th annual Walter e. Dandy orator 11:30 aM –12:30 pM Exhibit hall break and Demonstration Theater Presentations 12:30–2:00 pM luncheon Seminars (M01–M15) 2:00–3:30 pM Special course i: Neurosciences center and the Neurosurgeon: An Evolving Practice landscape consensus Session i: Management of cerebral gliomas: building consensus from controversy cNS Original Science Program–Oral Presentations i 3:30–5:00 pM cNS Original Science Program–cNS Neurosurgical forum Operative Neurosurgery i: Techniques to Advance Safety and Efficacy in Microneurosurgery 5:00–6:30 pM international reception 6:00–8:30 pM Dinner Seminar 3: beyond ‘Through the Tube’– When and When Not to use MiS Dinner Seminar 4: Evolution of the Endovascular revolution 2 www.cns.org
  • 4. 2013AT-A-GLANCE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 7:00–11:30 aM general Scientific Session iii 8:33 aM–8:47 pM Bai-nan Xu international lecture 9:00 aM–6:30 pM Exhibit hall Open 9:00–10:00 aM Exhibit hall break and Demonstration Theater Presentations 10:05–10:25 aM Andrew Kaye Honored guest: Continuing evolution: the biology and treatment of gliomas 10:30–10:50 aM Clay Marsh special lecture: From the blue Zones to the lab: secrets to living long and living Well 10:55–11:30 aM Frank Gehry Cns Michael l.j. apuzzo lecturer on Creativity and innovation 11:30 aM–12:30 pM Exhibit hall break and Demonstration Theater Presentations 12:30–2:00 pM luncheon Seminars (T16–T29) 2:00–3:30 pM Special course ii: Sagittal balance: improving Outcomes from Spine Surgery cNS Original Science Program–Oral Presentations ii Section Sessions 3:30–5:00 pM Operative Neurosurgery ii: intraoperative complication Avoidance and Management 5:00–6:30 pM cNS resident SANS challenge championship round in Exhibit hall Wine and cheese reception in Exhibit hall 6:00–8:30 pM Dinner Seminar 5: Placing Sports under the Microscope: head injury and cTE Dinner Seminar 6: The burden of Proof: quality improvement initiatives 6:30–7:30 pM resident recruitment Social WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 7:00–11:30 aM general Scientific Session iv 7:07–7:27 aM Benjamin Warf special lecture: three steps Forward and two steps back: the echternach procession towards optimal Hydrocephalus 7:37–8:07 aM Elad I. Levy live! in the or – revascularization of the Carotid: Clinical equipoise 8:45–8:55 aM Yuichi Hirose president–the japanese Congress of neurological surgeons 9:00 aM–2:00 pM Exhibit hall Open 9:00–10:00 aM Exhibit hall break and Demonstration Theater Presentations 10:35–10:55 aM Liangfu Zhou international lecture 10:02–10:17 aM Susan Hockfield special lecture 11:30 aM –12:30 pM Exhibit hall break and Demonstration Theater Presentations 12:30–2:00 pM luncheon Seminars (W30–W45) 2:00–3:30 pM consensus Session ii: Acute cervical Spine and Spinal cord Trauma: The Medical Evidence and controversies of Top-flight care cNS Original Science Program–Multidisciplinary Oral Presentations ii Section Sessions ARE YOU CONNECTED TO THE CNS? Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for the most up-to-date information and meeting updates! 3Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 5. CONTINUINGMEDICALEDUCATION EDUCATIONAL DESCRIPTIONS The cNS offers sessions in a variety of formats to enhance your educational experience. Each session is open to all who have paid the general medical registration fee with the exception of optional innovation Technology Symposia, Practical courses, luncheon Seminars and Dinner Seminars, which are available for an additional fee. Innovation Technology Symposia New for the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting! These four, full-day symposia will bring together a variety of key stakeholders to discuss how to help move the field of neurosurgery forward. Sessions will highlight advances through a combination of lectures and interactive technology sessions. Experts will establish the clinical and technological needs and present emerging technologies and opportunities. innovation Technology Symposia are offered on Saturday, October 19 and Sunday, October 20. Practical Courses Didactic and hands-on courses are presented by expert neurosurgical educators and demonstrate clinical techniques and applications via technology, models, simulation and lectures. hands-on Practical courses will provide participants an opportunity to improve surgical skills by applying and demonstrating learned techniques. Didactic Practical courses provide an opportunity to review case-based complex issues and discuss potential solutions. Practical courses are offered Saturday, October 19 and Sunday, October 20. General Scientific Sessions Expand your horizons with special presentations, including a live surgery via telemedicine technology, and keynote lectures during the general Scientific Sessions. Many individuals have been selected based on their outstanding contributions to the field of neurosurgery. general Scientific Sessions are offered Sunday, October 20 through Wednesday, October 23. Section Sessions Join your peers for an afternoon of lectures devoted solely to the specific subspecialty of interest to you! Section Sessions are offered on Tuesday, October 22 and Wednesday, October 23. Special Courses Special courses offer lectures presented by several faculty on a specific topic that is pertinent to all neurosurgeons. Special courses are offered on Monday, October 21 and Tuesday, October 22. Luncheon Seminars and Dinner Seminars Experts present research, best scientific evidence, and associated outcomes demonstrating clinical techniques and applications via didactic lectures. The basics of translational development, clinical trials, guideline review and updated changes, and evaluation of clinical experience followed by examples of successful application are presented in various sessions with information you can apply in your daily practice and professional life. luncheon Seminars are offered Monday, October 21 through Wednesday, October 23. Dinner Seminars are offered on Saturday, October 19 and Monday and Tuesday, October 21 and 22. CNS Consensus Sessions with Audience Response Polling consensus Sessions provide an opportunity for expert presentations, discussion, and peer debate on various topics, treatments, guidelines, and solutions. A review of the best evidence-based literature is conducted and then an opportunity is provided to share your perspective on the optimal management of these disorders as a consensus is reached for the best application of surgical strategies in a variety of clinical scenarios. consensus Sessions are offered on Monday, October 21 and Wednesday, October 23. 3-D Operative Neurosurgery Sessions challenging neurosurgical cases will be reviewed and discussed by leaders in the field using 3-D high definition video. 3-D Operative Neurosurgery Sessions are offered on Monday, October 21 and Tuesday, October 22. Original Science Program get first exposure to unpublished science and ground-breaking research! The cNS Original Science Program includes scientific abstract presentations that offer the best clinical and basic neurosurgical science Congress of Neurological Surgeons 2013 Annual Meeting Objectives The congress of Neurological Surgeons exists to enhance health and improve lives worldwide through the advancement of education and scientific exchange in the field of neurosurgery. The cNS continuing Medical Education (cME) program provides participants with various learning formats to keep current in the field and to improve skills and enhance professional performance to provide the best possible care for their patients. The cNS cME program is designed, planned, and implemented to evaluate a comprehensive collection of activities within the specialty of neurosurgery. The cNS plans to yield results that not only contribute to lifelong learning, but, also demonstrate change and improvement in competence and performance. At the conclusion of the 2013 CNS Annual Meeting participants should be able to: 1. Alter their current practice patterns in accordance with the latest data. 2. compare techniques based on findings discussed during case presentations. 3. Apply and/or perform new techniques based on best practices and current procedures. 4. Practice evidence-based, informed neurosurgical medicine. 5. interpret newly found outcomes as a result of the scientific abstract presentations. 6. Demonstrate change in competence or performance. 4 www.cns.org
  • 6. CONTINUINGMEDICALEDUCATION while allowing for audience questions and moderated discussions. Sunday, October 20: Multidisciplinary Session i Monday, October 21: Oral Presentations by subspecialty and the cNS Neurosurgical forum Tuesday, October 22: Oral Presentations by subspecialty Wednesday, October 23: Multidisciplinary Session ii Accreditation The congress of Neurological Surgeons is accredited by the Accreditation council for continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. CME Credit us physicians: The cNS designates this live activity for a maximum of 45.5 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM . Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. * A maximum of 21.5AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM may be earned for general sessions only. cME credit earned at the cNS Annual Meeting can be applied towards Part ii of Maintenance of certification. Mid-level practitioners: An application has been submitted to the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) for approval of 1.5 contact hours. The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses credentialing center’s cOA. for all other health professionals, please directly contact your state medical association, specialty society or state board for medical licensure. Please note: cME credit is not available for SyM01: Neurosurgery innovations. Additional CME Credits can be earned by attending the following: Practical Courses Attendees will receive a maximum of three-and-a-half (3.5) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM for each Saturday half-day Practical course, a maximum of seven (7) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM for each eligible Saturday full-day Practical courses, a maximum of three-and-a-half (3.5) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM for Sunday half- day Practical courses, and a maximum of seven (7) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM for each eligible full-day Sunday Practical course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Luncheon Seminars Attendees will receive a maximum of one-and-a-half (1.5) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM for all eligible luncheon Seminars. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Dinner Seminars Attendees will receive a maximum of two (2) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM for all eligible Dinner Seminars. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Posters Physicians may claim a maximum of five (5) AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM directly from the AMA for preparing a poster presentation, which is also included in the published abstracts. Physicians may claim them on their AMA PrA certificate application or apply directly to the AMA for an AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM certificate. Physicians may claim AMA PRA Category 2 CreditsTM for viewing scientific posters. Physicians should self-claim credit on their AMA PrA certificate application form. Please visit the AMA web site for details at www.ama-assn.org. Claiming CME Credit cME credits can be claimed through the online cME system at www.cns.org. upon completion of this process your cME certificate will be sent to you via email at the email address you used at registration. The cME tracking system lets you create and print a cME certificate immediately following the cNS Annual Meeting either while you are still in San francisco or from the convenience of your home or office. log in using your last name and the email address with which you registered. you will need to enter the number of hours you are claiming for each session you attended including Practical courses, luncheon Seminars, Dinner Seminars, general Scientific Sessions, the Original Science Program, Special courses, Section Sessions and Operative Techniques with the Masters. Physicians should only claim credit for the learning activities at the Annual Meeting in which they actively participated. Disclosures The Accreditation council for continuing Medical Education Standards for commercial Support requires that anyone in a position to control the content of the educational activity has disclosed all financial relationships with any commercial interest. failure or refusal to disclose or the inability to satisfactorily resolve the identified conflict may result in the withdrawal of the invitation to participate in any of the cNS educational activities. The AccME defines a “commercial interest” as any entity producing, marketing, re-selling or distributing healthcare goods or services consumed by, or used on, patients. it is also each speaker’s responsibility to include the fDA clearance status of any device or drug requiring fDA approval discussed or described in their presentation or to describe the lack of fDA clearance for any “off label” uses discussed. Speakers from the audience are also required, therefore, to indicate any relevant personal/professional relationships as they discuss a given topic. Disclosures will be published in the Scientific Program book that will be distributed at the Annual Meeting. handout materials are prepared and submitted for distribution by the presenters who are solely responsible for their content. FDA Statement Some drugs or medical devices demonstrated at the Annual Meeting have not been cleared by the fDA or have been cleared by the fDA for specific purposes only. The fDA has stated that it is the responsibility of the physician to determine the fDA clearance status of each drug or medical devices he or she wishes to use in clinical practice. The cNS policy provides that “off label” uses of a drug or medical device may be described at the Annual Meeting so long as the “off label” use of the drug or medical device is also specifically disclosed. Any drug or medical device is “off label” if the described use is not set forth on the products approval label. it is also each speaker’s responsibility to include the fDA clearance status of any device or drug requiring fDA approval discussed or described in their presentation or to describe the lack of fDA clearance for any “off label” uses discussed. Speakers from the audience are also required, therefore, to indicate any relevant personal/professional relationships as they discuss a given topic. 5Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 7. WHAT’SNEW2013 learn and engage in open dialogues on critical topics related to the rapidly advancing field of neurosurgery. hear neurosurgical experts and corporate viPs explore the future advancements in neurosurgery from new monitoring techniques and therapies in traumatic brain injury, to flow diversion in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and much more! This dynamic learning experience offers a combination of lecture and interactive discussion and technology sessions. WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 (For details see pages 20-21) WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19(For details see pages 22-23) Plan on attending each of the three dynamic keynote speakers talks throughout the Annual Meeting! Explore Where Good Ideas Come From with Steven Johnson on Sunday, October 20. hear itzhak Perlman on Monday, October 21, and gain new information about the musicians’ brain, the role of nerves, performance, concentration, practice and much more. finally, on Tuesday, October 22, plan on gaining insight from Pritzker Prize winning architect, frank gehry. Each of these speakers is sure to deliver an exciting and insightful presentation. hearAcquire valuable insights each day of the Scientific Program as experts debate on what truly is the best practice for some of the most challenging topics facing neurosurgeons today. WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 spinal Cord injury and steroids: reality, Data, guidelines – now What (page 35) WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 open vs. endoscopic – When to use Which? (page 45) WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 open vs. endovascular approach to aneurysms (page 55) tHe eXperts Debate at tHree Controversy sessions dyNamICKeynote speaKers innovation anD teCHnology syMposiaFour Steven Johnson JoHn tHoMpSon lECtUrEr itzhak perlman WaltEr E. DanDy orator Frank gehry CnS MiCHaEl l.J.apUzzo lECtUrEr on CrEatiVity anD innoVation WHAT’S NEW THIS YEAR! 6 www.cns.org
  • 8. WHAT’SNEW2013 guIdelINes ProvIde tHe latest inForMation ontHe use oF steroiDs During sCi eXPaNdyour HoriZons WitH our tHree HonoreD guests hear new perspectives on neurosurgery, lifelong learning, leadership and career development. gain new understandings that can help you advance your practice and your career. The Three honored guests will be presenting each day in the general Scientific Sessions and at the honored guest luncheon Seminars. an all NeWsans CHallenge come and enjoy the all new and enhanced SANS challenge. This year the challenge will be “Are you Smarter Than…?”you won’t want to miss this fun and engaging competition as residents go head to head (no pun intended) and test their knowledge. Audience participation is encouraged. ChINa cNS welcomes the chinese Neurosurgical Society as our official Annual Meeting Partner society. Please take this opportunity to network and share solutions to common challenges with our chinese partners as well as colleagues from across the globe. tHe Cns annual Meeting partner hear the evidence presented and debated on the recently published guidelines for the Management of Acute cervical Spine and Spinal cord injury at 7 different sessions. gain an in-depth understanding of the data and the guidelines and how it will affect your practice for managing acute cervical and spine and spinal cord injuries. TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 Controversy: spinal Cord injury and steroids: reality, Data, guidelines – now What? WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 guidelines for the Management of acute Cervical spine and spinal Cord injuries, luncheon seminar t21 WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 acute Cervical spine and spinal Cord trauma: the Medical evidence and Controversies of top-flight Care AR EYOU T HAN ...? ARRRARA EEEE R E R YYOOYOYYOY UUUOUO TT HAAHAH NNNNANAANA ...? SMARTER andrew Kaye, MD australia Johannes Schramm, MD germany l. nelson Hopkins, MD United States of america 7Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 9. HONOREDGUEST HonorED gUESt l. Nelson hopkins, md professor and Chairman of neurosurgery, professor of radiology, and Director of the toshiba Stroke research Center, University at buffalo, State University of new york After completing his undergraduate studies at rutgers university, Dr. hopkins earned a doctor of medicine degree cum laude from Albany Medical college. his post-graduate training included a surgical internship at case Western reserve, followed by neurology and neurosurgical training at the university at buffalo. Active in national neurosurgery, Dr. hopkins has served as a member of the board of Directors of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and of the Executive committee of the Stroke council of the American heart Association. he has served as Scientific and Annual Meeting chairman for both the AANS and congress of Neurological Surgeons and chairman of the Joint Section on cerebrovascular Surgery, and president of the American Academy of Neurological Surgery. Dr. hopkins is currently the principal investigator of several national clinical trials testing catheter-based technologies for the treatment of neurovascular diseases. he is the endovascular principal for the editorial board of Neurosurgery®, and the author of over 300 publications centered on the prevention and treatment of stroke. Dr. hopkins is an advocate of cross-specialty and multidisciplinary collaboration. he fostered the creation of the Toshiba Stroke research center, bringing together physicists, chemists, aerospace engineers, neurosurgeons, cardiologists, and radiologists to study the neurovascular circulation and develop innovative technologies and approaches for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of neurovascular diseases. A proponent of the global approach to revascularization for the improvement of outcomes for patients with vascular disease, Dr. hopkins has served on the faculty of numerous symposiums nationally and internationally and each year hosts multidisciplinary seminars along with industry leaders focused on assessing and managing complications associated with minimally invasive catheter- based interventions. he and his wife, bonnie, live in buffalo, New york and have three children and eight grandchildren. looK for dr. hopkins during the following sessions! WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 5:00–5:20 pM HonorED gUESt lECtUrE Breaking Down the Silos of Medicine: The Future of Vascular Neurosurgery WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 10:38–11:08 aM Investing in Neurosurgery Innovations 12:30–2:00 pM Resident/Honored Guest Luncheon Complimentary to Resident Members! 8 www.cns.org
  • 10. HonorED gUESt johannes schramm, md professor of neurosurgery University of bonn, bonn, germany, retired Chairman Department of neurosurgery Johannes Schramm, MD was born in a small village in East germany on March 24, 1946. The family fled to West germany in 1953. he studied medicine in heidelberg, berlin, and Manchester, u.k., wrote his dissertation and received his MD from the university of heidelberg in 1972. After internship in West berlin he did his residency at the university hospital of the free university in West-berlin. There he was introduced to microsurgery by Mario brock and initiated to first scientific work by Takanori fukushima who was a post-doctoral research fellow there. After post-graduate training he did his habilitation (equivalent to a Ph.D.) at the free university of berlin in 1981. in 1983 he became associate professor of neurosurgery and vice-chairman in rudolf fahlbusch’s Department of Neurosurgery at the university of Erlangen-Nürnberg. in 1989 he was appointed professor and chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the university of bonn where he retired in March 2012. Dr. Schramm is the immediate past-president of the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies (EANS), having been the president of the EANS from 2007- 2011. he is second vice-president of the World federation of Neurological Surgeons and currently a member of the Joint residency Advisory and Accreditation committee of the EANS and the uEMS Section of Neurosurgery. he served as co-chairman of the working group “Neurophysiology and Neuromonitoring” of the german Society of Neurosurgery, as chairman of the committee on Training and continuing Medical Education and was delegate of the german Society of Neurosurgery in the Examination committee and the Training committee of the EANS. he served as chairman of the research committee of the EANS, then as vice-president of the EANS. he was vice-president of the german Society of Neurosurgery, president of the german Academy of Neurosurgery. he was president of the german language “Working group on presurgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery”. he served as a member of the Scientific Advisory board of the german federal medical association and as deputy medical director of the university hospital in bonn and later served as a member of the supervisory board of the bonn university Medical center. Dr. Schramm is a member of the german Society of Neurosurgery, congress of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, german Academy of Neurosurgery, Academia Eurasiana Neurochirurgica. Dr. Schramm’s clinical interests range from glioma surgery to AvMs and epilepsy surgery, as well as spine. his research initially focused on experimental cord injury and evoked potentials. clinically on development and introduction of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, later on gliomas, and surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy. looK for dr. schramm in the following sessions: TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 10:03–10:23 aM HonorED gUESt lECtUrE Epilepsy Surgery and the Evolution of Clinical and Translational Science 12:30–2:00 pM Resident/Honored Guest Luncheon Complimentary to Resident Members! HONOREDGUEST 9Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 11. HONOREDGUEST HonorED gUESt andrew Kaye, md Director of neurosurgery and Director of the Melbourne neuroscience Centre, the University of Melbourne,the royal Melbourne Hospital Andrew kaye, MD graduated from the university of Melbourne in 1973, and subsequently trained in Neurosurgery at the royal Melbourne hospital and the royal children’s hospital in Melbourne. he undertook further neurosurgery training in Oxford, london and at the cleveland clinic. On returning to Australia in 1983, he was appointed Neurosurgeon at the royal Melbourne hospital, and commenced research into neuro-oncology at the ludwig institute for cancer research. he was then appointed Professor of Neurosurgery at the university of Melbourne in 1992, and the James Stewart Professor of Surgery and head of the Department of Surgery at the university of Melbourne, royal Melbourne hospital in 1997. he is the head of the Department of Neurosurgery at the royal Melbourne hospital. for the past twelve years he has been the chairman of the board of Examiners for final year Medicine at the faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and health Sciences at the university of Melbourne. in 2010 he was appointed by the New Zealand government to chair the board of the New Zealand South island Neurosurgery Service. his main clinical and research interest involves neuro-oncology and cerebrovascular disease. in 1992 he was awarded the John Mitchell crouch fellowship by the royal Australasian college of Surgeons, and in 1997 was appointed the Sir Arthur Sims commonwealth Travelling Professor. in 2003, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons honored him with the ronald bittner Award for contributions to the treatment of brain tumors and in 2006 the Paul bucy Award for his contribution to neurosurgery education. in 2004 he presented the Sir John Eccles lecture at the Australian Neuroscience Society. in 2011 he was awarded the Medal of honour from the World federation of Neurosurgical Societies for “outstanding contribution to neurosurgery.” he was awarded the commonwealth of Australia centenary Medal in 2003 and Order of Australia in 2004. he is a Director of the hawthorn football club, Australian football league. he is the President of the Asian Australasian Society of Neurological Surgeons and a vice President of the World federation of Neurosurgical Societies. he is the foundation Editor-in-chief of the Journal of clinical Neuroscience. he has authored and co-authored over 200 journal articles and book chapters, as well as five books including being the co-author with Dr. Edward laws of “brain Tumours”, a text recognized as being the definitive work on the subject. looK for dr. Kaye during the following sessions: WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 8:00–11:30 aM PC20: Surgical Management of Tumors in Eloquent Regions WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 10:05–10:25 aM HonorED gUESt lECtUrE Continuing Evolution: The Biology and Treatment of Gliomas 12:30–2:00 pM Resident/Honored Guest Luncheon Complimentary to Resident Members! 10 www.cns.org
  • 12. FEATUREDSPEAKERS FEatUrED SpEaKEr Charles elachi, Phd Director, Jet propulsion lab MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19Evolution of Space Discovery charles Elachi, PhD has been the Director of the Jet Propulsion laboratory since May 2001. in 1968, Dr. Elachi received his bSc in physics from the university of grenoble, france; the Dipl. ing. in 1968 in engineering from the Polytechnic institute, grenoble, france, and both a MSc (1969) and PhD (1971) degree in electrical sciences from the california institute of Technology. he also earned an MSc degree in 1983 in geology from the university of california, los Angeles, and an MbA in 1979 from the university of Southern california. Dr. Elachi joined JPl in 1970. Prior to becoming Director, Dr. Elachi was JPl’s Director for Space and Earth Science Programs beginning in 1982, where he was responsible for the development of numerous flight missions and instruments for Earth observation, planetary exploration and astrophysics. he has been a principal investigator on a number of NASA-sponsored studies and flight projects, including the Shuttle imaging radar series (Science Team leader), the Magellan imaging radar (Team Member), and the cassini Titan radar (Team leader). he is the author of over 230 publications in the fields of active microwave remote sensing and electromagnetic theory, and he holds several patents in those fields. FEatUrED SpEaKEr allan I. Basbaum, Phd, Frs professor and Chairman of the Department of anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19Evolving Science of Pain Allan i. basbaum, PhD, frS is professor and chairman of the Department of Anatomy at the university of california, San francisco (ucSf), and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Physiology. he is also a member of the W. M. keck foundation center for integrative Neuroscience. Dr. basbaum’s interest in pain research began as an undergraduate at Mcgill university, in Montreal, where he worked with ronald Melzack. After receiving a PhD from the university of Pennsylvania, he did postdoctoral research at university college london, with Patrick Wall. he then moved to ucSf and was appointed to the faculty in 1977. Dr. basbaum’s research concerns the transmission and control of pain messages, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of persistent pain after tissue or nerve injury. he has served on the council of the international Association for the Study of Pain (iASP), as its treasurer, and this January relinquished his position as as editor-in-chief of Pain, the journal of the iASP. Dr. basbaum has been a board member and program chair of the American Pain Society. he is a recipient of the f. W. l. kerr Memorial Award from the American Pain Society and the bristol-Myers Squibb Prize for Distinguished Pain research. Dr. basbaum was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, to the institute of Medicine and the british Academy of Medical Science. he is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the royal Society in the united kingdom. 11Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 13. FEATUREDSPEAKERS JoHn tHoMpSon lECtUrEr steven johnson best-Selling author WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19Where Good Ideas Come From Steven Johnson is the leading light of today’s interdisciplinary, collaborative, open- minded approach to innovation. his writings have influenced everything from cutting-edge ideas in urban planning to the battle against 21st-century terrorism. he unites a deep understanding of scientific progress with a sharp sensitivity to contemporary online trends. Together, those traits give him an unmatched insight into how ideas emerge and spread and how they affect the world today. A practitioner as well as a theoretician, Steven has co-created three influential sites: the pioneering online magazine fEED, the Webby Award-winning community site, Plastic.com, and the hyperlocal media site outside.in, recently acquired by AOl. he is a contributing editor to Wired magazine and has written for The New york Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Nation, and many other periodicals. he’s appeared on many high-profile television programs, including The charlie rose Show, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and The Newshour with Jim lehrer. Steven blogs at stevenberlinjohnson.com. WaltEr E. DanDy orator Itzhak Perlman reigning Virtuoso of the Violin WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19Walter E. Dandy Oration undeniably the reigning virtuoso of the violin, itzhak Perlman enjoys superstar status rarely afforded a classical musician. beloved for his charm and humanity as well as his talent, he is treasured by audiences throughout the world who respond not only to his remarkable artistry, but also to the irrepressible joy of making music. A major presence in the performing arts on television, itzhak Perlman has been honored with four Emmy Awards. in March 2006, a worldwide audience in the hundreds of millions saw Mr. Perlman perform live on the 78th Annual Academy Awards telecast, as he performed a medley from the five film scores nominated in the category of best Original Score. One of Mr. Perlman’s proudest achievements is his collaboration with film score composer John Williams in Steven Spielberg’s Academy Award winning film Schindler’s list, in which he performed the violin solos. in february 2008, itzhak Perlman was honored with a grammy lifetime Achievement Award for excellence in the recording arts. his recordings regularly appear on the best-seller charts and have garnered fifteen grammy Awards. Numerous publications and institutions have paid tribute to itzhak Perlman for the unique place he occupies in the artistic and humanitarian fabric of our times. his presence on stage, on camera and in personal appearances of all kinds speaks eloquently on behalf of the disabled, and his devotion to their cause is an integral part of Mr. Perlman’s life. 12 www.cns.org
  • 14. FEATUREDSPEAKERS CnS MiCHaEl l.J.apUzzo lECtUrEr on CrEatiVity anD innoVation Frank gehry pritzker prize-Winning architect WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19Lecture on Creativity and Innovation raised in Toronto, canada, frank gehry moved with his family to los Angeles in 1947. Mr. gehry received his bachelor of Architecture degree from the university of Southern california in 1954, and he studied city Planning at the harvard university graduate School of Design. in subsequent years, Mr. gehry has built an architectural career that has spanned five decades and produced public and private buildings in America, Europe and Asia. his work has earned Mr. gehry several of the most significant awards in the architectural field, including the Arnold W. brunner Memorial Prize in Architecture, the Pritzker Prize, the Wolf Prize in Art (Architecture), the Praemium imperiale Award, the Dorothy and lillian gish Award, the National Medal of Arts, the friedrich kiesler Prize, the American institute of Architects gold Medal, and the royal institute of british Architects gold Medal. FEatUrED SpEaKEr Clay B. marsh, md professor and Senior associate Vp for Health Sciences, Chief innovation officer, oSU Wexner Medical Center,Vice Dean of innovation, College of Medicine, Executive Director of the iDea Studio WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 From the Blue Zones to the Lab: Secrets to Living Long and Living Well clay b. Marsh, MD, is Executive Director of the center for the new iDeA Studio (innovation, Design and Application) and the first chief innovation Officer at The Ohio State university Wexner Medical center. he is Professor of internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, critical care and Sleep Medicine, Department of internal Medicine and is board certified in Pulmonary and critical care Medicine. Dr. Marsh is cross-appointed in five basic science departments and graduate programs. he has mentored over 50 MD, MD/PhD and PhD doctoral students, post-doctoral researchers and junior faculty. he has published over 130 papers in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Marsh is a longitudinally Nih funded researcher and his laboratory focuses on understanding biology underlying human health and disease, particularly lung fibrosis and cancer applications. in the iDeA Studio, he and his team will focus on the discovery and delivery of solutions that will be implemented in the P4 (predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory) medicine program, which he also leads. borrowing from blue Zones of the world, where people live long and well, Dr. Marsh and colleagues are developing technologies and mobile applications that will navigate and provide solutions around the areas of exercise, food, resilience/ happiness, sleep and social connections to be deployed in communities. The goal is to transform the environment, or ecosystem, around communities to make the individuals living there naturally uptake these solutions to improve their lives. 13Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 15. FEATUREDSPEAKERS FEatUrED SpEaKEr susan hockfield, Phd president Emeriti Massachusetts institute of technology WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19Special Lecture A noted neuroscientist whose research has focused on the development of the brain, Susan hockfield was the first life scientist to serve as President of the Massachusetts institute of Technology, where she holds a faculty appointment as Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of brain and cognitive Sciences. before assuming the presidency of MiT in 2004, she was Provost at yale university, where she had taught since 1985 and had also served as Dean of the graduate School of Arts and Sciences. A graduate of the university of rochester, Dr. hockfield received her PhD from the georgetown university School of Medicine, carrying out her dissertation research in neuroscience at the National institutes of health. An elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, she holds honorary degrees from brown university, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Tsinghua university (beijing), university of Edinburgh, university of Pierre and Marie curie (Paris) and the Watson School of biological Sciences at cold Spring harbor laboratory in New york. Additionally, she holds a jointly-awarded honorary degree from the New university of lisbon, the Technical university of lisbon and the university of Porto, Portugal. She serves as a director of the general Electric company and qualcomm incorporated, a trustee of the carnegie corporation of New york, and an overseer of the boston Symphony Orchestra. Dr. hockfield lives in cambridge with her husband, Thomas N. byrne, M.D. They have a grown daughter, Elizabeth. FEatUrED SpEaKEr Benjamin C. Warf, md associate professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, Director of neonatal and Congenital anomalies neurosurgery at boston Children’s Hospital WED OCT 23 TUE OCT 22 MON OCT 21 SUN OCT 20 SAT OCT 19 Three Steps Forward and Two Steps Back: the Echternach Procession towards Optimal Hydrocephalus Treatment Dr. benjamin c. Warf graduated from harvard Medical School in 1984, completed his neurosurgery residency training at case Western reserve university, and was the first fellow in Pediatric Neurosurgery at boston children’s hospital. from 1992 to 2000, he was chief of Pediatric Neurosurgery and Director of Surgical Education at university of kentucky. from 2000 to 2006, he and his wife, cindy, and their six children lived in uganda, where they helped found the curE children’s hospital of uganda, a pediatric neurosurgery specialty hospital. While there, Dr. Warf characterized neonatal infection as the most common cause of infant hydrocephalus in the region, developed a novel technique for treating infant hydrocephalus that avoided shunt dependence in the majority, and developed a program to train and equip neurosurgeons from developing countries in this procedure. he is currently Associate Professor of Surgery at harvard Medical School, Director of Neonatal and congenital Anomalies Neurosurgery at boston children’s hospital, and Affiliate faculty with the harvard Medical School Department of global health and Social Medicine. he also serves as the Senior Medical Director of curE hydrocephalus and Director of research at curE children’s hospital of uganda. in 2007, Dr. Warf received the humanitarian Award from the AANS, and in 2012 he was named a MacArthur fellow. 14 www.cns.org
  • 16. The CNS is pleased to welcome our 2013 International Partner – the Chinese Neurosurgical Society, a branch of the Chinese Medical Association! Dr. Jizong Zhao Dr. Liangfu Zhou Dr. Ying Mao Dr. Bia-nan Xu Dr. Dingbiao Zhou Dr. Yuanli Zhao Dr. Xiaolei Chen Dr. Jianning Zhang Congratulations to all of the 2013 Award Winners! Pinakin Rameshchandra Jethwa, MD Julius Goodman Resident Award Matthew J. McGirt, MD Sam Hassenbusch Young Neurosurgeon Award David Weintraub, MD Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery Resident Award Hai Sun, MD, PhD CNS Resident Award Jin-song Wu, MD, PhD Journal of Neuro-Oncology Award Ranjith Babu, MS Stryker Neuro-Oncology Award Hideyuki Kano, MD, PhD Synthes Skull Base Surgery Award Russell R. Lonser, MD National Brain Tumor Society Mahaley Clinical Research Award Arman Jahangiri, BS Integra Foundation Award Aditya Vedantam, MD Synthes Award for Resident Research on Spinal Cord and Spinal Column Injury Yirui Sun, PhD Synthes Award for Resident Research on Brain and Craniofacial Injury Erlick A.C. Pereira, MD, PhD Ron R. Tasker Young Investigator Award Achal Patel, MD Synthes Cerebrovascular Award Robert M. Starke, MD, MSc Galbraith Award Peter Fecci, MD, PhD Preuss Award Matthew Frank Gary, MD Sherry Apple Resident Travel Scholarship (WINS) Stay connected at http://m.cns.org 15
  • 17. ANNUALMEETINGLEADERSHIP CnS prESiDEnt ali r. rezai, md Ali r. rezai, MD is Associate Dean of Neuroscience, Professor of Neurosurgery, Stanley and Joan ross chair in Neuromodulation, and the Director of the Neuroscience Program and the center for Neuromodulation at the Ohio State university. Dr. rezai majored in biology at uclA, earned his medical degree with honors from the university of Southern california, and received neurosurgical training at New york university under the direction of Joseph ransohoff and Patrick kelly. he completed his subspecialty training in functional neurosurgery at the university of Toronto, then joined the neurosurgical faculty at New york university Medical center. Subsequently, he moved to the cleveland clinic to become the director of functional neurosurgery and the center for Neurological restoration. in August 2009, Dr. rezai joined the neurosurgical faculty at the Ohio State university. Dr. rezai’s areas of expertise include functional neurosurgery, neuromodulation, and neurosurgical management of patients with movement disorders, chronic pain and neurobehavioral psychiatric disorders. his research focuses on mechanisms of neurostimulation and novel clinical applications. Dr. rezai has trained over 35 fellows in functional neurosurgery. Dr. rezai is the editor of two books and the author of over 140 peer-reviewed publications and more than 30 book chapters. he is on the Editorial board of Neurosurgery® and five other journals. he has been a principal or co-investigator on eight Nih grants and has delivered over 400 lectures internationally. he holds 30 issued uS patents. Dr. rezai has been actively involved in a variety of capacities with the congress of Neurological Surgeons, holding leadership positions which include Annual Meeting and Scientific Program chairman. he has served on the cNS Executive committee for the past eleven years. Dr. rezai is also the Past President of the American Society of Stereotactic and functional Neurosurgery (ASSfN), and the President of the North American Neuromodulation Society (NANS). CnS prESiDEnt-ElECt daniel resnick, md, ms A native of Philadelphia and a persistent Eagles fan, Dr. resnick is a summa cum laude graduate of Princeton university and graduated as a member of AOA from the university of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. following an internship at Pennsylvania hospital he completed his residency training at the university of Pittsburgh under the tutelage of Drs. Jannetta, lunsford, and Marion. During residency he earned a master’s degree in neuroscience based on spinal cord injury research and did an “infolded fellowship” at the university of New Mexico with Dr. benzel. focusing his career in spinal surgery, Dan joined the faculty at the university of Wisconsin where he is now Professor, vice chairman, and Program Director. he has accrued numerous awards including the Dean’s teaching award for education of medical students. Dr. resnick has authored over 175 peer reviewed scientific papers, has contributed over 80 chapters, has edited five books, and authored 130 other publications. his academic interest currently is in the use of comparative effectiveness research to inform and improve spine care and he has, as a consequence, become an advocate for spine surgeons and spine patients. he is past chairman of the spine section, past chair of the Washington committee quality improvement Workgroup, and currently Director of research for the North American Spine Society. he joined the congress Executive committee in 2001 and has served in a variety of posts including vice president, treasurer, and chair of the education committee. Dr. resnick is immensely proud of his 5 children, leah (a senior at the university of Michigan), Sabrina (a sophomore at ithaca college), Eli and Talia (both freshmen at East high School in Madison), and Zev (working on his pre-nursery school studies). he and his wife rachel enjoy music, cycling, and traveling (preferably in pursuit of music and cycling!). 16 www.cns.org
  • 18. annUal MEEting CHairMan alan m. scarrow, md, jd Alan M. Scarrow, MD, JD has been on the cNS Executive committee since 2005 as an Ex-Officio and Member-at-large. Dr. Scarrow is married to Meera and has 3 children: Evelyn 12, William 9, and harrison 6. in his free time, Dr. Scarrow enjoys spending time with his family on their organic farm. Dr. Scarrow is a neurosurgeon and President of the Mercy clinic Springfield Division in Springfield, Missouri. Dr. Scarrow currently serves as Secretary of the cNS. SCiEntiFiC prograM CHairMan ashwini d. sharan, md Ashwini D. Sharan, MD, is currently Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Neurology at Jefferson Medical college and Thomas Jefferson university. his practice focuses on neurostimulation neurosurgery, surgery for epilepsy, and spinal neurosurgery. in 1995, he completed his bA-MD degree from boston university and uMDNJ - Newark, New Jersey in an accelerated medical program. he completed the majority of his training at Thomas Jefferson university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Since then he has completed a fellowship in Spinal Neurosurgery and functional Neurosurgery both at the cleveland clinic foundation in cleveland, Ohio. At Thomas Jefferson university, Dr. Sharan provides unique expertise in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. his expertise additionally includes intrathecal pump implantation for spasticity, cortical and spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain disorders, and vagal nerve stimulation for epilepsy and depression. Additionally, at Thomas Jefferson university, he leads the Surgical Epilepsy program in which they treat with surgery approximately 100 patients per year achieving cures in a majority of their patients. he performs approximately 200 spinal operations for spinal trauma, spinal cord tumors, metastatic carcinoma, infections, and degenerative disorders. in addition to his clinical work, Dr. Sharan is a true academician. he has been awarded the William h. Sweet young investigator Award and the William buchhiet teacher of the year award. Dr. Sharan is a leading research in advance functional imaging of the brain for patients with epilepsy. in addition to these responsibilities, he is currently the Program director of the Jefferson Neurosurgery residency. he is vice President and serves on the board of director of the North American Neuromodulation Society and Past President of the American Association of South Asian Neurosurgeons. he has authored numerous publications and given countless invited talks. Dr. Sharan has been a faculty member for several review courses throughout the united States and internationally. he is presently the Scientific program chair for the 2012 NANS Annual Meeting and the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting. his topics of expertise included deep brain stimulation, neuromodulation for epilepsy, advanced stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, pain, and spinal neurosurgery – its aspects and treatment. ANNUALMEETINGLEADERSHIP 17Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 19. 2013ANNUALMEETINGCOMMITTEE Annual Meeting Chairman: Alan M. Scarrow, MD, JD Scientific Program Chairman: Ashwini D. Sharan, MD Vice Scientific Program Chairman: Elad I. Levy, MD, FACS, FAHA Guest Society and International Partner: Charles Y. Liu, MD, PhD Chinese Neurosurgical Society: Ying Mao, MD Liangfu Zhou Jizong Zhao Bainan Xu Dingbiao Zhou Yuanli Zhao Xiaolei Chen Jianning Zhang Consensus Sessions: Nicholas C. Bambakidis, MD James Bradley Elder, MD Roland A. Torres, MD, FACS Neurosurgical Forum: Brian L. Hoh, MD Edward R. Smith, MD Michael G. Kaplitt, MD, PhD John Y.K. Lee, MD SECTION REPRESENTATIVES Council of State Neurosurgical Societies: Deborah L. Benzil, MD, FACS Section on Cerebrovascular Surgery: Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, MD Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves: Joseph S. Cheng, MD, MS Section on Neurotrauma and Critical Care: Geoffrey T. Manley, MD, PhD Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery: Alan R. Cohen, MD Section on Pain: Christopher J. Winfree, MD Section on Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery: Konstantin V. Slavin, MD Section on Tumors: Frederick F. Lang, MD Information Technology Advisory Committee: Brain T. Ragel, MD Brian L. Hoh, MD Practical Courses: Steven N. Kalkanis, MD Brian T. Ragel, MD Peter Konrad, MD, PhD Alexander A. Khalessi, MD Luncheon Seminars: Bernard R. Bendok, MD, FACS Aviva Abosch, MD, PhD Michael Y. Wang, MD, FACS James K. Liu, MD Eric Sauvageau, MD Evening Sessions: Ashok R. Asthagiri, MD Roham Moftakhar, MD Erich O. Richter, MD Special Courses: Zoher Ghogowala, MD, FACS, Domagoj Coric, MD, Daniel M. Prevedello, MD J D. Mocco, MD Operative Neurosurgery: Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol, MD Aaron S. Dumont, MD Paul A. Gardner, MD Elad I. Levy, MD, FACS, FAHA Live Surgery Symposium: Elad I. Levy, MD, FACS, FAHA Resident SANS Challenge: Zachary N. Litvack, MD, MCR Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris, MD Sergeant-at-Arms: William James Thoman, MD Peter Kan, MD, MPH, FRCSC Luis M. Tumialan, MD Simulation Committee: James S. Harrop, MD, FACS Pascal Jabbour, MD International Division Chair: Anil Nanda, MD, FACS CME/Education Chair: Ganesh Rao, MD Resident Liaison: Aviva Abosch, MD, PhD Allied Health Care CME Liaison: Andrea L. Strayer, ARNP 18 www.cns.org
  • 20. DiSCOVer the latest advances and technology eXPerieNCe live demonstrations CONNeCT with your corporate contacts through pProduct and Technology Showcase pIn-booth Demonstrations pTuesday Afternoon Wine and Cheese Reception pDaily Beverage Breaks pDigital Poster Center pCNS Member Services Booth Engage and connect with hundreds of your exhibitor contacts in San Francisco at the 2013 CNS Annual Meeting Exhibit Hall. Take advantage of this exciting opportunity to learn more about the most cutting- edge products and services in the field of neurosurgery! DISCOVER CONNECT EXPERIENCE
  • 21. 8:00AM– 5:00PM SYM01: Neurosurgery Innovations CME not offered for this course. $300 Medical Annual Meeting Attendee $550 MedicalNon-AnnualMeetingAttendee Non-Medical Non-Annual Meeting Attendee Course Directors: Brian L. Hoh, Steven N. Kalkanis Course Faculty: Gene H. Barnett, Bob S. Carter, E. Antonio Chiocca, Brad Clayton, Ralph G. Dacey, Jr., Adam Elesser, Richard G. Fessler, Kevin T. Foley, Douglas Garrabrant, Roger Hartl, Robert F. Heary, William F. Hoffman, James McCollough, Mark L. Rosenblum, Robert H. Rosenwasser, John E. Schellhorn, Erol Veznedaroglu, Felix von Coerper, Max Wallace, Tom Wilder Course Description: Engage in open dialogue about the future of cerebrovascular/ endovascular, spine, and brain tumor neurosurgery. Neuromedicine is among the most rapidly growing areas in surgery and medicine, and novel technologies in devices, imaging, biomaterials, molecular diagnostics, and regenerative medicine are leading this field forward. This all-day open forum will include faculty of key thought-leaders in neurosurgery, chief executive officers, and lead engineers, with expertise in the cutting-edge technologies of the future in cerebrovascular/endovascular, spine, and brain tumor neurosurgery. The open forum will enable participants, faculty, and panelists to engage in free dialogue for the purpose of collectively pushing the field forward. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to participate in this important event in the field of innovation and technology in neurosurgery. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss areas of need for new technology in cerebrovascular/endovascular, spine, and brain tumor neurosurgery. Discuss innovative technologies in the pipeline in cerebrovascular/endovascular, spine and brain tumor neurosurgery. Opening Remarks Ashwini D. Sharan Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery Technology and Innovation The WEB Aneurysm Embolization System Tom Wilder Sequent Medical Discussion Tulleken Sutureless Laser Bypass Surgery Felix von Coerper ELANA Discussion Future Endovascular Devices and the ICH Endoscope Adam Elsesser Penumbra Open Discussion Forum Ralph G. Dacey, Jr., Robert H. Rosenwasser iMRI Technology for Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery Douglas Garrabrant Advanced OR Technologies Discussion Novel Endovascular Aneurysm Device Erol Veznedaroglu Capital Institute for Neurosciences Discussion Open Discussion Forum Break Spine Neurosurgery Technology and Innovation Biologics for Skeletoligamentous Regeneration Johnson Johnson Discussion Disruptive Biomaterials Globus Discussion Image Guidance-New Technologies on the Horizon Brad Clayton Medtronic Discussion Power Tools in Spinal Instrumentation for Preventing Occupational Injuries in Surgeons Stryker Discussion Intraoperative Molecular Navigation – Fluorescent Labeling for Peripheral Nerve Surgery Quygen T. Nguyen Discussion Open Discussion Forum Richard G. Fessler, Kevin T. Foley, Robert F. Heary, Roger Hartl Lunch SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIA 20 www.cns.org
  • 22. Brain Tumor Technology and Innovation Precision Medicine and Molecular Genomics Max Wallace Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure Discussion Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes) as Emerging Biomarkers for Disease James McCollough ExosomeDx Discussion Laser-Induced Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Brain Tumors: MRI-guided Laser Technology for Neurosurgery William H. Hoffman Visualase NeuroBlate Laser Thermal Therapy for Brain Tumors John Schellhorn MONTERIS Discussion Advances in Imaging and Neuronavigation David Simon, PhD MEDTRONIC Discussion Open Discussion Forum Gene H. Barnett, Bob S. Carter, Mark L. Rosenblum, E. Antonio Chiocca Cocktail Hour 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM SYM02: traumatic head injury $550 Medical Annual Meeting Attendee $750 Medical Non-Annual Meeting Attendee Course Directors: Raj K. Narayan, Jack Jallo Course Faculty: Julian E. Bailes Jr., Randall M. Chesnut, Jamshid Ghajar, Mathew Joseph, Geoffrey T. Manley, Andrew I. Maas, Andres M. Rubiano, Guy Rosenthal, Lori A. Shutter, Shelly D. Timmons, David W. Wright Course Description: This course presents current controversies relating to the surgical and non-surgical treatment of traumatic brain injury in adults. Newer monitoring techniques, as well as promising new therapies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Structure treatment plans around recent developments in this field. Discuss current management guidelines. Opening Remarks Hot Topics Clinical Trials – Past, Present and Future Neuromonitoring – When, Why and How? Geoffrey T. Manley Outcome Prediction – The Murky Crystal Ball Andrew I. Maas Concussion – Much Ado About Nothing? Julian E. Bailes Jr. Break and Hands-On with Exhibitors Controversies In Traumatic Brain Injury Monitoring Can Improve Outcomes in the Severe TBI Patient Yes: Geoffrey T. Manley No: Randall M. Chesnut Medications Can Improve Outcomes from TBI Yes: David Wright No: Guy Rosenthal Lunch MRI Can Improve Outcome Predictions in TBI Yes: Lori A. Shutter No: Shelly D. Timmons Guidelines Development Has Been Valuable in Improving Outcomes Yes: Jamshid Ghajar No: Break and Hands-On with Exhibitors TBI in Developing Countries Should be Managed Similarly to Developed Countries Yes: Andres M. Rubiano No: Mathew Joseph Repeated Concussions Result in CTE Yes: Julian E. Bailes Jr. No: Closing Remarks SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIA 21Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 23. 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM SYM03: Neuromodulation 2013: What Every Neurosurgeon Needs to Know $300 Medical Annual Meeting Attendee $550 Medical Non-Annual Meeting Attendee Course Directors: Michael G. Kaplitt, Parag G. Patil Course Faculty: Jin Woo Chang, Paul S. Larson, Robert M. Levy, Alon Y. Mogilner, Joseph Samir Neimat, Julie G. Pilitsis, Jean M. Regis, Konstantin V. Slavin, Donald M. Whiting Course Description: The evolution of neuromodulation is one of the fastest areas of growth in neurosurgery. This symposium provides a detailed view of the current state-of-the-art therapies to the most advanced research in the field. Focused upon practical knowledge and insights for community neurosurgeons and neurosurgeons in training, clinical applications and financial considerations are integrated into a comprehensive view of the neuromodulation field. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe current indications for neuromodulation therapies for pain, movement disorders, epilepsy and psychiatric conditions. Describe recent developments in neuromodulation technology. Describe clinical and financial considerations for the integration of neuromodulation therapies, including spinal stimulation, intrathecal drug delivery, and deep brain stimulation, into a busy community practice. Discuss future areas of neuromodulation therapy, including neural ablation, patient-responsive neuromodulation, optogenetics, gene therapies, and neuroprosthetics. What Every Neurosurgeon Needs to Know About Pain SCS for Back and Extremity Pain DRG and Root Stimulation for Pain Treating Nerve Injury Pain and CRPS Profitably Integrating SCS into Your Practice Break Neurosurgical Treatment of Cancer Pain Neurosurgical Treatment of Headache and Facial Pain Lunch What Every Neurosurgeon Needs to Know about Deep Brain Stimulation DBS for Parkinson’s Disease DBS for Tremor DBS for Dystonia Profitably Integrating DBS into Your Practice Break What Every Neurosurgeon Needs to Know about the Future DBS for Depression and OCD Back to the Future: Ablation in the 21st Century Responsive Neuromodulation and DBS for Epilepsy Neuroprosthetics and Optogenetics in Neurosurgery SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIA San Francisco Marriott Marquis San Francisco, CA Saturday, October 19, 2013 7:00 AM – 5:30 PM ANSPA will be holding its Fall Meeting in conjunction with the CNS Annual Meeting in San Francisco! ANSPA plans to offer a day of neurosurgical lectures from top experts in the field. Always an attendee favorite, this agenda will feature a panel discussion on current issues facing the Physician Assistant. Breakfast and lunch are included with the registration fee. Come to San Francisco to join your fellow PAs for a day of continuing education, networking and fun! New for 2013! There will be a Surgical Skills lab open to a limited number of registrants on Friday, October 18th. More details on this event and the meeting will be available at www.anspa.org. For more information, please contact: Erin McClure ANSPA CME Manager cme@anspa.org 22 www.cns.org
  • 24. SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIA 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM SYM04: STroke 2014 $300 Medical Annual Meeting Attendee $550 Medical Non-Annual Meeting Attendee Course Directors: Peter Kan, Adnan H. Siddiqui Course Faculty: Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, Ali Alaraj, Ricardo A. Hanel, Brian L. Hoh, Pascal Jabbour, Michael T. Lawton, Elad I. Levy, Demetrius K. Lopes, Cameron G. McDougall, J D. Mocco, Jacques J. Morcos, Rafael A. Ortiz, Stephen R. Ramee, Andrew J. Ringer, Lucie Thibault, Aquilla S. Turk Course Description: This course provides a forum for attendees to obtain the latest information about EC-IC bypass, medical and interventional therapies, and optimal treatments of intracranial aneurysms, as well as discussing the best methods for patient selection and advance imaging for acute stroke intervention. Additionally, the critical care management of aneurysmal and subarachnoid hemorrhage and acute ischemic stroke will be covered. Learning Objectives: Upon the completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the medical therapy for stroke prevention and acute thrombolysis. Review recent literature regarding the use of endovascular therapy for acute stroke. Review recent literature on endovascular and surgical revascularization (stenting versus EC-IC bypass). Discuss the optimal treatment of intracranial aneursyms including recent literature on flow-diversion. Welcome Peter Kan, Adnan H. Siddiqui Medical Therapy for Stroke: What is the Evidence? Secondary Prevention Peter Kan Thrombolytic Therapy Rafael A. Ortiz Interventional Therapy for Stroke: What is the Evidence? Secondary Prevention: PFO Closure, Left Atrial Appendage Closure Stephen R. Ramee Endovascular Therapy: PROACT, MERCI, PENUMBRA Andrew J. Ringer Stentrievers: SWIFT, TREVO Elad I. Levy IMSIII, MR RESCUE, SYNTHESIS J D. Mocco Break Breakout Session Patient Selection and Advance Imaging for Acute Stroke Intervention MRI-Based Imaging CT-Based Imaging Aquilla S. Turk Breakout Session Break Critical Care Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke Point/Counterpoint – Management of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease in the Post-SAMMRIS Era: Is There Still a Role for Stenting? Brian L. Hoh Lunch Break EC-IC Bypass:What is the Evidence? Sepideh Amin-Hanjani Breakout Session Break Optimal Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms Clipping for Intracranial Aneurysms Jacques J. Morcos Primary or Assisted Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms Cameron G. McDougall Deconstructive Strategies in Intracranial Aneurysms Pascal Jabbour Bypass for Intracranial Aneurysms Michael T. Lawton Flow Diversion in the Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms:When Should We Use It? Indications and Results from Published Studies Ricardo A. Hanel Complications Demetrius K. Lopes Insight into Platelet Function Studies Lucie Thibault Break Breakout Session Critical Care Management of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Ali Alaraj Discussion 23Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 25. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM complimentary PC01: Workshop on Grant Writing and Career Development Practical Didactic Course Directors: Steven J. Korn, Russell R. Lonser Course Faculty: Aviva Abosch, Edward F. Chang, E. Antonio Chiocca, Emad N. Eskandar, Walter J. Koroshetz, Story C. Landis, Linda M. Liau, David D. Limbrick, Gary W. Mathern, Kareem A. Zaghloul, Gregory J. Zipfel Course Description: Balancing a research career and clinical neurosurgery is challenging. A key to success is to master the art of grant writing. This course is led by faculty who have successfully obtained funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at different stages of their careers and faculty that sit or have sat on NIH study sections that review grants. Participants are encouraged to bring their own grant-in-progress; time will be set aside for the faculty to review these grants and provide individual instruction. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the methods for writing successful grants, for both the NIH and private foundations. Prepare their own grant applications based on tips and tricks that have helped the faculty write their own successful grants. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM $550 PC02: Brain Tumor Update Practical Didactic tumor Course Directors: Andrew T. Parsa, Jason P. Sheehan Course Faculty: Manish K. Aghi, Frederick G. Barker, John A. Boockvar, Franco DeMonte, Michael Lim, Russell R. Lonser, Mark E. Shaffrey, Michael E. Sughrue, Charles Teo, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Isaac Yang Course Description: This course will include current research topics but emphasizes practical management issues. It will provide an up-to-date overview of current management strategies for major types of glial tumors including astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and others. Treatment strategies for major types of benign and malignant brain tumors of non-glial origin will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Formulate treatment plans based on the state-of-the-art management of benign and malignant brain tumors including meningiomas, acoustic neuromas, skull base tumors, pediatric tumors and metastases. Incorporate current concepts in glioma management including surgical techniques, adjuvant treatments, tumor biology and clinical management decisions into their treatment plans. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM $1,600 PC03: Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery (Cadaver Course) Practical hands-on Spine and Peripheral Nerves Course Directors: Richard G. Fessler, John C. Liu Course Faculty: Nader S. Dahdaleh, Kurt M. Eichholz, Langston T. Holly, Robert E. Isaacs, Bong-Soo Kim, John E. O’Toole, Alfred T. Ogden, Avelino Parajon, Mick J. Perez-Cruet, Faheem A. Sandhu, Zachary Adam Smith, Trent Lane Tredway, Jean-Marc Voyadzis Course Description: This course will focus on minimally invasive procedures for cervical and lumbar spine surgery. Techniques for decompression, fixation, and fusion will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Incorporate various minimally invasive techniques into their approach for cervical and lumbar spine surgery. Identify the indications, results and potential complications for these procedures. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $25 PC04: So, You Want to be a Neurosurgeon? Medical Students/Residents Course Practical Didactic Course Directors: Aviva Abosch, Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris Course Faculty: Frederick A Boop, Susan Chang, Daniel Robert Fassett, Neil A. Martin, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Daniel A. Lim, Nathan R. Selden Course Description: This is a novel practical course, intended for Medical Students, Residents and Fellows. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Provide an overview of US Neurosurgery Residency Programs, application process, and how to interview. Describe strategies for successful residency training, clinical training, guaranteeing a productive research experience and passing the written boards. Demystify fellowship training and sub- specialization through an overview of sub-specialties with neurosurgery and rationale for fellowship training. Provide a primer on neurosurgery careers – academic, private practice and hospital-based; statistics on employment type, negotiating a contact and avoiding burnout. Review basics of neuroradiology and neuro-anatomy, including spinal, cerebral and vascular anatomy, and neuroimaging fundamentals. Review neurosurgical emergencies (cauda equina, epidural/subdural/subarachnoid hemorrhage, TBI, SCI) and provide an overview of neurological examination for the Neurosurgeon. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC05: Neurosurgery Board Review Practical Didactic all Course Director: Allan D. Levi Course Faculty: James S. Harrop, Thomas J. Leipzig, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Robert J. Spinner Course Description: This course will provide an in-depth review of likely oral board questions and topics. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss strategies for studying and mastering a wide range of typical exam-style questions. Plan a timeline for case collection, submission, studying and practice sessions. SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM PRACTICAL COURSES 24 www.cns.org
  • 26. Focus on high-yield clinical scenarios very likely to appear on the exam. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC06: Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Radiculopathy: Treatment Approaches and Options Practical Didactic Spine and Peripheral Nerves Course Directors: Michael G. Kaiser, Regis W. Haid, Jr. Course Faculty: Kurt M. Eichholz, James S. Harrop, Langston T. Holly, John E. O’Toole Course Description: This course will present the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and current diagnostic modalities involved in the care of cervical degenerative disease. The indications, techniques and complications associated with the operative management of cervical degenerative disease, including correction of degenerative deformities, will be reviewed through lectures, case-presentations and hands-on practical exercises. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify the appropriate indications and recommend state-of-the-art techniques for surgical management of degenerative disease of the cervical spine. Establish steps to avoid common complications. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC07: Open Aneurysm Surgery: A 3-D Practical Course Practical Didactic Cerebrovascular Course Directors: Michael T. Lawton, Byron Gregory Thompson, Jr. Course Faculty: Fady T. Charbel, Ali F. Krisht, Jacques J. Morcos, Troy D. Payner, Howard A. Riina Course Description: This course will discuss optimal approaches for management of intracranial aneurysms. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Analyze case presentations of patients presenting with intracranial aneurysms to select the optimal (endovascular or microsurgical) approach. Interpret advanced preoperative imaging evaluation to maximize effectiveness of preoperative surgical planning. Plan for skull base approaches for anterior and posterior circulation aneurysm surgery in order to optimize exposure for complex aneurysms. Initiate adjunctive intraoperative imaging techniques to optimize obliteration of cerebral aneurysms with preservation of parent and branch vasculature. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC08: Neurosurgical Approaches to the Pain Patient: Patient Selection, Techniques, and Complication Avoidance Practical Didactic pain Course Directors: Julie G. Pilitsis, Joshua M. Rosenow Course Faculty: Steven M. Falowski, Krishna Kumar, Jonathan Miller, Sean J. Nagel, Parag G. Patil, William S. Rosenberg Course Description: This course will discuss pain management techniques. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Illustrate the physiology and operative techniques of recent advances in neurosurgical pain management. Determine the current role of ablative neurosurgical procedures for pain. Determine how to efficiently and effectively perform pain procedures in a busy neurosurgical practice. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC09: Using Evidence-Based Medicine to Manage Spinal Disorders Practical Didactic Spine and Peripheral Nerves Course Directors: Peter D. Angevine, John E. O’Toole Course Faculty: Mark H. Bilsky, Andrew T. Dailey, Daniel J. Hoh, Michael G. Kaiser Course Description: This course will discuss spinal tumors,degenerative cervical and lumbar disease, use of biological substances, and minimally invasive techniques. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify use of biological substances and minimally invasive techniques for spinal disorders. Incorporate the latest evidence into their management of spinal disorders. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC10: Trauma Update: Spinal Cord Injury Guidelines and Best Practices Practical Didactic Spine and Peripheral Nerves Course Directors: Michael G. Fehlings, James S. Harrop Course Faculty: Bizhan Aarabi, Steven Casha, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Mohammed F. Shamji Course Description: This course will discuss classification of spinal trauma and principles of management and treatment of spinal cord injury. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Incorporate the classification of spinal trauma, principles of management of spinal cord injury (SCI). Implement the appropriate use of steroids and the timing of surgery and the principles of managing cervical, thoracic and thoracolumbar spine injuries into treatment plans. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC11: Masters of Cranial Neuroendoscopy Practical Didactic pediatrics, tumor Course Directors: Alan R. Cohen, James M. Drake Course Faculty: Daniel J. Guillaume, John Anthony Jane, David F. Jimenez, David D. Limbrick, Charles Teo Course Description: This course will cover the management of pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, hydrocephalus, intraventricular tumors and cysts and other skull base tumors. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM PRACTICAL COURSES 25Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 27. Compose management practices for skull base tumors. Discuss the use of endoscopy for intracranial applications including endonasal and intraventricular approaches. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC12: Implementing Quality Improvement in Neurosurgery: Raising Quality, Lower Cost, and Maximizing Compensation Practical Didactic socioeconomic Course Directors: William A. Friedman, Stephen J. Haines, Neil A. Martin, Nader Pouratian Course Faculty: Dong H. Kim, Nancy McLaughlin Course Description: The course provides a comprehensive introduction to implementing quality improvement in a neurosurgical program or practice. While delivering quality care has always been an expectation, Medicare mandates and reimbursements, public reporting, and evidence-based practice guidelines now mandate that physicians and neurosurgeons actively engage in the process of delivering and improving quality care. The goals of developing a quality improvement program are to optimize patient care using an evidence-based approach and to minimize the cost of health care, thereby providing the best value to patients and payors. Participants will learn in this interactive practical course that implementing quality improvement in neurosurgery requires recognition of evidence-based best-practice guidelines, models for implementations, and continuous measurement to assess success and outcomes. In this course, participants will learn about the history of quality improvement and lessons learned from the aviation industry, which has made great strides in standardizing safety. Participants will also learn about complementary methods of clinical research and process improvement to improve patient outcome. The course will specifically explore the neurosurgical quality improvement landscape and areas for prioritization. Finally, participants will learn about how to increase value in neurosurgery, by cutting costs, decreasing waste and utilization, and improvement patient outcomes and satisfaction, and leveraging these improvements to augment physician compensation. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Explain how aviation industry quality improvements have been successfully applied in surgery Describe the concept of “just culture” Describe how to implement and sustain comprehensive value based quality improvement Explain how to track clinical quality improvement Apply concepts to cut costs, decrease utilization and thereby increase revenue and compensation Complimentary to 12:30 – 4:00 PM Program Directors PC13: RRC Next Accreditation System, Milestones, and the Neurosurgery Matrix Practical Didactic Course Directors: H. Hunt Batjer, Nathan R. Selden Course Faculty: Pamela L. Derstine Course Description: This course will be particularly useful for Residency Program Directors, Associate Program Directors, Program Coordinators, Department Chairs, and other faculty and educational leaders in academic neurosurgery centers. The course will cover the dynamic changes now occurring in the RRC Common Program Requirements and Neurosurgery Residency Program Requirements, the RRC Milestones Curriculum initiative, and the Neurosurgery Matrix Curriculum. Details of these new Neurosurgery residency curricular initiatives, due to roll out in all ACGME accredited programs in July 2013, will be reviewed by members of the Neurosurgery RRC, the ACGME, and the Society of Neurological Surgeons Committee on Resident Education (CoRE). Best practices and compliance with the latest resident duty hour regulations will also be covered. Time for questions and interactive discussion with panel members will be provided. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify the principal new requirements for ACGME accredited neurological surgery residencies. Describe the principal components of the ACGME Milestones teaching and assessment system. Identify curricular resources being provided by the Society of Neurological Surgeons Matrix Curriculum. Design strategies for programs at their institution to keep up with changing curricular requirements and best practices. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC14: 3-D Anatomy (Supratentorial) Practical Didactic cerebrovascular, Pediatrics, tumor Course Directors: Albert L. Rhoton, Jr. Course Description: This course will provide three-dimensional microsurgical instruction on the following topics: routes through the anterior and posterior cerebrum and temporal lobe; anatomy and approaches to the lateral and third ventricles and pineal region; anterior skull base and cavernous sinus; and transsphenoidal, transmaxillary and transoral approaches. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Plan the routes through the anterior and posterior cerebrum and temporal lobe. Identify the anatomy and approaches to the lateral and third ventricles and pineal region, the anterior skull base and cavernous sinus and transsphenoidal, transmaxillary and transoral approaches. SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM PRACTICAL COURSES 26 www.cns.org
  • 28. SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM DINNER SEMINARS 5:30 – 8:00 PM $190 Dinner Seminar 2: Working with Your Hospital Moderator: Alex B. Valadka Faculty: James R. Bean, Deborah L. Benzil, Robert E. Harbaugh, Edie E. Zusman Learning Objectives: Upon the completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the impact of proposed new physician payment structures on clinical practice. Describe challenges facing academic, private practice and hybrid neurosurgeons. Each Dinner Seminar includes a three- course plated dinner and wine service. Transportation will be provided. 6:00 – 6:05 PM Introduction Alex B. Valadka 6:05 - 6:25 PM The Value of a Neurosurgeon Edie E. Zusman 6:25 – 6:45 PM Neurosurgical Practice in a Large Multispecialty Group Deborah L. Benzil 6:45 – 7:05 PM Hospital Employment of Neurosurgeons: Rationale, Advantages, Disadvantages James R. Bean 7:05 – 7:25 PM Hospital Support for Academic Work Robert E. Harbaugh 7:25 – 8:00 PM Questions and Discussion Boulevard Surrounded by Pat Kuleto’s timeless Belle Epoque inspired design, Chef Oakes wonderful expression of American regional flavors with a French influenced style has made Boulevard a culinary landmark on San Francisco’s revived Embarcadero waterfront. Nancy Oaks, Chef and Co-Owner of Boulevard, was named best chef in California in 2010 by the James Beard Foundation. 5:30 – 8:00 PM $190 Dinner Seminar 1: Brain Metastases Guidelines Moderator: Steven N. Kalkanis Faculty: David W. Andrews, Timothy C. Ryken Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe changes in management strategies for brain metastasis. Integrate brain metastasis guidelines into clinical practice. Each Dinner Seminar includes a three- course plated dinner and wine service. Transportation will be provided. 6:00 – 6:15 PM Introduction Steven N. Kalkanis 6:15 – 6:35 PM Brain Mets Should Come Out! Timothy C. Ryken 6:35 – 6:45 PM Discussion 6:45 – 7:05 PM Brain Mets Should be Treated with Radiosurgery Only David W. Andrews 7:05 – 7:15 PM Discussion 7:15 – 7:35 PM Newer Treatments for Brain Mets Steven N. Kalkanis 7:35 – 7:45 PM Discussion 7:45 – 8:00 PM Wrap-up Farallon Located in San Francisco’s popular Union Square area, Farallon is a resemblance of a beautiful underwater fantasy that has proven to be the ideal setting for sophisticated “coastal cuisine” menu created by Chef Franz. 27Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 29. SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM PRACTICAL COURSES 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM $1,600 PC15: Endoscopic and Keyhole Approaches to Anterior Skull Base (Cadaver Course) Practical hands-on Tumor Course Directors: Zachary N. Litvack, Charles Teo Course Faculty: Garni Barkhoudarian, Sebastien Froelich, Jeremy D.W. Greenlee, Caroline Hayhurst, Nikolai J. Hopf, Daniel F. Kelly, Daniel M. Prevedello, Jonathan H. Sherman, Michael E. Sughrue Course Description: This course is designed for neurosurgeons interested in adding minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to their arsenal. The full- day clinic will provide a combination of didactic lectures, prosections and mentored hands-on practice in minimally invasive approaches to the Anterior Skull Base. Participants will have the opportunity to learn a number of approaches including the Supraciliary (“Eyebrow”) Craniotomy, Mini-Pterional Craniotomy with a focus on endoscopic visualization from faculty from around the world. Additionally, a significant portion of the course will cover expanded endoscopic endonasal approaches to the anterior cranial fossa. Panel discussions will review indications and outcomes, along with ‘tricks of the trade.’ A large portion of each block will be spent at the bench practicing the approaches with faculty mentorship. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe 3-D anatomy of the anterior skull base as it applies to keyhole surgery. Discuss indications for keyhole approaches, and avoid common miss- steps and complications. Demonstrate acquisition of new manual surgical skills in approach and dissection of the anterior cranial fossa for a number of pathologies. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM Complimentary PC16: Simulation-Based Neurosurgical Training Practical hands-on Course Directors: James S. Harrop, Darlene A. Lobel Course Faculty: Bernard R. Bendok, Peter Campbell, Rohan Chitale, Aaron S. Dumont, James B. Elder, Aruna Ganju, George M. Ghobrial, Daniel J. Hoh, Pascal Jabbour, Thomas Kerwin, Elad I. Levy, J D. Mocco, Gregory J. Murad, Daniel M. Prevedello, Wilson Zachary Ray, Daniel Refai, Andrew J. Ringer, Clemens M. Schirmer, Nathan R. Selden, Warren R. Selman, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Harminder Singh, Erol Veznedaroglu Course Description: This course utilizes simulation-based training techniques to educate neurosurgical residents in skills necessary to manage patients with traumatic brain injury, spine trauma and deformity, cerebrovascular disorders, and skull-base tumors. The course incorporates both didactic and hands-on training using state-of-the-art simulators, including virtual reality-based and physical models. Participants can expect one-on-one training with faculty experts in the subspecialty modules. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Demonstrate proficiency using realistic simulators for craniotomy for trauma, placement of an external ventricular drain, cervical spine decompression and lumbar pedicle screw placement, repair of CSF leak, performance of cerebral angiogram, and performance of retrosigmoid craniotomy. Interpret indications for and basic concepts and techniques in management of traumatic brain injury, degenerative spine disease, cerebrovascular disease, and skull base tumors. A $250 registration fee is required to guarantee a seat in this course. Upon completion, the $250 registration fee will be refunded in its entirety. This course is for PGY3, PGY4 and PGY5 residents. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC17: 2013 CPT Coding Update Practical didactic socioeconomic Course Director: Alexander Mason, John K. Ratliff Course Faculty: Kim Pollock, Karin R. Swartz, Luis M. Tumialan Course Description: This course summarizes the anticipated CPT 2013 coding changes and also reviews the 2013 coding changes that affect neurosurgeons. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Apply new and revised CPT coding concepts to key neurosurgical and reporting services with CPT codes and modifiers in order to effectively protect surgical and evaluation/management reimbursement. Strategize how to avoid compliance issues with regard to new regulations. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC18: Practical Spine Biomechanics for Clinical Practice Practical didactic Spine and Peripheral Nerves Course Directors: Edward C. Benzel, Tyler R. Koski Course Faculty: Zoher Ghogawala, Langston T. Holly, John H. Shin Course Description: This course will present the physical principles and biomechanical foundations of spinal surgery and stabilization via a didactic and interactive case discussion format. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Integrate biomechanical principles and strategies into their surgical planning. Strategize to avoid and manage complications. 28 www.cns.org
  • 30. SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM PRACTICAL COURSES 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC19: 3-D Anatomy (Infratentorial) Practical didactic Course Director: Albert L. Rhoton, Jr. Course Description: This course will provide three-dimensional microsurgical instruction on the anatomy and approaches through the temporal bone; cerebellum and fourth ventricle; far lateral and transcondylar approaches; approaches to the cerebellopontine angle; and the anatomy and approaches to the jugular foramen. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the anatomy of the temporal bone; cerebellum and fourth ventricle; far lateral and transcondylar approaches; approaches to the cerebellopontine angle; and the anatomy and approaches to the jugular foramen. Discuss the three-dimensional neurovascular relationships of each region. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC20: Surgical Management of Tumors in Eloquent Regions Practical Didactic tumor Course Directors: Andrew H. Kaye, Guy M. McKhann Course Faculty: Giuseppe Barbagallo, Edward F. Chang, Jorge A. Gonzalez-Martinez, Andrew Morokoff Course Description: This course will present surgical management of tumors within eloquent areas of the brain, including brain mapping, planning and avoidance of technical errors. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify the indications for surgical management of tumors within eloquent areas of the brain. Integrate current technologies for pre-operative and intra-operative brain mapping for tumors in eloquent cortex and fiber tracts into surgical planning by recognizing how they can enhance the safety of surgery, while considering their limitations. Strategize how to avoid common technical errors in brain mapping techniques. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC21: Building a Neurosciences Program Practical Didactic socioeconomic Course Director: Steven A. Toms Course Faculty: P. David Adelson, James M. Ecklund, Robert M. Friedlander, John Pracyk, Gary K. Steinberg Course Description: The development of a neurosciences program is a complex enterprise involving the initiation and maintenance of a multitude of institutional and departmental relationships. Although there are significant advantages in an integrated neurosciences program, significant coordination and entry barriers can impede the program growth. This course will describe steps in neuroscience program development, differentiation, and maturation in order to aid participants in launching and coordinating their own neuroscience programs. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe how a coordinated neuroscience program differs from a neurosurgery department or practice. Review the structures under which neuroscience programs can be formed. Discuss how neuroscience programs are necessary for hospital platforms and accountable care organizations. Assess mechanisms of neuroscience program governance. Analyze the methods by which neuroscience programs can differentiate your practice. Demonstrate the roles of research and quality metrics in developing a neuroscience program. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC22: Negotiation Tactics from the Experts – Getting the Best Deal (Hospital Negotiations) Practical Didactic socioeconomic Course Directors: Deborah L. Benzil, Alex B. Valadka Course Faculty: Daniel L. Barrow, Gary M. Bloomgarden, Troy D. Payner, James T. Rutka, Edie E. Zusman Course Description: This course will teach you the critical tools you need to effectively negotiate with your hospital administration. These strategies will also prove invaluable in many other negotiation environments. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe principles of negotiation. Identify specific methods of maximizing chances of achieving goals during a negotiation. 8:00 – 11:30 AM $450 PC23: How to Develop/ Participate in Clinical Trials Practical Didactic socioeconomic Course Directors: Mark E. Linskey, Andrew E. Sloan Course Faculty: Manish K. Aghi, David W. Andrews, Frederick George Barker, Susan Chang, Frederick F. Lang, Russell R. Lonser, Jeffrey J. Olson, Andrew T. Parsa Course Description: This course will look at how to develop and participate both device and drug trials, including a focus on multi-institution collaboration, IRB and consent process approval, interfacing with drug and/or device companies, for all subspecialties. 29Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 31. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC24: My Worst Spinal Complication: What I Learned Practical Didactic Spine and Peripheral Nerves Course Directors: Charles Kuntz, IV, Christopher I. Shaffrey Course Faculty: Robert Bohinski, Regis W. Haid, Laurence D. Rhines, Michael P. Steinmetz, Vincent C. Traynelis, Juan S. Uribe Course Description: This course will present and review the avoidance, evaluation, pathophysiology, and treatment of surgical complications. Contemporary avoidance, evaluation, and management of surgical complications remain controversial. Despite significant medical advances, surgical complications can result in poor clinical outcomes and increased medical costs. There is a need for a better understanding of these surgical complications. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Integrate contemporary evaluation and pathophysiology recognition of spinal complications. Develop complication avoidance and management strategies for their current treatment plans. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC25: Neurocritical Care and Neurosurgical Emergencies Update Practical Didactic trauma Course Directors: Jack Jallo, Christopher J. Madden Course Faculty: Kamran Athar, Ian E. McCutcheon, John K. Ratliff, Jonathan A. White Course Description: This course will promote rapid identification and a better understanding of the management of neurosurgical emergencies. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Design key management strategies for emergencies involving the brain, spine and peripheral nerves. Evaluate the current evidence for patient specific therapies. Apply the latest modalities in the management and understanding of neurosurgical emergencies. Identify controversies in management of these emergencies, considering the role of the surgeon in emergency neurosurgery. Discuss the physiology of a variety of neurosurgical emergencies. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC26: Innovation and Intellectual Property Development: From Concept to Company Practical Didactic socioeconomic Course Directors: Richard G. Fessler, Erol Veznedaroglu Course Faculty: John M. Abrahams, L. Nelson Hopkins, John Kilcoyne, Elad I. Levy, Stephen R. Ramee, Gwen Watanabe Course Description: This course will review approaches to intellectual property development. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Evaluate methods to transform intellectual property into viable products. Determine the value of developing intellectual property to the neurosurgeon and to Neurosurgery as a specialty. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC27: Cranial Neurosurgery: Complication Avoidance and Management Practical Didactic Course Directors: William T. Couldwell, Jack P. Rock Course Faculty: Ossama Al-Mefty, Allan H. Friedman, Raj K. Narayan, Robert H. Rosenwasser Course Description: This course will use case presentations, didactic lectures and interaction with faculty to provide clinical scenarios that may result in complications. Appropriate management will be reviewed. Will discuss strategies designed to anticipate complications so that they may be avoided. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify common complications associated with a variety of cranial procedures. Plan strategies to avoid and manage them. 12:30 – 4:00 PM $450 PC28: Cranial and Spinal Radiosurgery Update Practical Didactic Stereotactic and Functional Course Directors: Randy L. Jensen, Andrew E. Sloan Course Faculty: Steven D. Chang, Michael W. McDermott, Jason P. Sheehan Course Description: This course will discuss the appropriate use of various radiosurgery delivery platforms for benign and malignant cranial lesions. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participantes shoud be able to: Recommend radiosurgery more safely by recognizing the appropriate use of radiosurgery for benign and malignant cranial lesions. Differentiate between the various radiosurgery delivery platforms. Implement radiosurgery delivery techniques to avoid injury to intracranial neurovascular structures. Identify the indications for the use of radiosurgery for functional disorders and pain. Apply techniques learned in this course to formulate a radiosurgery plan for a given cranial pathology. 1:00 – 3:00 PM CNS Resident SANS Challenge Preliminary Rounds Zachary Litvack, Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM PRACTICAL COURSES 30 www.cns.org
  • 32. SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 1:30 – 4:00 PM ORIGINAL SCIENCE PROGRAM 1:30 – 4:00 PM Multidisciplinary Oral Presentations i MoDerators: Bharat Guthikonda, Amir R. Dehdashti learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: inspect the findings of novel neurosurgical studies, critique the design and methodology of these studies. list important areas for further knowledge development and research. identify the most important ongoing clinical trials. 1:30 – 2:30 PM Guest Lecturers 2:30 – 2:37 PM 100 Utility of Hematologic Labs Following Lumbar Fusion Andrew Y Yew, Haydn Hoffman, Charles Li, Daniel C. Lu 2:37 – 2:44 PM 101 Clinical Course after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty according to the Type of Single Level Herniated Lumbar Disc with 12 Months Follow-up Gyu Yeul Ji, Chang Hyun Oh, Junho Lee, Jung Hoon Kim, Dong Ah Shin 2:44 – 2:51 PM 102 Validation and Modification of a Predictive Model of Post- resection Hydrocephalus in Pediatric Patients with Posterior Fossa Tumors Paul Foreman, Samuel McCluggage, Robert Partlow Naftel, Christoph Johannes Griessenauer, Benjamin J. Ditty, Bonita Agee, Jay Riva-Cambrin, John C. Wellons, III 2:51 – 2:58 PM 103 Evaluation of the Immediate Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in the Treatment of Refractory ICP in Cases of Traumatic Brain Injury. Experience of a Tertiary Care Trauma Center in Alexandria, Egypt Mohamed E. El-Fiki 2:58 – 3:05 PM 104 Risk Factors and Long-Term Survival in Adult Patients with Primary Malignant Spinal Cord Astrocytomas Albert Wong, Rishi R Lall, Nader S. Dahdaleh, Richard G. Fessler, Zachary A Smith, Sandi Lam 3:05 – 3:12 PM 105 DBS Lead Proximity to DTI-based Sensory Thalamus Correlates with Pain Relief Won Kim, Jason Scott Hauptman, Nader Pouratian 3:12 – 3:19 PM 106 ProvenCare® Lumbar Spine: Reengineering Care Delivery for Elective Lumbar Spine Fusion (LSF) Surgery. Jonathan Slotkin, Mauricio Campos-Benitez, Greg F. Burke, David A. Andreychik, W. Fred Hess, Karen E. McKinley, Michel Lacroix, Steven A. Toms 3:19 – 3:26 PM 107 Dose-Finding and Safety Study of an Oncolytic Polio/ Rhinovirus Recombinant against Recurrent Glioblastoma John H. Sampson, Annick Desjardins, Katherine B Peters, Tulika Ranjan, Gordana Vlahovic, Denise Lally-Goss, Stevie Threatt, James Herndon, Allan H. Friedman, Henry Friedman, Darell Bigner, Matthias Gromeier 3:26 – 3:33 PM 108 Human Electrocorticography- based Stimulation David Keisho Su, Jeremiah D Wander, Lise Johnson, Devapratim Sarma, Eberhard E. Fetz, Jeffrey G. Ojemann 3:33 – 3:40 PM 109 Submaximal Angioplasty Prospective Registry: Preliminary Report Travis Michael Dumont, Maxim Mokin, Jorge Luis Eller, Grant C. Sorkin, Kenneth V. Snyder, L. Nelson Hopkins, III, Adnan Hussain Siddiqui, Elad I. Levy 3:40 – 3:47 PM 110 A Novel 6-item Outcome Instrument (VNI-6) for Assessing the Effectiveness of Cervical Surgery in Registry Efforts Saniya S. Godil, Matthew J. McGirt 3:47 – 3:54 PM 111 Surgical Outcomes in a Modern Series of Low-grade Gliomas Undergoing Surgical Resection Josiah N. Orina, Shanna Fang, Fredric B. Meyer, Ian F. Parney 1:00 – 3:00 pM CNS RESIDENT SANS CHALLENGE PRELIMINARY ROUNDS AR EYOU T HAN ...? ARRRARA EEE R E R YOYOY UUOUO TT HAAHAH NNNNANAANA ...?SMARTER DON’T MISS the 2013 CNS Resident SANS Challenge Preliminary Rounds! This year, our new format Are You Smarter Than...? will put nine domestic and three international training programs head-to-head. 31Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 33. 10 N. Martingale Road, Suite 190 Schaumburg, Illinois 60173 Phone: 847.240.2500 • Fax: 847.240.0804 Toll-free: 877.517.1CNS info@1cns.org • www.cns.org Register today at www.cns.org! Look for these highlights specifically designed for neurosurgeons-in-training! l New Course: So You Want to Be A Neurosurgeon l New CNS Resident SANS Challenge Format Are You Smarter than…? l Complimentary housing available on a first-come, first-served basis l Reduced registration to all Luncheon Seminars l Complimentary registration to: w PC16:Simulation Based Neurosurgical Training ($250 deposit required) w Daily Honored Guest Resident Luncheon Seminars .NETWORKwith leaders and up-and-comers who are making a difference! .EXPLOREthe latest research and developments! .CONNECTwithother young neurosurgeons! .GAINnew skills from a world-class faculty! Neurosurgeons-in-training: Obtain the skills and techniques necessary to advance our field forward at the 2013 CNS Annual Meeting!
  • 34. GENERAL SCIENTIFIC SESSION I 4:30 – 6:30 PM p San Francisco Marriott Marquis MoDerators: Alan M. Scarrow, Ashwini D. Sharan learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: identify trends in facial region mapping. Discuss the science of pain. incorporate the latest knowledge in neurovascular neurosurgery into current treatment plans. Discuss the process of creativity. 4:30 – 4:35 pM Introduction Alan M. Scarrow, Ashwini D. Sharan, 4:35 – 4:55 pM The Evolution of Functional Anatomy, the Face as Paradigm Dennis Spencer 4:55 – 5:00 pM Introduction of Honored Guest Robert F. Spetzler HonorED gUESt lECtUrE Breaking Down the Silos of Medicine: The Future of Vascular Neurosurgery L. Nelson Hopkins, III 5:00 – 5:20 pM 5:20 – 5:23 pM Introduction of Special Lecture Bernard R. Bendok FEatUrED SpEaKEr Evolution of Space Discovery Charles Elachi Director, Jet propulsion lab 5:23 – 5:44 pM 5:44 – 5:47 pM Introduction of Special Lecture Julie G. Pilitsis FEatUrED SpEaKEr Evolving Science of Pain Allan Basbaum, PhD, FRS professor and Chairman of the Department of anatomy at UCSF 5:47 – 6:07 pM 6:07 – 6:10 pM Introduction of Thompson Lecture Alan M. Scarrow JoHntHoMpSon lECtUrE Where Good Ideas Come From Steven Johnson best-Selling author 6:10 – 6:30 pM SUNDAY,OCTOBER20 Opening Reception SuNDAY, oCtoBEr 20 6:30 – 8:30 PM Live music, entertainment and a delicious spread of food and beverages await you at the 2013 CNS Opening Reception. Mingle with colleagues while enjoying a relaxed and festive evening at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis. 33Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 35. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS 2:00 – 5:00 PM Original Science Program 3:30 – 5:00 PM Operative neurosurgery 2:00 – 3:30 PM CONSENSUS SESSION 5:00 – 6:30 PM International Reception 34 www.cns.org
  • 36. GENERAL SCIENTIFIC SESSION II 7:00 – 11:30 AM p Moscone West Convention Center MONDAY,OCTOBER21 Presiding Officer: Daniel K. Resnick Moderators: Michael P. Steinmetz, Michael Y. Wang Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: Evaluate the latest innovations in spine surgery – with a particular broad focus on how it relates to vascular lesions in the spine and spinal oncology. Discuss the socioeconomic issues changing in the current environment. Describe how changes in health care economics will affect the practice of neurosurgery. Discuss the new cervical spine guidelines particularly in the changing paradigm of steroid use in spinal cord injury. Implement a strategy to critically review a recent journal publication in the field of spine. Describe the current and evolving strategies of surgically managing epilepsy. 7:00 – 7:04 AM CNS Foundation Richard W. Byrne 7:04 – 7:18 AM Spinal Vascular Malformations Dural AVF – How, When Why Cameron G. McDougall 7:18 – 7:32 AM Outcomes Research and Patient Access to Spine Care: Lessons Learned and Implications for the Future of Spine Surgery John K. Ratliff 7:32 – 7:46 AM Spinal Oncology: from XRT, Surgery, Radiosurgery Peter C. Gerszten 7:46 – 8:00 AM Spinal Technologies Not in the USA Domagoj Coric 8:00 – 8:23 AM Controversy: Spinal Cord Injury and Steroids: Reality, Data, Guidelines – Now What? Moderator: James S. Harrop R. John Hurlbert vs. Michael G. Fehlings 8:23 – 8:33 AM Editor’s Choice Spine Paper Daniel K. Resnick 8:33 – 8:47 AM Operative Pearls: Tackling Challenges in Aneurysm and AVM Surgery Aaron Cohen-Gadol 8:47 – 9:00 AM Introduction of CNS Resident Award and CNS Getch Fellowship Award to Hai Sun Steven N. Kalkanis CNS Resident Award Electrophysiological Evidence of the Efference Copy in Human Voluntary Movements CNS Getch Fellowship Award Characterization of Interactions Between Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) and Primanry Motor Cortex (M1) During Human Movement Using Electrocorticography (ECoG) 9:00 – 10:00 AM E X H I B I T HALL B REA K 10:00 – 10:03 AM Introduction of Honored Guest George A. Ojemann HONORED GUEST Epilepsy Surgery and the Evolution of Clinical and Translational Science Johannes Schramm 10:03 – 10:23 AM 10:23 – 10:26 AM Introduction of CNS President Presidential Address Ali R. Rezai 10:26 – 10:51 AM 10:51 – 10:54 AM Introduction of Walter E. Dandy Orator WALTER E. DANDY ORATOR Itzhak Perlman Reigning Virtuoso of the Violin 10:54 – 11:30 AM 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM E X H I B I T HALL B REA K 35Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 37. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 12:30 – 2:00 PM LUNCHEON SEMINARS All Luncheon Seminars include a plated lunch served in the seminar room. Luncheon Seminar fees are $95 each ($75 for Residents/Fellows/Medical Students/Nurses/Physician Extenders) M01: Honored Guest Luncheon Cerebrovascular Complimentary to CNS Resident Members! Moderator: Johannes Schramm Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Recognize the importance of leadership principles at various stages in a neurosurgeon’s career. Understand the principles of developing a rewarding career as a neurosurgeon in academic or community practice. Explain how to develop an effective mentor /mentee relationship in the early phase of establishing their practice. M02: Cervical Arthroplasty and Lumbar Motion Preservation Technologies Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Regis W. Haid, Jr. Faculty: Richard G. Fessler, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Michael Y. Wang Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Analyze the current state-of-the-art cervical disc arthroplasty technology. Understand Lumbar Preservation Technologies. Determine indications for use of these technologies and potential complications. M03: Radiosurgery in Vestibular Schwannoma Management TUMOR Moderator: Steven L. Giannotta, Douglas Kondziolka Faculty: Jean M. Regis Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss modern indications for radiosurgical management of vestibular schwannoma. Review potential complications of vestibular schwannoma radiosurgery. Discuss future directions of radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. M04: Innovations in the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage cerebrovascular Moderator: Issam A. Awad Faculty: Neil A. Martin, Mario Zuccarello Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss natural history of intracerebral hemorrhage. Identify traditional surgical and new minimally invasive options for management of intracerebral hemorrhage. Interpret indications, outcomes, and complications from these approaches. M05: Managing Long-term Complications of Cervical and Lumbar Spine Surgery Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: William C. Welch Faculty: Bong-Soo Kim, Michael Y. Wang, Timothy Witham Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the causes of long-term post- operative spinal surgery complications. Discuss various treatment strategies available for the correction of long-term spinal surgery complications. M06: Managing Pediatric Neurovascular Diseases PEDIATRICS Moderator: Edward R. Smith Faculty: Peter B. Dirks, Cormac O. Maher Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the natural history and indications for treating pediatric neurovascular diseases. Review microsurgical, interventional and radiosurgical approaches to pediatric neurovascular diseases. M07: Peripheral Nerve Board Review Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Lynda Jun San Yang Faculty: Allen H. Maniker, Rajiv Midha, Robert J. Spinner Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Address the important peripheral nerve injuries frequently presented on board examinations. Demonstrate comprehension of the peripheral nerve physical examination. Explain how to manage peripheral nerve injury/disease surgically and non- surgically. M08: Strategies to Reduce Risk in Surgical Management of Tumors in Eloquent Regions TUMOR Moderator: Jeffrey S. Weinberg Faculty: Edward F. Chang, Florian Ringel Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify the unique anatomic and functional considerations required for surgical resection of tumors in eloquent cortex. Describe the utility of adjunctive tools in preparing for surgery in eloquent cortex. Determine the indications for surgery for tumors in eloquent cortex. M09: Neurosurgical Emergencies: An Update for Allied Health Care Professionals SOCIOECONOMIC Moderators: Michael P. Steinmetz, Erol Veznedaroglu Faculty: Ajit A. Krishnaney, Brian T. Ragel, Andrea L. Strayer Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the initial workup, triage and diagnosis of patients in need of emergency Neurosurgical care. Review critical care, open surgical and endovascular approaches to neurosurgical emergencies. MONDAY,OCTOBER21 36 www.cns.org
  • 38. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 12:30 – 2:00 PM LUNCHEON SEMINARS M10: Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Disease Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Praveen V. Mummaneni Faculty: Sanjay S. Dhall, Zoher Ghogawala, Daniel K. Resnick Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Assess the current literature on surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease. Analyze the indications and expected outcomes for various lumbar spine surgical procedures to improve their treatment plans. M11: Surgical Management of Meningiomas TUMOR Moderator: Philip H. Gutin Faculty: Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol, Michael W. Dermott, Daniel M. Prevedello Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Explain the surgical decision-making, approaches to, and complications of meningiomas of the anterior cranial base, visual pathways and the posterior fossa. Describe the place of radiation therapy and radiosurgery in the treatment of meningiomas. M12: New Technologies and Innovations In Spinal Neurosurgery Socioeconomic, Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderators: John C. Liu, John E. O’Toole Faculty: John Adler Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss state-of-the-art technologies in spinal neurosurgery. Describe recent innovations in the treatment of spinal diseases. M13: Multidisciplinary Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Vasospasm cerebrovascular Moderators: Robert H. Rosenwasser Faculty: C. Michael Cawley, E. Sander Connolly, Daniel L. Surdell Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Compare the current surgical, interventional and medical management of subarachnoid hemorrhage and vasospasm secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysms and vascular malformations. M14: Management of Complex and Refractory Chiari Malformations and Syringomyelia Pediatrics, Stereotactic and Functional Moderator: Richard G. Ellenbogen Faculty: Arthur J. DiPatri, David M. Frim, Matthew J. McGirt Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Consider various medical and surgical treatment options in the management of Chiari I malformations, their controversies and the differences in management of pediatric vs. adult Chiari I malformations. Incorporate new research relevant to the treatment of Chiari I malformations and syringomyelia into treatment plans. M15: Evidence-Based Management of Brain Metastases Stereotactic and Functional, Tumor Moderator: Raymond E. Sawaya Faculty: David W. Andrews, Robert J. Weil Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Analyze the current status of research pertaining to the treatment of brain metastases. Incorporate surgical and radiosurgical treatment options appropriate for treating intracranial metastases, their complications and results into their current management strategies. MONDAY,OCTOBER21 Earn Additional CME with the SANS Annual Meeting Supplemental exams! Continue your education after the Annual Meeting and earn one hour of additional CME credit with SANS supplemental exams! The supplemental exams for each of the following courses are available for only $15 each. Any Annual Meeting attendee can purchase – one or all – regardless of attendance at the live course. Practical Courses Brain Tumor Update (Tumor PC) Saturday, October 19 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM Using Evidence-Based Medicine to Manage Spinal Disorders (Spine PC) Saturday, October 19 12:30 PM – 4:00 PM Cranial Neurosurgery: Complication Avoidance and Management (Vascular PC) Sunday, October 20 12:30 PM – 4:00 PM Luncheon Seminars Managing Long-term Complications of Cervical and Lumbar Spine Surgery (Spine LS) Monday, October 21 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM Radiosurgery in Vestibular Schwannoma Management (Tumor LS) Monday, October 21 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM Innovations in the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (Vascular LS) Monday, October 21 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM 37Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 39. MONDAY,OCTOBER21 MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 2:00 – 3:30 PM AFTERNOON SESSIONS KEEP all the CNS Meeting Information at Your Fingertips with the Annual Meeting Guide GET all the details and stay connected throughout the cNS Annual Meeting with the Annual Meeting guide using your smart phone or tablet. This guide includes: All course details – title, date, time, course description, learning objectives, faculty and location Save favorite sessions or events you would like to attend within the guide or in your own personal iOS calendar receive alerts and special announcements throughout the conference Send and receive messages with other attendees review the list of exhibitors and their location within the exhibit hall request an appointment with an exhibitor Note taking ability on each of the sessions you attend And much more… AVAILABLE IN FALL 2013! Android users visit http://m.cns.org and Apple users download the device in the App Store! 2:00 – 3:30 PM Special Course i: Neurosciences Center and the Neurosurgeon: an evolving Practice landscape Course DireCtor: Alexander A. Khalessi FaCulty: Nicholas M. Barbaro, Bob S. Carter, Brendan Kremer, Marc R. Mayberg, Jayme Zage Course DesCription: The national emergence of Neuroscience centers carries important implications for the modern neurosurgeon. As both a practice environment and an opportunity to lead care delivery for neurological disease across multiple specialties, the Neuroscience center model will shape modern neurosurgical care. This Special course examines the regional referral, sub-specialty and financial implications of these centers for the neurosurgical community. learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Explain the design and implications of a central, multidisciplinary Neurosciences center on geographic referral patterns for neurosurgical disease. gain familiarity with Joint commission comprehensive Stroke center Designation as an example of sub-specialty consolidation of cerebrovascular care. Appreciate the potential for multi- specialty innovation and care advancement fostered by a Neurosciences center support in functional neurosurgery. recognize the potential for neurosurgical leadership in the administration of an integrated Neurosciences center and effective collaboration with other specialties. Describe the macroeconomic and financial forces that provide a backdrop for the national development of Neuroscience centers. 2:00 – 2:18 PM Neurosciences Centers as a Destination for Care Nicholas M. Barbaro 2:18 – 2:36 PM Comprehensive Stroke Centers and Proof-of-Principle Bob S. Carter 2:36 – 2:54 PM Effectively Integrating Multiple Specialties in a Neuroscience Center Marc R. Mayberg 2:54 – 3:12 PM Bilateral Strategic Partnerships and Telemedicine: Potential Building Blocks of the Neurosciences Center Brendan Kremer 3:12 – 3:30 PM Health Care Financing and Neurosciences Centers – From Profit Center to Cost Center Jayme Zage 2:00 – 3:30 PM Consensus Session i: management of Cerebral gliomas: Building Consensus from Controversy MoDerator: Mitchel S. Berger FaCulty: Susan Chang, E. Antonio Chiocca, Andrew E. Sloan, Ying Mao learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss current state of knowledge regarding glioma genetics. Describe glioma treatment in china. 2:00 – 2:18 PM Introduction and Treatment of Low Grade Gliomas Mitchel S. Berger 2:18 – 2:36 PM Impact of Genetics on Treatment Planning and Outcomes Andrew E. Sloan 2:36 – 2:54 PM Surgical Management of Gliomas E. Antonio Chiocca 2:54 – 3:12 PM Adjuvant Treatment Paradigms Susan Chang 3:12 – 3:30 PM Treatment Paradigms of Gliomas in China Ying Mao gliomas: Building Consensus 38 www.cns.org
  • 40. 2:00 – 3:30 PM CNS Original Science Program: Oral Presentations I Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Analyze the findings of novel neurosurgical studies, critique the design and methodology of these studies. List important areas for further knowledge development and research. Identify the most important ongoing clinical trials. 2:00 – 3:30 PM Council of State Neurosurgical Societies 2:00 – 2:09 PM 112 Development of a Novel Quality of Life Utility Index using NDI and VAS in Patients with Multi-level Cervical Spondylosis Jared D Ament, Zhuo Yang, Kee Duk Kim 2:09 – 2:18 PM Julius Goodman Resident Award 113 Cost-Effectiveness of CT Angiography in Screening for Aneurysm in Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pinakin Rameshchandra Jethwa, Ennis J. Duffis, Chirag D. Gandhi, Charles J. Prestigiacomo 2:18 – 2:27 PM 114 A Novel 6-item Outcome Instrument (VBI-6) for Assessing the Effectiveness of Lumbar Surgery in Registry Efforts Saniya S. Godil, Matthew J. McGirt 2:27 – 2:36 PM 115 Utility of Post-Operative CT following Ventricular Catheter Placement: A Prevalence and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Vinayak Nikam, Luke Macyszyn, Robert L. Bailey, Michael Sean Grady, Sherman C. Stein 2:36 – 2:45 PM 116 Mechanical versus Chemical Prophylaxis for Deep Venous Thrombosis in Patients undergoing Lumbar Spinal Fusion: Comparative Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit Saniya S. Godil, Michael C. Dewan, Matthew J. McGirt 2:45 – 2:54 PM 117 Accurately Dead or Alive: A Neurosurgical Review of Quality Patient Care and Outcomes. The Importance of Data Fidelity in Calculating Quality Metrics Utilizing University Health System Consortium (UHC) Clinical Administrative Database. John J Knightly, Scott A. Meyer, Bonnie B Weiss, Rami Bustami, John J Halperin, Stuart Fox, Mark Diamond 2:54 – 3:03 PM 118 Impact of Improved Documentation on an Academic Neurosurgical Practice Omar Akram Zalatimo, Robert E. Harbaugh, Mark Iantosca 3:03 – 3:12 PM 119 Cost-utility Analysis of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Plating (ACDFP) versus Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy (PCF) for Patients with Single-level Cervical Radiculopathy Matthew D. Alvin, Daniel Lubelski, Kalil G. Abdullah, Robert G. Whitmore, Edward C. Benzel, Thomas E. Mroz 3:12 – 3:21 PM 120 Follow-Up on a National Survey: Neurosurgery Resident Opinions on the 2011 ACGME Implemented Duty Hours Kyle Michael Fargen, Jamie Dow, Krystal Lynne Tomei, William A. Friedman 3:21 – 3:30 PM Sam Hassenbusch Young Neurosurgeon Award 121 Cost-Consequence Analysis of Antibiotic-Impregnated Shunts and External Ventricular Drains (EVDs) in Hydrocephalus Matthew J. McGirt, Natalie Edwards, Luella Engelhart 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery 2:00 – 2:09 PM 122 Pediatric Radiation- associated Meningiomas: Distinct Clinical, Pathological and Cytogenetic Characteristics Samer K. Elbabaa, Murat Gokden, John Crawford, Santosh Kesari, Ali G Saad 2:09 – 2:18 PM 123 Time to First Blood in Craniosynostosis Surgery Ruth E. Bristol, Davinder Singh, Nicole Hooft, Richard Cotugno, Stephen Beals, Edward Joganic, Celia Maneri 2:18 – 2:27 PM 124 Symptomatic Recurrence Following the Open Surgical Repair of Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis: A Sixteen Year Experience Corey M Mossop, Gary Rogers, Michael Boyajian, John S. Myseros, Robert F. Keating 2:27 – 2:36 PM 125 Vein number and Drainage Pattern Predicts Hemorrhage Risk and Outcome in Pediatric Arteriovenous Malformations. Michael Maurice McDowell, Christopher P. Kellner, Michelle Q Phan, E. Sander Connolly, Jr., Sean D. Lavine, Phillip M. Meyers, Daniel Sahlein, Neil Feldstein, Richard C. E. Anderson 2:36 – 2:45 PM 126 CNS Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses: Summary of Long Term Follow-up Study Results Nathan R. Selden, Amira Al-Uzri, Robert Steiner, Stephen L. Huhn 2:45 – 2:54 PM 127 Assessment of the Impact of Comorbidities on Perioperative Complications in Pediatric Neurosurgery Akash J. Patel, Ahilan Sivaganesan, Alison Brayton, Robert John Bollo, Andrew Jea MONDAY,OCTOBER21 MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 2:00 – 3:30 PM ORIGINAL SCIENCE PROGRAM 39Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 41. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 2:00 – 3:30 PM ORIGINAL SCIENCE PROGRAM MONDAY,OCTOBER21 2:54 – 3:03 PM 128 Neoplastic Presentation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) Disease in the Pediatric Population Jose M De Campos, Maria Elena Kusak, Daniel Aguirre, Pablo De Andrés, Julia Montoya, Iñigo Jimenez-Alfaro, Jose F. Fabregat 3:03 – 3:12 PM 129 Urinary Biomarkers Predict the Onset and Progression of Medulloblastoma in a Spontaneous Murine Model Edward R. Smith, Rajarshi Majumder, Xuezhe Han, Brendan McNeish, Ayesha Dholakia, Michael Robert Raber 3:12 – 3:21 PM 130 Risk of Secondary Malignancy from Computerized Tomography (CT) Scanning in Very Young ( 1 year old) Neurosurgical Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study with a Minimum of 10-year Follow-up Ian Kainoa White, Kashif Ajaz Shaikh, Daniel H. Fulkerson, Carli Bullis 3:21 – 3:30 PM 131 Pediatric Skull Lesions Yasser Jeelani, Stephanie L Da Silva, Grace J Young, Mark D. Krieger, J. Gordon McComb 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Stereotactic Functional Neurosurgery 2:00 – 2:09 PM 132 Cortical-spinal Neural Prosthesis for Restoring Volitional Limb Movement in a Paralyzed Primate Avatar Ziv Williams 2:09 – 2:18 PM Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery Resident Award 133 Encoding of Reward Size and Reward Delay by Individual Neurons in the Ventral Striatum in the Non-human Primate Engaged in an Intertemporal Choice Task David Weintraub, Barry Richmond 2:18 – 2:27 PM 134 Deep Brain Stimulation of the Medial Septal Nucleus Improves Spatial Working Memory Following Pilocarpine- Induced Status Epilepticus Darrin J. Lee, Gene G Gurkoff, Ali Izadi, Arne D. Ekstrom, Jan Muizelaar Muizelaar, Bruce G Lyeth, Kiarash Shahlaie 2:27 – 2:36 PM CNS Resident Award 135 Electrophysiological Evidence of the Efference Copy in Human Voluntary Movements Hai Sun, Tim Blakely, Felix Darvas, Jeremiah D Wander, Lise Johnson, Kai Miller, Jeffery Ojemann 2:36 – 2:45 PM 136 Reinstatement of Oscillatory Power and Synchrony during Successful Memory Encoding and Recall Kareem A. Zaghloul 2:45 – 2:54 PM 137 Cortical Beta Suppression is Spatially Linked to Beta Coherence Modulation Andrew B O’Keeffe, Christos Tsiokos, Nader Pouratian 2:54 – 3:03 PM 138 Beta Suppression in EEG over the Motor Cortex and Simultaneous Tremor Attenuation in Arm EMG after STN Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Tremor Jayant P. Menon, Makato Mikakoshi, Scott Makeig 3:03 – 3:12 PM 139 Brain Extracellular Branched- chain Amino Acids in Medically Refractory Localization-related Epilepsy Caroline Ong, Eyiyemisi Damisah, Clayton Haldeman, Tore Eid, Dennis Spencer 3:12 – 3:21 PM 140 Cognitive Deficits after Traumic Brain Injury are Associated with Decreased Hippocampal Bursting and Improved with Burst Stimulation of the Fornix Jennifer A. Sweet, Jonathan P. Miller 3:21 – 3:30 PM 141 How Context Influences the Physiology of Perception: The Sub-second Dynamics of Repetition Suppression in Inferior Temporal Cortex Kai Miller, Kalanit Grill-Spector, Adam Olding Hebb, Dora Hermes, Rajesh Rao, Jeffrey G. Ojemann 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Tumors 2:00 – 2:09 PM Journal of Neuro-Oncology Award 142 3.0T iMRI Guided Resection in Cerebral Glioma Surgery: Interim Analysis of a Prospective, Randomized, Triple-blind, Parallel- controlled Trial Jin-song Wu, Xiu Gong, Yanyan Song, Dongxiao Zhuang, Chengjun Yao, Tianming Qiu, Junfeng Lu, Jie Zhang, Wei Zhu, Ying Mao, Liang-Fu Zhou 2:09 – 2:18 PM Stryker Neuro-Oncology Award 143 Spinal Cord Astrocytomas: A Modern 20-year Experience at a Single Institution Ranjith Babu, Isaac Karikari, Timothy Ryan Owens, Carlos A. Bagley 40 www.cns.org
  • 42. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 3:30 – 5:00 PM ORIGINAL SCIENCE PROGRAM MONDAY,OCTOBER21 2:18 – 2:27 PM Synthes Skull Base Surgery Award 144 Chondrosarcoma Radiosurgery: Report of the North American Gamma Knife Consortium Hideyuki Kano, Jason P. Sheehan, Penny Sneed, Heyoung Mcbride, A. Byron Young, Christopher M. Duma, David Mathieu, Michael William McDermott, Aditya K. Iyer, L. Dade Lunsford 2:27 – 2:36 PM National Brain Tumor Society Mahley Clinical Research Award 145 Natural History of Central Nervous System Hemangioblastomas in von Hippel-Lindau Disease. Russell R. Lonser, Kristin Huntoon, John A. Butman, Ashok Rajappa Asthagiri, Kamran Bakhtian, Zhengping Zhuang, Edward H. Oldfield 2:36 – 2:45 PM Integra Foundation Award 146 Rate and Time Course of Improvement in Endocrine Function After Over 1000 Pituitary Operations Arman Jahangiri, Jeff Wagner, Sung Won Han, Justin Meyerowitz, Lauren Rose Ostling, Sandeep Kunwar, Lewis Blevins, Manish Kumar Aghi 2:45 – 2:54 PM 147 Gamma Knife Treatment Results for Multiple Brain Metastases: A Multi-Institutional Prospective Study in Japan (Abbreviation, JLGK0901, UMIN ID, 00001812) Masaaki Yamamoto 2:54 – 3:03 PM 148 Extent of Resection of Glioblastoma Revisited: Personalized Survival Modeling Facilitates More Accurate Individualized Survival Prediction and Supports a “Maximum Safe Resection” Approach Surgery Nicholas Frank Marko, Robert John Weil, Jason L. Schroder, Raymond Sawaya 3:03 – 3:12 PM 149 Continuous Dynamic Mapping of the Corticospinal Tract During Surgery of Motor Eloquent Brain Tumors: a Prospective Study Andreas Raabe, Jürgen Beck, Philippe Schucht, Kathleen Seidel 3:12 – 3:21 PM 150 Gene Expression Analysis Revealed Distinct Physiology in G-CIMP+ and G-CIMP- Gliomas Zachary J Taich, Amit Goyal, David D. Gonda, Eric Marcusson, Vivek Kaimal, Tao Jiang, Bob Carter, Clark C. Chen 3:21 – 3:30 PM 151 Effect Of Pretreatment Lymphopenia On Survival In Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma Receiving Immunotherapy Orin Bloch, Yelena S. Fuks, Manish Kumar Aghi, Michael William McDermott, Mitchel S. Berger, Andrew E. Sloan, Jeffrey N. Bruce, Andrew T. Parsa Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM COUNCIL OF STATE NEUROSURGICAL SOCIETIES Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on Cerebrovascular Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on NeuroTrauma and Critical Care Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on Pain Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery Neurosurgical Forum 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery 3:30 – 5:00 PM Section on Tumors 41Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 43. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 3:30 – 5:00 PM AFTERNOON SESSIONS MONDAY,OCTOBER21 International Colleagues! Don’t miss the 2013 International Reception! Enjoy cocktails, hors d’oeuvers at this networking opportunity exclusively for our colleagues from across the globe. Taking place in the San Francisco Marriott Marquis, Monday, October 21 from 5:00 – 6:30 PM. All international attendees and their guests are invited to attend. Operative Neurosurgery Session I: Techniques to Advance Safety and Efficacy in Microneurosurgery Moderators: Aaron Cohen-Gadol, Aaron S. Dumont Faculty: Bernard R. Bendok, William T. Couldwell, Steven L. Giannotta, James T. Rutka, Robert A. Solomon, Robert F. Spetzler, Harry R. Van Loveren Course Description: This course will review the important technical nuances for the successful management of complex cranial cases. Information will be delivered through 3D high definition surgical videos and step-by-step discussion by experienced experts in the field. Topics to be reviewed include surgery for vascular and neoplastic lesions. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the management of complex cranial cases. Incorporate new techniques into their surgical practice. 42 www.cns.org
  • 44. MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 6:00 – 8:30 PM DINNER SEMINARS MONDAY,OCTOBER21 6:00 – 8:30 PM $190 Dinner Seminar 3: Beyond ‘Through the Tube’ When and When Not to Use MIS Moderator: Michael Y. Wang Faculty: Praveen V. Mummaneni, Richard G. Fessler, Robert F. Heary, Larry Khoo Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Judge the applicability of MIS approaches to various spinal pathology. Compare the relative merits of open vs. MIS approaches to various spinal pathology. Each Dinner Seminar includes a three- course plated dinner and wine service. Transportation will be provided. 6:30 – 6:40 PM Introduction Michael Y. Wang 6:45 – 7:05 PM A Review of Tubular Technologies: What is Possible? Larry T. Khoo 7:05 – 7:10 PM Discussion 7:10 – 7:30 PM Applications of MIS Surgery for Spinal Neoplasms Praveen V. Mummaneni 7:30 – 7:35 PM Discussion 7:35 – 7:50 PM MIS for Spinal Deformity Richard G. Fessler 7:50 – 8:00 PM Discussion 8:00 – 8:20 PM Is Tubular Technology Headed the Way of MED? Robert F. Heary 8:20 – 8:30 PM Discussion Conclusion Michael Y. Wang One Market In 1993, One Market Restaurant’s debut was one of the most eagerly anticipated events in San Francisco. Since then, One Market has become the standard for sophisticated dining in the city. The current incarnation features the award winning farm-to-table food of Chef Mark Dommen, who ably follows in the footsteps of One Market’s celebrated founding chef and principal, Bradley Ogden. 6:00 – 8:30 PM $190 Dinner Seminar 4: Evolution of the Endovascular Revolution Moderator: Pascal Jabbour Faculty: David M. Hasan, Elad I. Levy, Cameron G. McDougall, J D. Mocco Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe changing practice patterns in management of common cerebrovascular diseases (CAD, AVM, SAH). Recognize the growing importance of endovascular methods in managing cerebrovascular disease. Recognize the indications and limitations of each endovascular technique. Each Dinner Seminar includes a three- course plated dinner and wine service. Transportation will be provided. 6:30 – 7:00 PM The Evolution of Flow Diversion: Conquest and Challenges Elad I. Levy 7:00 – 7:30 PM The Evolution in the Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Venous Pathology Cameron G. McDougall 7:30 – 8:00 PM The Evolution of Acute Stroke Intervention Post-IMS III J D. Mocco 8:00 – 8:30 PM The Evolution of Stem Cell Therapy in Neurovascular Disease David M. Hasan EPIC Roasthouse Featuring panoramic views of the bay, Bay Bridge Treasure Island and the San Francisco skyline, Epic Roasthouse features acclaimed chef Jan Bimbaum’s innovative interpretations of traditional steakhouse favorites and more. 43Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 45. TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 6:30 – 7:30 PM Resident Recruitment Social 5:00 – 6:30 PM SANS Challenge Championship Round 3:30 – 5:00 PM Operative Neurosurgery: Complication Avoidance and Mangement 5:00 – 6:30 PM Wine Cheese Reception in the Exhibit Hall PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS 44 www.cns.org
  • 46. GENERAL SCIENTIFIC SESSION III 7:00 – 11:30 AM p Moscone West Convention Center TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 Presiding Officer: Jamie S. Ullman Moderators: Steven N. Kalkanis, Ganesh Rao Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: Describe the evolving role of radiosurgery in brain lesions. Describe the complexity of interactions of surgical implants and MR field imaging. Develop a personalized approach to brain tumor therapy. Implement a strategy to critically review a recent journal publication in the field of tumor. Discuss and implement a strategy of when to approach tumors via open surgery vs. craniotomy. 7:00 – 7:05 AM Introduction of CNS International Division Anil Nanda 7:05 – 7:19 AM HowRadiosurgeryChangedNeurosurgery and the Changes that Lie Ahead Douglas Kondziolka 7:19 – 7:33 AM MRI Safety and Neurosurgery: Brain and Spine Implants Frank G. Shellock 7:33 – 7:47 AM Evolution of Brain Tumor Treatment: From Chemo to Vaccines to Viruses E. Antonio Chiocca 7:47 – 7:57 AM Editor’s Choice Tumor Paper Nelson M. Oyesiku 7:57 – 8:15 AM Controversy: Open vs. Endoscopic: When to Use Which Moderator: William T. Couldwell Laligam N. Sekhar vs. Theodore H. Schwartz 8:15 – 8:29 AM Operative Pearls: Expanding Operative Corridor for Difficult-to-Reach Tumors Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol 8:29 – 8:33 AM Introduction Charles Liu INTERNATIONAL LECTURE Status of Neurosurgery in China Professor Bai-nan Xu 8:33 – 8:47 AM 8:47 – 9:02 AM Awards Presentations Christopher E. Wolfla 8:47 – 8:48 AM Introduction of Fellowship Award Winners Aviva Abosch 8:48 – 8:51 AM Fellowship Award Winners 8:51 – 8:54 AM Neurosurgical Forum Winners Ashwini D. Sharan 8:54 – 8:57 AM Presentation of Distinguished Service Award to Regina Shupak Gerald E. Rodts, Jr. 8:57 – 9:00 AM Presentation of CNS Founder’s Laurel to Arthur Day Christopher E. Wolfla 9:00 – 10:00 AM E X H I B I T HALL B REA K 10:00 – 10:05 AM Introduction of Honored Guest Edward R. Laws, Jr. HONORED GUEST LECTURE Continuing Evolution: The Biology and Treatment of Gliomas Andrew H. Kaye 10:05 – 10:25 AM 10:25 – 10:30 AM Introduction of Special Lecturer SPECIAL LECTURE From the Blue Zones to the Lab: Secrets to Living Long and Living Well Clay B. Marsh 10:30 – 10:50 AM 10:50 – 10:55 AM Introduction of Apuzzo Speaker Michael L. J. Apuzzo CNS Michael L.J.Apuzzo Lecturer on Creativity and Innovation Frank Gehry Pritzker Prize-Winning Architect 10:55 – 11:30 AM 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM E X H I B I T HALL B REA K 45Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 47. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 12:30 – 2:00 PM LUNCHEON SEMINARS All Luncheon Seminars include a plated lunch served in the seminar room. Luncheon Seminar fees are $95 each ($75 for Residents/Fellows/Medical Students/Nurses/Physician Extenders) T16: Honored Guest Luncheon Complimentary to CNS Resident Members! Moderator: Andrew H. Kaye Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Recognize the importance of leadership principles at various stages in a neurosurgeon’s career. Understand the principles of developing a rewarding career as a neurosurgeon in academic or community practice. Explain how to develop an effective mentor /mentee relationship in the early phase of establishing their practice. T17: Surgical Management of Cervical Degenerative Disease Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderators: Michael P. Steinmetz Faculty: Ajit A. Krishnaney, Daniel Refai, Gregory R. Trost Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Assess the current literature on surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease. Analyze the indications and expected outcomes for various lumbar spine surgical procedures to improve their treatment plans. T18: Skull Base Endoscopy: Utility and Limitations TUMOR Moderators: Paul A. Gardner, Charles Teo Faculty: Juan Carlos Fernandez-Miranda, Fred Gentili, Daniel R. Peiper Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Plan various approaches for intraventricular and skull base surgery. Identify current indications and risks of endoscopy for intraventricular and skull base surgery. T19: Multimodal Management of Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations Cerebrovascular Moderator: Michael T. Lawton Faculty: Felipe Albuquerque, Daniel L. Barrow, Giuseppe Lanzino Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Account for the natural history of arteriovenous malformations of the brain. Assess the relative merits and limitations of radiosurgery, microsurgery and embolization for treatment of this disease when planning treatment strategies. T20: The Aging Spine: Considerations in Surgical Management Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderators: Christopher P. Ames, Gerald E. Rodts, Jr. Faculty: Michael W. Groff, Michael Y. Wang Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Assess the characteristics of spinal disorders unique to elderly patients. Identify surgical considerations for treating spinal disorders in the aging population. T21: Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: R. John Hurlbert Faculty: Sanjay S. Dhall, Mark N. Hadley, Beverly C. Walters Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify advances in the medical treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury. Determine state of the art surgical management of cervical spine trauma and spinal cord injury. Write protocols for identifying and assessing cervical spine injury in the comatose patient. T22: Pituitary Adenomas: Operative Nuances and Management Considerations TUMOR Moderator: James J. Evans, Edward R. Laws, Jr. Faculty: Manish K. Aghi, James P. Chandler, Fred Gentili Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Explain the roles of medical, radiation and surgical treatment for secretory and non-secretory pituitary adenomas. Describe the medical, imaging and laboratory evaluation for various pituitary adenomas. Identify the surgical nuances of pituitary adenoma resection. T23: Advances in the Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Facial Pain Stereotactic and Functional Moderator: Kim J. Burchiel Faculty: Douglas Kondziolka, Jonathan Miller, Konstantin V. Slavin Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Incorporate surgical, percutaneous, radiosurgical and neuromodulation options for trigeminal neuralgia and facial pain syndromes into practice. Recognize the complications and outcomes with these approaches. T24: Multidisciplinary Management Strategies for Unruptured Aneurysms Cerebrovascular Moderator: Robert A. Solomon Faculty: J D. Mocco, Gregory J. Zipfel Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the epidemiology and natural history of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Construct appropriate treatment algorithms for these lesions. TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 46 www.cns.org
  • 48. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 12:30 – 2:00 PM LUNCHEON SEMINARS T25: Managing Complications In Spinal Surgery Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Edward C. Benzel Faculty: Daniel J. Hoh, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Gregory R. Trost Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify operative events dictating the need for intraoperative salvage techniques in spinal surgery. Plan for the specific techniques necessary to rectify intraoperative difficulties. T26: Guidelines for Neurocritical Care Management for Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Trauma Moderator: Shelly D. Timmons Faculty: Joshua E. Medow, Patricia B. Raksin, Joseph Christopher Zacko Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Review their strategies for managing traumatic brain injury. Assess current practice standards, practical issues surrounding management. Identify the unique challenges facing patients with traumatic brain injury. T27: Controversies in Management of Low Grade Gliomas TUMOR Moderator: Michael W. McDermott Faculty: Gene Barnett, Nader Sanai Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Compare various surgical and medical modalities appropriate for the treatment of low grade gliomas. Discuss current research pertaining to the management of these tumors and their treatment strategies. T28: Complication Avoidance and Advanced MIS Applications Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Richard G. Fessler Faculty: Larry T. Khoo, Faheem A. Sandhu, Trent L. Tredway Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify the current indications for minimally invasive spinal surgery. Plan techniques appropriate for minimally invasive spinal surgery. Determine the expected outcomes and complications associated with these techniques. T29: Peripheral Nerve Entrapment Syndromes: Diagnosis and Management Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Eric L. Zager Faculty: Jason H. Huang, Robert J. Spinner, Lynda J. S. Yang Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Explain the diagnosis and workup of peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes Review surgical indications of these syndromes Discuss complication avoidance in the management of these syndromes TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 WINS Symposium/Reception Tuesday, October 22 6:00 PM Women Leading The Way Reception Join us for an evening of networking opportunities, hors d’ oeuvres and a Leadership Panel 47Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 49. 2:00 – 3:30 PM CNS Original Science Program: Oral Presentations II Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the findings of novel neurosurgical studies and critique the design and methodology of these studies. List important areas for further knowledge development and research and identify the most important ongoing clinical trials. 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Spine and peripheral nerves 2:00 – 2:09 PM 152 Minimally Invasive versus Open Posterior Interbody Lumbar Fusion: A Propensity-matched Analysis of Quality Measures Scott L. Parker, Jason Lerner, Matthew J. McGirt 2:09 – 2:18 PM 153 Cost-Utility and Comparative Effectiveness Analyses of Surgery versus Comprehensive Medical Management for Lumbar Spondylosis in Elderly Scott L. Parker, Saniya S. Godil, Stephen Mendenhall, Scott L. Zuckerman, David Shau, Matthew J. McGirt 2:18 – 2:27 PM 154 Outcomes After ALIF versus TLIF For Treatment of Symtomatic L5-S1 Spondylolisthesis: A Prospective, Multi-Institutional Comparative Effectiveness Study Owoicho Adogwa, Paul Thompson, Terence Verla, Kemp Knott, Ulysses Null, Kevin T. Huang, Joseph S. Cheng, Robert E. Isaacs 2:27 – 2:36 PM 155 The Implantation of Facet Bone Dowels may not Provide Adequate Fixation for Fusion Stephen M. Pirris, Ronald Reimer, Hugh Gordon Deen, Robert E. Wharen, Eric W. Nottmeier 2:36 – 2:45 PM 156 Adult Deformity Surgery (ASD) Patients Recall Fewer than 50% of the Risks Discussed in the Informed Consent Process Preoperatively and the Recall Rate Worsens Significantly in the Postoperative Period Rajiv Saigal, Aaron J. Clark, Justin K. Scheer, Justin S. Smith, Shay Bess, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Ian McCarthy, Robert Hart, Khaled Kebaish, Eric Klineberg, Vedat Deviren, Frank Schwab, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Christopher P. Ames, International Spine Study Group 2:45 – 2:54 PM 157 Increased Incidence of Pseudoarthrosis after Unilateral Instrumented Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Patients with Lumbar Spondylosis Yakov Gologorsky, Branko Skovrlj, Jeremy Steinberger, Marc Arginteanu, Frank M. Moore, Alfred A. Steinberger 2:54 – 3:03 PM 158 Dexamethasone’s Effect in Multiple-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Shiveindra Jeyamohan, Tyler James Kenning, Paul Feustel, Karen Petronis, Darryl J. Dirisio 3:03 – 3:12 PM 159 A Blinded, Multi-Center Clinical and Radiological Study to Evaluate the Use of OsteoAMP versus rhBMP-2 in TLIF/LLIF Procedures Christopher Yeung, Justin Field, Jeffrey Roh 3:12 – 3:21 PM 160 Failure of Indirect Decompression with the Extreme Lateral Interbody (XLIF) Approach: A Study of Radiographic Factors Isaac Karikari, Owoicho Adogwa, Timothy Ryan Owens, Paul Thompson, Robert E. Isaacs 3:21 – 3:30 PM 161 Pain and Functional Outcomes After Incidental Durotomy in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Propensity Matched Prospective, Multi-Institutional Longitudinal Study of 1,741 Patients Owoicho Adogwa, Paul Thompson, Terence Verla, Ulysses Null, Kemp Knott, Kevin T. Huang, Joseph S. Cheng, Robert E. Isaacs 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on trauma and Critical care 2:00 – 2:09 PM Depuy-Synthes Award for Resident Research on Spinal Cord and Spinal column Injury 162 Clinical Correlates of High Cervical Fractional Anisotropy in Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Aditya Vedantam, Gerald Eckardt, Marjorie C. Wang, Brian Schmit, Shekar N. Kurpad 2:09 – 2:18 PM 163 Enhancement of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis by a Neurotrophic Peptide in Traumatic Brain Injury Muhammad Omar Chohan, Khalid Iqbal, Howard Yonas, Edwin Nemoto 2:18 – 2:27 PM 164 Reversal of Pre-Morbid Oral Anti-Platelet Therapy is Not Associated with a Decrease in Radiographic Progression of Intracranial Injury Joshua S Bauer, David Michael Panczykowski, Benjamin Zusman, Ramesh Grandhi, Yuefang Chang, Ava Puccio, David O. Okonkwo 2:27 – 2:36 PM 165 A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Progesterone with or without Hypothermia in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury- Analysis of Preliminary Data Neha Samson, Sumit Sinha, Vivek Tandon, Sanjeev Bhaoi, S Arulselvi, Pushpa Sharma, AK Mahapatra, B S Sharma TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 2:00 – 3:30 PM Original Science Program TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 48 www.cns.org
  • 50. 2:36 – 2:45 PM 166 The role of NgR1 Function in vivo after Spinal Cord Injury Vassilios Georgios Dimopoulos, Henry N. Kesler, Jason H. Huang 2:45 – 2:54 PM 167 Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Predictor of Experimental Spinal Cord Injury Severity and Recovery Brian Joseph Kelley, Noam Harel, Chang-Yoen Kim, Xing Xing Wang, Omar Hasan, Adam Kauffman, Ronin Globinsky, Lawrence Staib, Xenophon Papademetris, Stephen Strittmatter 2:54 – 3:03 PM Depuy- Synthes Award for Resident Research on Brain and Craniofacial Injury 168 Predictive Value of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials for Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Yirui Sun 3:03 – 3:12 PM 169 Pressure Is Only Part of the Story In Traumatic Brain Injured Patients, Focal Cerebral Blood Flow Goes To Zero In Some Patients With Adequate Cerebral Perfusion Pressure George Chovanes, Rafael M Richards 3:12 – 3:21 PM 170 Myelination and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Heather Spader, Anna Ellermeier, Lindsay Walker, Jeffrey Rogg, Rees Cosgrove, Sean Deoni 3:21 – 3:30 PM 171 Application of the CRASH Score When Using Intracranial Multimodality Monitoring Syed O Shah, Artin Minaeian, Michael F. Stiefel 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on pain 2:00 – 2:09 PM 172 Use of Intraoperative Collision Testing vs Electromyography for Predicting Postoperative Foot Paresthesias during Spinal Cord Stimulation Vidya Bhalodia, Anthony K. Sestokas, David Glassman, William Loftus, Steven Levin, Joanne Contratti, Richard W Vogel, Ashwini Dayal Sharan 2:09 – 2:18 PM 173 Nerve Injury Pain: It’s All about Glutamate in Peripheral (not CNS) Neurons Luc Dupont Jasmin, Kerui Gong, Ling-Hsuan Kung, Peter Ohara, Aditi Bhargava 2:18 – 2:27 PM 174 Association between Posterior Cranial Fossa Volumetry and CSF Flow Dynamics in Chiari Malformations Type I Noam Alperin, Sang H. Lee, Ahmet Bagci, Raymond F. Sekula, Jr., Barth A. Green 2:27 – 2:36 PM 175 Predictors of Outcomes after Percutaneous Balloon Compression for Trigeminal Neuralgia Eveline M. Gutzwiller, Nicolas Smoll, Raphaël Meier, Jyi-Feng Chen 2:36 – 2:45 PM Ron R. Tasker Young Investigator Award 176 Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex: Targeting the Affective Component of Chronic Pain. Erlick A.C. Pereira, Sandra GJ Boccard, Liz Moir, James J Fitzgerald, Alexander L. Green, Tipu Z. Aziz 2:45 – 2:54 PM 177 Microstructural Neural Changes Due to Neurovascular Compression in Trigeminal Neuralgia Detcted by Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI: correlation with intra-operative findings and possible clinical implications) Jan H. Mehrkens, Niklas Thon, Jennifer Linn, Hartmut Brückmann, Joerg-Christian Tonn, Jürgen Lutz 2:54 – 3:03 PM 178 Postoperative Intravenous Ketorolac Following Intracranial Surgery: A Retrospective Case Series Patrick R. Maloney, Ravi Kumar, Ross Puffer, Giuseppe Lanzino, Nicholas Michael Wetjen 3:03 – 3:12 PM 179 Brief Pain Inventory Facial: Calculation of the Minimal Clinically Important Difference in Trigeminal Neuralgia Casey H. Halpern, Sukhmeet Sandhu, Venus BS Vakhshori, Keyvan Mirsaeedi-Farahani, Marie Kerr, John Y.K. Lee 3:12 – 3:21 PM 180 Long Term Outcomes of Dorsal Root Rhizotomy for Refractory Occipital Neuralgia Abhiram Gande, John Jefferson Moossy, Michael B. Horowitz, William E. Rothfus, Paul A. Gardner 3:21 – 3:30 PM 181 Percutaneous Dorsal Root Ganglion Lysis with Phenol for Treatment of Thoracic Compression Fracture Chun-Hsien Lin, Chun-Yu Cheng, Kuo-tai Chen, Martin Hsiu Chu Lin, Ting-Chung Wang, Jen-Tsung Yang 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Cerebrovascular 2:00 – 2:09 PM 182 Do Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated at Hospitals That Offer Endovascular Therapy Fair Better at Discharge? Eric M. Deshaies, Mark R Villwock, David Padalino, Amit Singla TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 2:00 – 3:30 PM Original Science Program TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 49Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 51. TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 2:09 – 2:18 PM 183 Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Prevention of Vasospasm in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study Sachin A Borkar 2:18 – 2:27 PM 184 Infliximab Suppresses TNF-± Induced Inflammatory Phenotype in Cerebral Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Implications for Cerebral Aneurysm Formation Muhammad S Ali, Robert M. Starke, Pascal Jabbour, Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris, L. Fernando Gonzalez, Robert H. Rosenwasser, Aaron S. Dumont 2:27 – 2:36 PM 185 Post-Conditioning with Isoflurane Reduces SAH-induced Vasospasm and Microthrombosis via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 and Nitric Oxide Synthase Eric Milner, Michael D Harries, Ananth Kesav Vellimana, Jeffrey M. Gidday, Byung Hee Han, Gregory J. Zipfel 2:36 – 2:45 PM 186 The THERAPY Trial: A Prospective, Randomized, Concurrent Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Role of Mechanical Embolectomy As Adjunctive Treatment to IV rtPA for Acute Ischemic Stroke. J D. Mocco, Sophia Kuo, Pooja Khatri, Osama O. Zaidat 2:45 – 2:54 PM Synthes Cerebrovascular Award 187 A Novel Virtual Reality Simulation for Hemostasis in a Brain Surgical Cavity: Perceived Utility for Visuomotor Skills in Current and Aspiring Neurosurgery Residents. Achal Patel, Cristian Luciano, Thomas Jefferson Holbrook, Silvio Rizzi, Patrick Kania, Sohum K Desai, Dan Branch, Adrian Mzee Smith, P. Pat Banerjee, Ben Z. Roitberg, Jaime Gasco-Tamarit 2:54 – 3:03 PM 188 Role of Hyperhomocysteinemia in the Development of Intracranial Aneurysms Masaaki Kohrai, David Kung, Keiko T. Kitazato, Nobuhisa Matsushita, Yoshiteru Tada, Kenji Yagi, Kenji Shimada, Yasuhisa Kanematsu, Junichiro Satomi, Shinji Nagahiro 3:03 – 3:12 PM 189 Utility of Monitoring Cerebral Autoregulation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Results from a Prospective Observational Study. Karol P Budohoski, Marek Czosnyka, Peter Smielewski, Magdalena Kasprowicz, Adel Helmy, Diederik Bulters, Miroslaw Zabek, John Douglas Pickard, Peter J. Kirkpatrick 3:12 – 3:21 PM Galbraith Award 190 Critical Role of TNF-a in Cerebral Aneurysm Formation and Rupture Robert M. Starke, Nohra Chalouhi, Muhammad S Ali, Pascal Jabbour, Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris, L. Fernando Gonzalez, Robert H. Rosenwasser, Gary Owens, Nigel H. Greig, Aaron S. Dumont 3:21 – 3:30 PM 191 Heme Induces Microglial CXCL2 Release – a Mechanism of Neutrophil-Mediated Injury after Intracerebral Hemorrhage David B Kurland, Volodymyr Gerzanich, J. Marc Simard 2:00 – 3:30 PM Council of State of Neurosurgical Societies Enhancing Patient Experience: Impact on Your Practice Moderators: Darlene A. Lobel, Gregory R. Trost FACULTY: Edward C. Benzel, Adrianne Boissy, Jeff Grossman Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: List tools you can use to optimize your patient’s experience. Explain the benefits and shortcomings of patient reported data. Define practices and strategizes that result in optimal patient satisfaction in differing practice patterns. 2:00 – 2:30 PM Improving Physician and Patient Experience through Effective Communication Skills Training: Cleveland Clinic’s Journey and the Neurosurgical Perspective Edward C. Benzel, Adrianne Boissy 2:30 – 3:00 PM Optimizing your Practice for the Best Patient Experience 3:00 – 3:30 PM Should Neurosurgeons (or anyone) Care About Patient Satisfaction Data? Jeff Grossman 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery Tackling Difficult Shunt Problems: Headaches, Slit Ventricles and their Management Strategies Moderators: Greg Olavarria FACULTY: Rick Abbott, Abhaya V. Kulkarni, Harold L. Rekate Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the recent advances in the treatment of hydrocephalus and research initiatives. Identify the potential complications of shunted hydrocephalus, i.e. slit ventricles, high and low pressure headaches, and TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 2:00 – 3:30 PM AFTERNOON SESSIONS 50 www.cns.org
  • 52. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 2:00 – 3:30 PM Afternoon Sessions TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 how to differentiate between diagnoses. Describe management strategies for the child with headaches and a shunt, both surgical and non-surgical. 2:00 – 2:20 PM Update on Shunt Technology, Hydrocephalus and Shunt Research Initiatives, ETV vs. Shunting Abhaya V. Kulkarni 2:20 – 2:40 PM Indications for ICP Monitoring and Therapeutic Intervention such as Cranial Expansion Procedures Rick Abbott 2:40 – 3:00 PM Types of Slit Ventricle Syndrome Presentations and their Management, Low Pressure Hydrocephalus Harold L. Rekate 3:00 – 3:30 PM Challenging Case Presentations Expert Panel Discussion 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Stereotactic Functional Neurosurgery Advances in Epilepsy Surgery Moderators: Aviva Abosch, Michael G. Kaplitt FACULTY: Gordon H. Baltuch, Matthew During, Emad N. Eskandar, David W. Roberts Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Explain the role of preoperative language mapping in epilepsy surgery and the advantages and limitation of different mapping methods. Discuss the different approaches and methods for intraoperative and/or invasive monitoring in epilepsy surgery. Explain the data supporting the use of advanced experimental techniques in epilepsy surgery, including neurostimulation and gene therapies, and the potential for application to clinical practice in the future. 2:00 – 2:22 PM Advances in Language Mapping Prior to Surgery: Wada vs. fMRI David W. Roberts 2:22 – 2:44 PM Technical Advances in Epilepsy Surgery Emad N. Eskandar 2:44 – 3:07 PM Advances in Neurostimulation for Epilepsy Gordon H. Baltuch 3:07 – 3:30 PM Advances in Clinical Translation of Gene Therapy for Epilepsy Matthew During 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Tumors Novel Imaging in Brain Tumor Surgery Moderator: Frederick G. Barker, Ian F. Parney FACULTY: James T. Rutka, Jinsong Wu Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe recent advances in neurosurgical oncology. Describe recent advances in basic and translational research in neuro-oncology. Discuss current trends in novel imaging in brain tumor surgery for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. 2:00 – 2:18 PM Ab Guha Award 2:18 – 2:36 PM Update in MR Spectroscopy in Brain Tumors 2:36 – 2:54 PM Metabolic Imaging in Brain Tumors 2:54 – 3:12 PM Intra-Operative MRI: Preliminary Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of iMRI vs. Standard Resection for Glioblastoma (NCT01479686) Jinsong Wu, University of Shanghai 3:12 – 3:30 PM Nanoparticle Delivery to Brain Tumors with MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound James T. Rutka 2:00 – 3:30 PM Special Course II: Out of Balance: How Can We Improve Outcomes from Spine Surgery? Course Director: Edward C. Benzel, Zoher Ghogawala Faculty: Domagoj Coric, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Christopher I. Shaffrey Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Recognize the common measurements used to describe sagittal balance in the cervical, thoracic, and spino-pelvic regions of the spine. Know the validated outcomes tools for measuring disability and health-related quality of life when considering patients with spinal deformity. Become familiar with the surgical strategies for correcting sagittal balance. 2:00 – 2:10 PM Introduction and Biomechanics Edward C. Benzel 2:10 – 2:25 PM Cervical Sagittal Balance and Outcomes Zoher Ghogawala 2:25 – 2:35 PM Correction of Cervical Deformity Edward C. Benzel 2:35 – 2:50 PM Spinopelvic Parameters and Use of Navigation for Deformity Correction Domagoj Coric 2:50 – 3:05 PM Sagittal Balance and Lumbar Degenerative Surgery Praveen V. Mummaneni 3:05 – 3:20 PM Surgical Correction of Sagittal Imbalance: The Role of Osteotomies and Other Realignment Techniques Christopher I. Shaffrey 3:20 – 3:30 PM Conclusion/Discussion 51Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 53. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 3:30 – 5:00 PM AFTERNOON SESSIONS TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 3:30 – 5:00 PM Operative Neurosurgery ii: Intraoperative Complication avoidance and management MoDerators: Aaron Cohen-Gadol, Paul A. Gardner FaCulty: Daniel L. Barrow, Ketan R. Bulsara, Richard G. Fessler, Michael T. Lawton, Jacques J. Morcos, Laligam N. Sekhar Course DesCription: This session will discuss specific strategies for avoidance and management of intraoperative complications. information will be delivered through operative examples. intraoperative videos with discussion and guidance provided by experts. learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe specific strategies for avoidance and management of intraoperative complications. C onnect with your corporate colleagues during the 2013 wine Cheese Reception in the Exhibit Hall from 5:00 – 6:30 PM. Enjoy select regional wines and savory cheeses while learning about the latest developments in neurosurgical technologies. 5:00 – 6:30 PM WINE AND CHEESE RECEPTION IN EXHIBIT HALL 6:30 – 7:30 PM RESIDENT RECRuITMENT SOCIAL RESIDENTS have the opportunity to make connections at the 2013 Resident Recruitment Social from 6:30 – 7:30 PM with recruiters and practicing physicians who are looking to add to their practice. 5:00 – 6:30 PM SANS CHALLENGE CHAMPIONSHIP ROuND Come and enjoy the ALL NEW and enhanced SANS Challenge. This year the challenge will be “Are You Smarter Than…?” You won’t want to miss this fun and engaging competition as the residents go head to head (no pun intended) and test their knowledge.Audience participation is encouraged. AR EYOU T HAN ...? ARRRARA EEE R E R YOYOY UUOUO TT HAAHAH NNNNANAANA ...? SMARTER 52 www.cns.org
  • 54. TUESDAY,OCTOBER22 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 6:00 – 8:30 PM DINNER SEMINARS 6:00 – 8:30 PM $190 Dinner Seminar 5: Placing Sports Under the Microscope: Head Injury and CTE Moderator: Richard G. Ellenbogen Faculty: Russell R. Lonser Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the definition, neuropathology and possible incidence and prevalence of the findings of CTE after TBI. Review the recommendations from the Zurich Conference in 2012 for the return to play criteria for athletes. Describe how rules and laws change the culture and the outcome of concussion. Discuss the evolving research issues surrounding the longitudinal outcome of athletes with TBI. Describe how culture change occurs through rule and laws. Each Dinner Seminar includes a three- course plated dinner and wine service. Transportation will be provided. 6:30 – 6:48 PM Overview of Challenges on the Field and in Research on TBI 6:48 – 7:06 PM Concussion in All Sports – The Zurich Solution for Return to Play (RTP) 7:06 – 7:24 PM CTE: What are the Risks and What Should We Do to Prevent It? 7:24 – 7:42 PM The Longitudinal Risk of Long Term Consequences of TBI and CTE 7:42 – 8:00 PM What is the Pathology of CTE? 8:00 – 8:30 PM Questions and Answers Waterbar Waterbar is a seafood-centric restaurant located on the waterfront with spectacular panoramic views of the bay and city skyline, exceptional design, and a menu of the freshest sustainable fish and seafood. Respecting seasonality and the natural essence of the sea, preparations are unpretentious, soulful, and elegant. 6:00 – 8:30 PM $190 Dinner Seminar 6: The Burden of Proof: Quality Improvement Initiatives Moderator: Anthony L. Asher Faculty: Robert E. Harbaugh, Matthew J. McGirt, Katie O. Orrico, Michael J. Schlosser Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Recognize the value of QI initiatives in neurosurgical practice. Develop hospital-based or practice based QI initiatives that promote safety. Each Dinner Seminar includes a three- course plated dinner and wine service. Transportation will be provided. 6:30 – 6:40 PM Introduction to Healthcare Quality Initiatives 6:40 – 6:55 PM Current Forces Driving Healthcare Quality Programs 6:55 – 7:00 PM Discussion 7:00 – 7:15 PM The Science of Quality Measurement – What is it? 7:15 – 7:30 PM Applied Quality Measurement – Practical Implementation at the Group or Individual Practitioner Level 7:30 – 7:35 PM Discussion 7:35 – 7:50 PM Applied Quality Measurement – Practical Implementation at the Medical Society Level 7:50 – 7:55 PM Discussion 7:55 – 8:10 PM Healthcare Quality Improvement: A Hospital System’s Perspective 8:10 – 8:15 PM Discussion 8:15 – 8:30 PM Panel Discussion Harris’ Steakhouse For nearly a century this classic American Steakhouse, the landmark address of 2100 Van Ness Avenue, has hosted some of the finest meals on the West Coast. Harris’ Steakhouse has a rich tradition of luxurious dining in a warm, comfortable, sophisticated environment. Harris’s was ranked as one of the nation’s Top 10 Steak houses by the Wine Spectator. 53Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 55. WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER 23 7:37 – 8:07 AM Live! In the or – Revascularization of the Carotid: Clinical Equipoise 2:00 – 3:30 PM Consensus Sessions 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM Last Chance to VISIT the Exhibit Hall! PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS 54 www.cns.org
  • 56. GENERAL SCIENTIFIC SESSION IV 7:00 – 11:30 AM p Moscone West Convention Center WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 Presiding Officer: Russell R. Lonser Moderators: Elad I. Levy, Nathan R. Selden Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to: Implement a strategy to critically review a recent journal publication in the field of vascular neurosurgery. Describe the complexity in designing clinical trials. Describe the various issues, business models, intellectual property involved in neurosurgical innovations. Discuss worldwide trends in pediatric neurosurgery. 7:00 – 7:05 AM Introduction of CNS Education Committee Zoher Ghogawala 7:05 – 7:07 AM Introduction Special Lecturer Nathan R. Selden FEATURED SPEAKER Three Steps Forward and Two Steps Back: The Echternach Procession towards Optimal Hydrocephalus Treatment Benjamin C. Warf MacArthur Fellows Award Winner 7:07 – 7:27 AM 7:27 – 7:37 AM Editor’s Choice Vascular Paper E. Sander Connolly, Jr. 7:37 – 8:07 AM LIVE! In the OR – Revascularization of the Carotid: Clinical Equipoise Elad I. Levy 8:07 – 8:22 AM Endovascular Neurosurgery in Evolution – Flow Divergence Ajay K. Wakhloo 8:22 – 8:42 AM Controversy: Open vs. Endovascular Approach to Aneurysms Moderator: H. Hunt Batjer Robert F. Spetzler vs. Robert H. Rosenwasser 8:42 – 8:45 AM Introduction 8:45 – 8:55 AM Yuichi Hirose President Japanese Congress of Neurological Surgeons 8:55 – 9:00 AM AANS President William T. Couldwell 9:00 – 10:00 AM E X H I B I T HALL B REA K 10:00 – 10:02 AM Introduction INTERNATIONAL LECTURE Surgical Treatment of Brainstem Hemangioblastoma Liangfu Zhou 10:02 – 10:17 AM 10:17 – 10:32 AM The Evolution of Clinical Trials Richard E. Kuntz 10:32 – 10:35 AM Introduction of Special Lecture Zoher Ghogawala SPECIAL LECTURE Susan Hockfield President Emeriti Massachusetts Institute of Technology 10:35 – 10:55 AM 10:55 – 11:30 AM Investing in Neurosurgery Innovations L. Nelson Hopkins, Fred Khosravi, Hank Plain, Paul Yock 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM E X H I B I T HALL B REA K 55Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 57. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 12:30 – 2:00 PM LUNCHEON SEMINARS All Luncheon Seminars include a plated lunch served in the seminar room. Luncheon Seminar fees are $95 each ($75 for Residents/Fellows/Medical Students/Nurses/Physician Extenders) W30: Honored Guest Luncheon Complimentary to CNS Resident Members! Moderator: L. Nelson Hopkins, III Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Recognize the importance of leadership principles at various stages in a neurosurgeon’s career. Understand the principles of developing a rewarding career as a neurosurgeon in academic or community practice. Explain how to develop an effective mentor /mentee relationship in the early phase of establishing their practice. W31: Recurrent, Thoracic and Far Lateral Lumbar Disc Herniations Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Gerald E. Rodts, Jr. Faculty: J. Patrick Johnson, John C. Liu, Zachary A. Smith Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Analyze current treatment strategy for Cervical Radiculopathy. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of the various surgical approaches for the management of cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy, including the anterior foraminotomy approach, as well as more traditional approaches. W32: Complication Avoidance and Management in Skull Base Surgery Tumor Moderator: Albert L. Rhoton, Jr. Faculty: John G. Golfinos, Carl B. Heilman, Michael J. Link Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the common complications occurring in skull base surgery. Identify various techniques available for managing complications during skull base surgery. Identify the role of adjunctive technologies in managing complications during and after skull base surgery. W33: Update on Movement Disorders: Novel Targets, Indications, and Approaches Stereotactic and Functional Moderator: Robert E. Gross Faculty: Zelma HT Kiss, Karl A. Sillay Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the indications for deep brain stimulation for movement disorder. Determine outcomes and risks related to deep brain stimulation when assessing their management strategies for the treatment of movement disorders. W34: Malignant Glioma: Where Are We Now? Tumor Moderator: Jeffrey N. Bruce Faculty: E. Antonio Chiocca, Andrew T. Parsa Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify current and emerging techniques for treating patients with malignant gliomas. Determine the impact on treatment strategies for these patients. W35: Lessons Learned: Avoidance and Management of Complications of Aneurysm Surgery Cerebrovascular Moderator: Giuseppe Lanzino Faculty: Ali F. Krisht, Michael T. Lawton, Andreas Raabe Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the common complications in aneurysm surgery. Describe management of complications occurring during aneurysm surgery. List the different techniques available to manage complications with adjunctive technologies. W36: Sagittal Balance in Spine Surgery Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Regis W. Haid, Jr. Faculty: Christopher P. Ames, Tyler R. Koski, Juan S. Uribe Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the appropriate clinical and radiographic evaluation for the patient who might have sagittal misalignment. Detail techniques to reduce the risk of improper sagittal alignment following even limited fusion procedures. Describe the interaction of the spinal parameters and pelvic parameters in the patient with sagittal misalignment. Apply operative pearls for the management of sagittal plane deformity such as iatrogenic flat back deformity. Appraise new techniques in spinal osteotomy surgery to improve outcomes and reduce complications. W37: Strategies for Maximizing Compensation for Your Neurosurgical Practice Socioeconomic Moderators: Donald M. Whiting Faculty: Gary M. Bloomgarden, Fernando G. Diaz Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Evaluate the pressures in the current economic environment affecting medical reimbursement. Design strategies for maximizing reimbursement in the existing economic environment. Identify approaching challenges in medical reimbursement. WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 56 www.cns.org
  • 58. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 12:30 – 2:00 PM LUNCHEON SEMINARS W38: Athletic Head Injuries: Return To Play Trauma Moderator: H. Hunt Batjer Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe the diagnosis and workup of athletic head injury. Discuss current guidelines for return to play. W39: Quality and Value in Health Care Socioeconomic Moderators: Zoher Ghogawala, Daniel K. Resnick Faculty: Sigurd Berven, E. Sander Connolly, Matthew J. McGirt Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Determine standards of quality in healthcare. Explain the issue of value and how it relates to efficiency and outcomes. W40: Hematology and Coagulation for Neurosurgeons: Dangers and Solutions Moderator: Issam A. Awad Faculty: Alan S. Hoffer, Maciej S. Lesniak, R. Loch Macdonald Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss acute peri- and intraoperative decisions regarding the diagnosis and management of coagulopathy that are crucial to patient safety and excellent outcomes. Review important coagulation mechanisms, parameters, indications and clinical pearls to their current strategy. List important screening guidelines and define the key points of emergency and intraoperative coagulation management. W41: Managing Metastasis to the Spine Stereotactic and Functional, Spine and Peripheral Nerves Moderator: Laurence D. Rhines Faculty: Mark H. Bilsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Daniel M. Sciubba Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Incorporate current diagnostic and treatment strategies for metastatic tumors of the spine into their treatment plans. Conceptualize a framework for decision making about surgery, conventional radiation, radiosurgery, and vertebral augmentation for these disorders. W42: Open Skull Base Surgery: When is the Traditional Approach Necessary? Tumor Moderators: William T. Couldwell, Ricardo J. Komotar Faculty: Jacques J. Morcos, Harry R. Van Loveren Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify the common pathologies affecting the skull base. Describe the various surgical approaches available for treating skull base lesions. Identify the available surgical adjuncts in managing patients with skull base lesions. W43: Cellular Therapies in Neurosurgery Tumor Moderators: Nicholas M. Boulis Faculty: Nalin Gupta, Nathan R. Selden, Gary K. Steinberg Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss new cellular technologies in Neurosurgery. Determine which patients might benefit from cellular therapies and future directions. W44: New Technologies and Innovations in Cranial Neurosurgery Cerebrovascular Moderator: Neil A. Martin Faculty: David J. Langer, Elad I. Levy, Gregory J. Zipfel Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Identify state of the art technologies in cranial neurosurgery. Review recent innovations in cranial neurosurgery. W45: Developing a Telemedicine and Stroke Network Socioeconomic Moderators: Adam S. Arthur, Adnan H. Siddiqui Faculty: Don Frei, Erol Veznedaroglu Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Recognize the advantage of a stroke network in terms of patient outcomes. Identify the necessary components of a stroke network. Recognize the advantage of a team approach to stroke patients. WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 57Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 59. 2:00 – 3:30 PM Multidisciplinary Oral Presentations II Moderator: Michael R. Chicoine Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Evaluate the findings of novel neurosurgical studies. Critique the design and methodology of these studies. List important areas for further knowledge development and research. Identify the most important ongoing clinical trials. 2:00 – 2:07 PM 192 Pediatric Head Injury during Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom Paul Klimo, Jr., Brian T. Ragel, Rocco Armonda, Shalece Kofford, Randall R. McCafferty 2:07 – 2:14 PM 193 Optogenetic Stimulation of Motor Cortex Neurons Promotes Functional Recovery after Stroke Michelle Cheng, Wyatt J Woodson, Eric Wang, Stephanie Wang, GuoHua Sun, Alex G. Lee, Ahmet Arac, Lief Fenno, Karl Deisseroth, Gary K. Steinberg 2:14 – 2:21 PM 194 High Performance Computer Cursor Control Using Neuronal Ensemble Recordings From the Motor Cortex of a Person with ALS Jaimie M. Henderson, Vikash Gilja, Chethan Pandarinath, Christine Blabe, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy 2:21 – 2:28 PM 195 What is the Current Practice of Restarting Oral Anticoagulant in Patients with Subdural Haemorrhage? Fahad A. Alkherayf, Philip Wells, Charles B. Agbi, Harrison Westwick 2:28 – 2:35 PM 196 Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Chronic SCI: Interim Results of a Phase I/II Trial Raphael Guzman, Martin Schubert, Dagmar Keller-Lang, Stephen L. Huhn, Armin Curt 2:35 – 2:42 PM 197 C2 Nerve Root Transection during C1 Lateral Mass Screw Fixation: Does it affect Functionality and Quality of Life? Michael C. Dewan, Saniya S. Godil, Matthew J. McGirt 2:42 – 2:54 PM Preuss Award 198 Of Mice and Men: Matched Observations of Lymphopenia, Splenic Retraction, and the Bone Marrow as Harbor for Lost T-cells in Mice and Patients with Glioblastoma Peter Fecci, Christina Chen, Shohei Koyama, Glenn Dranoff, Robert L. Martuza, William T. Curry, Jr. 2:54 – 3:01 PM 199 Comparison of Plaintiff and Defendant Expert Witness Qualification in Malpractice Litigation in Neurological Surgery James K. Liu, Jean Anderson Eloy, Peter Svider, Adam J. Folbe, William T. Couldwell 3:01 – 3:08 PM Sherry Apple Resident Travel Scholarship 200 LMP Knockout Mice have Reduced Spine Trabecular Bone Density on Micro-computed Tomography Due to Decreased BMP Responsiveness. Matthew Frank Gary, Manjula Viggeswarapu, Colleen Oliver, Maggie Bargouti, Mesfin Teklemariam, Sree Sangadala, Louisa Titus, Scott Boden 3:08 – 3:15 PM 201 Meningeal Mast Cell- dependent Exacerbation of Brain Injury after Stroke in Mice Ahmet Arac, Michele Grimbaldeston, Andrew Nepomuceno, Oluwatobi Olayiwola, Marta P. Pereira, Yasuhiro Nishiyama, Hannes Vogel, Mindy Tsai, Stephen Galli, Tonya Bliss, Gary K. Steinberg 3:15 – 3:22 PM 202 Rapid Assessment of Platelet Dysfunction in the Traumatic Brain Injury Patient: Application of Point of Care Assays Yair Gozal, Christopher Patrick Carroll, Norberto O. Andaluz 3:22 – 3:29 PM 203 Application Accuracy of a Second Generation Interventional MRI Stereotactic Platform: Initial Experience in 101 DBS Electrode Implantations Paul Larson, Philip A. Starr, Jill L. Ostrem, Nicholas Galifianakis, Marta San Luciano Palenzuela, Alastair Martin WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 2:00 – 3:30 PM Original Science Program WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 58 www.cns.org
  • 60. 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves Cervical Spine Surgery:Where We Come From,Where We Are, Where We Are Going Faculty: Edward C. Benzel, Domagoj Coric, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Paul Park, Daniel M. Sciubba, Michael Y. Wang Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the state of the art in cervical spinal surgery. Discuss historic reasons why current standards have evolved. Discuss new technologies and procedures in the era of complex spine surgery. 2:00 – 2:15 PM ACDF vs. Athroplasty: State-of-the-Art Domagoj Coric 2:15 – 2:30 PM Cervical Myelopathy: Anterior vs. Posterior Edward C. Benzel 2:30 – 2:45 PM Neurologic Compromise in Diffuse Metastic Disease: When to Operate and Treatment Options Daniel M. Sciubba 2:45 – 3:00 PM Where and When is Neuromonitoring Necessary? Michael Y. Wang 3:00 – 3:15 PM With Current C1-2 Fusion Options are O-C Fusions Obsolete? Paul Park 3:15 – 3:30 PM Cervical Deformity: Last Frontier for the Neurosurgeon Praveen V. Mummaneni 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Neurotrauma and Critical Care Evolution of Neurosurgery – Translational Research to Clinical Trial Moderator: Odette Harris, David Okonkwo FACULTY: Randall M. Chesnut, Eve Tsai Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Describe novel translational research in head injury. Discuss current clinical trials in head injury treatment. Describe novel translational research in spinal cord injury. Discuss current clinical trials of spinal cord injury trials. 2:00 – 2:23 pm Novel Translational Research in Head Injury 2:23 – 2:45 pm Current Clinical Trials in Head Injury Treatment Randall M. Chesnut 2:45 – 3:08 pm Novel Translational Research in Spinal Cord Injury Eve Tsai 3:08 – 3:30 pm Current Clinical Trials of Spinal Cord Injury Trials 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Pain The Evolution of Pain Neurosurgery Moderator: Andre Machado, Julie G. Pilitsis Faculty: Alon Y. Mogilner, Parag G. Patil, Konstantin V. Slavin, Raymond F. Sekula Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: Discuss the changes in the practice of neurosurgical pain management Describe the advances in the basic science of nociception. Apply advances in the treatment of cancer pain and facial pain to practice. Explain the technological advancements in neuromodulation. Discuss the evolution of the evidence base in pain neurosurgery. 2:00 – 2:15 PM Peripheral Nociception Julie G. Pilitsis 2:15 – 2:30 PM Central Pain Pathways Andre Machado 2:30 – 2:45 PM Surgery for Cancer Pain Parag G. Patil 2:45 – 3:00 PM Surgery for Facial Pain Raymond F. Sekula 3:00 – 3:15 PM Neurostimulation Konstantin V. Slavin 3:15 – 3:30 PM Intrathecal Infusion Therapy Alon Y. Mogilner WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 2:00 – 3:30 PM AFTERNOON SESSIONS WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 59Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 61. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 2:00 – 3:30 PM AFTERNOON SESSIONS WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER23 2:00 – 3:30 PM Section on Cerebrovascular Surgery the evolution of Neurosurgery MoDerators: Peter Nakaji, J D. Mocco FaCulty: Robert M. Friedlander, Dade L. Lunsford, Yuichi Marayama, Gary K. Steinberg, Raymond D. Turner, IV learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: incorporate practical lessons learned into patient management plans related to neurovascular problems. Define the forces shaping the future management of patients with cerebrovascular problems. Enumerate the ways in which the evolution of cerebrovascular surgery has affected its current practice. 2:00 – 2:05 PM Introduction to Drake Lecture Robert M. Friedlander 2:05 – 2:30 PM Drake Lecture Dade L. Lunsford 2:30 – 2:45 PM The Future Evolution of the Cerebrovascular Neurosurgeon: Implications for Training 2:45 – 3:00 PM How Japanese Neurosurgery has Embraced Acute Stroke Therapy: A Lesson for the u.S.? Yuichi Marayama 3:00 – 3:15 PM The Thinning of the Specialty: Are We Evolving Ourselves Towards Too Many CV Specialists Who Provide Worse Care? Raymond D. Turner, IV 3:15 – 3:30 PM Future Treatments for Cerebrovascular Pathology: After Clopping and Coiling Gary K. Steinberg 2:00 – 3:30 PM Consensus Session ii: acute Cervical spine and spinal Cord trauma:the medical evidence and Controversies of top-flight Care MoDerator: Mark N. Hadley FaCulty: Sanjay S. Dhall, R. John Hurlbert, Curtis J. Rozzelle, Nicholas Theodore, Beverly C. Walters learning objeCtives: Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to: 2:00 – 2:15 PM Introduction and Development of the Cervical Spine Trauma Guidelines Mark Hadley 2:15 – 2:30 PM Clearance of the Cervical Spine, X-rays, CT or MRI? Beverly C. Walters 2:30 – 2:45 PM Closed Reduction, Pre-reduction MRI or Open Reduction for Acute Dislocation Injuries Sanjay S. Dhall 2:45 – 3:00 PM Acute Critical Care Management of C Spine Injuries. ICu Setting, Blood Pressure Augmentation, Pharmacology R. John Hurlbert 3:00 – 3:15 PM The Timing of Surgical Management After SCI Nicholas Theodore 3:15 – 3:30 PM Pediatric Cervical Injuries Curtis J. Rozzelle KEEP all the CNS Meeting Information at Your Fingertips with the Annual Meeting Guide GET all the details and stay connected throughout the cNS Annual Meeting with the Annual Meeting guide using your smart phone or tablet. This guide includes: All course details – title, date, time, course description, learning objectives, faculty and location Save favorite sessions or events you would like to attend within the guide or in your own personal iOS calendar receive alerts and special announcements throughout the conference Send and receive messages with other attendees review the list of exhibitors and their location within the exhibit hall request an appointment with an exhibitor Note taking ability on each of the sessions you attend And much more… AVAILABLE IN FALL 2013! Android users visit http://m.cns.org and Apple users download the device in the App Store! 60 www.cns.org
  • 62. = CNS Membership A Great Value CNS Members simply get more value for their $575 annual dues. with significantly lower dues than that of other neurosurgical organizations, CNS is considered the premier choice for neurosurgical education and member value. Education Offerings + Practice Resources + Leadership Opportunities EDUCATION Archived and live webinars, SANS lifelong learning, exclusive discounts on cNS Annual meeting and other live courses NEUROSURGERY® AND SUPPLEMENTS receive these world class publications delivered to your address each month l Neurosurgery® l Supplements l Congress Quarterly (cnsq) l iPad App l Podcasts l Clinical Neurosurgery PRACTICE RESOURCES in addition, you will receive immediate access to new guidelines as they are released LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES Obtain the information you need for your practice, advance your education, hone your leadership skills and advance your career as a member of the one organization providing new ideas and the future of neurosurgery. ADVOCACY cNS jointly supports the cNS/AANS Washington Office CNs ComINg attraCtIoNs Look for these upcoming, exciting opportunities from the CNS! International Webinar ........................Summer 2013 Highly-Anticipated Evidence-Based Guidelines........................Fall 2013 Spine Complications Course................Winter 2014 SANS MOC Board Review Course ........Spring 2014 Make sure you’re connected to get more details in the coming months! 61Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 63. IMPORTANT DATES TO REMEMBER September 19 Advance registration Discount and housing Deadline Registration Change/Cancellation Information full registration refunds, less a $100 processing fee, will be granted if written requests for cancellation are received by September 26, 2013. course, seminar and event tickets will be refunded in full until September 26, 2013. No refunds of any kind will be given after this date regardless of cause. refunds will not be given for no- shows. Written requests may be e-mailed to cns@wyndhamjade. com, faxed to 972.349.7715 or mailed to 6100 West Plano Parkway, Suite 3500, Plano, Tx 75093. Cancellation requests accepted via: E-mail: cns@wyndhamjade.com Fax: 972.349.7715 Mail: cNS Annual Meeting 6100 West Plano Parkway, Suite 3500, Plano, Tx 75093. October 11 Any changes to hotel reservations must be made directly with hotel from this date on. REGISTRATIONINFORMATION regIstratIoN methods for your convenience, you can register and reserve your hotel room via these four methods: ONLINE: www.cns.org PHONE*: 800.931.9543 uS canada 972.349.5539 international 8:00 AM – 6:30 PM cT FAX*: 972.349.7715 MAIL*: cNS registration and housing center 6100 West Plano Parkway, Suite 3500 Plano, Tx 75093 *Allow five business days for registration and housing confirmation. The cNS registration and housing center is not responsible for faxes not received due to mechanical failure or circumstances beyond our control. Credit Card Payments uS dollars and drawn on a uS bank visa Mastercard American Express Materials Pick-up All materials should be picked up on site at the Moscone convention center West. regIstratIoN rates advaNCe on or before September 19, 2013 after September 19, 2013 CnS active $650 $750 CnS active international Member $650 $750 CnS transitional Member $650 $750 CnS international Vista Member $650 $750 non-member neurosurgeon $875 $975 non-member physician $875 $975 non-member non-physician (Clinical researcher/ Scientist)*** $875 $975 armed Forces $475 $575 resident Member (Domestic int’l)* $150 $250 resident non-Member* $285 $385 Fellow Member (Domestic int’l)** $200 $300 Fellow non-member** $300 $400 CnS Senior Member $350 $450 Medical Student Member $0 $0 allied Health non-Member $500 $600 CnS affiliate Member $300 $400 nurse non-Member $500 $600 neurosurgeon (Faculty) non-Member $650 $750 nurse practioner non-Member $500 $600 CnS associate Member $650 $750 Medical Student non-Member $250 $350 pa/physician Extender non-Member $500 $600 Corporate representative non-Member $1250 $1350 non-Member registration categories are open to domestic and international registrants. *all international residents must have their program Director sign the registration form. if registering online, a letter from your program Director certifying that you are a resident in a neurosurgical training program accredited by the aCgME and the residency review Committee for neurosurgery must be faxed to 972-349-7715 or e-mailed to cns@wyndhamjade.com within one week of completing registration. **all international Fellows must attach a letter from their program Coordinator verifying Fellow status within one week of completing registration. ***non-Member/non-physician category is limited to scientists, engineers, etc. involved in neurosurgical research and/or product development not affiliated with a non-existing company. NOT a MeMBer? Join the CNS before September 19 and enjoy the member rate! Join CNS today and save on your CNS Annual Meeting Registration fee. Simply visit www.cns.org and register for the meeting and sign up to join CNS. 62 www.cns.org
  • 64. hotel INFormatIoN Contact the official Cns registration and Housing Center to reserve your guest rooms. Hotels will not accept reservations from the Cns meeting attendees directly. reservations can be made online or via fax, phone or mail. visit www.cns.org to make your reservation today! be sure to complete the entire housing section of the registration form which can be found online at www.cns.org. Hotel Reservation Information and Deadlines hotel reservations are only available to registered cNS attendees. you must first register for the cNS Annual Meeting before making your hotel arrangements – see page 62. rooms are subject to availability. reserve your room by October 9, 2013. Deposits A deposit of one night’s room and tax is due at the time your hotel reservation is made. This payment must be submitted with your registration fees. Please make your housing deposit check payable to cNS housing center and send to cNS registration and housing center at 6100 West Plano Parkway, Suite 3500, Plano, Tx 75093. All rooms are subject to applicable state and local taxes. A small portion of your room rate will be used to help defray the cost of registration and housing services. hotel reservations requested without deposit will not be processed. Hotel Change/Cancellation Policy The deadline date for new reservations is October 9, 2013. The hotel requires a deposit of one night’s room and tax to reserve your room. Please continue to make any reservations through the cNS housing bureau, Wyndham Jade, through October 9, 2013. beginning October 11, 2013 and up to 72 hours prior to your arrival, changes and cancellations must be made with your assigned hotel. Note: Some hotels may charge an early departure fee. Any cancellations made within 72 hours of arrival date will result in forfeiture of your first night’s deposit and tax. Beginning October 11, 2013 All changes and cancellations must be made directly with the hotel. if cancellation notice is not received according to the hotel policy, the deposit may be forfeited. check your hotel confirmation and contact the hotel directly for information. Complimentary Housing for CNS Resident Member Attendees complimentary housing at the cNS Annual Meeting is available to a limited number of cNS resident Members on a first-come, first-served basis. To be considered for this program, cNS resident Members must: register for the cNS Annual Meeting by August 1. complete a separate cNS resident housing form by August 1. (included with resident Member registration materials and can also be found at www. cns.org). This form is to be sent directly to cNS via e-mail to info@1cns.org, fax to 847 240 0804 or mail to 10 North Martingale road, Suite 190, Schaumburg, il 60173-2294. All residents enrolled in AcgME approved programs have been automatically given complimentary cNS resident Membership. if you are not a cNS resident Member, complete your application by August 26. residents who choose to reserve a room through the cNS registration and housing center and are later accepted into the cNS resident housing Program are responsible for cancelling their original reservation. Thank You for Your Continued Support of the CNS! The cNS thanks you for your support in reserving your guest room through the official cNS housing and registration center. The cNS, in negotiating contracts with convention centers and hotels, must commit to a minimum number of guest rooms. This commitment helps guarantee the availability of meeting space and helps control the cost of the meeting. A history of high utilization of our room block enables the cNS to negotiate better room rates for future meetings. HOTELINFORMATION HOTEL ROOM RATES (rate includes tax) SINGLE DOuBLE TRIPLE QuAD San Francisco Marriot Marquis (Headquarter Hotel) $393.24 $393.24 $416.44 $439.64 Courtyard by Marriott San Francisco Downtown $329.44 $329.44 $352.64 $375.84 Grand Hyatt San Francisco $381.64 $381.64 $410.64 $439.64 InterContinental San Francisco $404.84 $404.84 n/a n/a JW Marriott union Square $370.04 $370.04 $393.24 $416.44 Palace Hotel San Francisco $335.24 $335.24 $381.64 $428.04 St. Regis San Francisco $439.64 $439.64 $486.04 $532.44 Westin St. Francis $335.24 $335.24 $381.64 $428.04 W San Francisco $370.04 $370.04 $416.44 $462.84 *all hotel rates are inclusive of 16% tax a small portion of your room rate will be used to help defray the cost of housing and registration services. 63Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 65. HOTELINFORMATION San Francisco Marriott Marquis Headquarter Hotel 55 4th Street San francisco, cA 94103 0.2 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet fitness center room service virtual concierge Available Courtyard by Marriott San Francisco 299 2nd Street San francisco, cA 94105 0.4 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet (complimentary to cNS guests) fitness center (complimentary to cNS guests) local restaurant dinner delivery room service Grand Hyatt San Francisco 345 Stockton Street San francisco, cA 94108 0.6 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet (complimentary to cNS guests) fitness center (complimentary to cNS guests) room service uno-bitell Media phones with MP3/iPod docking capabilities/generous work desk with Wi-fi/37” flat screen Tv InterContinental San Francisco 888 howard Street San francisco, california 94103 0.1 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet (complimentary to cNS guests) fitness center (complimentary to cNS guests) room service complimentary luxury Sedan Service 8,000 sq. ft. spa JW Marriott union Square 500 Post Street San francisco, cA 94102 0.6 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: Twice Daily Maid Service high Speed internet (complimentary to cNS guests) fitness center (complimentary to cNS guests) room service Palace Hotel San Francisco 2 New Montgomery Street San francisco, cA 94105 0.5 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet (complimentary to cNS guests) fitness center (complimentary to cNS guests) room service complimentary coffee in lobby (Mon – Sun: 6:00 – 10:00 AM) On-site dining 64 www.cns.org
  • 66. HOTELINFORMATION St. Regis San Francisco 125 3rd Street San francisco, cA 94102 0.5 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: 13” flat Screen lcD Television in bathroom Wireless/Wired high Speed internet Access (subject to fee) fitness center 24 hour room Service W San Francisco 181 3rd Street San francisco, cA 94103 0.2 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet (complimentary to cNS guests) fitness center (complimentary to cNS guests) 32” flat Screen Plasma Television 24 hour room Service Westin St. Francis on union Square 335 Powell Street San francisco, cA 94102 0.5 miles to Moscone Convention Center West Amenities Include: high Speed internet fitness center room service On-siting dining Distance from Moscone Hotels West 1. San Francisco Marriott Marquis 0.2 miles (Headquarter Hotel) 2. courtyard by Marriott 0.4 miles San francisco Downtown 3. grand hyatt San francisco 0.6 miles 4. intercontinental San francisco 0.1 miles 5. JW Marriott hotel 0.6 miles San francisco union Square 6. Palace hotel San francisco 0.5 miles 7. St. regis hotel San francisco 0.5 miles 8. W San francisco 0.2 miles 9. Westin St. francis on union Square 0.5 miles 65Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 67. GENERALINFORMATION geNeral INFormatIoN airlines The cNS Annual Meeting hotels and the Moscone convention center West are located approximately 15 miles from San francisco Airport (SfO). Taxis are readily available outside of baggage claim at San francisco Airport. americans with disabilities act Wheelchairs, scooters, information booths, designated parking, TDD telephones and other services are available for visitors with disabilities. for wheelchair/electric scooter rental, please contact ScootAround, inc. at 1-888-441-7575, or by visiting their website at http://scootaround.com/rentals/rentals_ conventions.htm Please let us know if, under the ADA, you require special accommodations or services in order to attend the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting. We want to ensure that no individual with a disability is excluded because of the absence of auxiliary aids and services. your requirements should be sent directly to the cNS housing and registration center at: cns@wynhdamjade.com or call 1-800-931-9543. Please provide any requests at least 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting to guarantee accommodation. attire Professional attire is appropriate at the Annual Meeting and the Exhibit hall. Some San francisco restaurants require coats and ties for gentlemen. Please check each restaurant’s policy when making reservations. spouse hospitality suite All registered cNS Annual Meeting spouses and guests are invited to visit the Spouse hospitality Suite, Monday through Wednesday for daily continental breakfast from 8:00 – 10:30 AM. (Please note that admittance to the Spouse hospitality Suite is by Spouse/guest badge only.) The Spouse hospitality Suite is located in the Walnut room at the San francisco Marriott Marquis. Children children over the age of 12 may register as a guest at the guest registration fee. (Please note that children under the age of 18 are not allowed in the Exhibit hall.) Should you require babysitting services, please contact the concierge desk at your hotel. The cNS has no control over and assumes no responsibility for the care that is provided through hotels or these services. This information is provided solely to assist participants in identifying possible sources for childcare. Climate October temperatures in San francisco average a high of 65 degrees and a low of 53 degrees. Course agendas and Faculty Agendas are occasionally subject to change. As we continue to strive to improve the quality of your educational experience, the cNS may substitute faculty with comparable expertise when necessary. digital Posters Digital Posters will be displayed electronically, Monday through Wednesday in the Exhibit hall, and can be searched by author, topic or keyword. disclaimer The material presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting has been made available by the congress of Neurological Surgeons for educational purposes only. The material is not intended to represent the only, nor necessarily the best, method or procedure appropriate for the medical situations discussed, but rather is intended to present an approach, view, statement or opinion of the faculty which may be helpful to others who face similar situations. Neither the content (whether written or oral) of any course, seminar or other presentation in the program, nor the use of a specific product in conjunction therewith, nor the exhibition of any materials by any parties coincident with the program, should be construed as indicating endorsement or approval of the views presented, the products used, or the materials exhibited by the cNS or by its committees or Affiliates. The cNS disclaims any and all liability for injury or other damages resulting to any individual attending the Annual Meeting, and for all claims which may arise out of the use of the techniques demonstrated therein by such individuals, whether these claims shall be asserted by physicians or any other person. No reproductions of any kind, including audiotapes and videotape, may be made of the presentations at the cNS Annual Meeting. The cNS reserves all of its rights to such material, and commercial reproduction is specifically prohibited. exhibit hall Monday, october 21 9:00 aM – 3:30 pM tuesday, october 22 9:00 aM – 6:30 pM Wednesday,october 23 9:00 aM – 2:00 pM Admittance to the Exhibit hall is by the cNS name badge only. children under the age of 18 are not allowed in the cNS Exhibit hall. Future meetings 2014: boston, Massachusetts october 18-22 2015: new orleans, louisiana september 26-30 2016: san Diego, California september 24-28 housing Information See pages 63-65. Items included in registration Fee Admission to Sunday – Wednesday: general Scientific Sessions Original Science Program Admission Monday – Wednesday Special Courses Consensus Sessions Operative Neurosurgery Sessions Section Sessions Exhibit hall and beverage breaks One Ticket to: Opening reception on Sunday, October 20 international reception on Monday, October 21 (for international attendees) Wine and cheese reception in Exhibit hall on Tuesday, October 22 resident recruitment Social on Tuesday, October 22 (Note: Children under the age of 18 are not allowed on the exhibit floor.) 66 www.cns.org
  • 68. GENERALINFORMATION member services Booth The cNS Member Services booth is located in the Exhibit hall. Staff members will be available to assist you and answer any questions you may have about the cNS or your cNS Membership and its member services. Press room credentialed members of the media may register to attend the conference and are required to provide cNS staff with a copy of their press credentials and letters of assignment. qualified media outlets must be represented by editorial staff, not publishers or advertising or marketing staff. Media interested in attending should contact the cNS Marketing communications staff at 847- 240-2500 for instructions on registering. Only two registrations are allowed per media outlet. registration Information saturday, october 19 7:00 aM – 5:30 pM sunday, october 20 7:00 aM – 7:30 pM Monday, october 21 6:30 aM – 4:30 pM tuesday, october 22 6:30 aM – 4:30 pM Wednesday,october 23 6:30 aM – 3:00 pM shuttle services Shuttle service to the Moscone convention center West will be available from some of the official cNS hotels. A shuttle schedule will be posted at the hotels and convention center. smoking Moscone convention center West and official cNS hotels are non-smoking facilities. There are designated areas outside the buildings where smoking is permitted. speaker ready room All speakers and abstract presenters should visit the Speaker ready room at the Moscone convention center West prior to their presentations. saturday, october 19 7:00 aM – 5:30 pM sunday, october 20 7:00 aM – 6:00 pM Monday, october 21 6:30 aM – 3:00 pM tuesday, october 22 6:30 aM – 3:00 pM Wednesday,october 23 6:30 aM – 3:00 pM visa Information The State Department of the united States encourages international participants to apply for their visas as early as possible – at least 3 months before the meeting. Some consulates may have backlogs in scheduling visa interviews so applicants should first contact the consulate to find out how long the wait is for an interview. visa wait times are available at: http://travel.his.com/visa/ temp/wait/wait_4638.html. for information on the visa process, please visit www.nationalacademies.org/visas. The uS State Department’s visa site contains the official information on the visa application process: http://travel.his.com/visa. Introducing the CNS-SIM! As the global leader in neurosurgical education, the cNS is pleased to announce the launch of the CNS-SIM. utilizing the latest in simulation technology in conjunction with a standardized curriculum, task validation and prospective objective assessments, the CNS-SIM will provide neurosurgeons-in-training a comprehensive learning platform. The CNS-SIM includes web-based, virtual reality, haptic feedback devices, as well as physical models for the spine, skull base, trauma, vascular, endovascular and functional subspecialties. Preview the technology on-site at the 2013 cNS Annual Meeting during PC16: simulation-Based Neurosurgical training. A $250 registration fee is required to guarantee a seat in this course. Upon completion, the $250 registration fee will be refunded in its entirety. This course is for PGY3, PGY4 and PGY5 residents. 67Stay connected at http://m.cns.org
  • 69. 2013CNSANNUALExHIBITORS eXhIBItors Accuray Ad-Tech Medical Instrument Corp. Advanced Biologics Allen Medical Systems, Inc. Alpha Omega Co. USA Inc. Amedica Corporation American Association of Neurological Surgeons American Surgical Company Apex Medical, Inc. Arbor Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ASSI - Accurate Surgical and Scientific Instruments Baxano, Inc. Baxter Healthcare Corporation Besins Critical Care, LLC BioDlogics, LLC Biomet Spine / Microfixation Bioplate, Inc. BK Medical Boss Instruments Ltd Boston Scientific Neuromodulation Brainlab Cadwell Laboratories, Inc. Carl Zeiss Meditec CCV Centinel Spine CMF Medicon Surgical Inc. Codman Cosman Medical Covidien Depuy Synthes Spine Designs For Vision, Inc. Electrical Geodesics, Inc. (EGI) ELEKTA, Inc. elliquence Elsevier, Inc. Fehling Surgical Instruments Frontier Devices Gauthier Biomedical Globus Medical Haag-Streit Surgical Harlequin Recruiting Hayes Locums HCA - Hospital Corporation of America Hemedex, Inc. Hitachi Aloka Medical IMRIS Inion Inc. Innerspace Neuro, Inc. Innovasis, Inc. Integra LifeSciences Corporation InVivoLink Journal of Neurosurgery K2M, Inc. Karl Storz Kelyniam Global, Inc. Kinamed, Inc Kirwan Surgical Products LLC KLS Martin Group Kogent Surgical Koros USA Inc. LDR Spine Leica Microsystems Life Instrument Corporation Lippincott Williams Wilkins/ Wolters Kluwer Health Market Access Partners MASEP Infini Medical Science Technology Dev. Co. LTD Medprin Biotech GmbH Medtech Surgical MedTrak Medtronic, Inc. MicroVention Mizuho America, Inc. Monteris Medical Mountain States Health Alliance MRI Interventions Inc. Nadia International Inc NeuroLogica Corporation NeuroPace, Inc. NeuroPoint Alliance (NPA) Neuroptics Inc. Newport Surgical Instruments, Inc. Nexstim, Inc. Nexus Spine NICO Corporation North American Spine Society NovaBone Products LLC NSI NuTech Oncology Data Systems Orascoptic Orthofix Osteo Symbionics OsteoMed Paradigm Spine, LLC Paramed Medical Systems Penumbra, Inc. PeriOptix, Inc. Pfizer Piezosurgery Inc Pioneer Surgical PMT Corporation Precision Spine, Inc. pro med instruments, Inc. Pro-Dex, Inc ProNerve, LLC Providence Medical Technology, Inc. Renishaw, Inc. Residency Select, LLC Rose Micro Solutions RosmanSearch, Inc. RTI Biologics, Inc. Scanlan International, Inc. Scott White Healathcare ShuntCheck Inc. SI-BONE, Inc. Siemens Healthcare Sonowand Sophysa USA, Inc. Southern Spine LLC SpinalMotion, Inc. Spine Wave Inc. Spineology Inc. St. Jude Medical St. Mary’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center Stryker Surgical Theater SurgiTel / General Scientific Corp TeDan Surgical Innovations, LLC The Brain Aneurysm Foundation Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. Thompson Surgical Instruments, Inc. US Medical Innovations, LLC Varian Medical Systems, Inc. VG Innovations, LLC Weatherby Healthcare X-spine Systems, Inc. Zimmer Spine as of July 10, 2013 68 www.cns.org
  • 70. Uncompromised Spine Exposure with the INDEPENDENT CONTROL All blades angle retract independently NO RISE UP OR CREEP Add-on blades stop creep are individually positionable MIS POSTERIOR LUMBAR ACCESS SYSTEM ANTERIOR CERVICAL RETRACTOR SYSTEM UNCOMPROMISED ANTERIOR CERVICAL EXPOSURE Try the Thompson Retractor for Anterior Cervical Exposure: Independent, atraumatic retraction and stable exposure with fewer adjustments (top view) VERSATILE FRAME RACK 3 interchangeable rack lengths 2 table mount options OPTIMAL IMAGING All blades are radiolucent FREE TRIAL U.S. Customers Only Thompson Surgical Instruments, Inc. • 800-227-7543 • www.thompsonsurgical.com Patents Pending Please visit us at CNS Booth #1747
  • 71. The moment you expand the surgical boundaries beyond what seems possible. This is the moment we work for. TRENION 3D HD Advancing surgical education and training Join us for your personal tour of OPMI Pentero® 900 with TRENION™ 3D HD during the CNS Annual Meeting Visit Booth #1127 YELLOW 560™ image obtained with drug being investigated for new intended use. BLUE 400™ image obtained with investigational new drug. SUR.5263 © Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. All rights reserved. // TRENION 3D HD MADE BY CARL ZEISS // MICROSURGERY MADE BY CARL ZEISS

×