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WHO ARE WE? WHAT DO WE DO?
InfoGrafix, L.L.C. <ul><li>IS </li></ul><ul><li>Peggy Wilson, PRESIDENT </li></ul><ul><li>Mickey Campbell, Project Manager...
What Do We Do <ul><li>GIS Systems Planning </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Implementation Plans </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Production Map...
What Do We Do InfoGrafix provides Geographic Information Systems consulting services, project management and training for ...
What is GIS? •   Geographic Information System Definition •  What can GIS really do? •  GIS Data •  Spatial Data Major Ele...
GIS <ul><li>A geographic information system is a computerized database management system for  capture ,  storage ,  retrie...
Simplistic View of GIS GIS Maps Tables Maps Linked to Data Spatial Modeling Tools
GIS Primary Functions Capture Storage Retrieval Analysis Display Spatial Data
What can GIS  really  do? Thematic Mapping Functional Classification
What can GIS  really  do? Thematic Mapping Treatment Plant Major Interceptors
What can GIS  really  do? Spatial Queries   Map to Table Table to Map
11/17/09 2020 What can GIS  really  do? Spatial Queries - Map to Table To Chart
What can GIS  really  do? Spatial Queries - Table to Map Select the 2 subbasins  with greatest increase in flow Display Fl...
What can GIS  really  do? Data Integration Wastewater Flow Routing Model Data Predicted Overflow Predicted Overloaded Sewe...
What can GIS  really  do? Routing and Minimum Path Shortest Path From Water Reuse Sites to the Reclamation T/P Using City ...
What can GIS  really  do? Routing and Minimum Path Shortest Path from a Water Reuse Site to a Major Distribution Pipe Usin...
What can GIS  really  do? Buffering Proposed Water Pipe Contaminated Areas 500 & 1,000 Buffers Problems
What can GIS  really  do? Overlay <ul><li>1994 Northridge Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>Epicenter and after-shock data avai...
What can GIS  really  do? Overlay <ul><li>1994 Northridge Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>Damage Reports </li></ul>Bridge Dam...
What can GIS  really  do? Distance, adjacency , and Proximity Potential Water Reuse sites in Orange County Sources of recl...
What can GIS  Really  Do? Summary <ul><li>Presentations and thematic mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Data queries (spatial and t...
GIS Data Structure GIS Maps Tables Maps Linked to Data
GIS Data Structure
Irregular Tile Boundaries CDOT Region boundaries
Spatial Data Value Shape Location Spatial Reference Object’s data, information or description in tables Object’s external ...
Spatial Data Value Object’s data, information or description in tables <ul><li>Stored in a series of related data tables <...
Spatial Data Value Shape Location Spatial Reference Object’s external surface or outline on a map or drawing <ul><li>Graph...
Spatial Data Value Shape Location Spatial Reference Basic geometric figures Points Line 2 or more Points Polygon 3 or more...
Spatial Data Value Spatial Reference Shape Location Object’s place on a map that represents the real world position <ul><l...
Spatial Data Value Shape Object's relationship to the objects around it Location Spatial Reference <ul><li>Two basic metho...
Spatial Data Value Shape Object's relationship to the objects around it Location Spatial Reference <ul><li>“ Topology  is ...
Spatial Data Value Shape Object's relationship to the objects around it Location Spatial Reference <ul><li>Topological pro...
Two Major GIS Spatial Data Models <ul><li>Raster or grid GIS </li></ul><ul><li>Vector GIS (points, lines, and polygons) </...
Raster GIS Data Layer Note Grid/Raster Cell Size Rich mixture of data Fuzzy boundaries
Vector GIS <ul><li>Spatial  features are made up of basic geometric figures composed vectors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Points ...
Vector Data <ul><li>Vector  - A starting coordinate, displacement, and direction. </li></ul><ul><li>Start at first point m...
Vector GIS Spatial Reference <ul><li>Values  - Defined by data attribute linked to each geometric map feature </li></ul><u...
Conversion Between Vector and Raster Systems <ul><li>Provided by GIS software provide  </li></ul><ul><li>Some anticipated ...
Grid GIS provides more data variations and less precise edges. Missing data easily identified. Vector GIS provides better ...
<ul><li>Resource Management </li></ul><ul><li>Wide variation of data such as vegetation mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Use with...
Shape Location Spatial Reference Value Database Shape Graphics Location Coordinates Map Projection and Datum Spatial Refer...
GIS Data Structure Shape Value Location Spatial Reference Map Projection and Datum Containment Adjacency Orientation Conne...
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Info Grafix

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Transcript of "Info Grafix"

  1. 1. WHO ARE WE? WHAT DO WE DO?
  2. 2. InfoGrafix, L.L.C. <ul><li>IS </li></ul><ul><li>Peggy Wilson, PRESIDENT </li></ul><ul><li>Mickey Campbell, Project Manager </li></ul><ul><li>A virtual network of GIS professionals and IT companies </li></ul>
  3. 3. What Do We Do <ul><li>GIS Systems Planning </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Implementation Plans </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Production Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Database Design </li></ul><ul><li>Data Migration and Integration with other major database products </li></ul>
  4. 4. What Do We Do InfoGrafix provides Geographic Information Systems consulting services, project management and training for ESRI’s ArcView and ArcGIS Software. With the skills and experience necessary to help customers effectively utilize GIS technology we additionally provide planning, design, and implementation of GIS solutions. InfoGrafix, L.L.C. translates project challenges and issues into cost effective predictable project outcomes. “State-of-the-Art” GIS tools and quality service oriented people make InfoGrafix the right choice for your organization.
  5. 5. What is GIS? • Geographic Information System Definition • What can GIS really do? • GIS Data • Spatial Data Major Elements • Major Types of GIS GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)
  6. 6. GIS <ul><li>A geographic information system is a computerized database management system for capture , storage , retrieval , analysis , and display of spatial (locationally defined) data . </li></ul>G eographic I nformation S ystem National Science Foundation
  7. 7. Simplistic View of GIS GIS Maps Tables Maps Linked to Data Spatial Modeling Tools
  8. 8. GIS Primary Functions Capture Storage Retrieval Analysis Display Spatial Data
  9. 9. What can GIS really do? Thematic Mapping Functional Classification
  10. 10. What can GIS really do? Thematic Mapping Treatment Plant Major Interceptors
  11. 11. What can GIS really do? Spatial Queries Map to Table Table to Map
  12. 12. 11/17/09 2020 What can GIS really do? Spatial Queries - Map to Table To Chart
  13. 13. What can GIS really do? Spatial Queries - Table to Map Select the 2 subbasins with greatest increase in flow Display Flow Identify Subbasins
  14. 14. What can GIS really do? Data Integration Wastewater Flow Routing Model Data Predicted Overflow Predicted Overloaded Sewers
  15. 15. What can GIS really do? Routing and Minimum Path Shortest Path From Water Reuse Sites to the Reclamation T/P Using City Streets
  16. 16. What can GIS really do? Routing and Minimum Path Shortest Path from a Water Reuse Site to a Major Distribution Pipe Using City Streets
  17. 17. What can GIS really do? Buffering Proposed Water Pipe Contaminated Areas 500 & 1,000 Buffers Problems
  18. 18. What can GIS really do? Overlay <ul><li>1994 Northridge Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>Epicenter and after-shock data available to public within 24 hours </li></ul>Epicenter After-shocks
  19. 19. What can GIS really do? Overlay <ul><li>1994 Northridge Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>Damage Reports </li></ul>Bridge Damage Damaged Structures
  20. 20. What can GIS really do? Distance, adjacency , and Proximity Potential Water Reuse sites in Orange County Sources of reclaimed water
  21. 21. What can GIS Really Do? Summary <ul><li>Presentations and thematic mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Data queries (spatial and tabular) </li></ul><ul><li>Database integration and updating </li></ul><ul><li>Routing and minimum path </li></ul><ul><li>Buffering </li></ul><ul><li>Point-in-polygons </li></ul><ul><li>Overlay analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Distance, adjacency, and proximity </li></ul>
  22. 22. GIS Data Structure GIS Maps Tables Maps Linked to Data
  23. 23. GIS Data Structure
  24. 24. Irregular Tile Boundaries CDOT Region boundaries
  25. 25. Spatial Data Value Shape Location Spatial Reference Object’s data, information or description in tables Object’s external surface or outline on a map or drawing Object’s place on a map that represents the real world position Object's relationship to the objects around it
  26. 26. Spatial Data Value Object’s data, information or description in tables <ul><li>Stored in a series of related data tables </li></ul><ul><li>Data linked to object </li></ul><ul><li>Database managers provide </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reporting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analytical tools </li></ul></ul>Shape Location Spatial Reference
  27. 27. Spatial Data Value Shape Location Spatial Reference Object’s external surface or outline on a map or drawing <ul><li>Graphics approximate the real world feature on a map or drawing. </li></ul><ul><li>Shape is defined with some simple geometric figures </li></ul>
  28. 28. Spatial Data Value Shape Location Spatial Reference Basic geometric figures Points Line 2 or more Points Polygon 3 or more Lines
  29. 29. Spatial Data Value Spatial Reference Shape Location Object’s place on a map that represents the real world position <ul><li>Coordinates </li></ul><ul><li>Map projection </li></ul><ul><li>Datum </li></ul>
  30. 30. Spatial Data Value Shape Object's relationship to the objects around it Location Spatial Reference <ul><li>Two basic methods. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Grid or raster structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Topology </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. Spatial Data Value Shape Object's relationship to the objects around it Location Spatial Reference <ul><li>“ Topology is the study of those properties of geometric forms that remain invariant under certain transformations, as bending or stretching...” Random House Unabridged Dictionary </li></ul>
  32. 32. Spatial Data Value Shape Object's relationship to the objects around it Location Spatial Reference <ul><li>Topological properties </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connectivity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Orientation (to and from) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adjacency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Containment </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Two Major GIS Spatial Data Models <ul><li>Raster or grid GIS </li></ul><ul><li>Vector GIS (points, lines, and polygons) </li></ul>
  34. 34. Raster GIS Data Layer Note Grid/Raster Cell Size Rich mixture of data Fuzzy boundaries
  35. 35. Vector GIS <ul><li>Spatial features are made up of basic geometric figures composed vectors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Points (not a vector) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Line or vector (two or more points) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Polygons (three or more vectors) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Vector GIS (points, lines, and polygons) </li></ul>
  36. 36. Vector Data <ul><li>Vector - A starting coordinate, displacement, and direction. </li></ul><ul><li>Start at first point move to second point </li></ul>
  37. 37. Vector GIS Spatial Reference <ul><li>Values - Defined by data attribute linked to each geometric map feature </li></ul><ul><li>Shape </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Define from a combination of points, lines, and polygons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each data layer has only one geometric shape type </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Location - Defined by map coordinates </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial reference - Provided by the topology maintained by the software </li></ul>
  38. 38. Conversion Between Vector and Raster Systems <ul><li>Provided by GIS software provide </li></ul><ul><li>Some anticipated problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vector to raster - Lose vector precision </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Raster to vector - Lose data variability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Raster to vector polygons - Boundary distortions </li></ul></ul>
  39. 39. Grid GIS provides more data variations and less precise edges. Missing data easily identified. Vector GIS provides better edges and sharp changes in data, however, data is constant for entire area. Data Variation Greater Data Variation Missing Data Sharp Edges Single Value
  40. 40. <ul><li>Resource Management </li></ul><ul><li>Wide variation of data such as vegetation mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Use with aerial or satellite images </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation, utilities, land records, marketing applications </li></ul><ul><li>Network analysis such as a pipe or road network </li></ul><ul><li>Areas with sharp edges (lot lines) </li></ul>Primary Use Comparisons Raster GIS Vector GIS
  41. 41. Shape Location Spatial Reference Value Database Shape Graphics Location Coordinates Map Projection and Datum Spatial Reference Connectivity Orientation Adjacency Containment Spatial Data Summary
  42. 42. GIS Data Structure Shape Value Location Spatial Reference Map Projection and Datum Containment Adjacency Orientation Connectivity Database Coordinates Graphics GIS Geographic Information System

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