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Innovators Dilemma Slides

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As I have them I am 99% sure they are public

As I have them I am 99% sure they are public

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  • 1. Innovator’s Dilemma - Introduction Clayton M Christensen, HBS Press, 1997
  • 2. Innovator’s Dilemma - Introduction Clayton M Christensen, HBS Press, 1997
    • Disruptive technology is often developed by established companies
    • Existing customers undervalue the changes which do not address their specific needs
    • Established players renew their focus on ‘sustaining’ technology development
    • New entrants intro the disruptive technology to small ‘fringe’ markets (attacker’s advantage)
    • Disruptive technology moves ‘upmarket’
    • Established firms try to catch-up
  • 3. Innovator’s Dilemma Why upstarts and not established players? High dependency on existing customers Initial market too small (relative to current) Uncertain potential, certain consequences Established Technology Disruptive Technology
  • 4. Principles
    • Dependency
        • Companies do not have ‘free reign’ because they depend on customers and investors for resources
    • Size
        • Big companies overlook small markets because they need big markets to satisfy their growth objectives
    • Uncertainty
        • Markets that don’t exist tough to analyze
  • 5. Disruptive Technologies
    • Initial under-performance … against mainstream market requirements
    • Improvement trajectory: competitive performance in the future
  • 6. The ‘Dilemma Cycle’
    • Disruptive technology is often developed by established companies
    • Existing customers undervalue the changes which do not address their specific needs
    • Established players renew their focus on ‘sustaining’ technology development
    • New entrants intro the disruptive technology to small ‘fringe’ markets (attacker’s advantage)
    • Disruptive technology moves ‘upmarket’
    • Established firms try to catch-up
  • 7. Conclusions
    • Technology development and absorption rates may differ widely
    • Sometimes, it’s difficult to match new technologies and existing markets
    • Organizational capabilities are generally more specialized and context-specific than managers are inclined to believe
    • The information required ‘to disrupt’ just doesn’t exist … so projects are very high risk