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This week in mcfp 12 dec 2011

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The latest from Military Community and Family Policy, December 12, 2011.

The latest from Military Community and Family Policy, December 12, 2011.

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    This week in mcfp 12 dec 2011 This week in mcfp 12 dec 2011 Document Transcript

    • Image description. MC&FP banner image End of image description.Blog post of Robert L. Gordon III, Deputy AssistantSecretary of Defense (Military Community and FamilyPolicy)Image description. Robert L. Gordon III, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (MC&FP) End of image description.Voice Your Feedback on the New MSEP WebsiteThe Military Spouse Employment Partnership (MSEP) is only six months old, but we have madetremendous progress in that short time. With close to 100 employer partners that include Fortune 500companies, small businesses, non-profits, academia, government, and the medical field, we are on ourway to ensuring all military spouses who desire to work can find stable and meaningful employment.Since June, over 115,000 jobs have been posted to www.msepjobs.com, and there are currently over60,000 jobs available on the site. To date, over 10,400 spouses have found employment through theMSEP program.We have recently begun work on the next generation of the MSEP web site. Were at the ground floor ofthis effort, and we want your ideas and your input!We have created three mockups of what could be the home page of the new website. They are DesignOne, Design Two and Design Three. Click on the image once it opens to enlarge it for better viewing.Please take some time to focus on the look and feel of these pages. Tell us what you like, and tell uswhat you dont like. Which one is your favorite? What do you think of the general layout? Whatfunctions on the site would be the most valuable for you in finding employment? Please let us knowwhat you think by joining our discussion, and please share with your friends and families for them toprovide their input and ideas as well.Since MSEPjobs.com is a website for you, your feedback is critical for us to make it better. Please keepin mind that since these are simply snapshots of the homepages, the links will not be active, and sincethese are mockups, the text on the pages is the usual Latin gibberish that web designers use while pagesare still in development. The actual text and working links will be included later, but for now, we needyour thoughts on these new designs, the colors, the icons, and the overall feel.The new site will have enhanced functionality. For example, it will provide the ability to search jobs byzip code and the descriptor "telecommuting." It will include a resume builder function and provide youwith tailored email alerts when you are matched to a job posting. You will be able to build your profileand include your education and experience, and you will receive job matches based on this information. Page 1 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011Its important to note that these exciting upgrades have been included because military spouses like youare speaking up to help make this site as useful as possible.We are planning to launch the new MSEP site in early 2012. Our number-one goal is to support you andyour family. We can do that most effectively when you are involved with us in building tools for youruse. Please join us in making sure our military spouses have all the support and assistance they needwhen it comes to finding meaningful employment. Until next time, be well! Page 2 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011Joining ForcesJoining ForcesMilitary Spouse Career Forum and Hiring FairThe U.S. Chamber of Commerce is hosting a free Military Spouse Career Forum and Hiring Fair. Thisevent is scheduled for Jan. 13, 2012, 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. at the Washington DC Convention Center, 801Mount Vernon Place, NW.Military spouses may register for the hiring fair on-line at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Hiring OurHeroes website and upload a resume when registering.The day will feature resume and interview coaching prior to the hiring fair, and free makeovers. Bothnational and local employers with open positions will be present and interviews will be conducted on-site.This is the nations largest career fair dedicated exclusively to military spouses. This Military SpouseCareer Forum and Hiring Fair will be co-hosted by MC&FPs Military Spouse Employment Partnership(MSEP), NBC4, NBC News, Joining Forces and HandsOn Greater DC Care.Registration closes Jan. 10, 2012. Page 3 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011Weekly TipsMilitary Community and Family Policy Weekly TipsNutrition Tip of the Week - Avoiding Cross ContaminationCross-contamination is how bacteria can be spread. When handling raw meat, poultry, seafood, andeggs, keep these foods and their juices away from ready-to-eat foods. Always start with a clean scenewash hands with warm water and soap. Wash cutting boards, dishes, countertops, and utensils with hotsoapy water. • Separate raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs from other foods in your grocery shopping cart, grocery bags, and in your refrigerator. • Use one cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood. • Never place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat, poultry, seafood, or eggs.Parenting Tip of the Week - Getting Children Excited about Science, Engineering, and MathYou may have heard that NASA is seeking candidates for astronaut positions. This is a fun way to getyour children excited about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) this holiday season.The first US astronauts were selected in 1959 as NASA asked the military services to provide a list ofpersonnel who met specific qualifications; today, the backgrounds of NASA’s latest group of AstronautCandidates include doctors, scientists, and engineers and almost all of them have a military background. • Visit the NASA website for students for STEM activities and information for children in kindergarten through twelfth grade. • You can also visit and tour a NASA installation. Go to the NASA website for more details. • NASA is hosting the Optimus Prime Contest 2011, where students are invited to make a video about their favorite NASA spinoff technologies. Go to the NASA website for contest details.Lets Move/Childhood Obesity Tip of the Week - Tips to Help You Eat Vegetables • Buy fresh vegetables in season. They cost less and are likely to be at their peak flavor. • Stock up on frozen vegetables for quick and easy cooking in the microwave. • Buy vegetables that are easy to prepare. Pick up pre-washed bags of salad greens and add baby carrots or grape tomatoes for a salad in minutes. Buy packages of veggies such as baby carrots or celery sticks for quick snacks. • Use a microwave to quickly "zap" vegetables. White or sweet potatoes can be baked quickly this way. • Vary your veggie choices to keep meals interesting. • Try crunchy vegetables, raw, or lightly steamed.Financial Tip of the Week - Money Issues and Holiday StressWho buys the presents? Do we pay cash or charge them? How much should we spend? Money questionslike these pop up during the holidays and they can turn this wonderful season into the most stressful timeof the year. Page 4 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011The leading cause of holiday stress is money issues, according to a recent poll by the AmericanPsychological Association (APA). The survey found that 61 percent of Americans listed lack of moneyas the top cause of family tensions, holiday blues and depression – followed by the pressures of gift-giving, shortage of time and credit card debt. Additionally, younger Americans today – faced with atougher economy and less savings – worry more about gift-giving and a lack of money compared topeople over the age of thirty-five."People believe that they can go out and buy gifts because its the holidays, even if they cant afford todo so," says Dorothy Cantor, noted psychologist and former president of the APA. "Not only is itstressful to feel that you have to buy everyone an expensive gift, but youll also be stressed for the rest ofthe year trying to pay your bills. You can show love and caring by giving something that you know ismeaningful and personal that doesnt have to cost a lot."While managing money issues during the holiday season can be a challenge, financial experts agree thatyou can minimize tensions by planning ahead, exhibiting patience and managing expectations. Cantorrecommends that families first establish priorities for themselves then develop a strategy and a budget tomake the holiday season enjoyable and worry-free.For starters, make an agreement with family members to discuss holiday spending and finances beforeyou make any purchases. The goal here is to learn one anothers thoughts and feelings about prioritiesand wishes. Be realistic, decide together on a budget and only use cash, rather than using credit cards.Military OneSource Tip of the Week - Holiday Stress and DeploymentThe winter holidays can be stressful for anyone, but when your loved one is deployed, they can beespecially difficult. You may experience a range of emotions, from worry to loneliness -- even anger anddisappointment. The holidays may magnify those feelings, but they can also be a time to strengthen youremotional commitment to your service member and your family.Plan ahead for the HolidaysIf possible, sit down with your deployed service member before your separation to talk about how youwill mark the holidays. If you are already apart, discuss your plans through letters, e-mail, or telephonecalls. • Get an early start with gifts and cards. Depending on where your loved one is stationed, it can take a week or more for a package to arrive from the United States. Give yourself plenty of time to make or purchase and send your gift so your service member will receive it in time for the holiday. If you have children, ask them to write their gift lists early to avoid last-minute purchases that may put you over your budget. • Record a holiday message. Borrow a video camera or tape recorder if you dont have one, and record yourself and other family members wishing the service member a happy holiday season. Do this far enough in advance so your loved one receives it in time for the holiday. Include a "Do not open until…" note on the package asking your service member to wait until the day of the holiday to view or listen to the recording. • Take lots of pictures. Take pictures of you and your family decorating for the holidays, celebrating, and on the holiday itself, opening gifts. Send these to your service member so he or she will feel included in the festivities. • Be flexible with phone calls. Calls home are unpredictable, so its best not to count on a phone call from your service member on the holiday itself. You might want to aim for a call during the week of the holiday instead. Page 5 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011Spouse Tip of the Week - What Do You Want to be When You Grow Up?At first glance, you might think this is a funny question to be asking of a military spouse. After all,youre already "grown up." But, not so fast. Think about it. Adults make many transitions throughouttheir lifetimes. And career interests and transitions are no exception.How old you are when you make a career choice makes a big difference. What you are interested induring high school may be very different than what you are interested in during your early twenties,which may be very different than what you are interested in after you have raised your own children.Work-life experience, community service, relocation, deployment, personal finances, children, and postsecondary education all play important roles in shaping your ultimate career path.Before plunging into a career decision that requires additional or specialized training and education, besure to do more than just think about what is "interesting" or take a few career interest tests (which arestill good ideas). Take time to do some serious exploring – including talking with people in your careerfield of interest and researching the potential for finding jobs that pay a living wage in regions whereyou will most likely be living as a military spouse.By doing research and meeting seasoned professionals in your field of interest, you will quickly find outthat the same job pays different wages in different parts of the country. This makes a difference whenyou are considering how you are going to pay off educational loans you may need to finance the trainingand education required to practice in your chosen profession.The Department of Labors Career OneStop website is a great resource. It has the latest data andforecasts for salaries and benefits for career fields in regions across the United States. And theConsumer Financial Protection Bureau has an online tool being developed by the Department ofEducation that shows you how to compare financial aid packages offered by different types of schoolsthat will help you make the best possible career and educational loan package decisions.So, before you decide what you want to be when you grow up – throughout your life – seek good advicefrom trustworthy sources. For example, if you are a one hundred pound female interested in becoming afirefighter, you probably need to know that you will have to pass a course in "ladders" during which youwill carry a person heavier than yourself down out of a burning building on a ladder. Could you orwould you be able to do this? It would be helpful to talk with an experienced firefighter and a career oreducational counselor before you invest in a course of study that will give you the knowledge, skills andcredentials needed to become a firefighter. If the physical demands seem too much, maybe becoming anEmergency Medical Technician (EMT) or a dispatcher would be a better choice. These careers still havethe work satisfaction and thrill of helping others in lifesaving situations without the physical demands ofclimbing ladders.Final thoughts. There are many careers that are exciting and satisfying, but as a military spouse, youneed one that is portable. Choosing a career that will most likely have job openings at future dutystations is important if you are going to live a successful mobile military lifestyle. Once again, talkingwith a mentor (preferably another military spouse), an experienced professional or educator in your fieldof interest, and a career counselor will be well worth your time and effort.To find such individuals, call Military OneSource at (800) 342-9647. Ask to speak with a SpouseCareer and Educational Consultant. This trained professional can brainstorm with you, and give youreferrals, resources and career advice that will help put you on a path to portable career success.Also, check out military spouse blogs and pose your career and education questions to other experiencedmilitary spouses. Spark a good online discussion and stand by to learn more about reality and job Page 6 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011opportunities in military and civilian communities worldwide. Use of social media such as Facebook,Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn are great ways to leverage the power of the military communities andrelated professional networks to help you accomplish your career and education goals.Finally, check out the spouse employment and career services, articles and job opportunities availablethrough these Department of Defense websites:www.MSEPJobs.org – Job openings with military friendly employersMyCAA website -- Financial assistance for eligible military spouses pursuing portable careers, licenses,credentials and associates degreesMilitary OneSource – Spouse Career Center resources and counseling services for career exploration,career readiness, training and education, and career connectionsRelocation Tip of the Week - Passport and Visa RequirementsBe certain you know what they must do to legally leave and reenter the United States. Your personneloffice will be able to help. You can also get information from US Citizenship and Immigration Services.Visa requirements for your non-citizen dependent traveling outside the United States can be complex. Inmost cases, the host nation will treat them as "third country nationals" and they will be subject to therules governing travel from the country that granted their passport. Be certain you know the rules andfollow all required procedures before you travel. This will avoid difficulties and possible legal problems.Workforce Health Tip of the Week – Getting on the Path to a Better You (Part 4)Look at that picture of yourself at goal weight:When you are tempted to reach for the wrong foods and drinks or when you feel too tired to exercise: • Pull out that picture of yourself as you want to be. Think about how happy you will be to step on the scales tomorrow morning and see more weight loss, and see more inches disappear from your body. • Make the hard decision to keep driving past that favorite fast food drive-through window or convenience store. Reconfirm your commitment to stick to your plan and become the "you" you KNOW you can be again. Be proud of yourself for having the discipline to resist the fast food-convenience store temptation. Enjoy your ice cold homemade lemonade and afternoon piece of fruit. Dont turn. Keep driving. • Think about how good it will feel when your clothes are loose again or better yet, when you have to buy new clothes because the old ones don’t fit any longer. • By taking simple baby steps in each goal area, you will quickly and consistently start feeling better, have more energy, feel stronger, and be proud of what you have accomplished in such a short period of time. Your boss, your friends and your family will want to start doing what youre doing so they can get the same results youre getting: a healthier, happier, stronger, and more attractive YOU! Page 7 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011 • The key to making change permanent is commitment to becoming that person in your dream photo. YOU CAN DO IT! Page 8 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011In the NewsWeve captured the latest Quality of Life (QOL) information, as well as recent additions to the MilitaryCommunity & Family Policy (MC&FP) collection of websites, including MilitaryHOMEFRONT. Allin one location! For a complete listing of QoL topic areas and information, please return to theMilitaryHOMEFRONT homepage.In the NewsNotable Quality of Life developments and Department of Defense announcements and alerts.Biden Welcomes Sailors Home From DeploymentAlongside hundreds of military family members and friends, Vice President Joe Biden welcomed about350 sailors home as the USS Gettysburg returned to Mayport Naval Station in Jacksonville, Fla., after aseven-month deployment.Families Send Holiday Greetings to Deployed Loved OnesHoliday greetings were tied with a bow, wrapped in a virtual package and sent through cyberspace todeployed Soldiers and family members on Dec. 6, during Operation Best Wishes recording sessions.Dempsey Accepts USO Award on Behalf of Military MembersArmy Gen. Martin E. Dempsey accepted the USO’s Distinguished Service award on behalf of 2.2million men and women in uniform, along with his wife, Deanie, who he said has served alongside himfor the past 35 years.Budget Fatigue Can Lead to Holiday DebtIts easy to get frustrated and tired of tight purse strings, particularly after years of economical setbacks,and decide to let loose over the holidays. But todays spending excess is tomorrows debt hangover.Service members and their families can learn more about smart spending on Military OneSource orthrough the Consumer Financial Protection Bureaus Office of Servicemember Affairs, a governmentoffice dedicated to protecting service members and their families from financial predators and pitfalls.Support Center is Oasis for Wounded Warriors, FamiliesThe Warrior and Family Support Center on Fort Sam Houston offers wounded warriors and theirfamilies a place to connect and find emotional support, and to serve as a respite away from the rigors ofrecovery.Tele-behavioral Health officially opens its doors in HawaiiThe culmination of a year-long endeavor came to fruition Nov. 28 with a grand opening ceremony asPacific Regional Medical Commands Tele-behavioral Health (Tele-Medicine) officially opened itsdoors here.Sittercity Childcare Program for All Service MembersArmy, Marines, Navy and Air Force Families - Your Sittercity membership gives you online access tolocal caregivers with profiles that include pictures, parent reviews, references, background checks andmore. The best part is that this free membership is available to all military families (Army, Marines,Navy and Air Force; active duty, reserve and guard). Page 9 of 10
    • MC&FP Weekly (December 9,2011) 12/12/2011Guard and ReserveImage description. Two National Guard service members End of image description.Dec. 8-11 - Guard and Reserve - Chattanooga, TN Page 10 of 10