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  • Ship LCS 2 - June 16, 2011 marked the first successful launch and recovery of the Remote Multi-Mission Vehicle (RMMV) from a Littoral Combat Ship. The deployment and recovery demonstration of the unmanned, remotely-operated RMMV was conducted from USS Independence (LCS 2) while underwayPicture of the the Remote Multi-Mission Vehicle (RMMV) from a Littoral Combat ShipPictures of boats going in different directions is a training exercise pictureMQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned air vehicleSM-6 Missile picture - With integrated fire control support, SM-6 will provide the surface Navy with an increased battlespace against Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) threats over-the-horizon, taking full advantage of the kinematics available to Standard Missile. Lt. Cmdr. Frank Kim, fuel officer for Naval Supply Systems Command, Fleet Logistics Center San Diego, compares sample bottles of traditional diesel fuel marine and an algae-derived alternative fuel during the Navy's largest shipboard alternative fuel test at Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego. The fuel department of Naval Supply Systems Command, Fleet Logistics Center San Diego loaded the Self Defense Test Ship with 20,000 gallons of the alternative fuel for the demonstration.https://acquisition.navy.mil/rda/home/programs/information_communications
  • All amounts include baseline and OCO Flying Operations (1A1A/1A2A) $7,376M Met increased COCOM/OCO presence demand and accommodatedfuel price increases. Ship Operations (1B1B less MSC) $3,398M Met increased COCOM/OCO presence demand and accommodatedfuel price increases Air Maintenance (1A5A) $1,149MReduced Airframe requirement caused by deleting maintenance on for several retiring TMS and reduced flying hours on training aircraft. Ship Maintenance (1B4B) $6,875M Recovered from $215M shortfall, accommodated ~$500M of emergent requirements and got a head start on FY13 requirements OCO Overall (Total OMN) $6,673MFully funded increased COCOM demand and approved Request for Forces (RFFs), Joint Urgent Operational Needs (JUONS), and Urgent Operational Needs (UONS). *OMN ONLY
  • 040423-N-6967M-469 Huddled together in a man-made lake, the few men who have made it to the last day of Hell Week, await guidance from Instructors on what comes next. 040413-N-6967M-538 -http://www.navy.mil/media/allhands/acrobat/ah200408.pdf

Transcript

  • 1. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY FY 2013 PRESIDENT’S BUDGET Rear Admiral Kevin J. Kovacich, USNDirector, Joint Capabilities & Integration Division (N83) 27 September 2012 1
  • 2. Current DoD Fiscal Environment The Budget Control Act 2011 2 August 2011Establishes caps on discretionary funding through 2021 and proposes further reductions to at least $1.5T in budgetary savings over the next 10 years. It appears a pro-rata distribution would leave DoD funding levels at $529B/$525B/$528B over FY 11-13. ~$487B Mechanics of Sequestration and its Effects on Defense Operations 3 January 2013 •An automatic across-government spending cut of $1.2T over 9 years (FY 2013- FY 2021) •Includes FY 2013 (base budget + Overseas Contingency Operations + unobligated balances of defense funds from prior years ) •with one half of the sequestration to be assigned to Defense funds resulting in an additional $600B reduction beginning in January 2013 applied equally to each category of spending ~$600BFY 2013 base request $551B + OCO $88B + Unobligated balances $82B = Total base for sequestration $721B 2 2
  • 3. Budget Programming AcquisitionThe Budget and Accounting Act of 1921 – Section 201“The President shall transmit to Congress on the first day of each regular session, the Budget, which shall set forthin summary and in detail:” June 10, 1921 3 3
  • 4. Managing Three Budgets at a TimeFeb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 Budget Execution (FY 2012) FY 2013Congressional Review (FY 2013) FY 2014Budget Formulation (FY 2014) FY 2015 DoD manages three budgets simultaneously. This requires a process that is: Ongoing, Cyclic, and Overlapping. FY 2012 Mid Year Review Defending • Budget performance monitored against plans budget for • Realignment of funds in accordance with priorities FY 2013 to EXECUTION Congress FY 2012 Close Out • Annual appropriations must be fully obligated • Intense effort to pull back unobligated funds and reissue to other programs • Funds not obligated cannot be restored BUDGETING PLANNING Formulating PROGRAMMING Developed budget for plans and FY 2014 programs for FY 2014 4 4
  • 5. Priorities for 21st Century Defense Counter Terrorism 10 Conduct 1 Humanitarian, Disaster and Irregular Warfare Relief, and Other Operations 2 9Deter and Conduct Stability Defeat andAggression Counterinsurgency Operations 3 8 Provide aProject Power Despite Stabilizing Anti-Access/Area Presence 4 Counter 7 Defend the Homeland Weapons of 5 and Provide Support to Mass 6 Operate Effectively Maintain a Safe, Civil Authorities Destruction in Cyberspace and Secure, and Space Effective Nuclear 5 Deterrent 5
  • 6. Department of the Navy Objectives 2012 and Beyond KEY EFFORTS1 Take Care of Our Take Care of Our 2 Maintain Warfighter 3 Lead the Nation in Lead the Nation in People People Readiness in an Era of Sustainable Energy Sustainable Energy Reduced Budgets4 Promote Acquisition 6 Excellence and Drive Innovative Integrity Enterprise 5 Dominate in Transformation Unmanned Systems 6 6
  • 7. Department of the Navy Fiscal Balancing Tough Leadership Decisions Reshaping Restructured Forces New Strategy Controlled Growth Tempered Capabilities Revised Missions Reductions Refocused Manpower Terminations(In Billions of Dollars) FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FYDPDON TOA (PB12-PB13) -9.5 -13.2 -10.7 -12.5 -12.1 -58.1 7 7
  • 8. Department of the Navy Topline FY 2002-2017 FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17Total Funding (TY) $101.8 $126.4 $123.5 $133.6 $144.7 $151.7 $165.2 $166.5 $173.2 $176.8 $173.0 $170.1Baseline Funding (TY) $101.8 $116.8 $118.4 $120.9 $127.9 $127.2 $139.5 $148.1 $155.3 $156.2 $157.3 $155.9 $155.8 $162.4 $163.4 $167.4 FY13-17 -$58.1B (to PB12) -12.1 180 -9.5 -10.7 -12.5 20 -13.2 160 18 16 14 17 26 Billions of Dollars 140 25 5 17 70 13 69 68 67 120 10 69 65 62 62 64 59 100 47 54 52 44 48 80 39 46 46 50 49 49 50 51 60 42 42 43 37 40 38 35 36 33 40 20 40 42 44 45 46 44 44 45 46 47 30 35 36 37 37 38 0 FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 MilPers O&M Investment OCO ARRA 8 (FY 2009 $1B TY) Numbers may not add due to rounding 8
  • 9. FYDP Changes by Appropriation Title PB 2012 to PB 2013 MilPers: -$17.9B Procurement: -$32.0B Basic Pays -$6.9 Aircraft -$14.6 Housing Allowance +$2.3 Ships -$10.1 Retired Pay Accrual -$4.8 Health Accrual -$7.2 Weapons -$1.1 Reserve Personnel -$0.9 Marine Corps -$2.5 Subsistence +$0.1 Ammunition -$0.7 Allowances -$0.2 Special Pays -$1.4 Other Navy Procurement -$3.0 Other +$1.1 R&D: -$2.3B $ Basic Research $0.0 O&M: -$2.6B PB 12 $862.9B Applied Research $0.0 Advance Tech Dev -$0.2 Ship Ops +$1.3 PB 13 $804.8B -$3.0 Adv Component Dev +$1.3 Aviation Ops Base Ops +$2.0 -$58.1B System Dev & Demo -$2.0 Marine Corps O&M -$0.3 Management Support $0.0 Combat/Weapons Support -$1.2 Ops Systems Dev -$1.4 Service Wide Support -$0.6 Training and Education -$0.2 Reserve O&M -$0.7 Environmental Restoration $0.0 Infrastructure: -$3.3B Mobilization -$0.5 MILCON -$3.2 BRAC +$0.1 Family Housing -$0.2 9 9Numbers may not add due to rounding
  • 10. Summary by Appropriation Title FY 2013 Base Budget Procurement: $42.5B MilPers: $44.2B Aircraft $17.1 Basic Pays $18.2 DON (Base+OCO) Housing Allowance $7.3 Ships $13.7 Retired Pay Accrual $5.8 Committee FY13 Change Weapons $3.1 Health Accrual $2.1 HAC-D/M +$2.5B Marine Corps $1.6 Reserve Personnel $2.6 HASC +$1.7B Ammunition $0.8 Subsistence $2.1 Allowances $1.0 SASC +$0.3B Other Navy Procurement $6.2 Special Pays $1.6 SAC-D/M +$1.3B Other $3.5 R&D: $16.9B Navy Strength 322,700 Marine Corps 197,300 $ Basic Research $0.6 182,100 Base Applied Research $0.8 15,200 OCO FY13: Advance Tech Dev $0.6 Adv Component Dev $4.3 O&M: $49.9B $155.9B System Dev & Demo Management Support $5.8 $0.8 Ship Ops $11.9 Ops Systems Dev $4.0 Aviation Ops $9.4 Base Ops $8.1 DoD (Base+OCO) Marine Corps O&M $5.8 Committee FY13 Change Combat/Weapons Support Service Wide Support $5.2 $4.6 Infrastructure: $2.4B MILCON $1.7 HAC-D/M +$2.8B Training and Education $1.7 BRAC $0.2 HASC +$3.3B Reserve O&M $1.5 Family Housing $0.5 Environmental Restoration $0.3 SASC +$0.5B Mobilization $1.5 SAC-D/M -$0.7BNCBC June 2012 Numbers may not add due to rounding Office of Budget 10
  • 11. Military Personnel Active Navy Strength 328,000 326,000 325,700 Stabilizing the Force 324,000- FY 2013 end strength 322,700 322,700 322,000 322,700 322,700- Decrease from FY 2012 to FY 2013 by 3,000 320,300 319,900 320,000 321,053 319,000 personnel as a result of FY 2011 to FY2012 Enlisted Retention Board (ERB) identified 318,000 319,000 318,300 319,300 319,500 for separation due to overmanned ratings 316,000- 66,500 Reserve Strength in FY 2013 314,000 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 PB12 PB13 Actuals as of 18 JuneActive Marine Corps Strength 205,000 202,100 202,100 202,100 Right Sizing The Force 200,000- FY2013 end strength 197,300 195,000 196,415 197,300 192,100 190,000- Reduces Marine Corps end strength 192,200 182,100 185,000 from 202,100 to 182,100 by the end of FY 187,700 2016 180,000 182,100 182,100 182,100 182,100 182,100 175,000- Remaining agile, flexible, and ready for a full range of contingencies 170,000 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017- 39,600 Reserve Strength in FY 13 PB12 Base PB13 Base w/OCO Actuals as of 18 11 June 11
  • 12. Civilian Personnel Scientist FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Change 212.3 214.6 212.1 -2.5 225 1.8 2.0 2.0 Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs)(#K) 200 175 79.6 79.7 79.1 150 Engineer 125 100 75 130.8 132.9 130.9 50 25 0 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 IT Technician O&M NWCF Other Workforce sized to meet the workload 12Numbers may not add due to rounding 12
  • 13. Readiness Ship Operations Flying Hour Operation Marine Corps Ground Equip 58 days/qtr deployed Navy T-Rating 2.5 94% of projected 24 days/qtr non-deployed Marine Corps T-Rating 2.0 maintenance funded in FY13 7.0 Billions of Dollars 6.0 0.6 Billions of Dollars 6.0Billions of Dollars 1.3 0.9 5.0 1.4 0.5 5.0 0.5 1.4 1.1 4.0 0.4 4.0 3.0 0.3 0.2 3.0 4.9 0.4 4.7 2.0 4.2 4.5 0.2 0.3 2.0 3.6 3.8 1.0 0.1 0.2 1.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Ship Depot Maintenance Aircraft Depot Maint/Logistics Base Support 100% of projected 94% of projected Navy 80%/USMC 90% of facility maintenance funded maintenance funded sustainment model, BOS at targeted 12.0 capability levels 2.0 8.0 0.2 10.0 1.0 0.5 Billions of Dollars Billions of Dollars Billions of Dollars 1.5 6.0 2.5 1.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 8.0 1.5 4.0 1.0 6.9 6.0 6.4 6.5 5.1 1.2 1.3 1.3 2.0 4.7 4.5 0.5 4.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 2.8 3.0 3.0 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 0.0 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 13 NAVY BASE USMC BASE OCO 13
  • 14. Shipbuilding Procurement Plan FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FYDP LCS 2 CVN 21 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 SSN 774 2 2 AP (all) 1 +1 2 2 2 9 DDG 51 1 2 +1 AP 1 2 2 2 9 +1 LCS 4 4 4 4 2 2 16 LPD 17 1 0 AP 0 0 0 0 0 LSD(X) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LHA (R) 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 T-ATF(X) 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 MLP/AFSB* 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 LPD 19 JHSV 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 T-AO(X) 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 T-AGOS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SSBN (X) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Construction Total QTY 11 10 7 8 9 7 41 New Construction Total ($B) $14.2 $10.9 $9.9 $14.6 $13.1 $16.2 $64.7 SSN 782 LCAC SLEP 4 2 4 4 4 4 18 Oceanographic Ships 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ship to Shore Connector** 0 1 0 2 5 5 13 Moored Training Ships 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 CVN RCOH 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 Total Shipbuilding ($B) $15.4 $13.8 $13.2 $16.9 $16.3 $20.2 $80.5 *Funded in NDSF (FY 2011: $880M, FY2012: $400M, FY 2013: $38M, FY2014: $562M) **Two Lead SSCs are funded in RDT&E (FY 2011 and FY 2013) HAC-D +$1.7B HASC +$0.9B SASC +$0.8B SAC-D +$2.0B 14NCBC June 2012 Office of Budget
  • 15. Aircraft Procurement FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FYDP EA-18G Fixed Wing F-35B (STOVL JSF) 6 6 6 6 9 14 41 F-35C (CV JSF) 7 4 4 6 9 14 37 AP +1 F/A-18E/F 28 26 +11 13 0 0 0 39 EA-18G 12 12 AP 0 +15 0 0 0 12 AP +15 E-2D AHE 5 5 5 7 6 7 30 P-8A (MMA) 11 13 17 20 20 13 83 C-40A (USMC) 0 0 +2 0 0 0 1 1 KC-130J (NAVY) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 MV-22B KC-130J (USMC) 1 0 +2 2 2 2 2 8 Rotary Wing AH-1Z/UH-1Y* 26 28 +2 27 27 26 31 139 CH-53K (HLR) 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 MV-22B 30 17 +1 +1 18 19 19 18 91 MH-60R 24 19 +5 +5 19 31 38 0 107 MH-60S 18 18 18 8 0 0 44 UAV MQ-8B MQ-8 (VTUAV) 12 6 7 7 8 6 34 RQ-4 BAMS UAS 0 0 3 4 4 5 16 STUAS (NAVY) 0 5 5 5 0 0 15 Training T-6A/B (JPATS) 36 33 -2 31 0 0 0 64 TOTAL 216 192 175 142 143 113 765 *Includes Overseas Contingency Operations request of one AH-1Z in FY 2013 HAC-D +$0.4B HASC +$0.1B SASC +$0.06B SAC-D -$0.2B 15NCBC June 2012 Office of Budget
  • 16. R&D Investment $17.6B $17.7B $16.9B Major Systems ($M) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 32.0 Aviation HAC - D SAC-D +$105M -$237M Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) 1,256 1,310 1,481 HASC SASC CH-53K 558 624 606 -$835M -$9M MMA (P-8A) 907 609 421 Next Generation Jammer 84 171 187 16.0 Shipbuilding Ohio Replacement Program 610 1,067 565 LCS 164 293 429Billions of Dollars CVN 21 179 137 173 8.0 DDG-1000 362 258 127 14.3 14.8 14.1 Virginia Class SSN 167 112 165 Unmanned RQ-4 UAV (BAMS) 526 548 658 4.0 NUCAS - D 258 198 142 UCLASS 0 76 122 Other 1.2 Amphibious Combat Vehicle 0 37 95 0.8 0.9 Joint Light Tactical Vehicle 18 47 45 2.0 Marine Personnel Carrier 7 20 40 Defense Research Sciences 417 454 473 2.0 2.1 2.0 JTRS 609 676 337 AMDR 204 166 224 1.0 MC Comms Systems 170 215 219 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 Sat Com (Space) 410 263 188 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program 85 158 126 Science & Technology Management Development Surface Ship Torpedo Defense 50 119 93 G/ATOR 58 107 75Numbers may not add due to rounding 16 16
  • 17. Military Construction & Family Housing $4,000 $3,500 Military Construction $3,000 Committee FY13 Change $2,500 HAC-M No change $2,000 HASC No change 2,314 $1,500 1,200 741 SASC No change $1,000 $500 1,129 SAC-M No Change 1,049 1,011 $0 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Family Housing USMC 2,314 1,200 741 $600 NAVY 1,049 1,129 1,011 3,363 2,329 1,752 $500 TOTAL 197 *FY 2012 includes OCO 101 102 $400 No BRAC Construction in PB 2013 Committee FY13 Change $300 HAC-M** -$151M 372 HASC -$151M $200 368 378 SASC -$54M $100 SAC-M -$52M $0 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 **HAC added $151M to OCO FHCON 197 101 102 FHOPS 372 368 378 TOTAL 568 469 480 17Numbers may not add due to rounding 17
  • 18. Energy Investment F/A-18 Super Hornet PV System DDG-51 Hybrid Electric Drive April 2010 MCAS Miramar Test Platform: USS TRUXTUN Department of the Navy PB 2013 Energy Investments TY$M FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FYDPNavy Total 706 776 728 701 745 682 3,632USMC Total 261 226 172 127 130 133 788DON Total 967 1,002 900 828 875 815 4,420 Allison 501k G/T Generator Operations & Policy Reduce Drag & Power Demand January 2011 Example: Air Energy Examples: Stern Flaps & Solid State Conservation Program Lighting 18 18Numbers may not add due to rounding
  • 19. Overseas Contingency Operations Funding Department of Navy OCO Budget FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 (In Millions of Dollars) Actual OCO OCO Military Personnel, Navy 1,248 1,248 875 Health Accrual, Navy 26 - - Reserve Personnel, Navy 49 44 39 Operation and Maintenance, Navy 8,527 7,518 5,880 Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve 88 74 56 Aircraft Procurement, Navy 600 481 165 Procurement Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps 188 135 152 Other Procurement, Navy 405 236 99 Weapons Procurement, Navy 91 41 24 Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy 215 48 53 Military Construction, Navy - 190 - USN Subtotal 11,437 10,016 7,342 Military Personnel, Marine Corps 638 659 1,621 Health Accrual, Marine Corps - - 65 Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps 21 23 25 Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps 4,463 3,538 4,066 Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve 29 36 25 Procurement, Marine Corps 1,946 1,234 944 Procurement Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps 492 182 134 Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy 41 6 7 HAC - D SAC-D USMC Subtotal 7,630 5,678 6,888 +$627M +$1,303M DON Grand Total - Supplemental 19,067 15,693 14,230 19 19Numbers may not add due to rounding
  • 20. FY12 Navy O&M Priorities• OMN presented with significant challenges in FY12 ⁻ Fuel pricing shortfalls ($0.6B) • In previous years was sourced through Supplemental, outside reprogrammings • FY11 shortfall was smaller and sourced through OCO force structure assets • Recent reductions in the FY12 Fuel pricing to $97.02/bbl relieved most of FY 2012 shortfalls ⁻ CENTCOM demand has grown out of cycle ($0.5B  $0.6B in FY13) • SECDEF order book to provide more presence (CSG/ARG/MCM) • ISR initiatives (2X Fire Scout, transfer Army OIF Scan Eagle dets to OEF, etc) • Fastlane Initiatives (PC’s to Bahrain, AFSB) ⁻ Ship maintenance shortfalls ($0.6B) • Unfunded at Pres Bud due to late imposition of OMB OCO cap • Execution year growth during “open and inspect” • USS MIAMI fire repair• Significant mitigations completed ⁻ Bought down shortfalls at end of FY11 ⁻ OCO transportation asset applied, equipment retrograde deferred ⁻ Operational mitigations ⁻ Reprogramming – ($0.7B) • Largely from Military Personnel and Defense Health Program • This solution set is not available in the future 20 OMN wholeness achieved, solution set may not be repeatable 20
  • 21. FY12 Readiness FY12 Afloat Readiness FY12 Shore Readiness FY12 FY12 Oct-11 Sep-12 Program PB EOY Proj. Oct-11 Sep-12 Facilities Sustainment ($1.4B) % Funded 80% 84% Program PB EOY Proj. Renovation andFlying Operations % Funded 99% 100% Modernization % Funded 73% 80% ($0.7B)Ship Operations % Funded 100% 100% Base Ops Support ($4.8B) % Funded 87% 87%Air Maintenance % Funded 95% 100% Overall Shore Readiness % Funded 83% 85%Ship Maintenance % Funded 94% 107% ($6.9B) 21 21
  • 22. Now Repeat After Me – “I Will . . . . . . Develop better and more accurate budgets and exhibits . . . Embrace CNO’s “Culture of Judiciousness” . . . When given a new task, do not immediately ask • “Where are my new and greater resources?” . . . Ask everyday “Is this a need or a want?” • FMB corollary – Almost every stated need is actually a want . . . Challenge every growth, strive to match the NAVFAC and the CEC and achieve negative 7 to 10 % returns • Beware of DAU standard numbers • Look for the second knee in a curve . . . Beware the “Fallacy of savings” • “10X the gigabytes for only twice the price” is still twice the price • Its not just the Rate it is the Total, it is not the Unit Price it is the Total Price • True energy efficiency is not Biofuel, it is not BTU’s/sec, it is Total Energy Use 22 22
  • 23. Key Take Aways Resulting Force: Investments  Smaller and Leaner aligned to  Agile, Flexible and Ready strategic  Rapidly Deployable and Expeditionary  Innovative and Technologically Advanced priorities and  Capable of Confronting and Defeating Aggressionbudgetary goals Manned and Led by the Highest Quality Professionals “… we are united in the belief that this strategy and the resulting budget decisions followed the right approach to meet the country’s most pressing security challenges and to preserve the strongest military in the world and at the same time meet our fiscal responsibilities.“ Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta – 26 Jan 2012 23 23