Wellbeing Design Research: Four Part Framework, starting with Inbodied5

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annotated slides compiled from various talks in Oct/Nov 2013 around our four part framework to situate, develop and evaluate interaction design research for "Wellbeing" - or "being excellent in a body" - where the brain is part of the body, the body is a complex system

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Wellbeing Design Research: Four Part Framework, starting with Inbodied5

  1. 1. how design for wellbeing? and why doing so is so important pbodycology presentation by: m.c. schraefel, u of southampton, UK, based on work by m.c. with Natasa Millic-Frayling, Microsoft Research, Cambridge UK and Richard Gomer, USouthampton and stats magic and cogitation with Matt Kay, UWashington © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  2. 2. how design for wellbeing? and why doing so is so important pbodycology The focus of the work is to figure out in HCI what is the territory, what are the dimensions for understanding research/design opportunities for HCI around wellbeing © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  3. 3. @mcphoo pronounced “em cee fu” m.c. schraefel CONTEXT: Connect with me on twitter @mcphoo about this and related work © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  4. 4. @mcphoo pronounced “em cee fu” m.c. schraefel Just to make translating these slides easier, you might want to think of the small font notes in this reddish colour as the voice over of the talk that goes with these slides. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  5. 5. Current work in HCI/Wellbeing: What is the territory? How explore and chart the territory? Building maps is iteractive - note how California has changed connexion to the USA over time? - the presented work is an effort at being an early cartographer of wellbeing © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  6. 6. Current work in HCI/Wellbeing: What is the territory? How explore and chart the territory? Building maps is iteractive - note how California has changed connexion to the USA over time? - the presented work is an effort at being an early cartographer of wellbeing © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  7. 7. Current work in HCI/Wellbeing: What is the territory? How explore and chart the territory? Building maps is iteractive - note how California has changed connexion to the USA over time? - the presented work is an effort at being an early cartographer of wellbeing © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  8. 8. Current work in HCI/Wellbeing: What is the territory? How explore and chart the territory? Building maps is iteractive - note how California has changed connexion to the USA over time? - the presented work is an effort at being an early cartographer of wellbeing © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  9. 9. Reason for a map, model, theory Consistent Language, Measures, awareness in principled way of where we’ve been; where we may need to go © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  10. 10. Reason for a map, model, theory Consistent Language, Measures, awareness in principled way of where we’ve been; where we may need to go © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  11. 11. Reason for a map, model, theory Consistent Language, Measures, awareness in principled way of where we’ve been; where we may need to go © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  12. 12. Reason for a map, model, theory Consistent Language, Measures, awareness in principled way of where we’ve been; where we may need to go © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  13. 13. starting assumptions: what is wellbeing? what is the problem around wellbeing? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  14. 14. what is wellbeing? Being Excellent in a body where the Brain is part of the Body the body is a complex system we perform BETTER when optimizing i n b o d i e d how can interactive tech help us get to the SKILLS we need to UNDERSTAND what we need to perform our best as PHYSICAL beings? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  15. 15. challenge? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  16. 16. value as a sedentary culture we have progressively moved to privilege brain based activities. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  17. 17. value not we have dichotomized the brain away from the body © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  18. 18. current position our technology acts as if the body does not exist other than as a transport mechanism for the brain from one seated position to another © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  19. 19. our technology is designed to support this framing of the brain so that engaging with the body can be de-emphasized against brain engaged activities from work to entertainment © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  20. 20. brain based - that is sedentary, screen oriented work, is growing 40% GDP - knowledge work - UK/US © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  21. 21. But the state of the body effects the brain in critical ways © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  22. 22. Let’s consider just sugar, sedentarism and screen reading © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  23. 23. Type 3 diabetes - insulin resistance of the brain, aka: Alzheimer’s Disease de la Monte, 2012 sedentary = stupidity Whitehall II J. increase in myopia Leo/Young 2013 © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  24. 24. Type 3 diabetes - insulin resistance of the brain, aka: Alzheimer’s Disease de la Monte, 2012 one example: remember: this is your brain? this is your brain on drugs? comparable harm may be: this is your brain this is your brain on sugar sugar is in just about every processed food (food product in a box and with a label is usually processed) As such increasing evidence to suggest we’re out of balance on sugar. new work is showing how harmful this overload is for the brain, too. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  25. 25. Work by de le Monte where Rats with normal diets are placed in a water maze and comparied with rats that have brains that have been treated to reflect “insulin resistance” an effect that builds up from so much glucose that it can no longer be managed properly. This case is a great example of how interaction with food affects cognition, and cognition we’ll see shortly in discussion of the Nun Study correlates with effect of physical state of the brain, too. These are key interactions for TUNING awareness/evaluation © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  26. 26. here’s a sequence with normal food / insulin response rat to find the target island in 5.2 secs in a standard rat water maze © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  27. 27. now here’s the rat with an insulin resistant brain the rat swims passed the island several times; it literally has to bump into it to find it. “after a day they don’t remember their learning” de le Monte © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  28. 28. Goal of Wellbeing Design © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  29. 29. Put this back in © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  30. 30. Role of computation/ automation in this Wellbeing challenge? All computers can do is automate processes. So in wellbeing, we’re asking the question, what processes can be automated? Part of the work of HCI is to understand WHERE the opportunities may be before getting at WHAT to do. Most of us are very keen to get at WHAT can be done - the work here is to say first we need to understand better WHERE we might have an effect © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  31. 31. state of the current commercial art in what might be considered wellbeing design: things that count. anything we can automate by a sensor, from fitbits, to wifi scales, to calorie loggers. Things that can count Things (or doing what’s easy for computers to do) © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  32. 32. state of the current commercial art in what might be considered wellbeing design: things that count. anything we can automate by a sensor, from fitbits, to wifi scales, to calorie loggers. Things that can count Things (or doing what’s easy for computers to do) © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  33. 33. state of the current commercial art in what might be considered wellbeing design: things that count. anything we can automate by a sensor, from fitbits, to wifi scales, to calorie loggers. Things that can count Things (or doing what’s easy for computers to do) © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  34. 34. make a bug a feature: “self-monitoring of behaviour change” in the literature this is refered to as self-monitoring around persuasion for behaviour change. ok. that’s maybe fine. but (a) is self-monitoring all there is? is there more to the territory than this? (b) what is the scope of a fitbit for instance? is there an exit strategy? What’s missing? What is the territory? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  35. 35. Where are these on the map? so what we’re looking for iw where do these technologies fit into a wellbeing map? what’s going on in other parts of the map? what ARE the other parts of the map? where do we begin? WHEN are these on the map? what is the territory of wellbeing? what is needed? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  36. 36. Tools for Exploration to chart: what is the wellbeing design space? where are points for intervention? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  37. 37. 4 part model to begin to map the territory for design © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  38. 38. start with the body Part 1: in-bodied-ness © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  39. 39. In HCI in particular, the BODY has been introduced to consideration as “embodied” see Dourish 99 Where the Action Is for an example of this kind of framing. Embodied assumes that there are persons who interact in physical/social environments. That’s super. embodiment however treats the body itself as a black box. For wellbeing, we need to be able to lift the lid of the black box to understand the interactions of the complex system that is the body if we are going to design to support it. Part 1: in-bodied-ness distinct from embodied makes sense right? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  40. 40. But how are we going to understand the body? This slide shows reps of 8 of 11 systems of the body from the nervous system to the digestive system to skin and bone etc. Few HCI designers today will delve into this level of detail. As per einstein can we get to a place as simple as possible, but not simpler? what is sufficient? Part 1: in-bodiedness One way to understand in-bodiedness: 11 systems @mcphoo Friday, 29 November 13
  41. 41. I’m proposing “the inbodied5” that offers a functional model of the body: that reflects 5 key operations of the body that are (1) strongly correlated to our mortality and (2) that we therefore already perform - most at least daily if not more frequently - whether we want to or not. Consider, for instance, we will fall asleep at some point. If we undersleep, there are known functional effects. eg, it becomes difficult to lose weight; memory is affected and stress levels can increase. So someone trying to lose weight, we can through this model not just look at food, but at sleep. Someone wanting to socialize better - we can look at movement - more paths, strongly supported in research. (refs on request if not in chi14!) the inbodied5 in-bodied wellbeing move eat engage sleep cogitate Each linked by long research to mortality © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  42. 42. This point bears repeating: while these five components are life critical, the goal is NOT to treat them in isolation (as do current apps, either eating or moving or sleeping - even tools that support monitoring of each of these like jawbone’s UP do NOT show how these factors inter-relate). A key approach for more holistic consideration, and i argue based on coaching, much more effective, is to treat the person as an holistic being. Each of these attributes affects and is affected by the others. Complex systems. Paraphrasing einstein, as simple as possible but not simpler. Eating alone, movement alone - too simple. we need the interaction. the inbodied5 in-bodied wellbeing move eat engage sleep cogitate Each linked by long research to mortality © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  43. 43. Holt-Lunstad, J., Smith, T.B., and Layton, J.B. Social relationships and mortality risk: a meta-analytic review. PLoS medicine 7, 7 (2010), e1000316 in-bodied wellbeing move We need SKILLS to be able to perform well in social eat engagement with others IN THE REAL (not the digital) - we are wired to deal with particular components of PHYSICAL engage (or embodied in this case) interaction sleep cogitate Each linked by long research to mortality WHile eat & move & to a lesser extent sleep are already keen (isolated) focii of wellbeing apps, engage and cogitate are less so - but they are it seems just as critical. See HoltLundstad’s meta-review of effects of relationships on mortality. Strongly correlated. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  44. 44. Holt-Lunstad, J., Smith, T.B., and Layton, J.B. Social relationships and mortality risk: a meta-analytic review. PLoS medicine 7, 7 (2010), e1000316 in-bodied wellbeing move I   too   am   very   keen   to   examine   whether   such   digital   environments   offer   similar   benefits.     If   so,   there   is   great   poten>al   for   increasing   sociability   and   interven>ons.     If   not,   the   fact   that   it   is   so   prevalent   would  suggest   that   individuals   (and   society)   will  be   at   increased  risk. eat engage sleep cogitate This quote is from my question to H-L as to whether her review showed benefits of digitally mediated social interaction. The answer was no - the long studies wind up in 2002, predating face book. As she notes, it’s not clear that switching to digital for social mediation translates to similar benefits. Ask someone if they’re more comfy online or off dealing with people. If the preference is for online, it may be because we’re missing skills that are just as crucial there as knowing how to feed ourselves effectively. Each linked by long research to mortality © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  45. 45. Likewise the nun study shows that nuns who demonstrated in their writing high idea density did not manifest symptoms of Alzheimer’s, though their brains looked like they should have had AD. Hence, rich cognitive engagement creates neuro-physical defenses/resources in the body. in-bodied wellbeing move eat engage sleep cogitate Cognitive Engagement: Idea Density © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  46. 46. Much language of wellbeing is around “behaviour CHANGE” - change sounds so radical. If we are focusing on functions we carry out everyday, why not think about TUNE’ing that practice rather than “changing” it. In my experience as a coach, helping someone work with what they’re already doing, tuning it, making it more effective, has often been a far more effective path for evolving better, more effective practices to optimise wellbeing. How can our app designs help discover current practice and help tune that practice? in-bodied wellbeing move eat engage sleep cogitate Tune rather than “change” © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  47. 47. part 2: descriptive decision: design ops 2nd part of design research model: what does engagement with a tuning practice look like? We explored decision models to be able to map points where support has an opportunity to act. The goal being if we can understand specific points where intervention is possible we can evaluate strategies/interactions at these points for efficacy, vs at other points. We can also ask, critically, HOW do we get into ANY of these points? Opportunities for Intervention: OFFLOAD OUTSOURCE DIY a key concern here has been Natasa Millic-Frayling’s insight that we Offload/ Outsource our requirements at these points - whether it’s to offload meal care to a restaurant or to a ready meal for example; or movement to a trainer. Can design interventions fit into these offloading moments? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 Values Beliefs Knowledge Access Support rational decision theory theory of planned action (self-efficacy) affective modeling evolutionary process many many coaching sessions @mcphoo
  48. 48. Example walk through of cylce: “Wow, you’ve put on weight, eh?” To see where opportunities for intervention are, lets walk through this wellbeing decision process to assess a new or tuning practice. it starts with a trigger, like in this case someone saying “you’ve put on weight” a doctor, a friend, a nasty colleague may all be sources for such a trigger. Here it was a colleague © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  49. 49. Wow, you’ve put on weight a. The next step is to assess if this assertion is true: there is a measure of STATE (am i fat? - check put on skinny jeans haven’t worn in 10 years). There is a measure of process (how did i get here? - i haven’t been very active, gone to the gym) Wrong Measures? b. But what if these are the wrong measures for best tuning? It’s well established now that the best path to weight reduction is food. As a colleague sums up the research “you can’t outrun a donut” How can design help connect with the RIGHT measure © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  50. 50. Wrong Identification? The next step is to identify options again - what is informing the choice? There is then cost/benefit analysis: what informs this selection? picking something like the treadmill because it’s at work may actually be less appropriate than another practice that may be more sustainable assuming it’s an effective thing to do for a particular purpose © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  51. 51. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  52. 52. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  53. 53. “i’m broken” Reassess How many times is the practice repeated before it is remeasured? what helps with this part of the process? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  54. 54. i’m doomed Where reflection may lead to wrong understanding, and thus decisions that are inappropriate, and reassessment that can lead to faulty conclusions, then the person can create new beliefs about a practice that can lead to suboptimal practices Where can computational processes intervene in this cycle? “Exercise sucks...i quit” © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  55. 55. OFFLOADING OUTSOURCING DIY beliefs values knowledge Opportunities for new techno new culture how get to right sources © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  56. 56. OFFLOADING OUTSOURCING DIY beliefs values knowledge Opportunities for new techno new culture how get to right sources We see these four key moments as points where we tend to offload our practices to another party or we try to DIY something based on beliefs, like the last example. Offloading might be buying boxed meals at the store rather than buying whole food and cooking it, or going ot a restaurant. Outsourcing might be trusting a trainer. These are intervention opportunities © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  57. 57. In our surveys we saw that apps were not used for advice. And that mainly only experts consulted other experts. Most used books or friends as information sources for practice. How leverage these paths for interaction intervention? Decision Cycle: Action drilling in: interviews Not considered experts; like to “hack” Scared of Experts: bad experiences; bad results Expertise gained through reading; self-directed © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  58. 58. A current health app UI treats all food components equally. Is being low on fiber really as critical for attention as being low on protein? (there are only two essential nutrients: essential amino acids and essential fatty acids; there are no essential starches(including fiber)/sugars) This lack of discrimination lead one participant to focus on fiber to the detriment of protein. how get to right measures? drilling in: interviews who says these are the right measures? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  59. 59. Right OFFLOADING Practice? OUTSOURCING DIY beliefs values knowledge “no time” EXAMPLE What we have found is that someone saying i have “no time” for something like cooking usually means 1) i haven’t really done it before 2) i also don’t know how or what to do 3) i feel some shame and fear and guilt about this because i think i probably should how can design catch and interact with “no time” and create safe interaction? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  60. 60. Next part of our model is moving from evaluating a new or tuned practice to getting it to be routine - we need to talk about what we mean by routine, practice and habit. part 3: translation to routine practice (with a bit of habit) © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  61. 61. forget habits (well, good luck); think skills create robust practices Routine = Reps = Learning = a Practice how get reps for skills? habits are defined to include efficient repeatability that is cued by context, reflexively, unconsciously. What happens when the context isn’t there? Like someone who can’t action their good eating habit from home when they’re on the road or out for dinner. I’d suggest that instead of “habits” associated with “behaviour change” we challenge ourselves to design for robust PRACTICES that are skills based and can survive context changes. The example here is of Bear Grylis who’s famous for surviving any environment - he has some basic heuristics he follows - find protein and water - and has skills that can be applied to a variety of environments. As Natasa asked this summer, how do we create that kind of Bear Gryllis survivor for the grocery store or more challenging - a fresh produce market? How do we create both the SKILLS and OPPORTUNITIES for REPS? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  62. 62. forget habits (well, good luck); think skills create robust practices Routine = Reps = Learning = a Practice how get reps for skills? Here’s a potentially huge op for HCI wellbeing design: learning skills takes reps. If we only eat a few times a day, we only get in a few reps, not hundreds in a day, less than two dozen in a week. Computers are great at simulations. Are there opportunities for wellbeing simulations to provide opportunities for skills development towards context neutral practice? Are these also complex skills: eg, learning to ask a server at a restaurant to prepare something off menu is both knowledge that this is possible and an inbodied5 ENGAGEment skill. How support developing reps for both these skills? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  63. 63. Types of play jokes One way to encourage REPS in a safe way is to look at PLAY. Cunnane in Survival of the Fattest stories argues PLAY - not the fight or flight of desperate food search - is where our tool games building happened - exploring options happens in a safe place; not a life or death tinkering stress moment. Stuart Brown in PLAY talks about various ... types of play from games for friendly challenge/competition, to jokes, stories and tinkering among others. Outdoor play with others in particular is fabulous for engaging the body, developing a demand for food, having to engage the brain both to strategise and engage with others, and providing a driver for recovery as well as to blow off the fight or flight stress hormones. Play is also where we can learn and practice skills in an error free environment. How harness play for robust practice, er, practice? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 PLAY Types of play (flow) @mcphoo
  64. 64. Types of play jokes stories games tinkering ... PLAY move engage cogitate A very intriguing example of engagement with a practice, of translating it into something with fun and creativity is the gamification of a practice. Zombies, Run, uses the story of zombies chasing players/runners: runners listen to the story as they run and they get updates on their mileage and how far to a next target. They are running to DO something as opposed to run itself. Narrative is a keen type of play, and being able to make a routine practice PLAY is a well known great way to help develop skills. How help make the social element of ZR more real than virtual?? (thanks to Elizabeth Churchill for pointing me to Zombies, Run...) Zombies, Run! © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  65. 65. One’s own practice may also be game-ified in terms of competition. the Strava app combined with a bike computer enables one to record, compare and share ride information and it encourages one to see how they’re doing against others. Of course one can compete against oneself: the computer is used for real time monitoring of performance on multiple attributes from speed to heart rate to power during an activity as well as for reflection. A fitbit on steroids Translation to Routine Technology enhances EXISTING practice with adding Values: - sharing//comparing/real time feedback Friday, 29 November 13
  66. 66. What’s not entirely clear is the degree to which one’s practice is “changed” by these tools rather than, as we argue, TUNED by these tools. We did not get reports of *much* more cycling because of the tools, but that the quality of the engagement already planned seemed to benefit.Yes there were reports of oh i have to work harder to catch my friend, but that again is quality within an activity rather than MORE or CHANGE or NEW. Translation to Routine Increase inbodied5 Ratio, higher traction. Friday, 29 November 13 move engage cogitate
  67. 67. What we also saw is that where technology was being used as part of a practice - like a fitbit - was to mirror and validate existing practices. A participant who took a lot of stairs during the day was delighted to see stair climbing reflected in the fitbit. NOTE: It did not increase practice or change it; it validated an existing practice. Do mirrored practices need reinforcement, thought? Is mirroring a potential way to nudge an existing practice? For a number of participants, the social connection that fitbit facilitated became almost more important than the step monitoring. Routine, Practice And Technology drilling in: interviews Use of Technology where part of (existing) routine mirroring || Validating (but is it right?) Friday, 29 November 13
  68. 68. Design Caveat We also see practices change: cycling now means cycling with the computer; running now means zombies run. We may wish to consider if we want to deliberately design a revised practice rather than consider skills building and an exit strategy for a monitoring device. It may be fine to have running = running plus heart rate montior - but what does that particular tech dependence mean? are we designing for that deliberately or accidentily interactive technology becomes “the practice” or assists “a practice” to develop? integration or exit strategy? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  69. 69. Overview: forging robust practice Routine = Reps Learning a Practice The biggie takeaway about developing a robust practice is that it takes reps, and it’s very challenging for most of us to get PRACTICE at our practice what is practice shopping? what is practice cooking? or socializing? or recovery/sleeping? how can interactive tech help here? Routine structure for dynamic skills © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  70. 70. technology produces culture what culture are we creating? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  71. 71. Another caveat: technology creates culture. as we saw earlier we have reified a sedentary culture with all sorts of systems to privilege seated, screen based interactions, where the rest of the body is treated often with the equivalent of a feed lot or factory farm life. These (infra)structures are cultural. 1) we are potentially designing against the cultural grain - how do we do that successfully? 2) should our design targets be higher up the chain towards industry and govn’t interaction rather than individual? new infrastructure design? 4th element of model: technology creates culture technology of culture of wellbeing? Friday, 29 November 13
  72. 72. An example of change: processed foods were used as a way for women to get out of the kitchen (faster). Does the call to whole food/home cooking away from processed food, for instance, for wellbeing, risk re-introducing gender roles/ limitations? How bring these factors into our design work consciously? (Design) Tensions Values Beliefs Knowledge designing against cultural norms/beliefs © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  73. 73. culture = communication of values eg status (quo) education privilege (or not) social engagement rules © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  74. 74. Film Wall-e as embodiment of where the current practice of bodiless screen-ness is going By being aware that EACH OF OUR DESIGNS contributes to a reinforcement of or challenge to current culture, we may ask ourselves more deliberately - what are the cultural assumptions at play in my design? is this what i wish to reinforce? © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  75. 75. There are alternative cultures Alternative values, beliefs and practices. burn the chair © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 How does design help us get there? What is appropriate individual focus? What industrial, 3rd sec, govn’t? @mcphoo
  76. 76. Reality Check When i think about the folks who currently lead fields of interest, they embody the inbodied5. who are your research innovators/leaders? their inbodied5? @mcphoo Friday, 29 November 13 @begin2dig
  77. 77. Play decisions vs routines offloading outsourcing Access This talk has been an effort at a sketch of a model, a set of tools like the inbodied5, decision cycle, reps for robust practices, tuning rather than change, and deliberate culture creation as a means to begin to sketch a map for more deliberate design intervention accelerating Experience guidance option discovery accelerating REPS Test/reassess © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  78. 78. Play decisions vs routines offloading outsourcing Access This talk has been an effort at a sketch of a model, a set of tools like the inbodied5, decision cycle, reps for robust practices, tuning rather than change, and deliberate culture creation as a means to begin to sketch a map for more deliberate design intervention accelerating Experience guidance option discovery accelerating REPS Test/reassess © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  79. 79. Play decisions vs routines offloading outsourcing Access This talk has been an effort at a sketch of a model, a set of tools like the inbodied5, decision cycle, reps for robust practices, tuning rather than change, and deliberate culture creation as a means to begin to sketch a map for more deliberate design intervention accelerating Experience guidance option discovery accelerating REPS Test/reassess © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  80. 80. move eat engage sleep cogitate The hope is that in this talk we have begun to have a better sense of the scope of the domain where we might intervene for design (get California at least connected for the time being to the USA) © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  81. 81. The model is multi-dimensional: a way to think about the inter-relations of the body as a complex system opening up more design paths for TUNING (sleep affects body comp; movement affects cognition etc...); the descision cylce’s outsourcing are targetted moments for intervention; developing REPS to build skills/practice and the act of designing wellbeing as culture - that current cultural assumptions affect our designs: how become conscious of designing with or against that grain move eat engage sleep cogitate values knowledge beliefs Routine = Reps = Learning = Practice Technology / Culture 4 part in-bodied well being model © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  82. 82. Keep in touch - let me know what you think twitter @mcphoo http://ecs.soton.ac.uk/~mc Questions/Thoughts Welcome values knowledge beliefs move eat engage sleep cogitate @mcphoo Routine = Reps = Learning = Practice Technology / Culture 4 part in-bodied well being model © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  83. 83. bonus slide: why coffee w double cream vs pizza if you do dairy... whipping cream, unlike pizza (crust esp) is all fat and protein - no carbs; mostly fat with healthy fat like CLA strongly associated with promoting fat loss. Fat doesn’t disrupt RER - respiratory exertion rate - so doesn’t trigger (much of) an insulin response. That means triggering the storage of glucose as it enters the blood stream. Thus staying in more of a fat burning mode. Double cream - being closer to a whole food as well - has higher satiety cues than processed foods. Caffeine also has some interesting properties for mental acuity - if taken early enough in the day not to disrupt sleep. Some have also argued that starchy carbs tend to turn on the Grim Reaper genes rather than the Sweet Sixteen (google it, eh?) So, if i’m trying to maintain fat burning, and i haven’t just done some big exercise bout depleting glucose from muscles, and if i’m extending an overnight fast to get a little more fating benefit, this is a not bad way to go to get to dinner time. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo
  84. 84. © m.c. schraefel, 2013 Friday, 29 November 13 @mcphoo

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