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Sustain Test

Sustain Test

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  • Pls see my edits. Is MAF’s quote from a major policy speech or directive, or is it from a lesser message? If from a major communication, I would reference that communication.
  • Pls see my edits. Is MAF’s quote from a major policy speech or directive, or is it from a lesser message? If from a major communication, I would reference that communication.
  • Suggestions for graphics: (both in the context of foundation and future presentations) E1: For this slide, I would suggest either an actual, large scale, building roof mounted system of a commensurate size; UCSD/sun editson rendering of the PV array to provide shelter from the elements; or actual, large scale parking lot cover systems of a commensurate size. (For the slide when you discuss this topic, I would suggest that you have in this picture frame 2 or more examples transitioning while the main slide is being projected, i.e., it need not be just one example. ) E2: For this slide, I would have John’s shot of the CSU-Northridge system since it gives the impression of real hardware installed and a sense of dimension. For the topic slide I would have a sequence of a) Pt. Loma plant aerial, b) an actual photo of a tube trailer truck with the BOC/Linde logo on the truck, c) use the “path” feature or wav. Feature in Google Earth (the freeway path from Pt. Loma to UCSD and to QualComm and City of San Diego (we are not alone in this), d) the actual site, and e) the CSU demo plant. E3: For this slide, I personally would suggest that you use the bathymetric chart of the La Jolla Canyon, because without the coincidence of this trench, we would not be pursuing this feature. In the same way we are exploiting the solar insolation La Jolla is blessed with, we are exploiting the delta Temp of our shoreline. If we had wind on campus, we would be exploiting it. For the topic slide, I would have the overall schematic and then start with some of the construction deployment shots from Cornell and then maybe insert some video of the operations or deployment from Cornell. I would conclude with a global map of where else in the world that there are deep, shoreline accessible trenches where this technique could be u utilized. E4: For this slide, a wind farm with large scale units. For the topic slide, I would show a) the typical mis-match graphic of wind supply being out of sync with CA energy demand b) the typical daily profile of UCSD, c) the two gas turbines next to each other, d) the revised UCSD profile of UCSD if throttle back 11%, and e) the push pin location of the CA wind projects. Continues on Next page
  • Suggestions for graphics: (both in the context of foundation and future presentations) E1: For this slide, I would suggest either an actual, large scale, building roof mounted system of a commensurate size; UCSD/sun editson rendering of the PV array to provide shelter from the elements; or actual, large scale parking lot cover systems of a commensurate size. (For the slide when you discuss this topic, I would suggest that you have in this picture frame 2 or more examples transitioning while the main slide is being projected, i.e., it need not be just one example. ) E2: For this slide, I would have John’s shot of the CSU-Northridge system since it gives the impression of real hardware installed and a sense of dimension. For the topic slide I would have a sequence of a) Pt. Loma plant aerial, b) an actual photo of a tube trailer truck with the BOC/Linde logo on the truck, c) use the “path” feature or wav. Feature in Google Earth (the freeway path from Pt. Loma to UCSD and to QualComm and City of San Diego (we are not alone in this), d) the actual site, and e) the CSU demo plant. E3: For this slide, I personally would suggest that you use the bathymetric chart of the La Jolla Canyon, because without the coincidence of this trench, we would not be pursuing this feature. In the same way we are exploiting the solar insolation La Jolla is blessed with, we are exploiting the delta Temp of our shoreline. If we had wind on campus, we would be exploiting it. For the topic slide, I would have the overall schematic and then start with some of the construction deployment shots from Cornell and then maybe insert some video of the operations or deployment from Cornell. I would conclude with a global map of where else in the world that there are deep, shoreline accessible trenches where this technique could be u utilized. E4: For this slide, a wind farm with large scale units. For the topic slide, I would show a) the typical mis-match graphic of wind supply being out of sync with CA energy demand b) the typical daily profile of UCSD, c) the two gas turbines next to each other, d) the revised UCSD profile of UCSD if throttle back 11%, and e) the push pin location of the CA wind projects. Continues on Next page
  • Suggestions for graphics: (both in the context of foundation and future presentations) E1: For this slide, I would suggest either an actual, large scale, building roof mounted system of a commensurate size; UCSD/sun editson rendering of the PV array to provide shelter from the elements; or actual, large scale parking lot cover systems of a commensurate size. (For the slide when you discuss this topic, I would suggest that you have in this picture frame 2 or more examples transitioning while the main slide is being projected, i.e., it need not be just one example. ) E2: For this slide, I would have John’s shot of the CSU-Northridge system since it gives the impression of real hardware installed and a sense of dimension. For the topic slide I would have a sequence of a) Pt. Loma plant aerial, b) an actual photo of a tube trailer truck with the BOC/Linde logo on the truck, c) use the “path” feature or wav. Feature in Google Earth (the freeway path from Pt. Loma to UCSD and to QualComm and City of San Diego (we are not alone in this), d) the actual site, and e) the CSU demo plant. E3: For this slide, I personally would suggest that you use the bathymetric chart of the La Jolla Canyon, because without the coincidence of this trench, we would not be pursuing this feature. In the same way we are exploiting the solar insolation La Jolla is blessed with, we are exploiting the delta Temp of our shoreline. If we had wind on campus, we would be exploiting it. For the topic slide, I would have the overall schematic and then start with some of the construction deployment shots from Cornell and then maybe insert some video of the operations or deployment from Cornell. I would conclude with a global map of where else in the world that there are deep, shoreline accessible trenches where this technique could be u utilized. E4: For this slide, a wind farm with large scale units. For the topic slide, I would show a) the typical mis-match graphic of wind supply being out of sync with CA energy demand b) the typical daily profile of UCSD, c) the two gas turbines next to each other, d) the revised UCSD profile of UCSD if throttle back 11%, and e) the push pin location of the CA wind projects. Continues on Next page
  • Suggestions for graphics: (both in the context of foundation and future presentations) E1: For this slide, I would suggest either an actual, large scale, building roof mounted system of a commensurate size; UCSD/sun editson rendering of the PV array to provide shelter from the elements; or actual, large scale parking lot cover systems of a commensurate size. (For the slide when you discuss this topic, I would suggest that you have in this picture frame 2 or more examples transitioning while the main slide is being projected, i.e., it need not be just one example. ) E2: For this slide, I would have John’s shot of the CSU-Northridge system since it gives the impression of real hardware installed and a sense of dimension. For the topic slide I would have a sequence of a) Pt. Loma plant aerial, b) an actual photo of a tube trailer truck with the BOC/Linde logo on the truck, c) use the “path” feature or wav. Feature in Google Earth (the freeway path from Pt. Loma to UCSD and to QualComm and City of San Diego (we are not alone in this), d) the actual site, and e) the CSU demo plant. E3: For this slide, I personally would suggest that you use the bathymetric chart of the La Jolla Canyon, because without the coincidence of this trench, we would not be pursuing this feature. In the same way we are exploiting the solar insolation La Jolla is blessed with, we are exploiting the delta Temp of our shoreline. If we had wind on campus, we would be exploiting it. For the topic slide, I would have the overall schematic and then start with some of the construction deployment shots from Cornell and then maybe insert some video of the operations or deployment from Cornell. I would conclude with a global map of where else in the world that there are deep, shoreline accessible trenches where this technique could be u utilized. E4: For this slide, a wind farm with large scale units. For the topic slide, I would show a) the typical mis-match graphic of wind supply being out of sync with CA energy demand b) the typical daily profile of UCSD, c) the two gas turbines next to each other, d) the revised UCSD profile of UCSD if throttle back 11%, and e) the push pin location of the CA wind projects. Continues on Next page
  • Suggestions for graphics: (both in the context of foundation and future presentations) E1: For this slide, I would suggest either an actual, large scale, building roof mounted system of a commensurate size; UCSD/sun editson rendering of the PV array to provide shelter from the elements; or actual, large scale parking lot cover systems of a commensurate size. (For the slide when you discuss this topic, I would suggest that you have in this picture frame 2 or more examples transitioning while the main slide is being projected, i.e., it need not be just one example. ) E2: For this slide, I would have John’s shot of the CSU-Northridge system since it gives the impression of real hardware installed and a sense of dimension. For the topic slide I would have a sequence of a) Pt. Loma plant aerial, b) an actual photo of a tube trailer truck with the BOC/Linde logo on the truck, c) use the “path” feature or wav. Feature in Google Earth (the freeway path from Pt. Loma to UCSD and to QualComm and City of San Diego (we are not alone in this), d) the actual site, and e) the CSU demo plant. E3: For this slide, I personally would suggest that you use the bathymetric chart of the La Jolla Canyon, because without the coincidence of this trench, we would not be pursuing this feature. In the same way we are exploiting the solar insolation La Jolla is blessed with, we are exploiting the delta Temp of our shoreline. If we had wind on campus, we would be exploiting it. For the topic slide, I would have the overall schematic and then start with some of the construction deployment shots from Cornell and then maybe insert some video of the operations or deployment from Cornell. I would conclude with a global map of where else in the world that there are deep, shoreline accessible trenches where this technique could be u utilized. E4: For this slide, a wind farm with large scale units. For the topic slide, I would show a) the typical mis-match graphic of wind supply being out of sync with CA energy demand b) the typical daily profile of UCSD, c) the two gas turbines next to each other, d) the revised UCSD profile of UCSD if throttle back 11%, and e) the push pin location of the CA wind projects. Continues on Next page
  • Deleted: Development of campus network of micro weather stations by 2008 has potential to conserve building HVAC usage and irrigation. (now redundant to earlier student involvement)
  • Transcript

    • 1.
    • 2.  
    • 3. A History in Climate Research
    • 4. Campus Quick Facts Electricity Peak demands (MW) 50 40 30 20 10 0 City of San Diego UC San Diego Qualcomm SDSU 13 15 45 48 With a daily population of over 45,000, UC San Diego is the size and complexity of a small city. As a research and medical institution , we have a higher consumption of energy than comparable communities.
    • 5. Square Feet of Facility Space (in millions) City of San Diego UC San Diego SDSU Qualcomm 6 8 11 5 Campus Quick Facts 11 million sq. ft . of facility space, if we were a landlord , we would be one of the largest in San Diego Included in the daily population of 45,000, we have over 8,000 student residents living on campus
    • 6. Carbon Footprint metric tons/yr CO2 (in thousands) 200 0 150 100 50 197 160 61 58 City of San Diego UC San Diego Qualcomm SDSU Campus Quick Facts UC San Diego produces 197,000 tons of carbon dioxide each year UC San Diego is a charter member of, and first university in the California Climate Action Registry … . and one of 7 university members of the Chicago Climate Exchange
    • 7. ENERGY (GWhr) PER YEAR Generation  Consumption  Renewable Generation 200 0 100 300 City of SD UC San Diego Qualcomm SDSU 87 44 168 198 104 123 200 248  Campus Quick Facts We self-generate 80% of our electricity demand using efficient CNG fueled cogeneration. Even though UC San Diego generates the majority of its own electricity, we remain one of the top 5 customers of SDG&E +20
    • 8. 2.5 0.5 2 1.5 1 2.9 .45 .70 .96 City of SD UC San Diego Qualcomm SDSU 0 3 Annual Natural Gas Consumption (Million MMBtu) Campus Quick Facts UC San Diego uses natural gas to fuel its power plant. In order to reduce our dependence on natural gas, we are in the process of securing diverse sources of renewable energy
    • 9. Our Challenges Future Energy Costs and Emissions Regulations may Inhibit UCSD’S Growth  Energy Intensive Research University  $1B of new buildings every 5 years  Severe Operating Budget Reductions  Restrictions from State and University
    • 10. Vision for the next level of sustainabiltity UC San Diego Sustainability 2.0 Sustainability 1.0
    • 11. Solar panels Large scale, high efficiency solar Timers & thermostats Real-time weather-optimized systems Ethanol fuel Advanced bio-fuels Water conservation Ocean water cooling, reclaimed systems Wind when available Wind optimization, storage, smart grid Recycling Targeting zero waste Measuring Emissions Emissions as a trade-able commodity UC San Diego Sustainability 2.0 Sustainability 1.0
    • 12. Translating the Vision to
    • 13. 12 Key Elements of Strategy
    • 14. E7 E9 12 Key Elements of Strategy Smart Grid & Human UI Faculty Leadership E6 E1 E4 Recycling & Conservation E5 E10 Strategic Partnerships E11 Student Involvement E12 E7 Methane & Fuel Cells E8 Water Resources and Wind Energy E9 Transportation E2 Facilities & Operations E3 Building Design Photovoltaic THINK SOLAR ENERGY Advanced Energy Storage
    • 15. Even with increased energy intensive activities and growth, facility retrofits have decreased energy consumption per sq. ft. BTU/SF 2009-2014: Invest $66M (49+17) to achieve 35M kWh/hr reduction Continue to be a Leader in Carbon Reduction and Energy Efficiency
      • Award winning program:
      • 8 Best Practice Awards
      • 5 Excellence in Energy Efficiency Awards
      • 2 Energy Education & Leadership Awards
      Completed $60M in energy retrofits reducing energy use by 20% or 50M kWh/yr, saving UCSD $12M annually. 200,000 300,000 280,000 260,000 240,000 220,000 E1
    • 16. Maximize Use of Alternative Fuels & Transportation Replace UCSD vehicle fleet with hybrid, bio-diesel, and electric vehicles
      • Increase number of PZEV / ZEV vehicles 20% by 2010
      • Convert campus fleet to 50% non-carbon based fuel by 2010
      E2 CNG Shuttles & Light Duty Vehicles Prius & Escape Hybrids
    • 17.
      • Alternative Fuel Station
      • Will provide CNG, hydrogen and
      • hydrogen blend (HCNG) fuels
      • - Diesel to CNG / CNG hybrid fleet
      • Fuel Cell Slip Stream process for
      • hydrogen production
      E2
    • 18. 12 [ Rady or Liechtag ] Due to higher capital cost of meeting these standards, the campus will look for donor support to augment building budgets. At a Minimum, Design all Future Campus Buildings to LEED Silver or Gold Standards UCSD will exceed UC LEED by achieving a Silver-equivalent rating on all new buildings. $9M of state rebates will continue energy efficiency retrofits with a goal of 1 million sq ft of facilities by 2010 E3
    • 19. Create a State-of-the-Art Energy Infrastructure Calit2’s Project GreenLight will investigate new ways of measuring energy efficiency of computers Deployment of green cyber-infrastructure will consolidate computer servers in energy-efficient mobile facilities. E4
    • 20. 12:00 pm - SDG&E calls for assistance, UCSD initiates Demand Response 2:00 pm - SDG&E Loses South Bay Unit 4, Peaker Plants not performing 2:30 pm - SDG&E Loses San Onofre link E4
    • 21. 21 Create Leading Sustainability Program with Focus on Student and Community Involvement Involve students in photovoltaics, weather station network, biofuels Provide incentives for multidisciplinary student collaboration E4
    • 22. 17 Demonstrate Best Practices in Recycling The campus will achieve 75% waste diversion by 2012. Will complete conversion to compostable utensils in restaurants by Jan 2009 By 2020, UCSD’s goal is to be a zero-waste campus. UC San Diego diverted 67% of its waste, or 13,000 tons in 2008. E5
    • 23. 17 Transpiration & wind blocks reduce energy by 12,886 MWh Sequestration & energy reduction reduces CO2 over 10,000 tons each year Campus forest traps and filters 140M gallons/yr of storm water. Value to campus is over $2.7M each year. The Campus Forest Reduces CO2, Saves Energy, and Absorbs Pollutants E5
    • 24. 17 Energy Storage is the “enabler” for intermittent renewable energy UCSD’s goal is to shift 20% of its load from on-peak to off- peak periods by 2011 A 3.8M gallon Thermal Energy Storage already shifts 14% of our load daily A $3.4M CPUC rebate will permit the installation of 12 MWh of Electricity Energy Storage of UCSD’s renewable energy production E6
    • 25. E6 16 Become one of the Leading University Sites in the World for Photovoltaic Energy (PV) We have used CSI incentives to develop 1MW of PV energy E4 E7
    • 26. 8 E8 Become Leading University Site in the World for Ultra Clean Fuel Cells Campus plans to install 2.8 megawatts of methane powered Fuel Cells. Methane transported to campus provides an economic, renewable energy resource with a net CO2 reduction.
    • 27. E9 UC San Diego is helping California solve the water dilemma Scripps researchers predict that Lake Mead could be dry by 2021
      • Water use is reduced by:
      • Reclaimed water for
      • irrigation
      • Planting natural vegetation
      • Wx monitoring/soil moisture
      • controlled watering
      • Low flow fixtures
      • Condenser water capture
      UC San Diego Reclaimed Water System Lake Mead
    • 28. E9 18 Become a Global Demonstration Project for Sea Water Cooling Seawater Cooling could save $4M/yr in energy and 100M gallons of water per year.
    • 29. E9 20 Become a Pioneer in the Utilization of Off-Peak Wind Energy Throttle Down Power Plant Off-Peak Wind Generation
    • 30. A Leading Sustainability Research Program with Focus on Basic Research, Applied Research, and Prototyping Providing an environment for multidisciplinary academic collaboration E10
    • 31. E10 CO2 Sensing Calcification rates of sea life Need for uniform high-quality measurements Leadership in Ocean Acidification
    • 32. E10 Micro-algae High density No food competition Saltwater / wastewater Advanced Biofuel Program: SD-CAB
    • 33. E10 Water & Resource Management The Built Environment DEMROES Solar Energy: California Solar Collaborative Need Faculty In: Smart Grid Optimization Advanced Energy Storage
    • 34. E10 Aerosol & Climate Initiative UCSD-PNNL Partnership #1 Chem Program in Env. Science Measurement & Long Term Observation: Need for Infrastructure SIO & Physical Sciences & Cal-IT2 The Key: Endowed Chairs Graduate Student Fellowships
    • 35. E11  Founding Member of Climate Savers Computing Initiative  Minimize capital outlays  Leverages state and federal dollars  Leverages private sector partnerships
    • 36. 21 E12 Create a Leading Sustainability Program with Focus on Student and Community Involvement Involve students in photovoltaics, weather station network, biofuels Provide incentives for multidisciplinary student collaboration
    • 37. UC San Diego is a global leader in research and proto-typing solutions to climate change, renewable energy, and sustainable systems Investments in endowed chairs, graduate student fellowships, and infrastructure can lead to breakthroughs in critical areas

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