Spanish 3 Knowledge

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Spanish 3 Knowledge

  1. 1. <ul><li>Government Academic Definition </li></ul><ul><li>(FSI) Scale (ACTFL/ETS) Scale </li></ul>4+ Superior Able to speak the language with sufficient 4 structural accuracy and vocabulary to participate 3+ effectively in most formal and informal 3 conversations 5 Native Able to speak like an educated native speaker 2+ Advanced Plus Able to satisfy most work requirements and show some ability to communicate on concrete topics 2 Advanced Able to satisfy routine social demands and limited work requirements <ul><li>1+ Intermediate-High Able to satisfy most survival needs and limited </li></ul><ul><li>social demands </li></ul><ul><li>1 Intermediate-Mid Able to satisfy some survival needs and some limited </li></ul><ul><ul><li>social demands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intermediate-Low Able to satisfy basic survival needs and minimum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>courtesy requirements </li></ul></ul>0+ Novice-High Able to satisfy needs with learned utterances 0 Novice-Mid Able to operate in only a very limited capacity Novice-Low Unable to function in the spoken language No ability whatsoever in the language Source: Judith E. Liskin-Gasparro. ETS Oral Proficiency Testing Manual. Princeton, N.J.: Educational Testing Service, 1982.
  2. 3. Proficiency Levels by Years (Spanish - High School - 7500 students) 1 year of study 2 years of study 3 years of study 4 years of study
  3. 4. Novice Speakers <ul><li>Respond to simple questions on the most common features of daily life </li></ul><ul><li>Convey minimal meaning to interlocutors experienced at dealing with foreigners by using </li></ul><ul><li> -isolated words </li></ul><ul><li> -lists of words </li></ul><ul><li> -memorized phrases </li></ul><ul><li> -some personalized recombinations </li></ul><ul><li>of words or phrases </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfy only a very limited number of immediate needs </li></ul>
  4. 5. How accurate are Novice Speakers? <ul><li>Intelligibility (pronunciation and stress, e.g., feesh vs. feess ) </li></ul><ul><li>Contextually appropriate responses; </li></ul>
  5. 6. Intermediate Speakers <ul><li>Participate in simple, direct conversations on generally predictable topics related to daily activities and personal environment </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain and give information by describing and asking and answering questions </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate, sustain and bring to a close a number of basic, uncomplicated communicative exchanges, often in a reactive mode </li></ul><ul><li>Create with the language and communicate personal meaning to sympathetic interlocutors by combining language elements in discrete sentences and strings of sentences </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfy simple personal needs and social demands to survive in the target language culture </li></ul>
  6. 7. How accurate are Intermediate Speakers? <ul><li>Require interlocutors who are accustomed to non-native speakers of the language (more patient); </li></ul><ul><li>Speak mostly in present tense but can use some past and future; </li></ul><ul><li>Pronunciation, stress patterns, and grammar may all be flawed but there is sufficient accuracy for communication at the sentence level. </li></ul>
  7. 8. words sentences paragraphs
  8. 9. words sentences paragraphs

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