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  • The psychology of diet and exercise. It is how we are able to make ourselves go to practice every day, and how we are able to choose carrots over cookies... or not. It is how we exhibit self-control and motivation. It is how we perceive our body image. But before I go any further, let me ask you something. Have you ever thought to yourself...\n
  • The psychology of diet and exercise. It is how we are able to make ourselves go to practice every day, and how we are able to choose carrots over cookies... or not. It is how we exhibit self-control and motivation. It is how we perceive our body image. But before I go any further, let me ask you something. Have you ever thought to yourself...\n
  • How can I stay motivated to exercise?\n
  • How can I resist cravings and temptations?\n
  • Or, why do I give up and break my diets? These are all questions that I used to ask myself. Now, I don’t need to.\n
  • Although a physical challenge, dieting and exercising presents an equally large, if not larger mental challenge. The psychology behind dieting and exercising is complex, and in order to successfully maintain motivation and confidence while dieting or exercising, one’s will must be stronger than his or her desire. \n
  • Throughout most of my childhood and especially my teenage years, I have struggled tremendously with my weight and body image. It seems like no matter how hard I wanted to lose weight, I could never keep up with a diet or exercise program. I figured that learning about the psychological and mental aspect of dieting and exercising could help me understand what exactly is going on in my brain, and how I could fix my attitude towards dieting and exercising in order to finally accomplish my goals. \n\nNext year, I plan on attending Temple University with a major in Athletic Training. I was also recruited to their Division I rowing team. I have always been interested in health and physical wellbeing, but I didn’t want to neglect the mental aspect of it. Since my whole life next year will revolve around maintaining good health, I wanted to spend my year researching and learning all about diet and exercise.\n
  • First, we will look into the mental aspect of dieting. As someone who has attempted to lose weight for years, I am no stranger to these food restrictions causing misery and hunger pangs. But dieting doesn’t have to be a bad thing. As long as you can understand the science behind it and go into dieting with the right attitude, dieting can actually be fun and easy.\n\npicture: http://lose.kg/\n
  • There are many reasons why people choose to diet. One reason is because of medical conditions. Many patients are required to lose a certain amount of weight before going into surgery. People with cardiovascular illnesses generally choose to limit their intake of saturated fat in order to lower cholesterol, while people with diabetes need to monitor their diet to maintain their blood sugar levels.\n\nOther people choose to diet to manage their weight and reduce body fat. Dieting helps to improve body image and boost one’s self-confidence as well as energy. Not to mention the added health benefits, like reducing the risk of stroke, diabetes, and other medical issues.\n\nSome choose to diet in order to detox their body of accumulated toxins that leave them feeling sluggish and with pounds of extra fat. Detox diets can include juice fasts, eliminating the consumption of processed foods, and increasing the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables.\n\npicture: http://www.dietplanstips.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/The-most-efficient-diet-plan-for-losing-weight-fast-The-rice-die-2.jpg\n
  • There are many reasons why people choose to diet. One reason is because of medical conditions. Many patients are required to lose a certain amount of weight before going into surgery. People with cardiovascular illnesses generally choose to limit their intake of saturated fat in order to lower cholesterol, while people with diabetes need to monitor their diet to maintain their blood sugar levels.\n\nOther people choose to diet to manage their weight and reduce body fat. Dieting helps to improve body image and boost one’s self-confidence as well as energy. Not to mention the added health benefits, like reducing the risk of stroke, diabetes, and other medical issues.\n\nSome choose to diet in order to detox their body of accumulated toxins that leave them feeling sluggish and with pounds of extra fat. Detox diets can include juice fasts, eliminating the consumption of processed foods, and increasing the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables.\n\npicture: http://www.dietplanstips.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/The-most-efficient-diet-plan-for-losing-weight-fast-The-rice-die-2.jpg\n
  • There are many reasons why people choose to diet. One reason is because of medical conditions. Many patients are required to lose a certain amount of weight before going into surgery. People with cardiovascular illnesses generally choose to limit their intake of saturated fat in order to lower cholesterol, while people with diabetes need to monitor their diet to maintain their blood sugar levels.\n\nOther people choose to diet to manage their weight and reduce body fat. Dieting helps to improve body image and boost one’s self-confidence as well as energy. Not to mention the added health benefits, like reducing the risk of stroke, diabetes, and other medical issues.\n\nSome choose to diet in order to detox their body of accumulated toxins that leave them feeling sluggish and with pounds of extra fat. Detox diets can include juice fasts, eliminating the consumption of processed foods, and increasing the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables.\n\npicture: http://www.dietplanstips.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/The-most-efficient-diet-plan-for-losing-weight-fast-The-rice-die-2.jpg\n
  • In order to begin a diet, an individual must have the right attitude. The first requirement is the initial motivation. Whatever the reason for dieting may be, the dieter must have a strong want to make a lifestyle change. The second and most important requirement is the “self-regulatory process,” which is basically how the dieter plans on making this lifestyle change. This includes planning and maintaining the diet, and resisting temptations. The third requirement is the outcome expectancy. This is basically the end goal that the dieter is hoping to achieve. It may be a goal weight, or the elimination of a specific habit. Lastly, the dieter needs to have the right mindset. If a person believes that they can break a specific habit, they will be more likely to do so. If they have strong self-beliefs, they will be less likely to succumb to cravings and temptations.\n\nPicture: http://www.embodyingessence.org/healing.html\n
  • In order to begin a diet, an individual must have the right attitude. The first requirement is the initial motivation. Whatever the reason for dieting may be, the dieter must have a strong want to make a lifestyle change. The second and most important requirement is the “self-regulatory process,” which is basically how the dieter plans on making this lifestyle change. This includes planning and maintaining the diet, and resisting temptations. The third requirement is the outcome expectancy. This is basically the end goal that the dieter is hoping to achieve. It may be a goal weight, or the elimination of a specific habit. Lastly, the dieter needs to have the right mindset. If a person believes that they can break a specific habit, they will be more likely to do so. If they have strong self-beliefs, they will be less likely to succumb to cravings and temptations.\n\nPicture: http://www.embodyingessence.org/healing.html\n
  • In order to begin a diet, an individual must have the right attitude. The first requirement is the initial motivation. Whatever the reason for dieting may be, the dieter must have a strong want to make a lifestyle change. The second and most important requirement is the “self-regulatory process,” which is basically how the dieter plans on making this lifestyle change. This includes planning and maintaining the diet, and resisting temptations. The third requirement is the outcome expectancy. This is basically the end goal that the dieter is hoping to achieve. It may be a goal weight, or the elimination of a specific habit. Lastly, the dieter needs to have the right mindset. If a person believes that they can break a specific habit, they will be more likely to do so. If they have strong self-beliefs, they will be less likely to succumb to cravings and temptations.\n\nPicture: http://www.embodyingessence.org/healing.html\n
  • In order to begin a diet, an individual must have the right attitude. The first requirement is the initial motivation. Whatever the reason for dieting may be, the dieter must have a strong want to make a lifestyle change. The second and most important requirement is the “self-regulatory process,” which is basically how the dieter plans on making this lifestyle change. This includes planning and maintaining the diet, and resisting temptations. The third requirement is the outcome expectancy. This is basically the end goal that the dieter is hoping to achieve. It may be a goal weight, or the elimination of a specific habit. Lastly, the dieter needs to have the right mindset. If a person believes that they can break a specific habit, they will be more likely to do so. If they have strong self-beliefs, they will be less likely to succumb to cravings and temptations.\n\nPicture: http://www.embodyingessence.org/healing.html\n
  • Two of the most important things to be aware of while dieting are your will and desire. The “will” is the mechanism of self-control that is able to resist temptations, and it can restrain a person from fulfilling desires. The desire is a strong feeling of want- in this case, that “want” would be certain foods. In order to be successful while dieting, ones will needs to be stronger than their desire. If the desire is stronger than the will, the individual will give into temptations, and can end up binge eating and breaking their diet. If the will is stronger than the desire, it means that they are able to resist their temptations and exhibit a lot of self-control. However, overexertion of the will can lead to stress, so it is better to ease into a diet rather than to jump right into it. \n\nPicture: http://stephanie-fleming.blogspot.com/\n\n
  • Temptations are these desired foods that we crave so often when dieting. The will is what is supposed to control temptations and cravings for food while dieting, but let’s face it- we always want what we can’t have.\n\nPicture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/benedettabalestri/3997817774/\n\n\n
  • This diagram shows the different areas of the brain and what they do. The prefrontal cortex is the part of the brain that controls judgement, which includes impulses. The front of the brain develops slower than the back of the brain, so this part is not fully developed until about age 25. This may be why it is so difficult for teenagers to stick to a specific diet, or choose not to think before they act. The Nucleus Acumbens, positioned behind the prefrontal cortex, develops a bit faster. This part of the brain seeks pleasure and reward and is a source of motivation. \n
  • In order to avoid succumbing to a craving, first focus on what triggered the temptation in the first place. For example, if you walk by a fast-food restaurant and get a whiff of the burgers, it might trigger the desire to order a big mac and fries. If you were not hungry before you inhaled the smell of unnecessary calories, the craving will go away as soon as the scent is out of reach. The second way to resist temptations is to take inventory of everything you’ve previously eaten that day. In many cases, reviewing your previous intake of food will satisfy you enough to avoid fulfilling your current desire. Finally, take the time to create meal schedules and plan out what you will eat that day and when. Having a set scheduled will help to eliminate snacking.\n\npicture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ahmadpi/2421458561/\n
  • In order to avoid succumbing to a craving, first focus on what triggered the temptation in the first place. For example, if you walk by a fast-food restaurant and get a whiff of the burgers, it might trigger the desire to order a big mac and fries. If you were not hungry before you inhaled the smell of unnecessary calories, the craving will go away as soon as the scent is out of reach. The second way to resist temptations is to take inventory of everything you’ve previously eaten that day. In many cases, reviewing your previous intake of food will satisfy you enough to avoid fulfilling your current desire. Finally, take the time to create meal schedules and plan out what you will eat that day and when. Having a set scheduled will help to eliminate snacking.\n\npicture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ahmadpi/2421458561/\n
  • In order to avoid succumbing to a craving, first focus on what triggered the temptation in the first place. For example, if you walk by a fast-food restaurant and get a whiff of the burgers, it might trigger the desire to order a big mac and fries. If you were not hungry before you inhaled the smell of unnecessary calories, the craving will go away as soon as the scent is out of reach. The second way to resist temptations is to take inventory of everything you’ve previously eaten that day. In many cases, reviewing your previous intake of food will satisfy you enough to avoid fulfilling your current desire. Finally, take the time to create meal schedules and plan out what you will eat that day and when. Having a set scheduled will help to eliminate snacking.\n\npicture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ahmadpi/2421458561/\n
  • This video from Fox News shows how even simple substitutions can save pounds of fat per year. Although even the substitutions may not be the healthiest option for a person trying to lose weight, they will still aid in making lifestyle changes.\n
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  • So what did I do to test out the capacity of my will and to see what desires I could suppress, and which ones I could not? I devoted myself to 20 weeks worth of dieting and exercising. Each week proposed a different diet or exercise challenge, and I had to stick to it for a week while keeping track of my strengths, weaknesses, and progress. All in all, i’d say that I was pretty successful with my weekly challenges, and although I was by no means perfect, I did my best to keep myself motivated throughout that time period and accomplish my goals.\n
  • For my first week, I decided to ease into my challenges. I kept it basic with running every day. Although I thought it would be an easy challenge, it ended up being more difficult than I thought it would be. By the third day, my legs were so sore my “run” was more like a speed walk, but I managed to tough it out and actually run every single day. Weeks two and three I spent doing the “Special K Challenge,” which replaces two meals per day with either Special K cereal, milkshake, or meal bars. In addition, you are allowed one 500 calorie meal and two Special K snacks, plus an unlimited amount of fruits and vegetables. The first week, I lost two pounds. The second week, I slipped up and ended up snacking more than what I was allowed to, causing my progress to slow down exponentially. All in all, I think that the Special K Challenge really does work. Week four was core week. It was an incredibly horrible idea for me to devote a week to just one specific body part. I was sore and worn out, plus, I was neglecting my other muscles. I worked out my core every other day and felt all right, but I wish I would have done some extra lifting as to keep my other muscle groups strong as well.\n
  • For my first week, I decided to ease into my challenges. I kept it basic with running every day. Although I thought it would be an easy challenge, it ended up being more difficult than I thought it would be. By the third day, my legs were so sore my “run” was more like a speed walk, but I managed to tough it out and actually run every single day. Weeks two and three I spent doing the “Special K Challenge,” which replaces two meals per day with either Special K cereal, milkshake, or meal bars. In addition, you are allowed one 500 calorie meal and two Special K snacks, plus an unlimited amount of fruits and vegetables. The first week, I lost two pounds. The second week, I slipped up and ended up snacking more than what I was allowed to, causing my progress to slow down exponentially. All in all, I think that the Special K Challenge really does work. Week four was core week. It was an incredibly horrible idea for me to devote a week to just one specific body part. I was sore and worn out, plus, I was neglecting my other muscles. I worked out my core every other day and felt all right, but I wish I would have done some extra lifting as to keep my other muscle groups strong as well.\n
  • For my first week, I decided to ease into my challenges. I kept it basic with running every day. Although I thought it would be an easy challenge, it ended up being more difficult than I thought it would be. By the third day, my legs were so sore my “run” was more like a speed walk, but I managed to tough it out and actually run every single day. Weeks two and three I spent doing the “Special K Challenge,” which replaces two meals per day with either Special K cereal, milkshake, or meal bars. In addition, you are allowed one 500 calorie meal and two Special K snacks, plus an unlimited amount of fruits and vegetables. The first week, I lost two pounds. The second week, I slipped up and ended up snacking more than what I was allowed to, causing my progress to slow down exponentially. All in all, I think that the Special K Challenge really does work. Week four was core week. It was an incredibly horrible idea for me to devote a week to just one specific body part. I was sore and worn out, plus, I was neglecting my other muscles. I worked out my core every other day and felt all right, but I wish I would have done some extra lifting as to keep my other muscle groups strong as well.\n
  • For my first week, I decided to ease into my challenges. I kept it basic with running every day. Although I thought it would be an easy challenge, it ended up being more difficult than I thought it would be. By the third day, my legs were so sore my “run” was more like a speed walk, but I managed to tough it out and actually run every single day. Weeks two and three I spent doing the “Special K Challenge,” which replaces two meals per day with either Special K cereal, milkshake, or meal bars. In addition, you are allowed one 500 calorie meal and two Special K snacks, plus an unlimited amount of fruits and vegetables. The first week, I lost two pounds. The second week, I slipped up and ended up snacking more than what I was allowed to, causing my progress to slow down exponentially. All in all, I think that the Special K Challenge really does work. Week four was core week. It was an incredibly horrible idea for me to devote a week to just one specific body part. I was sore and worn out, plus, I was neglecting my other muscles. I worked out my core every other day and felt all right, but I wish I would have done some extra lifting as to keep my other muscle groups strong as well.\n
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  • Transcript

    1. The Psychology ofDiet and Exercise Meredith A. Consono
    2. “How can I staymotivated to exercise?”
    3. “How Can I resist cravings and temptations?”
    4. Why Do I Give up and break my diets?
    5. Thesis Although a physical challenge, dieting and exercising presents an equally large, if not larger mental challenge. The psychology behind dieting and exercising is complex, and in order to successfully maintain motivation and confidence while dieting or exercising, one’s will must be stronger than his or her desire.<http://www.jstor.org/stable/25471808>
    6. PERELEVANCESONA
    7. http://lose.kg/
    8. Why Do People Diet?http://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693 http://www.livestrong.com/article/460370-why-do-people-diet/
    9. Why Do People Diet? •Medical Conditionshttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693 http://www.livestrong.com/article/460370-why-do-people-diet/
    10. Why Do People Diet? •Medical Conditions •Weight Managementhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693 http://www.livestrong.com/article/460370-why-do-people-diet/
    11. Why Do People Diet? •Medical Conditions •Weight Management •Detoxificationhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693 http://www.livestrong.com/article/460370-why-do-people-diet/
    12. Requirements to Diethttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693
    13. Requirements to Diet •Initial Motivationhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693
    14. Requirements to Diet •Initial Motivation •Self-Regulatory Processhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693
    15. Requirements to Diet •Initial Motivation •Self-Regulatory Process •Outcome Expectancieshttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693
    16. Requirements to Diet •Initial Motivation •Self-Regulatory Process •Outcome Expectancies •Perceived Self-Efficiencyhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20182693
    17. Desire v. Will<http://www.jstor.org/stable/25471808>
    18. Temptations
    19. http://teenbrain.drugfree.org/science/growth.html
    20. T R E E M S P I T S A T T I I N O G Nhttp://www.aarp.org/health/fitness/info-12-2010/Three_Tips_For_Resisting_Food_Cravings.html S
    21. T R Focus E E M S P I T S A T T I I N O G Nhttp://www.aarp.org/health/fitness/info-12-2010/Three_Tips_For_Resisting_Food_Cravings.html S
    22. T R Focus E E M S P I T S Inventory A T T I I N O G Nhttp://www.aarp.org/health/fitness/info-12-2010/Three_Tips_For_Resisting_Food_Cravings.html S
    23. T R Focus E E M S P I T S Inventory A T T I I N O G Take time Nhttp://www.aarp.org/health/fitness/info-12-2010/Three_Tips_For_Resisting_Food_Cravings.html S
    24. video removed to reduce file size !http://video.foxnews.com/v/3922440/
    25. Impulse Control Disorders
    26. The Psychology of Exercising
    27. Motivation
    28. Tips to Stay motivated
    29. Sport Psychology
    30. Psychological Benefits of Exercise
    31. Body Image
    32. So What Did I Do?
    33. Weeks 1-5
    34. Weeks 1-5
    35. Weeks 1-5
    36. Weeks 1-5
    37. Weeks 1-5
    38. Weeks 6-10
    39. Weeks 11-15
    40. Weeks 16-20
    41. Video
    42. Conclusion
    43. Works Cited

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