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Dr Jones: Knee Joint Replacement

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McKinley Court Care Centre's Dr Jones presented the topic "Knee Joint Replacement" on July 9, 2011. The topics that were discussed covered normal/abnormal join function, symptoms of joint disorders, …

McKinley Court Care Centre's Dr Jones presented the topic "Knee Joint Replacement" on July 9, 2011. The topics that were discussed covered normal/abnormal join function, symptoms of joint disorders, and treatments.

Contact us for more information on knee joint replacement or to attend the next seminar!

info@mckinleycourtcarecentre.com
www.mckinleycourtcare.com


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Transcript

  • 1. Knee JointReplacement
    Tyler Jones, MD
  • 2. Topics
    • Normal/Abnormal Joint Function
    • 3. Symptoms of Joint Disorders
    • 4. Treatments
  • The Bones of the Leg
    • Femur (Thighbone)
    Supports the weight of the upper body at both the hip and the knee
    • Tibia (Shinbone)
    Supports the weight of the upper body at the knee and the foot
  • 5.
    • Fibula
    Smaller bone, always on the outside of the leg
    • Patella (Kneecap)
    Provides a fulcrum for the muscles of the upper leg to efficiently move the lower leg
    The Bones of the Leg
  • 6. Anatomy of the Knee
    Femur
    Patella
    Tibia
  • 7. Condyles
    • Rounded prominence at the end of the femur
    • 8. Provide smooth rocking movement
    • 9. Help distribute the weight of the upper body
  • Anatomy of the Knee
    Condyles
  • 10.
    • Strong bands of tissue
    • 11. Stabilize the joint
    • 12. Outside the knee
    • 13. Medial Collateral
    • 14. Lateral Collateral
    • 15. Inside the knee
    • 16. Posterior Cruciate
    • 17. Anterior Cruciate
    Four Major Ligaments
  • 18. Anatomy of the Knee
    Ligament
    Ligament
  • 19. Cartilage
    • Rubbery tissue found in joints
    • 20. Cushions and Protects the ends of bones
    • 21. Provides smooth gliding surface for bones
  • Anatomy of the Knee
    Cartilage
  • 22. Arthritis
  • 23. Arthritis
    • Defined as inflammation of the joint
    • 24. Over 100 different types
    • 25. Affects 43 million Americans each year
  • Two Primary Types of Arthritis
    • Osteoarthritis
    • 26. Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • 27. Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Affects about 2.5 million Americans annually
    • 28. Can be a particularly disabling disease
    • 29. Can seriously limit a person’s well-being
  • What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    • Inflammatory joint condition
    • 30. The joint’s lubricating fluid (synovial fluid) increases pressure inside joint
    • 31. Synovium thickens and begins to erode the cartilage
    • 32. Usually affects more than one joint at a time
  • Osteoarthritis
  • 33. Osteoarthritis
    • Most common type of arthritis
    • 34. Affects 23 million Americans
  • What is Osteoarthritis?
    • Degenerative disease affecting joint cartilage
    “Wear and tear”
    • A manageable, treatable condition
  • Osteoarthritis
    Normal Knee X-ray
    Arthritic Knee X-ray
  • 35. Symptoms of Arthritis
  • Physical Examination
    • Decreased range of motion
    • 40. Joint-line tenderness
    • 41. Joint deformities
  • X-ray Analysis
    Joint space narrowing
    Abnormal bone formation “spurs”
    Joint Deformity
    Bowleg
    Knock knee
  • 42. Treatments
  • 43. Treatments
  • Diet
    • Good nutrition promotes overall good health
    • 52. Excess weight places excess pressure on joints and can lead to or aggravate osteoarthritis
  • Exercise/Physical Therapy
    • Exercise improves joint mobility
    • 53. Physical therapy may help keep joints flexible and mobile
    • 54. Exercise can help strengthen muscles and provide support for joints
  • Treatments
    • Cane or walker may help reduce pressure and pain on affected joint
    • 55. Braces can help support or align joints to relieve pressure and pain
    • 56. Wedges may transfer force away from affected area
  • Pain Management with Medication
    • Tylenol XS
    • 57. NSAIDs and salicylates
    • 58. Anti-inflammatory medications
    • 59. Cox 1 vs. Cox 2
    • 60. Analgesics
    • 61. Pain relievers
    • 62. Corticosteroids
    • 63. Synthetic form of naturally occurring substance
    • 64. May only be used for short periods of time
  • Injections
    • Cortisone
    • 65. Decrease inflammation
    • 66. May reduce need for oral medications
    • 67. Contraindications
    • 68. Active local infection
    • 69. Use caution if taking blood thinning medicines
    • 70. Not recommended earlier than every 3-4 months
    • Hyalgan or Synvisc One
    • 71. Purified sodium hyaluronate
    • 72. Comes from rooster combs
    • 73. Acts like a lubricant or shock absorber
    • 74. In Osteoarthritis
    • 75. Decreased quantity of hyaluronate
    • 76. Possible change in quality of hyaluronate
    Viscosupplementation
  • 77. Viscosupplementation
    • Contraindications
    • 78. Allergic to Hyalgan, Synvisc One or similar material
    • 79. Local infection at injection site
    • 80. If allergic to bird products
    • 81. Feathers, eggs, poultry
    • 82. Pregnant women or nursing mothers
    • 83. Has not been tested in them
  • Nutritional Supplements
    • Glucosamine
    • 84. Chondroitin
  • Surgical Options
    • Arthroscopy
    • 85. Unicompartmental Knee Replacement
    • 86. Total Joint Replacement
  • Arthroscopy
  • 87. UnicompartmentalImplants
  • 88. Total Knee Replacement Surgery
  • 89. When Should Total Joint Replacement be Considered?
    • Pain negatively affects daily living
    • 90. Conservative treatment options fail to provide adequate relief from symptoms
    • 91. Extensive cartilage damage and/or joint deformity
  • Total Knee Replacement
    • Damaged bone resurfaced with components made from metal alloy and polyethylene (plastic)
    • 92. Advances in medical technology have helped make outcomes more predictable and acceptable
  • Problems
  • Primary Knee Components
    Femoral Component
    Polyethylene Bearing
    (Acts as cartilage)
    Tibial Tray
    (supports polyethylene bearing)
  • 95. Benefits of Total Joint Replacement
    • Can eliminate or reduce joint pain
    • 96. May enhance movement and mobility
    • 97. Can improve quality of life
    • 98. Return to normal activity
    • 99. Low impact sports and activities
  • After Joint Replacement Surgery
    • Hospital stay between 3 and 5 days
    • 100. Assisted walking within 24 hours of surgery
    • 101. Pain medication
    • 102. Physical therapy
    • 103. Key to recovery
    • 104. Help prevent swelling, stiffness, and pain
    • 105. Regain strength and mobility
  • Resume Usual Activities
    • Routine Activities (4-6 weeks)
    • 106. Walking (un-assisted), Driving, Gardening, Shopping, Housework
  • Resume Usual Activities
    • Low-Impact Activities (2-3 months)
    • 107. Golfing, Dancing, Bowling, Swimming, Bicycling
  • Restrictions
  • Possible Complications
  • Physical Therapy
    • Described by Physician
    • 115. Supervised Physical Therapy for 4-6 weeks
    • 116. Home exercise program as directed by physician
  • Home Care
    • Medications for Comfort While Healing
    • 117. Exercise
    • 118. Healthy Diet
  • Follow-up Visits with Your Physician
    • 6 weeks
    • 119. Set schedule first year
    • 120. Annually
    • 121. regularly checking the joint will assist in preventing complications
  • Closing
    • Your symptoms should be diagnosed to help you get relief
    • 122. Joint replacement patients should follow-up with their surgeon
    • 123. Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid arthritis are treatable, manageable conditions
  • Questions
  • 124. Thank You