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Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
Member Models and Their Relation to Value
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Member Models and Their Relation to Value

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Presentation given by Jodie Slaughter, FASAE and Jodie Slaughter, FASAE President and Founding Partner, McKinley Advisors and …

Presentation given by Jodie Slaughter, FASAE and Jodie Slaughter, FASAE President and Founding Partner, McKinley Advisors and
Michelle Mason, CAE, FASAE, CQIA
Managing Director, ASQ
at ASAE Annual Meeting 2012
Member Models and Their Relation to Value in a Time of Change

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  • Addressing the “Job to Be Done” is often a complex equation in an association contextOur structures, processes and resources are often out of sync with members’ needs, wants and expectationsTherefore, presenting a coherent membership offering is a struggle for manyA strong MVP begins start with a steadfast commitment from the top and shared understanding membership vs. product drivers
  • Addressing the “Job to Be Done” is often a complex equation in an association contextOur structures, processes and resources are often out of sync with members’ needs, wants and expectationsTherefore, presenting a coherent membership offering is a struggle for manyA strong MVP begins start with a steadfast commitment from the top and shared understanding membership vs. product drivers
  • Transcript

    • 1. Member Models and Their Relation to Value in a Time of Change Jodie Slaughter, FASAE President and Founding Partner McKinley Advisors And Michelle Mason, CAE, FASAE, CQIA Managing Director ASQ #ASAE12 LO1
    • 2. Membership is dead! Long livemembership!
    • 3. Is the annualized trend in full, paidmemberships for your association over thepast 5 years higher, lower or flat? F
    • 4. Is the annualized trend in full, paid membershipsfor your association over the past 5 years: CESSE 2012 EIA 2011 EIA 2010 EIA 44% 34% Higher 44% 44% 29% 26% Lower 38% 28% 27% 37% Flat 18% 23% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50%
    • 5. What do you anticipate will happen with membership over the next 5 years? forward-looking
    • 6. Same trend with 5 year forward-looking estimate:forward-lookingEstimate CESSE 2012 EIA 2011 EIA 2010 EIA 67% 44% Higher 34% 44% 44% 15% 29% Lower 26% 38% 28% 12% 27% Flat 37% 18% 23% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80%
    • 7. What concerns you most aboutmembership in your association over the next five years?
    • 8. What concerns you most about membership inyour association over the next 5 years? Aging Membership/Attracting 14 Youth Providing/Communicating 11 value Membership Model 6 Competition 4Lack of Employer/Govt funding 4 "Open" Journals / Info 4
    • 9. 65 or older 6% 55-64 39% 45-54 30% Typical age distribution of an 35-44 18% association’s 25-34 3% membership Under 25 1% TODAY 0% 20% 40% 60%
    • 10. 65 or older 39% 55-64 30% Forecast age 45-54 18% distribution for the 35-44 9% same association in 25-34 3% 2025 Under 25 1% 0% 20% 40% 60%
    • 11. Your Value Proposition• It’s more than what you say.• It’s also what you deliver.
    • 12. How we look to some…Pay us in advance so that you’ll have lots more to readand the ability to pay us again for access to things thatmay or may not be relevant for you… …because it’s the “right thing to do” and you’ll feel guilty if you don’t.
    • 13. Customer Value Proposition Job to be done: solves an important problem or fulfills an important need for the target customer Offering: satisfies the problem or fulfills the need. This is defined not only by what is sold but also by how it’s sold.Adapted from Reinventing Your Business Model; Mark W. Johnson, Clayton M. Christensen, Henning Kagermann; Harvard Business Review, December 2008
    • 14. Compare:•Networking Opportunities All Year Long•Meet Your Next Employer, Client, Hire Here•Keep Up to Date on Trends in the Field•Easy Ways to Maintain Your Designation/License/Credential (so you can keepworking, get business, etc.)
    • 15. is Subjective• Demographics can matter • Career stage • Job setting • Level of engagement…• And sometimes they don’tQ: What affects value in your Organization?
    • 16. Variable ValueGood of the Personal Order Benefits
    • 17. How do you determine membervalue in your organization?
    • 18. How do you know?• You have to be curious• Look at behaviors• Study transactional data• Link to demographics• Ask the right questions• And listen
    • 19. Your Value Proposition• It’s more than what you say• It’s also what you deliver
    • 20. Living with a mature modelWe typically try build our membervalue proposition around ourexisting processes and resources… …this has acute impact on the membership value proposition.
    • 21. Think about: Conference committees Website navigation Presidential initiatives Chapter meetings e-newsletters
    • 22. Some of our processes anddecisions that erode theMVP: Product development Pricing Brand strategy Incentive compensation Promotional mix Technology platforms Service levels R&D investment
    • 23. Think about what you offer:• Is available EXCLUSIVELY to members?• Addresses ONE job to be done, not ten?• Is CHEAPER, FASTER or EASIER to obtain?• Is relevant to nearly ALL of your target audience?What do you that fits the bill?
    • 24. Strategies to Enhance the MVP• REWORK internal structures• Seek BALANCE in the MVP• Focus on the USER EXPERIENCE• Determine what can be made EXCLUSIVE• Test low/no cost CONTENT alternatives• TARGET communications (REALLY)• Invest in MOBILE• Increase FLEXIBILITY in membership policies
    • 25. What should you do next toenhance your MVP?
    • 26. The Half-Full Glass:• There WILL be markets and potential members to serve in the future.• Certain membership drivers are ETERNAL.• Membership growth is a LAG INDICATOR of a viable customer value proposition.• Our challenge is to create a BALANCED AND COHERENT value proposition for membership.
    • 27. Really? Really?
    • 28. Not if you offer unique valueand have the tools to make it compelling.

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