EIA Fundamentals for the Future 2013

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Marking the sixth installment in McKinley Advisors' ongoing benchmarking series, the 2013 EIA study provides a glimpse of the current perceptions within our sector as well as clear illustrations of trending data that becomes so valuable in looking at the impact of changes over time.

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EIA Fundamentals for the Future 2013

  1. 1. 2013 Economic Impact on AssociationsFundamentals for the Future
  2. 2. March, 2013Dear Colleagues:McKinley’s 2013 Economic Impact on Associations (EIA) Study marks the sixth installment in aseries that examines the impact of shifting economic conditions on our sector. The report providesinsight into key benchmarks of association success, measures the reality of the past year and theoutlook for the coming one, and provides data that validates how challenges and opportunitiescan differ dramatically from one member sector to another.This year, as economic conditions improve and optimism rebounds, the emerging theme isstability. Associations are beginning to redirect their attention away from austere, short-termsolutions like hiring freezes and budget cutbacks to sustained efforts that require resources butpromise deeper return-on-investment. Similarly, the EIA Study has begun to look beyond thecoping practices of associations to reveal ways in which the community is working in smarter,more streamlined and more relevant ways for their members.We appreciate the time invested in this project by each of the 215 association executives whoresponded to the survey, and we look forward to continuing to deliver meaningful studies that helporganizations understand the larger environments in which they—and their members—areoperating. If you would like to discuss the data in more depth or arrange for a presentation foryour staff or Board, please be in touch.Best wishes for continued optimism and recovery.Jodie Slaughter Jay Younger President & Managing Partner &Founding Partner Chief Consultant Shelley Sanner, CAE Patrick Glaser Samantha DinaManaging Consultant Director of Research Project Associate 2233 Wisconsin Avenue NW t: 202.333.6250 Suite 525 f: 202.333.5172 Washington DC 20007 mckinley-advisors.com
  3. 3. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureIntroduction Survey MethodsThe EIA series has provided an interesting view of the McKinley developed and deployed an online survey toassociation landscape throughout the ever-changing association executives on January 14, 2013 to collect keyeconomic conditions of the past five years. The data has data around the economy and its impact on associations.shown the resilience of associations during this The survey remained open until January 28, 2013 andtumultuous time period—from the initial, drastic resulted in 215 responses representing a broad spectrummeasures to preserve core infrastructure to the first signs of the association community. If you wish to participate inof recovery as associations began to reinvest in critical future benchmarking studies or are interested in ainitiatives. This year, the data points to an increased tailored presentation of the EIA results to your senior staffsense of stability in the association world. Association or Board of Directors, please contact Samantha Dina atexecutives seem more confident with the economic sdina@mckinley-advisors.com.conditions of the coming year and are continuing torebuild.So what has changed for associations? Among the keyfindings from this year’s study: • After many years of unpredictable economic impact, association executives’ expectations towards the performance of the economy are in-line with actual economic conditions. • Despite the harsh economic conditions of the last five years, associations in nearly every industry sector reported higher membership trends. Even sectors that were deeply impacted by the recession (such as professional services) appear to be gaining stability. • Overall, associations are not relying on cost- saving strategies but are looking to the future with optimism, as demonstrated by the increased program expansion and lack of budget cuts reported. • Membership continues to be an area of focus for associations. While recruitment and retention still remain the top priorities, associations are intensifying their focus on member engagement and diversity. • Associations are willing and likely to alter their membership models in order to achieve organizational goals. 1
  4. 4. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureOrganizationsSixty percent of respondents represent professional TABLE Asocieties (consisting mostly of individual members), 23%are from trade associations, 11% from a “hybrid,” 3% Which of the following best describes thefrom philanthropic or cause-related, and 3% describe organization you work for?their association as “other.” Total Responses: 197Twenty-three percent of the survey respondentsrepresent healthcare associations; 18% describe their 3% 3%organizations as representing scientific and engineeringfields. Education and humanities associations accountfor 14% of respondents. The balance represents avariety of industries, including building / construction, 11%manufacturing, professional services, finance /accounting, food industry, legal, associationmanagement and the retail industry.Once again, senior executives represent the majority of 23% 60%responses, with 92% holding a director-level position orhigher. The remaining participants reflect the breadth ofthe profession and represent a variety of responsibilities.Fifty-eight percent of survey participants representorganizations whose annual operating budgets are lessthan $10 million, while 9% have budgets of more than$50 million. Professional (mostly individual members) Trade (mostly organizational members) Hybrid (both organizational and individual members) Philanthropic / Cause-Related Other 2
  5. 5. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future TABLE B What field/industry does your association represent? Total Responses: 197 Healthcare 23% Scientific / Engineering 18% Education / Humanities 14% Finance / Accounting 12% Professional Services 8% Building / Construction 7% Manufacturing 6% Food Industry 4% Legal 3% Association Management 2% Retail 1% Other 3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% TABLE C Which of the following most closely describes your position within your organization? Total Responses: 197 Executive Director / CEO 33%Associate Executive Director / Deputy CEO 8% Senior Vice President / Vice President 18% Managing Director / Senior Director 14% Director 18% Manager 7% Coordinator 0% Other 2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 3
  6. 6. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future TABLE D Which of the following best describe your areas of responsibility? Please select all that apply. Total Responses: 196 Executive Management 52% Membership 39% Marketing 33% Communications 23%Education / Professional Development 19% Meetings and Expositions 18% Publications 18% Finance / Accounting 14% IT / Technology 11% Component Relations 10% Government Affairs / Relations 8% Other 11% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% TABLE E What is your organization’s annual operating budget? Total Responses: 193 $100 million or more 5% $50 million to $99.9 million 4% $20 million to $49.9 million 14% $10 million to $19.9 million 19% $5 million to $9.9 million 20% $2 million to $4.9 million 24% Less than $2 million 14% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 4
  7. 7. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #1Respondents’ expectations towards the performance of the economywere in-line with actual economic conditions.The majority of respondents (57%) indicated the impact from 2012 economic conditions were in-line with what theyhad anticipated for their associations. This represents a 13 percentage point increase over those who said the samethe previous year. This finding could point to greater stability and certainty when it comes to the impact of economicconditions on associations. It may also be an encouragement to many association executives who are experiencing afavorable economic impact and may be more comfortable in their ability to anticipate and plan for the impact ofexternal economic factors on their organizations.TABLE 1Looking back on 2012, was the impact of economic conditions on your association…Total Responses: 2013: 192 2012: 183 6% Far better than expected 9% 27% Better than expected 35% 57% 2013 About what was expected 45% 2012 9% Worse than expected 11% 1% Far worse than expected 0% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 5
  8. 8. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #2Most respondents are optimistic looking towards 2013.Optimism abounds among nearly all participants in the study. Compared to last year’s study, the same number ofrespondents, around nine-in-ten, indicated they are optimistic about the coming year. Further, slightly morerespondents described feeling “very optimistic” about the coming year than did previously (22% to 17%, respectively).Overall, the level of optimism toward the future has been consistent over the past year. Again, this may be anindicator of consistent patterns of behavior as association executives have not altered their outlook over the past 12months.TABLE 2In general, how are you feeling about the year 2013 for your association?Total Responses: 2013: 170 2012: 161 80% 71% 70% 65% 60% 50% 40% 2013 30% 2012 22% 20% 17% 11% 12% 10% 2% 0% 0% Very optimistic Somewhat Somewhat Very pessimistic optimistic pessimistic 6
  9. 9. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #3Although the long-term economic impact of the recession is evident inmembership trends, there was a slight shift toward positive growth in 2012.When asked about membership trends over the past five years, 39% indicated experiencing growth, compared to only34% who said the same in 2012. Although this is still smaller than the 44% that indicated growth in years 2011 and 2010,it is important to note those previous studies captured growth rates in years before the onset of the recession.Importantly, if economic growth continues, five-year membership trends should continue to rise and surpass all previousyears reported in the study.TABLE 3Is the annualized trend in full, paid memberships for your association over the past fiveyears (since January 1, 2008):Total Responses: 2013: 191 2012: 159 2011: 234 2010: 307 2013 39% 32% 25% 4% Higher 2012 34% 37% 26% 3% Flat Lower Don’t know 2011 44% 18% 38% 1% 2010 44% 23% 28% 5% 7
  10. 10. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureTABLE 4What is the approximate annualized increase/decrease in full, paid membership foryour association over the past five years? (since January 1, 2008):Total Responses: 2013: 108 Base: Respondents whose Five-Year Association Retention Changed 50% 44% 40% 30% 22% 2013 20% 14% 10% 10% 7% 3% 0% -10% -5% 0% 0% 5% 10% or less to -10% to -5% to 5% to 10% or more 8
  11. 11. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureTable 5 depicts the net membership growth reported in each study. The net membership growth was calculatedto represent the difference between the percentage of respondents who reported a higher membership trend overa five-year period and the percentage of respondents who reported a lower membership trend over the same five-year period. Net Membership Growth = (% Reporting Higher Membership Trend) – (% Reporting Lower Membership Trend)The net membership growth rates of each EIA study correspond closely with the annual GDPs of the five-yearperiod. The highest net growth (16%) was reported in 2010, which captured two years of steep positive GDPgrowth, compared to this year’s 14% net membership growth, which captured membership trends during a three-year span of positive GDP growth since the 2007 recession.TABLE 5Annualized five-year membership trend analyzed by U.S. Annual GDP:Total Responses: 2013: 191 2012: 159 2011: 234 2010: 307 13.8 18% 13.6 16% 16% 14% 13.4 14% 12% 13.2 2013 10% Net Annualized Five- Net Annualized Five-Year Year Membership 13.0 Membership Trend 2012 8% Trend Annual GDP 12.8 8% Annual GDP in trillions) * 2011 6% (year-end, (year- end, in trillions) ** 6% 12.6 Five-year range 2010 4% included in net growth 12.4 2% 12.2 0% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013* GDP Data from U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. http://www.bea.gov/national/index.htm#gdp 9
  12. 12. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureAs might be expected, there are important differences in the five-year annualized trends reported by respondentscoming from different fields. For example, participants that represent healthcare or education/humanitiesorganizations reported higher than average membership trends over the past five years, while those that focus onprofessional services reported primarily flat membership trends.Although the net membership trends have varied greatly by field over the past four years, the net membership trendsremained stable or increased this year. It is interesting to note the net membership trends for the 2013 study appearto be very similar to those reported in the 2010 study, which captured pre-recession data.TABLE 6Annualized five-year membership trend analyzed by field represented by association,2010-2013.Total Responses: 2013: 191 2012: 159 2011: 234 2010: 307 30% 30% 20% 14% 20% 9% 10% 10% 10% 0% 0% -4% -3% -3%-10% -10%-20% -20%-30% -25% -30%-40% -40% -37%-50% -50% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2010 2011 2012 2013 Education/Humanities Professional ServicesNote: Only those segments with at least 20 respondents were included in the analysis. 10
  13. 13. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future 60% 60% 54% 50% 48% 50% 44% 40% 40% 29% 30% 30% 20% 20% 13% 10% 10% 6% 3% 0% 0% -4%-10% -10% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2010 2011 2012 2013 Healthcare Scientific / EngineeringNote: Only those segments with at least 20 respondents were included in the analysis.Key Finding #4Compared to previous years, concern across major business lines hasdecreased, albeit very slightly. Membership recruitment and retentioncontinue to be the top two areas of concern for the majority ofrespondents.Respondents were asked to share their levels of concern across core business lines. Concern across almost all coreassociation business lines continues to lessen, although decreases are minimal and at virtually the same levels as at thestart of 2012, demonstrating a trend of stability.For every business line, concern was either equal or slightly below the level of concern reported last year except in thecase of advertising. Last year, advertising showed one of the most significant drops, whereas this year the concernactually increased by 5%. Although this may indicate a slight decrease in optimism felt toward private sectorrelationships, it is important to note that concern around sponsorships fell slightly.On the other side of the engagement spectrum is membership, which, for many associations, represents the mostfundamental reason for existence. Throughout the survey, respondents indicated member recruitment and retention asprimary challenges and priorities for their associations. Although these areas have shown significant decreases inconcern over the past five years, they continue to be the top two areas of concern for the majority of associations. 11
  14. 14. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future TABLE 7 Considering the current economic situation, how concerned are you with the following issues? Total Responses: 2013: 170 2012: 162 2011: 237 2010: 340 2009: 283 72% 72% Membership recruitment 78% 78% 86% 70%rship retention 72% Membership retention 84% 77% 84% 88% 88% 64%hip recruitment 65% Sponsorship 78% 76% 88% 86% 88% 57% Sponsorship at other educational seminars 58% Attendance 68% 88% 74% 88% 74% 56% Concerned 2013 ng attendance 59% Annual meeting attendance 79% 69% 83% 79% 83% Concerned 2012 54% Concerned 2011tional seminars 49% Advertising 74% 59% Concerned 2010 80% 74% 74% Concerned 2009 47% Advertising 46% Note: Percentages Product sales 50% 80% 66% represent sum of 74% 58% “Extremely Concerned” 35% and “Somewhat Product sales 36% Volunteer participation 42% 66% Concerned” 36% 29% 58%er participation 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 36% 29% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 12
  15. 15. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future Key Finding #5 Associations are shifting from reduction to expansion. Most cost-savings activities are less wide-spread than in previous years. The most dramatic changes include decreases in reduction of programs and services and budget cuts; both down about 5% compared to previous years. More than six-in-ten respondents (61%) reported that their associations are currently expanding or planning to expand their programs and services this year. The overwhelming shift toward program expansion when compared with the low occurrences of budget cuts and reduction of programs (13%) demonstrates the expected growth and optimism associations feel going into 2013. TABLE 8 What do you expect to happen at your association in 2013 as a result of current economic conditions? Total Responses: 174 IS DEFINITELY PROBABLY PROBABLY DEFINITELY DONT HAPPENING WILL WILL WILL NOT WILL NOT TOTAL KNOW NOW HAPPEN HAPPEN HAPPEN HAPPENLayoffs / elimination of positions 2% 2% 9% 48% 35% 4% 174Hiring freeze 8% 2% 10% 44% 32% 4% 172Freeze on salary increases 6% 2% 9% 44% 35% 4% 173Staff reorganization 8% 6% 25% 39% 16% 6% 174Budget cuts 5% 4% 20% 52% 15% 4% 174Significant budget increases 1% 2% 10% 56% 27% 4% 171Reduction of programs and services 0% 1% 12% 57% 25% 5% 173Expansion of programs and services 3% 16% 42% 33% 3% 3% 172Change in investment strategy 5% 3% 12% 47% 13% 20% 174Outsourcing of staff functions 5% 2% 22% 43% 16% 12% 172 13
  16. 16. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureTABLE 9What do you expect to happen at your association as a result of current economicconditions?Total Responses: 2013: 171 2012: 160 2011: 237 2010: 301 2009: 256 38% 34% Staff reorganization 36% 44% 36% 30% 34% Budget cuts 44% 70% 84% 29% 29%Outsourcing of staff functions 23% 27% 25% 20% 22% Hiring freeze 24% 2013 53% 58% 2012 2011 19% 23% 2010Change in investment strategy 24% 35% 2009 51% Note: Percentages 17% represent sum of top 3 18% (happening, will happen, Freeze on salary increases 20% 54% probably will happen) 44% 13% Reduction of programs and 18% 18% services 45% 45% 13% Layoffs / elimination of 15% 12% positions 22% 26% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 14
  17. 17. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future Key Finding #6 The shift from acquisition and retention to member engagement strategies continues to occur. Focus is continuing to shift from member acquisition and retention to increased member engagement strategies. This shift in priorities was first noted in last year’s study and the trend remains evident this year with slight decreases seen in both new member acquisition and member retention. The commitment to member engagement and composition is also demonstrated through the growing focus on increasing participation among younger members and diversifying membership. Increasing participation and engagement among younger members has become increasingly important for associations over the past five years, and was the only area of focus to reach its peak in this year’s study. TABLE 10 What are your three highest priorities for 2013? Total Responses: 171 35% Developing new methods for member 37% 28% engagement 27% 34% 34% 38% New member acquisition 44% 44% 41% 32% 34% Improving member retention 40% 49% 50% 27% 28% Branding / increasing awareness 27% 32% 36% 22%Diversifying membership / attracting new 19% 2013 14% audiences 16% 15% 2012 21% 19% 2011 Increasing meeting attendance 23% 30% 26% 2010 19% 2009 23% New product research and development 14% 18% 0% 17% 29% Website enhancements 22% 18% 0% 17% Increasing participation among younger 14% 14% members 9% 12% 14% 11% Improving marketing results 15% 17% 22% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 15
  18. 18. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #7Associations are willing and likely to alter membership structure andbenefits in order to meet goals.New to the EIA study, respondents were asked whether or not their association has made, or has considered making,changes to its membership structure. Seven-in-ten respondents (70%) reported they had considered or actually hadmade significant changes to their membership structure and benefits package in 2012. Interestingly, only 28% ofassociation executives had not at least considered making changes to membership structure and benefits.The most popular changes to membership structure are through the creation of new membership categories (25%)and the addition of new member benefits (21%); once again demonstrating the increased focus on member retentionand diversification. Additional structural changes mentioned were dues restructuring, offering a la carte or online-onlymembership plans, and creating group or organizational memberships.The willingness to alter member packages indicates that the membership model is a powerful tool for associationmanagers to both generate revenues and achieve other association goals.TABLE 11In the past year, have you made or have you considered making, significant changesto your membership structure and benefits packages?Total Responses: 182 Not sure, 2% Yes, have considered making changes No, neither made changes Yes, have nor considered Yes, have made changes considered making changes, making changes, 28% 40% No, neither made changes nor considered making changes Yes, have made Not sure changes, 30% 16
  19. 19. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureTABLE 12In the past year, have you made or have you considered making, significant changesto your membership structure and benefits packages? Please describe those changes.Total Responses: 2013: 172 Creation of new membership categories 25% Addition of new member benefits 21% Dues restructure 17% À la carte/online membership offering 12% Group membership 7% Reduced cost of membership 6% Structural changes 5% Bundling options 5% Consideration of structural changes 5% Streamlined categories 5% Increase in dues 4% Other 5% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 17
  20. 20. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #8While not growing at the same rate as seen in the 2012 study,membership retention rates are still strong and appear to be stablizing.More than four-in-ten respondents in both the 2013 and 2012 studies experienced a member retention rate of 90% orhigher for the preceding year (43% and 42%, respectively). This year signifies the highest percentage of participantswho achieved a retention rate of more than 90%; however, there was a 6% decline in associations that experienced aretention rate of more than 80% compared to last year’s study (79% and 85%, respectively).Although fewer respondents indicated their retention rate had increased over the past 12 months compared toprevious year’s studies, almost half of the respondents reported stable retention rates. Once again, the consistency inretention rates is pointing toward renewed stability.TABLE 13What is your current membership retention rate?Total Responses: 2013: 185 2012: 153 2011: 227 2010: 301 2009: 256 Less than 70% 70-74% 75-79% 80-84% 85-89% 90–94% 95-100% 2013 5% 4% 11% 18% 18% 23% 20% 2012 3% 5% 7% 16% 27% 24% 18% 2011 5% 9% 10% 15% 21% 20% 19% 2010 7% 10% 10% 18% 22% 20% 12% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 18
  21. 21. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureTABLE 14Over the past 12 months, has your retention rate:Total Responses: 2013: 192 2012: 156 2011: 228 2010: 305 2009: 251 2013 24% 49% 24% 2012 28% 46% 24% Increased 2011 30% 45% 23% Stayed the same 2010 11% 39% 46% Decreased 2009 21% 52% 22% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 19
  22. 22. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #9Hiring plans for 2013 have stabilized, demonstrating similar statistics asin 2012.Since the number of associations with plans for hiring peaked in 2011 (almost doubling), these numbers haveremained relatively consistent at around 50% over the past two years. However, there was a slight increase inassociations who reported not having plans to add new staff in 2013.TABLE 15Does your association plan to add new staff positions in the next 12 months?Total Responses: 2013: 174 2012: 159 2011: 235 2010: 334 2013 49% 41% 10% 2012 50% 37% 14% Yes No 2011 41% 44% 15% Don’t know 2010 24% 60% 16% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 20
  23. 23. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the FutureKey Finding #10The decision to offer members content at no additional cost greatlydepends on the content vehicle, and its importance in providingmembership value.This year, the EIA study captured information to compare benefits that are included with the price of membershipversus those that are purchased separately. As the EIA trending surveys illustrate, associations regularly look toevaluate their membership model and understand the value they provide to members. However, associationmembers have changing expectations of value as recent poor economic times have focused members on return-on-investment and as new forms of competition have arisen from multiple sectors.For example, the internet has exponentially increased the availability of free resources and information, changingthe landscape of many industries, including associations. In order to stay competitive, associations must providevalue to members through free access to information content, while still ensuring some knowledge and informationproducts are distributed à la carte.More than eight-in-ten respondents (85%) indicated they offer free content in the form of news, information, andtrends to members. This was the most popular form of content to offer free of cost—likely because of the essentialvalue it provides for members, and the availability of similarly positioned information elsewhere on the internet.Additionally, the majority of respondents reported they offer members free content in the form of access to standardsand guidelines (69%), online journals (75%) and magazines (82%). These resources provide members valuableinformation and are core benefits of membership.There were some resources that the majority of associations indicated are provided to members, at a cost. Forexample, few respondents reported offering free content in the form of webinars (34%), recorded meeting content(27%), live streaming content (25%) or online courses (12%). Although these features are important to offer, theymay not compose the crux of membership benefits, but are instead a valued add-on. In addition, the time spentfacilitating and monitoring an online course or webinar can translate into an additional cost for the sponsoringassociation, often distributed to the participating members while shielding those costs from members that might notfind equivalent value in them. 21
  24. 24. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Fundamentals for the Future TABLE 16 In general, how much content does your association offer to members that is entirely free of cost? Total Responses: 168 News, information, trends 85% 11% 2% 1% (online) Magazines (online) 83% 9% 6% 3% Magazines (print) 81% 4% 3% 13% Journals (online) 75% 8% 10% 7% Standards, guidelines, best 69% 17% 6% 8% practices Advice, counsel, guidance 64% 27% 8% 1% Journals (print) 57% 8% 5% 31% Webinars 34% 18% 21% 27%Recorded content from meetings 27% 9% 25% 39% Live streaming content 25% 12% 26% 37% Online courses 12% 13% 24% 51% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Most content is free A substantial amount is free A small amount of content is free Almost no content is free Note: Percentages do not consider respondents who selected "Unsure" or "N/A." 22
  25. 25. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Partial List of Participating Associations AcademyHealth American Society of Civil Engineers American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons American Society of Consultant Pharmacists American Animal Hospital Association American Society of Interior Designers American Anthropological Association American Society of Radiologic Technologists American Association for Laboratory Animal American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Science American Thoracic Society American Association of Nurse Assessment American Water Resources Association Coordination American Water Works Association American Association of Physicists in Medicine Association for Behavioral and American Association of University Women Cognitive Therapies American Chemical Society Association for Corporate Growth Global American College of Healthcare Executives Association for Professionals in Infection American Dental Hygienists’ Association Control and Epidemiology, Inc. American Health Information Management Association for Women in Science Association Association Forum of Chicagoland American Institute of Architects Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons American Institute of Chemical Engineers Association of Public-Safety Communications American Pharmacists Association Officials American Physical Therapy Association Association of School Business Officials American Public Health Association International American Society for Clinical Pharmacology & Automotive Service Association Therapeutics Building Owners and Managers Association American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy International American Society for Nutrition Casualty Actuarial Society American Society for Parenteral and Council on Foundations Enteral Nutrition Ecological Society of America American Society for Pharmacology and Employers Resource Council Experimental Therapeutics Entomological Society of America American Society for Quality Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association American Society for Surgery of the Hand Industrial Supply Association 23
  26. 26. 2013 Economic Impact on Associations | Partial List of Participating Associations Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute Northwest Food Processors Association International Association of Movers Occupational Therapy Association of California International Foodservice Distributors Association Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public International Franchise Association Accountants Irrigation Association Practice Greenhealth Kappa Delta Pi Public Affairs Council Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Public Relations Society of America Innovation Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society Marketing Research Association Risk and Insurance Management Society, Inc. Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Selected Independent Funeral Homes Accountants Society for College and University Planning Michigan Library Association Society for Marketing Professional Services Minnesota Society of Certified Public Accountants Society for Neuroscience Missouri State Teachers Association Society of Manufacturing Engineers National Architectural Accrediting Board Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers National Association for College Admission Southern Association of Orthodontists Counseling Southern Medical Association National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers Special Libraries Association National Association of Independent Schools TESOL International Association National Association of Purchasing Card Professionals The Association of Pool and Spa Professionals National Federation of Humane Societies The Endocrine Society National Fluid Power Association The International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association National Foundation for Infectious Diseases The Morton Arboretum National Investor Relations Institute The National RV Dealers Association National Precast Concrete Association The New York Academy of Sciences National Ready Mixed Concrete Association United Nations Association of the USA New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants Utah Association of Certified Public Accountants North Carolina Association of Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants Certified Public Accountants Wisconsin Institute of Certified Public Accountants North Carolina Nurses Association 24
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