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  • Erste Folie jedes Vortrages
  • In order to compete in increasingly open and demanding (world, regional, local) markets, the application of knowledge is becoming increasingly important – in most cases more important than low-cost labour, abundant resources. Applying knowledge in products, services and processes allows companies to generate better quality products, higher productivity, and reaching new markets/customers. Thus, the crucial part about innovation is the commercial success on the market. It doesn ’ t matter whether the innovation introduced is something completely “ new to the world ” , or whether it is “ only ” an improvement of something existing, the imitation or adaptation of a novelty developed by someone else. Innovation as a result of competition in private sector: desire to generate innovation rents, „first mover advantage“, need for others to compete with ‘first mover’ rationale for government intervention  market failures: high costs and high risks for innovator, especially if of small or medium size, but benefits are not individually appropriable , information asymmetry, coordination failures also: weaknesses in the institutional set-up, lack of ties with private sector to foster applied research and joint learning
  • In order to compete in increasingly open and demanding (world, regional, local) markets, the application of knowledge is becoming increasingly important – in most cases more important than low-cost labour, abundant resources. Applying knowledge in products, services and processes allows companies to generate better quality products, higher productivity, and reaching new markets/customers. Thus, the crucial part about innovation is the commercial success on the market. It doesn ’ t matter whether the innovation introduced is something completely “ new to the world ” , or whether it is “ only ” an improvement of something existing, the imitation or adaptation of a novelty developed by someone else. Innovation as a result of competition in private sector: desire to generate innovation rents, „first mover advantage“, need for others to compete with ‘first mover’ rationale for government intervention  market failures: high costs and high risks for innovator, especially if of small or medium size, but benefits are not individually appropriable , information asymmetry, coordination failures also: weaknesses in the institutional set-up, lack of ties with private sector to foster applied research and joint learning
  • Innovation is not a linear process , which starts with a lonely researcher in a laboratory, and then automatically moves on to commercialisation at the market. Rather, innovation is a circular process , involving multiple interactions and feedback loops between different actors. These actors are companies, researchers, government, intermediaries. This is what we call the Innovation System . In our GIZ approach , we describe IS as consisting of 3 main elements : sub-systems, bridges and interactions, and the system environment.
  • all sub-systems are interrelated and interdependent through a supply- and demand-relationship . For example, even companies who have their own R&D departments and engage in applied research build on the basic research results of universities and research institutions. Similarly, companies depend on the education system to supply highly skilled human resources to them, while graduates at training institutions depend on companies who are demanding their individual skills. in order for this demand and supply to match , it is necessary to have very intense interaction, strong communication channels and intermediary institutions between the sub-systems: for example, private sector executives often sit on the boards of educational institutions and participate in the development of curricula
  • as we have seen, IS are very complex and demanding , there is a need for constant efforts by governments and all other players in the system to keep it functioning and constantly improve it  that ‘s what GIZ is trying to do together with our partners, by reinforcing the 4 sub-systems Promoting bridges Improving framework conditions
  • Letzte Folie jedes Vortrags

Transcript

  • 1. Africa Re:Load | Weimar 29./30. August 2011 Name, Vorname| E-Mail Adresse | Institution innovation collaboration entrepreneurship
  • 2. German Development Cooperation: innovation and green growth
    • Nguyen Van, Kim| BMZ
    • innovation
    Africa Re:Load | Weimar 29./30. August 2011 Name, Vorname| E-Mail Adresse | Institution
  • 3. Outline Involvement of BMZ in the international debate on Innovation and green growth 1 2 GIZ ‘s approach to Innovation System Development
  • 4.
    • G20 Development Working Group (Innovation Challenge)
    • UN Rio+20 Conference
    • Donor Committee on Enterprise Development
    • Events in cooperation with private sector on green growth (IBF)
    • Several studies on green growth issues
    1 Involvement of BMZ in the international debate on innovation and green growth
  • 5.
    • New factors of competitiveness : Access to and application of knowledge in processes, products, services
    • Innovation:
      • Commercially successful introduction or implementation of a technical, process or organizational novelty
      • includes product/ process improvement, adaptation, imitation
    • Innovation result of competition in private sector
    • – but: market and system failures affect innovation 
    • justifies state intervention: OECD countries!
    2 GIZ approach to Innovation System Development - Introduction
  • 6.
      • Innovation System (IS):
      • Interaction between public and private actors responsible for generating and applying knowledge and innovations, i.e. research, government, and enterprises
      • IS consists of
        • Sub-systems
        • Bridges and interactions
        • System Environment / Framework conditions
    GIZ approach to Innovation System Development - Introduction 10.09.11 2
  • 7. (1) Sub-systems Private Sector Public Sector
    • Research Capacity
    • Universities, R & D institutions, think tanks
    • Basic and applied research
    • Technological and innovative Performance
    • R & D within companies, creative firms
    • Applied process and product development
    • Human & Social Capital
    • Educational institutions, e.g. secondary, graduate or polytechnic schools
    • Academic & technical education and training
    • Absorptive Capacity
    • Firms, follower firms, users, customers
    • Markets for goods and services
    2
  • 8. (2) “Bridges” and Interactions Demand for new products and services Supply of inventions (products, services) Supply of human resources for R & D Supply of results and findings for education Supply of results and findings of research Demand for R & D
    • Research Capacity
    • Universities, R & D institutions, think tanks
    • Basic and applied research
    • Technological and innovative Performance
    • R & D within companies, creative firms
    • Applied process and product development
    Public Sector
    • Human & Social Capital
    • Educational institutions, e.g. secondary, graduate or polytechnic schools
    • Academic & technical education and training
    • Absorptive Capacity
    • Follower firms, users, customers
    • Markets for goods and services
    Private Sector Interaction, coordination, networks Supply of competent human resources Demand for education and knowledge 2
  • 9. Our Approach 2
    • Improving innovation-oriented private/ public service offers
    • Introduction of innovation management and skills in SMEs
    • Strengthening innovation networks
    • Support to the development of sector and cluster strategies
    • Advice on models of technology transfer
    • Advice on national innovation policies and coherence of instruments, market and institutional analysis and M&E-tools
    • Awareness raising on the importance of innovation
    Reinforcing the 4 sub-systems Promoting bridges between science - enterprises, esp. SMEs Improving framework conditions
  • 10. Africa Re:Load | Weimar 29./30. August 2011 Name, Vorname| E-Mail Adresse | Institution Workshop | Weimar, 29. bis 30. August 2011 Africa Re:Load | Discover new opportunities for innovation and business