• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

STATA Example Voter Turnout

on

  • 1,339 views

An example of how statistical analysis can help answer questions about voter turnout.

An example of how statistical analysis can help answer questions about voter turnout.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,339
Views on SlideShare
1,333
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0

2 Embeds 6

http://mcentellas.tumblr.com 5
http://safe.tumblr.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    STATA Example Voter Turnout STATA Example Voter Turnout Presentation Transcript

    • Miguel Centellas
      Croft Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science
      The University of Mississippi
      Voter Turnout in Europe & the Americas
    • Data from International IDEA
      Freely available on the web, along with background information.
    • Data from International IDEA
      Freely available on the web, along with background information.
    • Sample Selection: 51 Countries in Europe & the Americas
      Europe
      Albania • Austria • Belgium • Bulgaria • Czech Republic Denmark • Estonia • Finland • France • Germany Greece Hungary • Iceland • Ireland • Italy • Latvia • Lithuania Luxembourg • Malta • The Netherlands • Norway Poland • Portugal • Romania • Slovenia • Spain • Sweden Switzerland • United Kingdom
      The Americas
      Argentina • Bolivia • Brazil • Canada • Chile • Colombia Costa Rica • Dominican Republic • Ecuador • El Salvador  Guatemala • Honduras • Jamaica • Mexico • Nicaragua Panama • Peru • Suriname • United States • Uruguay  Venezuela
    • Sample Selection: 51 Countries in Europe & the Americas
      Established Democracies
      Austria • Belgium • Canada • Colombia • Costa Rica Denmark • Finland • France • Germany • Iceland Ireland • Italy • Luxembourg • Malta • The Netherlands Norway • Sweden Switzerland • United Kingdom
      United States • Venezuela
      New Democracies
      Albania • Argentina • Bolivia • Brazil • Bulgaria • Chile Czech Republic • Dominican Republic • Ecuador
      El Salvador • Estonia • Greece • Guatemala • Honduras Hungary • Jamaica • Latvia • Lithuania • Mexico Nicaragua • Panama • Peru • Poland • Portugal
      Romania • Slovenia • Spain • Suriname • Uruguay  
    • Voter Turnout in 51 Selected CountriesVote/VAP* in Legislative Elections, 2004-2008
      All data from International IDEA (http://idea.int/vt)
      VAP=Voting Age Population
    • How Can We Explain Differences in Voter Turnout?
      Hypothesis 1:Voter turnout is a function of electoral systems. Proportional representation should drive up voter turnout because voters are less likely to “waste” votes.
      Hypothesis 2:Voter turnout is a function of civil & political liberties. Citizens will exercise their right to vote if they enjoy a wide range of civil rights and political liberties.
      Hypothesis 3:Voter turnout is a function of voting laws. Where voting is compulsory, citizens are more likely to vote.
    • Voter Turnout in 51 Selected CountriesVote/VAP in Legislative Elections, 2004-2008Data from International IDEA (http://idea.int/vt)
    • Voter Turnout and Level of FreedomVote/VAP and Freedom House Index Scores
    • Voter Turnout and Level of FreedomVote/VAP and Freedom House Index Scores
    • Voter Turnout and Compulsory Voting
      Average = 62%
      (STDEV = 16.7%)
      Average = 69%
      (STDEV = 13.7%)
    • Regression Analysis Output in STATA
    • Regression Estimates for Voter Turnout
    • Regression Estimates for Voter Turnout
    • After Statistical Analysis:What Explains Differences in Voter Turnout?
      By itself, proportional representation does correlate with voter turnout. But in multivariate analysis, it has no statistically significant effect.
      By itself, a country’s Freedom House score does correlate with voter turnout. This variable also is consistently significant in multivariate models.
      By itself, compulsory voting has no affect on voter turnout. However, it does have a significant, positive effect on voter turnout in new democracies.
    • What Did We Learn?
      Voters are more likely to turn out to vote (controlling for other factors) when civil liberties and political rights are protected.