Seminar on Grant Writing

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Seminar on Grant Writing

  1. 1. Grant Writing<br />Dan Hager & Mike McDowell<br />
  2. 2. What is a grant?<br />In general, a grant is funding provided by a charitable-giving foundation, public charity, or a government agency to a nonprofit organization.<br />It is expected with this funding that the nonprofit organization will perform specified activities for the common good.<br />May also come from corporate giving programs or nonprofit intermediaries. <br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  3. 3. Who qualifies for grants?<br />Government Organizations<br />Education Organizations<br />Nonprofit Organizations<br />For-profit organizations (other than small business)<br />Small Businesses<br />Individuals<br />http://www.grants.gov/aboutgrants/eligibility.jsp<br />
  4. 4. Requests for Proposals (RFPs)<br />When a government issues a new contract or grant program, it sends out RFPs to agencies that it believes may be qualified to participate.<br />An RFP lists project specifications and application procedures.<br />While a few foundations occasionally use RFPs in specific fields, most prefer to consider proposals that are initiated by applicants.<br />http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-request-for-proposal-rfp.htm<br />
  5. 5. Requests for Proposals (RFPs)<br />RFPs change in structure from one situation to another.<br />Each proposal will require you to meet different goals and objectives depending on what grant you’re applying for.<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Request_for_proposal<br />
  6. 6. Reading and Analyzing RFPs<br />Key items to look for in an RFP before developing a proposal<br />Eligibility criteria <br />Project purpose<br />Deadline<br />Number of grants available<br />Funding limits<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  7. 7. Federal Register<br />Departments within the federal government determine priorities for domestic programs it wants to launch.<br />Departments then publish those programs in the federal register in anticipation of funding the annual budget.<br />Essentially a catalog of federal grants that organizations are able to apply for.<br />http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp<br />
  8. 8. State Grants<br />State Governments make funding available for certain projects they deem important to the growth of the community.<br />Depending on what the state sees as a need, they will provide funding towards certain interests.<br />Example: California<br />Energy Innovations<br /> Alcohol and Drug programs <br />Developmental Disabilities<br />Waste Management<br />http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp<br />
  9. 9. Before you write…<br />Gather information<br />Outline the grant proposal<br />Develop a schedule<br />Request letters of support<br />Write a first draft<br />Meet with a design team; review draft<br />Recruit an outside reader<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  10. 10. Before you write…<br />Complete the final edits<br />Complete all forms<br />Put the grant proposal packet together<br />Deliver the grant<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  11. 11. 5 Components of Every Grant Proposal<br />An abstract or executive summary<br />The statement of need or problem<br />The project description<br />An evaluation plan<br />A budget<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  12. 12. The Grantwriting Craft<br />Explain acronyms and terms<br />Use the active voice<br />First or third person?<br />Speak with Authority<br />Use “will” not “would”<br />Be politically correct<br />Check spelling, grammar, and punctuation<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  13. 13. While You Wait<br />Due Diligence is done by the grantmakers to investigate the applicant organizations qualifications to receive the grant.<br />Things they look for<br />Organizational stabilityand sustainability<br />Track record<br />Partners<br />Program<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  14. 14. While You Wait<br />Be prepared for site visits from foundation grant officers.<br />Preparation<br />Following Up<br />Reporting progress or setbacks<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  15. 15. You Got the Grant!<br />Media releases are not necessary for all grants received, but for some you want you want the community to be aware.<br />Create a press release to create a “buzz” within the community.<br />Be gracious<br />You got the grant, but…<br />Challenge grants<br />Progress Reports<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  16. 16. You Didn’t Receive the Grant<br />No limit to how many times an organization/person may apply for a grant.<br />It only takes one trustee to override the grant officer when denying a grant.<br />Request Notes<br />Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print. <br />
  17. 17. Activity<br />You have been awarded a grant of $20,000 for a new playscape, but must follow the grant guidelines to be awarded the money. Use the RFP provided to determine which companies have met the specified criteria. (Required items in design) <br />Community foundations (recreation departments) will usually send an RFP to all organizations who have done similar work for them in the past.<br />

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