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Seminar on Grant Writing
 

Seminar on Grant Writing

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    Seminar on Grant Writing Seminar on Grant Writing Presentation Transcript

    • Grant Writing
      Dan Hager & Mike McDowell
    • What is a grant?
      In general, a grant is funding provided by a charitable-giving foundation, public charity, or a government agency to a nonprofit organization.
      It is expected with this funding that the nonprofit organization will perform specified activities for the common good.
      May also come from corporate giving programs or nonprofit intermediaries.
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • Who qualifies for grants?
      Government Organizations
      Education Organizations
      Nonprofit Organizations
      For-profit organizations (other than small business)
      Small Businesses
      Individuals
      http://www.grants.gov/aboutgrants/eligibility.jsp
    • Requests for Proposals (RFPs)
      When a government issues a new contract or grant program, it sends out RFPs to agencies that it believes may be qualified to participate.
      An RFP lists project specifications and application procedures.
      While a few foundations occasionally use RFPs in specific fields, most prefer to consider proposals that are initiated by applicants.
      http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-request-for-proposal-rfp.htm
    • Requests for Proposals (RFPs)
      RFPs change in structure from one situation to another.
      Each proposal will require you to meet different goals and objectives depending on what grant you’re applying for.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Request_for_proposal
    • Reading and Analyzing RFPs
      Key items to look for in an RFP before developing a proposal
      Eligibility criteria
      Project purpose
      Deadline
      Number of grants available
      Funding limits
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • Federal Register
      Departments within the federal government determine priorities for domestic programs it wants to launch.
      Departments then publish those programs in the federal register in anticipation of funding the annual budget.
      Essentially a catalog of federal grants that organizations are able to apply for.
      http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp
    • State Grants
      State Governments make funding available for certain projects they deem important to the growth of the community.
      Depending on what the state sees as a need, they will provide funding towards certain interests.
      Example: California
      Energy Innovations
      Alcohol and Drug programs
      Developmental Disabilities
      Waste Management
      http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp
    • Before you write…
      Gather information
      Outline the grant proposal
      Develop a schedule
      Request letters of support
      Write a first draft
      Meet with a design team; review draft
      Recruit an outside reader
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • Before you write…
      Complete the final edits
      Complete all forms
      Put the grant proposal packet together
      Deliver the grant
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • 5 Components of Every Grant Proposal
      An abstract or executive summary
      The statement of need or problem
      The project description
      An evaluation plan
      A budget
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • The Grantwriting Craft
      Explain acronyms and terms
      Use the active voice
      First or third person?
      Speak with Authority
      Use “will” not “would”
      Be politically correct
      Check spelling, grammar, and punctuation
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • While You Wait
      Due Diligence is done by the grantmakers to investigate the applicant organizations qualifications to receive the grant.
      Things they look for
      Organizational stabilityand sustainability
      Track record
      Partners
      Program
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • While You Wait
      Be prepared for site visits from foundation grant officers.
      Preparation
      Following Up
      Reporting progress or setbacks
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • You Got the Grant!
      Media releases are not necessary for all grants received, but for some you want you want the community to be aware.
      Create a press release to create a “buzz” within the community.
      Be gracious
      You got the grant, but…
      Challenge grants
      Progress Reports
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • You Didn’t Receive the Grant
      No limit to how many times an organization/person may apply for a grant.
      It only takes one trustee to override the grant officer when denying a grant.
      Request Notes
      Smith, Nancy B., and E G. Works. The Complete Book of Grant Writing. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006. N. pag. Print.
    • Activity
      You have been awarded a grant of $20,000 for a new playscape, but must follow the grant guidelines to be awarded the money. Use the RFP provided to determine which companies have met the specified criteria. (Required items in design)
      Community foundations (recreation departments) will usually send an RFP to all organizations who have done similar work for them in the past.