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Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit, In Order to Set it Apart
 

Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit, In Order to Set it Apart

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Whether you are running a non-profit or for-profit enterprise, your organization’s brand is more than a name and a logo. Your brand is both your identity and the promise you make to your ...

Whether you are running a non-profit or for-profit enterprise, your organization’s brand is more than a name and a logo. Your brand is both your identity and the promise you make to your constituents and the public. As a result, it is also an important tool in your marketing arsenal.

The question many organizations have is “how can we use that tool to help us in our mission?”

Enter the team from McDougall & Duval – Dan Duval, Jeff Bard, Carie Schelfhaudt and Peter Hale. Their engaging and interactive presentation will help you understand how to define your brand and put it to work for your organization. From uncovering what your brand promise is, to cultivating a culture within your organization that reinforces it, and practical steps you can use to ensure it is working for you, this program will provide real-world insight to branding.

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  • Based on what you found in your brand exploration
  • RTN’s new logo was designed with purpose to visually represent the brand promise we make to each of our members, the seg groups we serve and the public. Every graphic element was precisely selected to symbolize some part of our organization. For example: While the primary color has transitioned to green (the color of money and finance), a square of “Raytheon red” anchors us to our organizational heritage; The icon is comprised of small squares, which represent our members and seg groups, coming together to create something of value: a diamond; The lower case typography reflects the friendly, casual, more modern financial institution that RTN Federal Credit Union is; The new tagline captures the continuity of the relationship we have with members: connecting with them through work (usually), helping them at home, and making their lives better.
  • RTN’s new logo was designed with purpose to visually represent the brand promise we make to each of our members, the seg groups we serve and the public. Every graphic element was precisely selected to symbolize some part of our organization. For example: While the primary color has transitioned to green (the color of money and finance), a square of “Raytheon red” anchors us to our organizational heritage; The icon is comprised of small squares, which represent our members and seg groups, coming together to create something of value: a diamond; The lower case typography reflects the friendly, casual, more modern financial institution that RTN Federal Credit Union is; The new tagline captures the continuity of the relationship we have with members: connecting with them through work (usually), helping them at home, and making their lives better.
  • Jeffrey Baker, President & CEO of Image 4, was extremely pleased:“We dealt Peter from a short deck, and he and his company turned it in to a winning hand. On a very tight deadline with not a lot of information, Peter created an excellent PR release, drove it deeply into our important markets, backed it up with data, guided us through the process, and did it all with a smile. He went over the top servicing us as a first-time relationship and has earned our business with his professionalism and support for our company. We have hired a number of PR "professionals" over the years, and none of them accomplished anywhere near what Peter and McDougall-Duvall did.”
  • We’re going to talk about two-way conversations and I’ll show you a case study of how we were able to identify target audiences for a non-profit experience
  • Think about what this could mean for a bad customer experience … or a good one.
  • We now know that creating personal relationships between brands an customers is what social media is all about. Think about your website and imagine that the CEO is extending their hand to shake hands with his/her target audience. That’s what social media does. Social media deepens the relationship between companies and their fans by keeping an open dialogue to talk to consumers how they want to be spoken to.1ST WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT HOW YOU PRESENT YOURSELF TO THE PUBLIC.You want your social media pages to be the best online representation of your brand that they can be. How would you dress at a chamber event? Would you be polished and in a suit and speak about serious issues with a tight-knit group of people… or, would you be in jeans and a polo with a lot of energy and lots to say? Define your brand’s voice with 5 main characteristics and use it to guide you in your two-way conversations online.
  • OK, so now you have your brand’s voice defined. Which social media channel best depicts your brand’s personality?THAT is the site that you should be on. Twitter – Do you have a lot to say?Facebook – Do you have great visuals?YouTube – Is your brand complicated and would be easier to show through videos or how-tos?Again, be on the network that will truly show the voice of your brandAnd, don’t forget to consider where your target audience will be most present.
  • But what that doesn’t mean is to spread yourself too thinAsk yourself - Do you realistically have the time to manage all of the social media sites that you want to be on?As Dan said in the last section, if you can’t be everywhere, you have to be different
  • Some companies figure that they have plenty of volunteers and interns to manage their online presence. While this is a true advantage, be aware of brand consistency when multiple usersAsk yourself - Is your message consistent, meaningful and on-strategy? And does it represent my brand?
  • What’s the best way to do this?In your social media plan, make it a point to identify staff roles and responsibilities (those that will post, respond, monitor and track feedback)Another way is to create approved content libraries and standard responses to common questionsWHY? TO MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BRAND’S VOICE IS CONSISTENT
  • Also, consider using a centralized or web-based social management platformArchive posts, likes, comments, tweets and re-tweet indefinitelyPre-schedule status updatesWHY? CENTRALIZED MANAGEMENT AND REPORTING
  • Now if done properly, social media will give you the top-of-mind awareness that you are striving for. It will X, Y, Z
  • NEXT WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT TWO-WAY CONVERSATIONS AND INTERACTING WITH THE PUBLIC.As a rule of thumb, only 20% of the content you post should be directly related to your fundraising efforts. The remaining 80% of your content should be about the community events, photos, or the industry in general, such as industry facts, related articles, statistics and newsworthy events/discussions.’Use phrases like, “like this status if….” or “Share your favorite tip with our community….” Also consider running contest. Many of the third-party platforms I mentioned also allow you to do that within Facebook’s rules/regulations.
  • When engaging the public in a two-way conversation, it’s imperative to construct a customized plan-of-action to maintain your favorable online presenceFlag activity by filtering keywords related to products, service offerings, events or inappropriate language
  • Are any of you not using social media because you are fearful of negative comments such as these?No? Great. You all know that you can quickly assess your audience-generated content to address any brand challenges or derogatory messages. Yes? If any of you were at a cocktail party and someone came up to you and started saying mean things about your non-profit, I’d bet that you have an arsenal of answers prepared to say in return. Though you may not bring out the heavy artillery, you may smile and look at it as an opportunity to change someone’s mind about you.Now, depending on your non-profit and your brand’s voice (whether you’re quietly making noise or have a more forceful message), think about this as your time to shine and an opportunity to enhance your brand. Also, other fans may come to your defense.
  • Again, social media is a place to embrace the ability to have a two-way dialogue. If negativity appears, use it as an opportunity to listen to your members and to showcase to the public how you can address common complaints. This will help to strengthen your voice and your brand online.
  • Another option for initiating two-way conversations online and showing your brand’s voice is to create a blog.If you belong to a larger non-profit, there may already be one created. Be sure to look into sharing blog posts from the national headquarters.If you’re part of a smaller non-profit, keep in mind that blogs can be a lot of work, so be sure to only start a blog if you know you have the time and willpower to manage the upkeep. You don’t want your brand to suffer because you don’t have the time to maintain it.
  • I was hired by the Partnership for a Tobacco-Free Maine to promote a new website geared towards teenagers.
  • The campaign, Unleash Your C, was centered around using “c” for “choice” as a strategy. Teenagers feel that they are old enough to make their own choices, and we wanted to encourage them to make the right choices.
  • The campaign was centered around a new destination website and we had to figure out a way to get people there.Now, if any of you have teenager, you know you need to tell them to do things at least 5 times before they’re done, right? In order to make this happen, we came up with a multi-pronged approach using new technology to reach the teens.
  • So here was the problem. We had to figure out a way to promote this new website without their parents knowing, without the community leaders knowing and without the schools knowing. First of all, Maine was under a tight budget crunch and we couldn’t appear to be too showy.Second, we know that teenagers will not do anything that their parents or teachers tell them is cool.Thirdly, we had to find these teenagers and speak to them how they want to be spoken too. So what we decided to do was get a group of young adults to go on the road (with training) to promote the website, while being the voice of inspiration to the youth. These brand ambassadors truly personified the brand’s image of being young, cool, edgy and owning their own choices.
  • While we were on the road, we initiated the conversationsBut what we found was that many of them are actually hanging out online.And instead of us reaching out them, the teenagers were the ones to initiate conversations in online communities
  • In the end, we found a new place to have conversations with teens.The moral of the story – Always carry your brand’s voice into all levels of communication, and look for new avenues to show your voice (whether it be social media or the next new thing)
  • Now that you’ve established your brand, let’s look at a few ways how you can promote it, as well as protect it.  That’s one of the keys that your PR strategy should focus on, by the way, as it relates to your social media strategy – taking steps to protect your brand. Carie’s last slide touches on that important point, and I promise I’ll get to it.
  • First, however, we should probably get to a hands-on, highly effective strategy that your organization, as a non-profit, can put into place.  We all heard Carie explain that because of the new search engine algorithms, the more interaction you page or profile has online, the higher your website will rank.
  • Just as you have been, or will be, taking steps to increase your traffic, for-profit businesses are doing the same thing. They are reacting to those changes as well, and they are trying desperately to come up with new ideas increase the number of “likes” on their Facebook page.  
  • The thing is, many community businesses are struggling to add new fans. Unless someone has an exceptional experience or has developed a fierce loyalty to a particular company, there is little enticement to publicly “like” a company. Our advice: Give them one.
  • Community businesses can gain a tremendous amount of visibility and help their own brand if they are seen as supporting local causes and community-focused organizations. That mean you have something to offer. If there is a business that your non-profit has a particularly good relationship with, talk to them about hosting a ‘like campaign.’
  • A ‘like campaign’ is very simple…for every new “like” they get during a set period of time – say a month – they’ll donate a dollar to your charity. To make sure they don’t over commit, they can cap the dollar amount with a specific maximum.  While the campaign is running, they can promote it in their regular advertising – giving them additional PR benefits – or they can extend their reach by you their reach by running FB ads that are target individuals by geography, or by interest. Ideally, their message encourages new “likes” to also like your organization’s FB page as well.  And while they might have capped the donation, there’s no reason that you shouldn’t do all you can to maximize that donation. Throughout the campaign, you should encourage all of your stakeholders to ‘like’ that business. How effective can these campaigns be?
  • As Dan mentioned, M&D has had a long-term relationship with The Salvation Army. When we were looking to expand our reach on Facebook, we ran a “like campaign” during the holiday season that named The Salvation Army as the beneficiary.In the course of one month, we added more than 2,700 likes to our FB page, exceeding the $2,500 maximum donation we had announced. The cost for the company is relatively low, they benefit from the PR value, your organization also gains valuable exposure and, as a bonus, you have the opportunity to generate a sizable donation.
  • I have one more observation to add: There’s no reason you can’t go to the well more than once with this idea. If I were the development director for a non-profit that was part of a successful “like campaign,” one of the first things I’d do is approach another community business and suggest a campaign for them as well.  After all, you’ll have the success of the prior campaign to help ‘sell’ the idea to the next business partner. And while I wouldn’t do these back-to-back…you’ll want to give some space between the campaigns so you don’t over-saturate...there’s no reason you couldn’t use this tactic on an annual or bi-annual basis.
  • The best option is to ensure the company you partner with is compatible with your organization’s mission. That way, the people who ‘like’ the company page or your page are more likely to have shared interests and therefore more likely to interact with you in the future. Their compatibility is also important in terms of protecting you brand value, something that, as I said at the start, is often overlooked when you’re at the crossroads of attracting donors and promoting your organization. What do I mean by ‘compatibility?’ Let’s have some fun for a second. 
  • Here we have a picture of a well known celebrity: The Cookie Monster. Cookie is highly recognizable for his role on Sesame Street, where he helps teach children about counting and learning their letters and even singing. We all know his hit single “C is for Cookie”, right? Most of all, he’s known for what? Eating cookies. Learning the alphabet. Counting. Singing. Eating cookies. Those are what Cookie Monster is known for. With that in mind, I want to throw up a few logos of some charities…and, as the Sesame Street song goes, “One of these things is not like the other
  •  “One of these things is not like the others, One of these things just doesn't belong, Can you tell which thing is not like the others By the time I finish my song?”I think it’s safe to say Cookie Monster could be the spokes-Muppet for either child literacy, or even childhood music education. Having him as the face for childhood obesity, however, isn’t exactly a good fit since all he eats are cookies.
  • Let me give you another example. The Situation from the cast of Jersey Shore might be appropriate “special guest” if you’re opening a nightclub. And, considering his physique, one could argue that he’d be okay for the President’s Physical Fitness Challenge.  Having him speak on behalf of MENSA might be a stretch…even if he is a published author.
  • Okay, maybe that’s a bit of a cheap shot, but I think you get the point. Organizations need a spokesperson with similar core brand value.The organizational brand needs to FIT AND WORK TOGETHER with the spokesperson or partner organziation’s brand.Companies put a lot of thought into who is – and is not – an appropriate match.  In the same way, if you align your non-profit with a business that is diametrically opposite of your mission, the money might be good, but you may erode your brand identity in the long-term.Here’s a real world example.
  • When I was working as Development Director at Seacoast Mental Health Center, one of the programs we ran was the New Heights Teen Center, an after-school program that provided a safe place for teens. Core to the mission were their anti drug & drink programs. Anyone here run a similar program? 
  • Smuttynose Brewing and the Portsmouth Brewery Pub.  The Brewery had a weekly fundraiser for local charities, called the Wooden Nickel program. Basically, for every pint of beer your ordered on a Tuesday night, you’d get a wooden nickel that you could then donate to one of a few promoted charities that month. The Brewery then donates money based on the ‘nickels’ collected by each charity.
  • A well-intentioned advisory board member suggested we submit New Heights to be the beneficiary. Let me tell you, that kicked off what I can only describe as a deep, sometimes heated, debate among the board members about whether the money was more important than protecting the perceived mission.  
  • At the end of the day, our board decided that – while the Wooden Nickels program is entirely appropriate for other non-profits in the area, it was not a good fit because it could have seriously negative consequences on the New Heights brand.
  • So…when picking a business partner to approach about a ‘like campaign’ make sure that you connect with a company that has similar brand values and whose fans can get behind your mission because they share those values. I want to assure you: Energizing those fans – and your own stakeholders – is the best way to promote your brand. Many of you know this intuitively, but let’s just talk quickly about how to reach the constituents you need to promote your brand to.First, I want you to remember there are basically three channels through which you can reach your audience:
  • Paid – Advertising, may not be in the budgetOwned – Many of the things we’ve talked about (FB, web, collateral, newsletter, etc.)Earned – that’s both things like the media AND the word of mouth that constituents share.
  • Public relations should be a part of all three channels, but since we have a limited amount of time, I want to focus on generating the Earned attention.  Earned attention means inspiring others – the “public” of Public Relations – to talk you up to others. That means reaching audiences that are internal and external to your organization. Externally, your stakeholders include community leaders, local government officials, the general public and potential donors.
  • When trying to reach those constituents, most people strictly think in terms of media placements.  I’m not going to review the basics of developing a media relationships, submitting photos or writing press releases…they are absolutely important to reinforce your brand, but if you’re not there already, we may have more serious issues to address and I’d urge you to grab me after the meeting. So let’s assume you’ve got the media relations component under control. What’s the best way to influence the external audiences?
  • BaconWait…wrong picture…
  • Kevin Bacon.Okay, not Kevin Bacon, the actor, but have we all heard about The Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon? The same applies to your organization. You need to get your internal audience to tell your story.  Like Kevin Bacon, they are connected to an increasingly larger network that reached deep into the external audience you are trying to reach.
  • Yes, Kevin, we know you know everyone….
  • Anyway, their network includes those ‘outsiders” you’re hoping to attract. They are the family, friends and neighbors of your staff, your volunteers, your board members and even your existing donors. Each of those groups will become your brand ambassadors wherever they go in the community. And while there may be some overlap between groups – say your staff and volunteers, or board members and donors – each of person within that group has their own unique network of connections.
  • So get them excited about your brand, the brand promise your organization makes, and the values that the organization stands for, they’ll share them with others.  And don’t forget to be creative and have fun while you’re doing it. Let me give you an example.
  • I’m on the organizing committee for the Portsmouth Maritime Folk Festival, which is an annual weekend of traditional folk music from the days of sail. We do a lot of sea shanties and others songs, and the weekend features free musical performances at different venues in and around Market Square. Just a few years ago, the festival was primarily held on Sunday, with just a couple of events on Saturday. When we decided to add a few other …
  • Roving band of local and visiting performers… Wander the streets, promote the events, hand out flyers… The Saturday expansion has been so successful that this past year we added yet another venue That simple act got committee members excited, performers, and provided exposure to the sponsors…
  • Most of all, it was fun. And that’s part of what your brand efforts should be focused on…creating an excitement about your brand so that your staff, volunteers and board members want to spread the word and get others excited about your group. Because here’s the bottom line about branding your organization from a PR perspective.... There needs to be consistency in your message and your values and how you present that to the public.
  • Only by repeatedly touching on those core values, and stating your brand promise, and presenting that to the public in everything you and your team does, can you reinforce the brand you’ve developed.

Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit, In Order to Set it Apart Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit, In Order to Set it Apart Presentation Transcript

  • Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit, In Order to Set it Apartmcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Meet the Team Dan Duval, CEO/Creative Director • 19 years of agency experience • Past employers include: Costmopolus, Crowley & Daily, McDougall Associates • Manages all concept development activities Jeff Bard, Strategic Planner • 25 years of advertising and direct marketing experience • Past employers include: Arnold Worldwide, Mullen, Direct Results Group • Manages all strategic planning procedures as called for: • Brand positioning plan • Target audience segmentation Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Meet the Team Peter Hale, Director of Public Relations • 17 years of communications experience, both as a reporter and public relations professional • Past employers include: Fidelity Investments, inc.com, Perseus Publishing, Adams Media • Manages all public relations planning, messaging and outreach Carie Schelfhaudt, Director of Social Media • Nearly a decade of social media experience • 6 years professional agency marketing experience • Active user since the inception of Facebook and Twitter • Past employers: Communicators International, CD&M Communications, and KG Partners • Leads all agency social media marketing efforts on behalf of clients, and manages the agency’s Facebook- preferred, third-party social media platform Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Overview Non-Profit Organization = Business • The Branding Process • Bringing Your Brand to Life • It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say • Reinforcing & Protecting the Brand Branding & Marketing Your Non-Profit mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • The Branding Processmcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Level of Communication The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Developing Your Brand Focus • Rational core message of what your brand represents • Emotional wrapping communicating the personality of your brand (the look and feel) • Is it unique, defensible, deliverable and consistent? • Is it meaningful to customers, employees, prospects and partners? The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Car Exercise The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Information Gathering Internal • Interview staff (including creative branding exercises) at appropriate and various levels • Interview members • Active • Inactive or lapsed • Review competitors External • Interview local leaders • Political • Business • Community The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Sample Questions 1. In a few sentences, how would you describe ABC organization? 2. What should be ABC’s short-term goals? Long-term goals? (new budget test) 3. SWOT analysis…what are ABC’s primary strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats? 4. What should ABC be known for? 5. Why is ABC’s work relevant? 6. How is ABC’s program distinctive? 7. Who is ABC’s target audience? Why should the target audience care about our organization? 8. Is the “low-hanging fruit” upgrading current members or acquiring new members? The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Sample Questions 9. What’s the biggest misconception people have about ABC? Biggest surprise? 10. What is the current market perception? What is the desired perception? 11. Rank your top 5 competitors. What 5 words come to mind when I say (name each competitor and our organization…what is your primary point of differentiation against this group? 12. Rank from 1-10 (1 the lowest and 10 the highest) your strengths in the following areas 13. (Compare #1 competitor from above) 14. Corporate personality test (celebrity spokesperson) • Now • Tomorrow 15. Last thoughts The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Suggested Brand Positioning The sum total of the thoughts, feelings, associations or expectations a consumer experiences when he or she is exposed to your name, trademarks, products, services, inte ractions, designs and symbols representing you. The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Suggested Brand Positioning A brand must • Be singular • Be donor-driven • Evoke a broad emotional response • Communicate a specific rational appeal A brand position answers: • Who is our target audience? • How is our program distinctive? • What do we want to be known for? • Why is our work relevant (why should our target audience care)? The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Suggested Brand Positioning Format • To (the target market), your non-profit is (known for) that (point of difference) and (relevance/care) • Desirable, Sustainable, Available, Supportable The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Making the Positioning Relevant The Branding Process mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Bringing Your Brand to Lifemcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Bring Your Brand to Life Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Logo: Starbucks Coffee Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Logo: Google Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Logo: Nike Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Logo: The Red Cross Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Logo: The Salvation Army Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Alive Brands • Singular • Evoke emotional response • Rational appeal Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Post-Brand Positioning Plan Define Branding Needs • Totally redefine • Message change • New way to fundraise Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Post-Brand Positioning Plan Totally Redefined Brand • Logo tired & stale • Evolve • Get younger! • Shake things up internally • Morale boost Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: RTN Federal Credit Union Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: RTN Federal Credit Union – Logo Redesign Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Pepsi Evolution Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Post-Brand Positioning Plan Changing the Message • Recognized logo • Brand equity • Need to maximize assets Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Logo: IC Federal Credit Union Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: “The Meaning” IC Federal Credit Union Case Study The “I” The “C” The Attributes mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: “The Meaning” TV Spot Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: “The Meaning Revisited” TV Spot Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: “The Meaning” Print Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: “The Meaning” Billboard Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: “The Meaning” Web Banner/Social Media “The Meaning” Web Banner Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Rewards of Branding ROI: 178 percent in one year • New loans: $3.5 million • New deposits: $1.7 million • Translate to donations Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Post-Brand Positioning Plan New way to fundraise • Organizational shift • Change the way you raise $ • Completely new idea Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • JC Penney Then Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • JC Penney Now Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Example: The Salvation Army, “The Army Behind the Army” Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • New Ideas Gift ranks • Lieutenant: $1,000 to $4,999 • Captain: $5,000 to $9,999 • Major: $10,000 to $24,999 • Lt. Colonel: $25,000 to $49,999 • Colonel: $50,000 to $99,999 • General: $100,000 and above Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • New Ideas Pay Off Results • Year one: $2 million (exceeded goal) • Year four: Over $5 million Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Just Do It Bringing Your Brand to Life Just do it! • Get people excited about your brand • Get people talking Bringing Your Brand to Life mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Saymcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Brand Ambassadors • A simple truth: Campaigning used to be about delivering messages • Now, it’s about creating personal relationships with brands • To today’s consumer, conversations are far more important than direct messages alone • In order to have these conversations, brand owners need to identify who in the target audience are the greatest influencers who generate the most online buzz • 57% of people talk to other people more online than in real life • In the world of search engine optimization (SEO), likes are considered the new links It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Brand Ambassadors It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Which social networking sites match your brand personality? It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Don’t spread yourself too thin It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Brand Consistency It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Staff Roles & Responsibilities It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Centralized Management Platform It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Top of Mind Awareness Everything you do right is online • Smart marketers use social media as a tool for top of mind awareness • If managed properly, social media should: • Be the voice of your brand • Establish you as a subject matter expert • Make you a resource for relevant newsworthy information • Allow you to generate leads • Be a facilitator for online donations and contribution campaigns It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Top of Mind Awareness It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Reputation Management It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
  • Reputation Management It’s Not What You Say, It’s What They Say mcdougall & duval advertising | Peoples United Bank
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