Gandhi

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A look at Gandhi and the influence he had on the world

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Gandhi

  1. 1. Gandhi’s Portrayal in the World Justin McCreary
  2. 2. Synopsis <ul><li>Throughout this presentation there will be a look back at Gandhi’s life. </li></ul><ul><li>Takes a look at Gandhi’s early years. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi’s transition in his early experiences with racial segregation. </li></ul><ul><li>His early nonviolent techniques that would later be used in India. </li></ul><ul><li>Looks at the aftermath of India’s freedom from Britain, Gandhi’s death, and the influence he had on the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi’s many portrayals in the media. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Mohandas Gandhi <ul><li>Mohandas Gandhi was born in the seaside town of Porbandar </li></ul><ul><li>Located in Northwestern India, north of Mubai (Bombay). </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi learned basic ideas of nonviolence from Hinduism, as well as Jainism. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Mohandas Gandhi (cont.) <ul><li>As Gandhi grew older, his family suggested he study law in London. </li></ul><ul><li>In the fall of 1888, Gandhi left for London at the age of 19. </li></ul><ul><li>His wife Kasturbai and son, Harilal, stayed with his parents. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Mohandas Gandhi (cont.) <ul><li>As Gandhi studied in London, he became familiar with the Bible of the Christian faith. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi was particularly fascinated by Jesus’ call to forgiveness and nonviolence. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Mohandas Gandhi (cont.) <ul><li>In London, Gandhi first read the Bhagavad-Gita, the wisdom of Hinduism. </li></ul><ul><li>From this he took its ideal of the active but selfless human being. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi obtained his law degree in 1891, then returned to India. </li></ul><ul><li>After returning he chose to accept an offer in South Africa. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Mohandas Gandhi (cont.) <ul><li>In South Africa where Gandhi experienced the inequalities of racial segregation and legal codes that favored Europeans. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi began to employ strikes and marches to make his goals heard. </li></ul><ul><li>He encouraged Indians to spin their own cloth and renounce British titles of nobility. </li></ul><ul><li>When Gandhi returned to India in 1915, Gandhi began dedicating his life towards helping India seek independence from Britain. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Gandhi and Nonviolence <ul><li>Gandhi was imprisoned repeatedly by the British. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi insisted that his followers continued to remain nonviolent. </li></ul><ul><li>For Gandhi, ahimsa (nonviolence) was a fundamental part of his teachings. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi believed that nonviolence gave a great moral power to its followers. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Gandhi and Nonviolence <ul><li>Gandhi named this power satyagraha (“reality force” or “holding onto truth”). </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi made use of every nonviolent technique imaginable. </li></ul><ul><li>These techniques included marches, hunger strikes, and demonstrations. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi argued that, “violence only begets further violence and brutalizes those who are violent, whereas nonviolence begets admiration, spiritual greatness, and ultimate freedom”(Molloy, 112). </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Salt March <ul><li>One of the most recognized of Gandhi’s nonviolent protests was the Salt March of 1930. </li></ul><ul><li>During this period of time all the salt that was eaten in India was taxed by the British. </li></ul><ul><li>The British made it illegal to possess any salt not purchased from their government. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi led a march to the ocean that lasted three weeks, and spanned over 250 miles. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi and his followers collected the natural salt left on the beach by waves. </li></ul><ul><li>Thus breaking the law. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Turning Point <ul><li>Upon learning of this event, seashore communities all throughout India began to do the same. </li></ul><ul><li>Thousands were imprisoned for this, including Gandhi. </li></ul><ul><li>This march became the turning point of the Indian independence movement. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Title <ul><li>The British government was weakened by both the Indian independence movement and World War II. </li></ul><ul><li>British forces finally agreed to leave India in 1947. </li></ul><ul><li>Realizing Gandhi’s greatness after his actions on the Great Salt March, the writer Rabindranath Tagore called him Mahatma (“great spirit”). </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually, this became Gandhi's title. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Mahatma Gandhi <ul><li>“ Gandhi believed so much in loving tolerance that he hoped it could keep a newly independent India free of religious battles”(Molloy, 112). </li></ul><ul><li>Unfortunately, fear and tension are quite common between religious faiths. </li></ul><ul><li>Muslim leaders feared oppression from the Hindu majority. </li></ul><ul><li>Worked to create the new separate Muslim state of Pakistan. </li></ul><ul><li>As a result of this, some Hindu militants wished for revenge. </li></ul><ul><li>In a fit of rage, one of the Hindu militants shot and killed Gandhi in 1948. </li></ul><ul><li>The last words of Mahatma Gandhi were Ram, Ram (“God”, “God”). </li></ul>
  14. 14. Gandhi’s End <ul><li>In a fit of rage, one of the Hindu militants shot and killed Gandhi in 1948. </li></ul><ul><li>The last words of Mahatma Gandhi were Ram, Ram (“God”, “God”). </li></ul>
  15. 15. Gandhi’s Example <ul><li>Even after death, Gandhi’s example was so powerful that is idea of satyagraha spread to other countries across the globe. </li></ul><ul><li>Gandhi's ideology later influenced Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1960s, during his help to protest racial segregation in the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>He “insisted that activists march peacefully and sit in restaurants quietly, without responding to threats or cruelty” (Molloy 113). </li></ul>
  16. 16. Gandhi’s Portrayal <ul><li>Mahatma Gandhi has been portrayed, both comically and seriously, in popular culture. </li></ul><ul><li>In the humorous cases it is either a comical portrayal of him, his habits, or reference to him. </li></ul><ul><li>In more serious cases, It is a portrayal that shows respect for Mahatma Gandhi. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Bruce Almighty <ul><li>God: “I wanted to explain things to you better, but you left so quickly that I never got the chance.” </li></ul><ul><li>Bruce: “That thing with the seven fingers kind of freaked me out.” </li></ul><ul><li>God: “(laughs) I did the same thing to Gandhi once, he didn’t eat for three weeks.” </li></ul>
  18. 18. The Simpsons: “Hungry, Hungry Homer” <ul><li>Lisa: “You could do what Gandhi did.” </li></ul><ul><li>Homer: “Lisa, I don’t see what fighting the British has to do with this.” </li></ul><ul><li>Lisa: “What?!? No! I mean you could go on a hunger strike.” </li></ul><ul><li>Homer: “Very well then, I’ll go on a hunger strike.” </li></ul>
  19. 19. Family Guy: “ Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story” <ul><li>Stewie: “You know who was brave? Gandhi!” </li></ul><ul><li>Cut to Gandhi on stage. Gandhi: “And the black people are always like ‘Hey Bitch!’ and the Indians, we do not call our women in such a way.” </li></ul><ul><li>Audience member: “Boo! You suck.” </li></ul>
  20. 20. Clone High <ul><li>In this show, one of the main characters is a clone of Mahatma Gandhi. </li></ul><ul><li>Unlike the real Gandhi, this character is nothing more than a party animal. </li></ul><ul><li>This character caused a great deal of controversy in the Indian community. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Gandhi <ul><li>Gandhi (1982) is a biographical film about Mohandas (&quot;Mahatma&quot;) Gandhi. </li></ul><ul><li>This is considered to be the most acclaimed tribute to Mahatma Gandhi’s life. </li></ul><ul><li>As far as most biographical films go, this one is fairly accurate in terms of Gandhi’s life and the Indian struggle for independence. </li></ul><ul><li>In AFI’s “100 Years…100 Heroes and Villains” Gandhi is ranked at #21 for Heroes. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Lage Raho Munna Bhai <ul><li>Lage Raho Munna Bhai (English: Carry on Munna Bhai ) is a 2006 Indian musical comedy film. </li></ul><ul><li>In this film, a Mumbai (Bombay) underworld don, named Munna Bhai begins to see the spirit of Mahatma Gandhi. </li></ul><ul><li>Through his interactions with the image of Gandhi, Munna Bhai begins to practice what he calls Gandhigiri . </li></ul><ul><li>Lage Raho Munna Bhai has had a strong cultural impact in India. </li></ul><ul><li>Popularized Gandhism. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Conclusion <ul><li>Gandhi greatly influenced the world in his lifetime. </li></ul><ul><li>He showed that one can fight their enemies without ever laying a finger on them. </li></ul><ul><li>His example influenced many recognized people over the years </li></ul><ul><li>One of the most recognized being Martin Luther King Jr. </li></ul><ul><li>Though many portrayals show respect towards him, some also choose to mock him. </li></ul><ul><li>One must never forget the message the Gandhi wanted all of his followers to take to heart, “An eye for and eye only makes the whole world blind.” </li></ul>
  24. 24. Questionnaire <ul><li>What was Gandhi’s title? </li></ul><ul><li>What nonviolent event is he most known for? </li></ul><ul><li>How did he die? </li></ul><ul><li>Who is recognized for following in Gandhi’s footsteps? </li></ul><ul><li>Name one of the media portrayals from this presentation. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Bibliography <ul><li>Molloy, Michael. Experiencing the World’s Religions Tradition, Challenge, and Change . New York: McGraw-Hill, 1999. pp. 111-113. </li></ul>

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