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Disabilities storyboard
 

Disabilities storyboard

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    Disabilities storyboard Disabilities storyboard Document Transcript

    • Multimedia Storyboard.............................................................................................project: Understanding Disabilities and Technologydate: 2/20/12.............................................................................................screen: _1_ of ___ screen description: Home Pagelinks: Links located in the navigation bar to the rest ofthe site.............................................................................................Page:background: #F7F7F7 audio: nonecolor schemes: Gray, Blue, and White video: nonetext attributes: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif stills: noneText in main body: Located in the attached pageText in the side bar: All of the quizzes for this sitewill be located in this bar, as well as possible contactinformation.............................................................................................
    • Text for main body of the Home Page:Hello and Welcome to the Understanding Disabilities and Technology, the site where we will help youbecome familiar with some of the disabilities affecting the population, as well as some of the techniquesthat allow one to make there documents and presentations more accessible. Information will also begiven on how to access tools built into Mac and Windows operating systems that can aid the disabled.Please keep in mind that this site only provides and introduction to these disabilities, and further may berequired in order to gain a full and complete understanding of these disabilities
    • Multimedia Storyboard.............................................................................................project: Understanding Disabilities and Technologydate: 2/20/12.............................................................................................screen: _2_ of ___ screen description: Cerebral Palsylinks: Links located in the navigation bar to the rest of Pagethe site;Link to the Cerebral Palsy Quiz on the side bar.............................................................................................Page:background: #F7F7F7 audio: nonecolor schemes: Gray, Blue, and White video: nonetext attributes: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif stills: image ofText in main body: Located in the attached page the brainText in the side bar: Cerebral Palsy Quiz: When you haveread the information on this page, select the followinglink to test what you have learned. If you score an 70% orhigher, you are beginning to understand the basics ofcerebral palsy. If you score less, it is recommended thatyou review the information on this page.............................................................................................
    • Text for main body of the Cerebral Palsy (CP) page: alt text: X-Ray of the brain<Header> What is Cerebral Palsy? </Header>Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a condition due to injury in parts of the brain that control ones ability to use themuscles in the body. Cerebral is defined as having to do with the brain, and Palsy means weakness, ordifficulty using muscles. This injury to the brain is not due to one cause, as it can be due to problemsboth before and after the birth. The range of Cerebral can range from mild to severe, with the moresevere cases often requiring a wheelchair or other form of equipment. Cerebral Palsy can also affectones ability to learn, affecting their sensory functions, and even their intellect.<Header>Forms of Cerebral Palsy </Header>There are form main types of Cerebral Palsy:1. Spastic CP: There is too much muscle tone or tightness in the body, the movements become stiff.2. Athetoid (Dyskinetic) CP: can affect the movements of the entire body, often causing slow,uncontrolled body movements and low muscle tone that can make it difficult to sit properly or walk3. Ataxic CP: Results in poor coordination, balance, and depth perception.4. Mixed CP: A combination of the symptoms from the previous forms of CP.Further Terms to describe the forms of CP include:- Diplegia: Only the legs are affected- Hemiplegia: This means half the body (such as the left arm and leg) is affected- Quadriplegia: Both arms and legs are affected, this can sometimes include facial muscles and torso<Header> Cerebral Palsy and Learning </Header> Cerebral Palsy can greatly ones ability to learn, and in a variety of ways. There are those affected bycerebral palsy that cannot use a keyboard or mouse, and sometimes they cannot both. Some are limitedwith the use or one hand, others may have difficulty even using a computer at all. There are tools andtherapy designed specifically to aid those with cerebral palsy, including physical and speech-language
    • therapy, and such tools as communication boards and special switches for those who cannot usecommon computer tools.Research for this page is provided from http://nichcy.org/disability/specific/cp/
    • Multimedia Storyboard.............................................................................................project: Understanding Disabilities and Technologydate: 2/20/12.............................................................................................screen: _3_ of ___ screen description: Visuallinks: Links located in the navigation bar to the rest of the Impairmentssite; PageLink to the Visual Impairment Quiz on the side bar.............................................................................................Page:background: #F7F7F7 audio: nonecolor schemes: Gray, Blue, and White video: nonetext attributes: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif stills:Text in main body: Located in the attached pageText in the side bar: Visual Impairment Quiz: When you haveread the information on this page, select the following linkto test what you have learned. If you score an 70% or higher,you are beginning to understand the basics of visualimpairments. If you score less, it is recommended that youreview the information on this page............................................................................................
    • Text for the main body of the visual impairments page:<Header>What is Visual Impairment </Header>Visual Impairment can refer to those with various visual disabilities which can include those who arepartailly sighted, low vision, legally blind, and totally blind.-Partially sighted: Indicates some type of visual impairment has resulted in a special need for theindividual- Low Vision : refers to a severe visual impairment, and at times is not limited to distance vision. Thisapplies to invdividuals who are unable to read at a normal viewing distance. They will use a combinationof vision and other senses in order to learn.- Legally Blind: An individual who has less than 20/200 vision or a very limited field of vision-Totally Blind: An individual who has no form of vision, and learns by braille or other non-visual media<Header> More on Low Vision </Header>Low vision can take many forms, and they each affect ones ability to read in a different way.-Macular Degeneration: The macula is near the center of the retina, the area in the back of the eye. Thepersons central are of sigh is affected, making it difficult to see objects that the person is looking atdirectly. Text can appear broken and unclear.- Glaucoma: Caused by an increase in presssure inside the eye, which will cause damage to the opticnerve. This results in the opposite effect of macular degeneration: the loss of peripheral vision and ablurry central area of vision. Text can appear both faded and blurry.-Diabetic Retinopathy: One of the effects of long-term diabetes can be the leaking of retinal bloodvessels, which can cause dark patches in the field of vision where the leaks occur. Text can appearblurred or distorted in these regions.-Cataract: Those with cataract have areas of opacity in the lens of the eyes which will result in a blurredor hazy effect, often in bright light. Text can appear to fade in the background of the page.<Header>Aiding those with Visual Impairments</Header>There are various tools that can aid those with visual impairments, and they often include screenreaders and screen magnifiers. This is why is encouraged to use true text as much as possible on theweb, as text in graphics will become blurry when enlarged.Research for this page is provided from:http://nichcy.org/disability/specific/visualimpairment/http://webaim.org/articles/visual
    • Multimedia Storyboard.............................................................................................project: Understanding Disabilities and Technologydate: 2/20/12.............................................................................................screen: _4_ of ___ screen description: Accessible Information Pagelinks: Links located in the navigation bar to the restof the site;Link to the Accessible Information Quiz on the sidebar.............................................................................................Page:background: #F7F7F7 audio: nonecolor schemes: Gray, Blue, and White video: Video demonstrations of sometext attributes: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif of the options in Word and PowerPointText in main body: Located in the attached page stills: Screenshots fromText in the side bar: Accessible Information Quiz: Microsoft Word andWhen you have read the information on this page,select the following link to test what you have PowerPointlearned. If you score an 70% or higher, you arebeginning to understand the information on accessibleinformation. If you score less, it is recommended thatyou review the information on this page
    • Text for the main body of the accessible information page:Microsoft Word and PowerPoint are two very popular tools that many students and teachers use toconvey information. The following is a few tips for making Word and PowerPoint documents moreaccessible to those with disabilities.<Header> Making Word More Accessible </Header><H2>Headings </H2>Headings, though simple in appearance, is important when considering accessibility in Word Documents.Headings allow screen readers to navigate through the page easily and helps make the page moreusable. It is not enough to simply change the font or using bold. The option for changing the headingdepends upon the version of word being used.<H3> Word 2000-2003 </H3>The drop-down styles list allows you to create true headings<H3> Word 2007-2010</H3>A portion of the default toolbar in this version of Word is devoted to styles. To change a block of text,select the text and click on the appropriate style.<H3> Word for Mac</H3>
    • Styles on Word for Mac are available in the Formatting palette. The Styles dropdown list is similar to thelist found in Word 2000-2003 for Windows.<H2>Alternative Text </H2>Images in Word can also be given appropriate alternative text, and not only can this alternative text beread by screen readers, it should remain intact if the document is exported as an HTML or PDF.<H3> Word 2000-2003 </H3>To provide alternative text, Right-click on the image, then select Format Picture....A dialog box will appear. Select the Web tab and then add the appropriate alternative text.<H3> Word 2007 </H3>To add alternative text, right-click on the picture and select Size....
    • A dialog box will appear. Select the Alt Text tab. You will notice that the image filename is entered intothe field by default. Replace the filename with appropriate alternative text.VideoVideo of how to add alt text to Word 2007<H3> Word 2007-2010</H3>Word 2010 moved the alt text field back to an intuitive place, but made things even more confusing bycreating two fields for alt text. To add alt text to an image, Select the Format Picture... option.
    • With the Format Picture menu open, select the option for Alt Text in the sidebar. Two fields will appear,one labeled Title and one labeled Description. For best results, add appropriate alt text to theDescription field, not the Title field.<Header> Making PowerPoint More Accessible </Header><H2>PowerPoint for Mac </H2>It should be noted that PowerPoint for Mac has accessibility limitations, such as being unable to addalternative text. Becuase of this, the information provided here can aid those who use Office for Mac.<H2> Slide Layouts </H2>Since 2000 Microsoft PowerPoint provides a number of accessible slide layouts. These layouts areencouraged to be used because they ensure that the PowerPoint slides have correct headings, lists, andreading order. The use of proper slide layouts is a simple way to make PowerPoint presentations moreaccessible.<H3>PowerPoint 2000-2003 </H3>Select Format > Slide Layout... or use the Slide Layout sidebar.
    • <H3>PowerPoint 2007-2010 </H3>Select Home > New Slide, or select the New Slide button, and a menu of slide types will appear.VideoVideo to show how to access and the various options of PowerPoint 2007 in terms of slide layouts<H2>Alternative Text </H2>Images can be given alternative text in PowerPoint, and like Word, this alt text can be read byscreenreaders in a PowerPoint file, and remain intact when exported to HTML or PDF formats.<H3>PowerPoint 2000-2003 </H3>
    • To provide alternative text, right click on the image, then select Format Picture....A dialog box will appear. Select the Web tab and then add the appropriate alternative text.<H3>PowerPoint 2007</H3>]A dialog box will appear. Select the Alt Text tab. You will notice that the image filename is entered intothe field by default. Replace the filename with appropriate alternative text.VideoVideo of how to add alt text to PowerPoint 2007
    • <H3> PowerPoint 2010 </H3>To add alternative text to an image, select Format Picture...With the Format Picture menu open, select the option for Alt Text in the sidebar. Two fields will appear,one labeled Title and one labeled Description. For best results, add appropriate alternative text to theDescription field, not the Title field.Research for this page is provided from:http://webaim.org/techniques/word/http://webaim.org/techniques/powerpoint/
    • Multimedia Storyboard.............................................................................................project: Understanding Disabilities and Technologydate: 2/20/12.............................................................................................screen: _5_ of ___ screen description: Accessibility Tools Pagelinks: Links located in the navigation bar to therest of the siteLink to the assessment.............................................................................................Page:background: #F7F7F7 audio: nonecolor schemes: Gray, Blue, and White video: video demonstrations of sometext attributes: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif of the toolsText in main body: Located in the attached page stills: images to showText in the side bar: Accessibility tools how to access the tools/whatassessment: The users will experience some of the the tools look liketools being described, and fill out assesstmentdescribing their experiences.............................................................................................
    • Main Body Text for Accessibility Tools:<Header> Accessibility Tools </Header>There are a great deal of tools being created in the world that can provide accessibility on computers forthe disabled. While some of these tools can be expensive, there are a number of free tools madeavalilable on either Windows or Mac operating systems that can provide aid to those with disabilities.Some of these tools will be explain on this page.<H2>Windows Operating System </H2><H3>Ease of Access Center </H3>The Ease of Access Center is a central location that you can use to set up the accessibility settings andprograms available in Windows. In the Ease of Access Center, youll find quick access for setting up theaccessibility settings and programs included in Windows.Open Ease of Access Center by clicking the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Ease of Access,and then clicking Ease of Access Center.VideoVideo of how to access Ease of Access, and what options it provides.<H3>Narrator and Audio Description</H3>Narrator is a basic screen reader made available with Windows. It reads aloud text on the screen andevents such as the appearance for error messages. There are two ways to access Narrator:
    • 1. Click the Start button, type "Narrator" in the search box, then select Narrator from the list of results.2. Click the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Ease of Access, clicking Ease of Access Center,and then clicking Use the computer without a display. Then select the option Turn on NarratorAudio Description is another useful tool that describes what is happening in videos.To access: Click the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Ease of Access, clicking Ease of AccessCenter, and then clicking Use the computer without a display. Then select the option Turn on AudioDescription.VideoVideo of how to access and turn on Narrator and Audio Description and what happens when they areactivated<H3>Maginfier </H3>This tools made available in Windows magnifies the screen or a portion of the screen to make text,images, and objects easier to read.To access:Click the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Ease of Access, clicking Ease of Access Center, andthen clicking Make the computer easier to see. Then select the option Turn on Magnifier.<H3>On-Screen Keyboard</H3>This tool displays a visual keyboard with all of the standard keys. Unlike a regular keyboard, one can usethe on-screen keyboard and select keys using the mouse or another form of pointing device.To access:Click the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Ease of Access, clicking Ease of Access Center, andthen clicking Use the computer without a mouse or keyboard. Then select the option use the on-screenkeyboardVideoVideo of how to access and turn on the On-Screen Keyboard and what happens when it is activated<H3>Speech Recognition</H3>This tool that allows one to interact with ones computer with just their voice while still being able touse the computer successfully.To access:Click the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Ease of Access, clicking Ease of Access Center, andthen clicking Use the computer without a mouse or keyboard. Then select the option use SpeechRecognitionVideoVideo of how to access and turn on the Speech Recognition and what happens when it is activated<H2>Mac OS X Operating System </H2><H3>Voiceover</H3>
    • A tool built into the Mac OS X Operating System that is more than a text-to-speech tool. The tools usesspeech to describe what is happening on the computer, and it allows one to control the computerwithout using the screen.To access:Go to the Apple Menu, choose System Preferences, click universal access to display its preferences, clickthe seeing tab, then select the On radio button below VoiceOver to enable it, click the Open VoiceOverUtility button to customize VoiceOver.<H3>Screen Magnification and Cursor Magnification</H3>Zoom is a built-in, full-screen magnifier that can magnify the items on the screen up to 40 times.The cursor on a Mac can also be magnified so it becomes easier to see and follow when one uses amouse. The cursor will remain scaled to the preferred size and this scaling remainz in effect until onechanges it.<H3>Onscreen Keyboard </H3>The Onscreen Keyboard built into the Mac Operating System, called Keyboard Viewer, allows one to useenter text by using a mouse or other form or pointer. The Keyboard Viewer floats above otherapplications (so you can’t misplace it) and can be resized to fit your screen. Though you “type” with amouse or other pointing device, it otherwise works just like a physical keyboard.You’ll find this onscreen keyboard in the Language & Text pane of System Preferences.<H3>Speech Recognition </H3>Speakable Items, built into OS X and located in the Speech pane of System Preferences, lets you controlthe computer using your voice instead of the keyboard.<Header> Accessibility tools found online </Header>Though most of this page is devoted to tools that can be found on the operating system, here are a fewtools.<H2> Text Aloud </H2>Text Aloud is Text to Speech software that converts your text from MS Word Documents, Emails, WebPages and PDF Files into natural-sounding speech. Users can listen on their PC or create audio files foruse on portable devices such as IPods. A free trial of this software can be found at:http://www.nextup.com/TextAloud/Video: Video on Text aloud (previously recorded with Camtasia, which I no longer have access to)http://www.screencast.com/t/2cLEYrIU<H2>Text2Speech.org </H2>Text to Speech software that is free online and allows a user to convert a document into an MP3 file.There is no downloading for this, and can be found at: http://www.text2speech.org/Research for this page is provided from:http://www.microsoft.com/enable/products/windows7/default.aspx
    • http://www.apple.com/accessibility/macosx/vision.htmlhttp://www.nextup.com/TextAloud/http://www.text2speech.org/
    • Multimedia Storyboard.............................................................................................project: Understanding Disabilities and Technologydate: 2/20/12.............................................................................................screen: _6_ of ___ screen description: Resources & Contact Pagelinks: Links located in the navigation bar to therest of the site.............................................................................................Page:background: #F7F7F7 audio: nonecolor schemes: Gray, Blue, and White video: nonetext attributes: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif stills: noneText in main body: Located in the attached pageText in the side bar: Contact information: Tocontact me myname@email.com.............................................................................................
    • Text for main body of Resources page:For more information on what has been described on the pages of this site, you can view theinformation found on the following links:Alt Text. Retrieved from webaim.org/techniques/alttext/Cerebral Palsy. Retrieved from nichcy.org/disability/specific/cp/Links and Hypertext. Retrieved from webaim.org/techniques/hypertext/#overviewMac Accessibility. Retrieved from www.apple.com/accessibility/macosx/vision.htmlUsing Headings. Retrieved from webaim.org/techniques/semanticstructure/#contentstructureVisual Disabilities. Retrieved from webaim.org/articles/visual/Visual Impairment. Retrieved from nichcy.org/Disabilities/Specific/Pages/VisualImpairment.aspxWebAim. Retrieved from www.webaim.orgWindows 7 Accessibility Retrieved fromwww.microsoft.com/enable/products/windows7/default.aspx