Corporate Social     Responsibility:     its importance for industry     and education     David Willey     Deputy Vice-Ch...
Corporate Social Responsibility• Term used interchangeably with corporate  responsibility, corporate citizenship and “trip...
Definition“A concept whereby companiesintegrate social and environmentalconcerns in their businessoperations and in their ...
2nd definition“A commitment to improvecommunity well-being throughdiscretionary business practices andcontributions of cor...
“While there is no universal definition ofcorporate social responsibility, it generallyrefers to transparent business prac...
Four prevailing drivers• Moral obligation• Sustainability  • „meeting the needs of the present without    compromising fut...
Triple Bottom Line• People• Planet• Profit      www.bournemouth.ac.uk   7
People• Fair and beneficial business practices  towards labour, community, region in  which a corporation conducts its  bu...
Planet• Sustainable environmental practices• Careful management of its consumption of  energy and non-renewables• Reductio...
Profit• Not limited to the internal profit made  by a company or organisation• It is the economic benefit enjoyed by  the ...
CSR: the business benefits•   Employee recruitment and retention•   Employee motivation and productivity•   Enables compli...
Other Issues• Globalisation• Governmental and inter-governmental interventions• Consumer and investor activism• Serious an...
Bournemouth University• „A socially responsible organisation‟• „Inspiring our students, graduates and  staff to enrich the...
Sustainable Development at BUSustainable Development (SD)is about ensuring a better qualityof life for everyone, now and f...
Environmental Management• EcoCampus Gold Award May 2011• Green League 2011 – Ranked 5th in UK• Rated excellent for Environ...
The University as a „Global Citizen‟                                         BU as a Business                             ...
CSR: the educational benefitsAll the business benefits plus…..• Student recruitment• Students and graduates as global   ci...
Final thought“Not everything that can be countedcounts, and not everything thatcounts can be counted.”                    ...
Questions and Comments?www.bournemouth.ac.uk       19
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

India csr ppt by mr.david willey

1,236
-1

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,236
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
46
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

India csr ppt by mr.david willey

  1. 1. Corporate Social Responsibility: its importance for industry and education David Willey Deputy Vice-Chancellor Bournemouth Universitywww.bournemouth.ac.uk
  2. 2. Corporate Social Responsibility• Term used interchangeably with corporate responsibility, corporate citizenship and “triple bottom line”• Covers the relationship between corporations and societies with which they interact• Going beyond economic & legal concerns• Often involves trade-offs between competing issues, particularly profit to address broader stakeholder and global concerns• Increasingly important, yet term remains unclear www.bournemouth.ac.uk 2
  3. 3. Definition“A concept whereby companiesintegrate social and environmentalconcerns in their businessoperations and in their interactionwith their stakeholders on avoluntary basis” The European Union, 2002 www.bournemouth.ac.uk 3
  4. 4. 2nd definition“A commitment to improvecommunity well-being throughdiscretionary business practices andcontributions of corporate resources” Kotler and Lee (2005) Corporate Social Responsibility, New Jersey, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. NY, USA www.bournemouth.ac.uk 4
  5. 5. “While there is no universal definition ofcorporate social responsibility, it generallyrefers to transparent business practices thatare based on ethical values, compliance withlegal requirements, and respect for people,communities, and the environment” Sir Geoffrey Chandler, Defining Corporate Social Responsibility, 2001 www.bournemouth.ac.uk 5
  6. 6. Four prevailing drivers• Moral obligation• Sustainability • „meeting the needs of the present without compromising future generations‟• Licence to operate • Compliance and building goodwill to acquiescence of government and stakeholders• Reputation • enhancing brand www.bournemouth.ac.uk 6
  7. 7. Triple Bottom Line• People• Planet• Profit www.bournemouth.ac.uk 7
  8. 8. People• Fair and beneficial business practices towards labour, community, region in which a corporation conducts its business• Would not knowingly use child labour• Fair salaries to its workers• Safe working environment• Good working conditions for employees• Contribute to its community, for example through health care or education www.bournemouth.ac.uk 8
  9. 9. Planet• Sustainable environmental practices• Careful management of its consumption of energy and non-renewables• Reduction in manufacturing waste• Treatment of toxic chemicals in a safe and legal manner• Life cycle assessment of products (from raw materials to disposal by the end user)  Determine the true environmental cost www.bournemouth.ac.uk 9
  10. 10. Profit• Not limited to the internal profit made by a company or organisation• It is the economic benefit enjoyed by the host society• It is the lasting economic impact the organisation has on its economic environment www.bournemouth.ac.uk 10
  11. 11. CSR: the business benefits• Employee recruitment and retention• Employee motivation and productivity• Enables compliance with regulatory requirements• Supportive community partners and local government• Understanding of wider impact of business enables innovation and new product/services development• Enhances competitive advantage, reduces risk from reputational damage www.bournemouth.ac.uk 11
  12. 12. Other Issues• Globalisation• Governmental and inter-governmental interventions• Consumer and investor activism• Serious and high-profile breaches of corporate ethics• Citizens in many countries are making it clear that corporations should meet standards of social and environmental care• Increasing awareness of limits of government legislative and regulatory initiatives• Risk of business disruption, and damage to brand and company reputation www.bournemouth.ac.uk 12
  13. 13. Bournemouth University• „A socially responsible organisation‟• „Inspiring our students, graduates and staff to enrich the world‟• Educating students as global citizens who understand Sustainable Development• Engaging with community partners for sustainable development and green economy www.bournemouth.ac.uk 13
  14. 14. Sustainable Development at BUSustainable Development (SD)is about ensuring a better qualityof life for everyone, now and forgenerations to come www.bournemouth.ac.uk 14
  15. 15. Environmental Management• EcoCampus Gold Award May 2011• Green League 2011 – Ranked 5th in UK• Rated excellent for Environmental Policy, Auditing, Staff & Student Engagement• Performance Improvements e.g., water consumption cut by 22% in 5 years; recycling rate up to 43%• Challenging target to reduce CO2 emissions by 30% from 2005/6 levels by 2015/16 www.bournemouth.ac.uk 15
  16. 16. The University as a „Global Citizen‟ BU as a Business Ensuring that global perspectives (and sustainable development) inform the planning processCurricula and Pedagogy Extra/co-curricular activities Ensuring that all learners Ensuring that the learningdevelop knowledge & skills environment and opportunities for GP and SD in an reinforce the Global and SD international curriculum Global agenda. Perspectives Research Community Ensuring that research Ensuring a vibrant international contributes to the development community & providing of sustainable development and leadership at the local, national collaboration on global issues and international level www.bournemouth.ac.uk 16
  17. 17. CSR: the educational benefitsAll the business benefits plus…..• Student recruitment• Students and graduates as global citizens• Supportive community partners• Enhances competitive advantage, reduces risk from reputational damage www.bournemouth.ac.uk 17
  18. 18. Final thought“Not everything that can be countedcounts, and not everything thatcounts can be counted.” Albert Einstein www.bournemouth.ac.uk 18
  19. 19. Questions and Comments?www.bournemouth.ac.uk 19

×