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The Politics of War
 

The Politics of War

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VERY Brief presentation about the Emancipation Proclamation and British position. Includes Common Core Practice. For use with the Americans section 11.2.

VERY Brief presentation about the Emancipation Proclamation and British position. Includes Common Core Practice. For use with the Americans section 11.2.

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    The Politics of War The Politics of War Presentation Transcript

    • Section 11.2
    •  decided to stay neutral in the war as it had reserves of cotton and could now also buy it from India and Egypt; also buying wheat and corn from the North  the Confederate South tried to get Britain to fight on their side; they sent Slidell and James Mason to talk to Britain and France; they traveled on board the British ship Trent and the US ship San Jacinto stopped the ship and arrested them  Britain threatened war and Lincoln had the prisoners freed which made Britain and the North happy as neither wanted war with the other
    •  Lincoln did not like slavery but his main concern was keeping the Union and he did not feel he could legally end slavery  He found a way around it by saying slave labor built fortifications and grew food for the Confederacy  he had ordered the Union army to seize Confederate supplies which meant he could emancipate slaves  Because abolitionist views were so prominent in Britain he felt emancipation would discourage Britain from joining the Confederacy
    •  Slavery had become a weapon of war  January 1, 1863 the Emancipation Proclamation was issued  it only applied to slaves behind Confederate lines  did not apply to territories occupied by Union troops or to slaves in states that had not seceded
    •  Reaction to proclamation:  had much symbolic importance but nothing really     beyond that free blacks liked the portion of the proclamation that allowed them to enlist Democrats in the North thought it would antagonize the South not all Union soldiers liked it but followed it if they thought it would end the war/unify the nation Confederates were outraged and knew they could only preserve slavery if they won the war and encouraged a fight to the death attitude
    • Common Core Practice 1) These two drawings reflect a) the Union viewpoint of the Emancipation Proclamation. b) the Confederate viewpoint of the Emancipation Proclamation. c) c) contrasting viewpoints of the Emancipation Proclamation. d) the European viewpoint of the Emancipation Proclamation
    • Common Core Practice 2) In the drawing at the top, the artist shows Lincoln holding the Constitution and the Bible. Which best describes the artist’s point of view? a) He supports the Emancipation Proclamation b) He believes the Emancipation Proclamation is unconstitutional c) He does not think slavery is a moral issue d) He thinks Lincoln just made up the Emancipation Proclamation so he could win more battles
    • Common Core Practice 3) In the bottom drawing, the artist shows Lincoln stepping on the Constitution and using ink from a pot held by the devil. Which statement best describes the artist’s point of view on the Emancipation Proclamation? a) He disagrees with it. b) He believes it is unconstitutional. c) He believes it is evil. d) All of the above.
    • Common Core Practice 4) The drawing on the top would reflect the viewpoint of a) Confederate soldiers. b) slaves. c) Southern politicians. d) None of the above