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World Lit II - Class Notes for January 10, 2012
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World Lit II - Class Notes for January 10, 2012

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  • 1. World Literature II Renaissance to the Present Dr. Michael Broder University of South Carolina January 10, 2012
  • 2. Daily Write
    • What do you already know about world literature from the Renaissance to the present, and what would you like to know?
  • 3. Course Description
    • European masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present.
  • 4. Why study world literature?
    • Pleasure/enjoyable
    • Knowledge/interesting/useful
      • History
      • Society
      • Culture
    • Remember: learning is not only cognitive but also affective
      • Cognitive learning = knowledge, intellectual skills
      • Affective learning = feelings and attitudes
  • 5. Course Objectives
    • By the end of this course, students should be able to
      • Identify major authors and texts from the Renaissance to the present
      • Explain how literary texts relate to their social, cultural, and historical contexts
      • Apply factual and conceptual knowledge to the analysis of literary texts
      • Assess how knowledge of European literature is valuable in your own life
  • 6. Methods of Assessment
    • Your achievement of course objectives will be assessed in the following ways
      • Daily Writes 20%
      • Midterm exam 20%
      • Final exam 20%
      • Papers (2) 40%
  • 7. Words: World
    • Of course, the world includes more than the continent of Europe
    • For whatever reason, the topic of this course is defined as “European masterpieces”
    • We will therefore read major works of European literature, but be aware that “Europe” ≠ “the world”
  • 8. Words: Literature
    • Latin litteratura , writing, grammar, learning
    • Latin litteratus , learned, educated, scholarly
    • Latin litterae , a letter, written texts in general
  • 9. Words: Renaissance
    • Cultural movement in Europe from about 1300 to about 1700
    • Began first in Italy and later spread to the rest of Europe
    • From the Italian word Rinascimento , “rebirth”
    • Rebirth of “classical learning,” meaning knowledge of Latin and Greek and the history and culture of Greco-Roman civilization
  • 10. Authors and Texts
    • Giovanni Boccaccio (Italian, 1313-1375), The Decameron
    • François Rabelais (French, 1494-1553), Gargantua and Pantagruel
    • William Shakespeare (British, 1564-1616), Othello
    • Molière (French, 1622-1673), Tartuffe
    • Denis Diderot (French, 1713-1784), Jacques The Fatalist
    • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (German, 1749-1832), The Sorrows Of Young Werther
    • Fyodor Dostoevsky (Russian, 1821-1881), Notes From Underground
    • Virginia Woolf (British, 1882-1941, Mrs. Dalloway
    • Wis ł awa Szymborska (Polish, b. 1923), Miracle Fair
    • Tomas Tranströmer (Swedish, b. 1931), Half-finished Heaven
  • 11. For Next Class
    • Boccaccio, Decameron
      • Author’s Preface and Introduction, pp. 3-24
      • Day 1, Story 4, pp. 45-49
      • Day 2, Story 5, pp. 99-113
      • Day 3, Story 1, pp. 193-200
  • 12. For Next Tuesday
    • Boccaccio, Decameron
      • Day 4, Story 4, pp. 303-313
      • Day 5, Story 10, pp. 432-440
      • Day 6, Story 7, pp. 462-465
      • Day 7, Story 2, pp. 492-497
      • Day 8, Story 8, pp. 614-619
      • Day 9, Story 2, pp. 659-662
      • Day 10, Story 6, pp. 729-734
      • Author’s Conclusion, pp. 802-807
  • 13. Daily Write
    • What point do you remember most clearly from today’s lecture or think was most important, and why?
  • 14. World Literature II Renaissance to the Present Dr. Michael Broder University of South Carolina January 10, 2012