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CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012
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CLAS220 - Lecture Notes for March 13, 2012

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  • 1. Introduction toClassical Mythology Dr. Michael BroderUniversity of South Carolina March 13, 2012
  • 2. Please write your Daily Write ona complete sheet of paper, not ahalf sheet, and not a sheet withother Daily Writes already on it. Violators will be docked 1 point no matter how good their answer is.
  • 3. If you leave the room early, I will ask for your name and deduct 1 point from your Daily Write. If it’s an emergency we can discuss it at another time. But I know it is usually NOT an emergency. And I will not tolerate it without a penalty.
  • 4. Daily Write #14: Review• In Homer’s Iliad, Homer tells us that Aphrodite gave Helen to Paris because he judged Aphrodite to be the most beautiful goddess. At Histories 1.3, Herodotus tells us that Paris “Resolved to use abduction to get a wife from Greece, being confident that he would get away with this unpunished, just as the Greeks had done.”• Comment on the presence or absence of divine intervention in these two accounts• What do you think Herodotus might have thought about the idea that Paris won Helen through the help of a goddess?
  • 5. Daily Write #14: Review• Comment on the presence or absence of divine intervention in these two accounts – Divine intervention is present in the Homeric account – Divine intervention is absent in the account by Herodotus• What do you think Herodotus might have thought about the idea that Paris won Helen through the help of a goddess? – Herodotus would have been scornful of the idea – Herodotus believed in historical explanations, not mythological stories
  • 6. Daily Write #15At Herakles 1223, Theseus scolds Herakles forthreatening suicide, saying, “Threats are no use, thegods don’t care.” Why do you think Theseus believesthat the gods don’t care? Don’t you think he knowshow the gods helped Greek heroes like Odysseus? Doyou think Theseus’s attitude might have something todo with the Greek invention of history? If so, how? Ifnot, please offer an alternate explanation.
  • 7. Histories: Identification• Author = Herodotus – Greek – c. 480-c. 420 BCE• Title = Histories• Genre = History, historiography, prose
  • 8. History of the Peloponnesian War: Identification• Author = Thucydides – Greek – c. 460-c. 400 BCE• Title = History of the Peloponnesian War• Genre = History, historiography, prose
  • 9. Mythology vs. History• Two distinct types of knowledge about the past – Mythology = Knowledge of past events through traditional stories – History = Knowledge of past events through inquiry and research
  • 10. Why do ancient Greek historianslike Herodotus and Thucydidesrefer to mythological people and events like Paris, Helen, Agamemnon, and the Trojan War?
  • 11. Because history cannot escape its mythological past!
  • 12. History’s Encounter with Myth• Herodotus includes mythological stories of Io, Europa, Medea, and Helen in his account of the Persian Wars• Thucydides locates the growth of Athenian naval power in the context of the Trojan War and Agamemnon’s leadership of the Greek forces
  • 13. Important Distinctions Between Mythology and History• Mythology • History – Based on traditional stories – Based on inquiry & research – Based on oral tradition – Written (not oral) – Favors poetry (epic, lyric) – Prose (not poetry) – Favors supernatural – Favors rational explanations explanations (gods, divine (natural events, human intervention in human actions) affairs) – Has a clear timeline – Lacks a clear timeline • Persian Wars took place in • When the world began 490 and 480 BCE • When gods came into being • Peloponnesian War took • When humans came into place from 431-404 BCE being • Specific dates of battles and • When events happened other key events are known
  • 14. Something to think about…Are various texts we have read theproducts of a historical society or of a pre-historical society?
  • 15. Timeline of Authors & Texts Homer, Odyssey (c. 750 BCE) Hesiod, Theogony (c. 700 BCE) Archilochus (c. 680–c. 645 BCE) Semonides (c. 650 BCE) Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite (c. 650 BCE) Sappho (c. 620–c.570 BCE) Simonides (c. 556 -468 BCE) Homeric Hymn to Demeter (c. 525 BCE) Xenophanes (c.570 – c.475 BCE)Pre-historical Pindar (c. 522–443 BCE) Herodotus (c. 484–c. 425 BCE) Historical Thucydides (c. 460 BC – c. 395 BCE)
  • 16. Timeline of Authors & Texts Homer, Odyssey (c. 750 BCE) Notice that the Hesiod, Theogony (c. 700 BCE) pre-historical Archilochus (c. 680–c. 645 BCE) authors and Semonides (c. 650 BCE) texts include Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite (c. 650 BCE) both epic and Sappho (c. 620–c.570 BCE) lyric poets. Simonides (c. 556 -468 BCE) Homeric Hymn to Demeter (c. 525 BCE) Xenophanes (c.570 – c.475 BCE)Pre-historical Pindar (c. 522–443 BCE) Herodotus (c. 484–c. 425 BCE) Historical Thucydides (c. 460 BC – c. 395 BCE)
  • 17. So what happens to mythology after the Greeks invent history?
  • 18. So what happens to mythology after the Greeks invent history? Mythology takes refuge in Greek tragedy!
  • 19. Greek Tragedy• Plays that combine dramatic action with song and dance• For the Greeks, playwriting was a competitive activity• Plays were performed at the Dionysia, an annual festival in honor of Dionysus, the god of wine• The actors’ salaries were paid for by the public treasury• The singers, dancers, musicians, and costumes were paid for by a wealthy citizen called a choregos
  • 20. We have complete plays by three Greek tragic playwrights• Aeschylus (c. 525–456 BCE)• Sophocles (c. 496–406 BCE)• Euripides (c. 480–406 BCE)
  • 21. Timeline of Authors & Texts Semonides (c. 650 BCE) Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite (c. 650 BCE) Notice where Sappho (c. 620–c.570 BCE) the Greek Simonides (c. 556 -468 BCE) tragic playwrights fall Homeric Hymn to Demeter (c. 525 BCE) on the pre- Xenophanes (c.570 – c.475 BCE) historical / Pindar (c. 522–443 BCE) historicalPre-historical Aeschylus (c. 525–456 BCE) timeline! Sophocles (c. 496–406 BCE) Historical Herodotus (c. 484–c. 425 BCE) Euripides (c. 480–406 BCE) Thucydides (c. 460 BC – c. 395 BCE)
  • 22. Herakles: Identification• Author = Euripides – Greek – (c. 480–406 BCE)• Title = Herakles• Genre = Tragedy, tragic play, tragic drama
  • 23. Upcoming Assigments• 3/13—Euripides, Herakles (in Grief Lessons)• 3/15—Overview of underworld myths – No assigned reading• 3/20—Euripides, Alkestis (in Grief Lessons)
  • 24. Introduction toClassical Mythology Dr. Michael BroderUniversity of South Carolina March 13, 2012

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