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  • Making it known how much athleticism there actually is involved and all of the spirit needed is my <br /> goal. If more people knew how dangerous and competitive cheerleading actually is, then maybe cheerleaders would get more credit for the things they do and how they put themselves at risk every time they do it. <br />
  • Besides the fact that the one thing I have stuck with is Cheerleading, I chose to do my Senior Graduation project on the subject because after being asked to try out for UCA, even though I did not make it, it showed me there are so many different organizations that teaches cheerleaders how to better themselves physically and mentally. Each team is a family, and that bond, no matter where it is, college, high school, states, wherever, that bond will stay with you for the rest of your life. <br />
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  • &#x2022;Princeton vs. Rutgers in 1869, the Princeton crowd started yelling &#x201C;Sis Boom Rah&#x201D;, for their team. By the early 1800&#x2019;s Princeton formed an all male prep squad, creating the Princeton Yell. <br /> oDuring a Minnesota football game in November of 1898, Johnny Campbell, a medical student, got the crowd to cheer on their football team in the stands. He made a headline in the newspaper and earned the name &#x201C;cheerleader&#x201D;. Cheerleading started to make headlines and more people started to het involved. What started out as your regular everyday spirit become a worldwide activity. <br /> oIn the 1900&#x2019;s, the megaphone was introduced and fundraising was used by colleges as well as universities. <br /> o1923-women on the squad. <br /> oNCA- The NCA was created by Lawrence Herkimer to pass on cheering skills to potential candidates. Cheerleaders in this time era well known today are President Bush, Senator Trent Lott, actors Samuel L. Jackson and Steve Martin. <br /> &#x2663;This was when cheerleaders started coming to more sports such as basketball games and sport competitions, supporting for both sexes. <br /> o1960&#x2019;s-cheerleading is standard at high schools across America as well as youth leagues popped out <br /> o1970- cheerleaders started to compete against each other, involving gymnastics, pyramids, stunts, and dancing. <br /> oNo rules yet, could use trampolines <br /> o1976- The idea of risqu&#xE9; and flirtatious outfits were brought about at NFL&#x2019;s Super Bowl X, which was featured on television. There were mixed feelings about the outfits worn and dances performed, starting controversy and assuming cheerleading as an all female sport. <br /> o1996- 18000 cheerleaders injured to 326,000 basketball and 514,000 football players <br /> <br />
  • *Movies influence on the perception of Cheerleading. <br /> *Bring it On, Bring it On Again, Bring it On: All or Nothing, Bring it On: Fight to the Finish <br />
  • &#x2022;Title IX <br /> oMission: to make men and women in sports equal by banning gender discrimination at schools and colleges <br /> oDid not classify cheerleading as a sport because at that time, (1972), cheerleading did not involve direct athletic competition. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • During World War 2, women replaced men when the men went off into the war. People looked to cheerleaders in their large sweaters and pleated skirts as role models. Up until 1976 when uniforms started becoming a little more revealing, the wholesome image was something cheerleaders were known for during this time. Little by little, uniforms went from tennis sneakers to boots and so on, but they started out as humble athletes. <br /> <br />
  • &#x2022;1979 the U.S. department of health, Education, and welfare under Jimmy Carts administration thought of the three prong test for title ix, making it simpler to address: <br /> oprong one-providing athletic participation opportunities that are substantially proportionate to the student enrollement <br /> oprong two- demonstrating a continual expansion of athletic opportunites for the underrepresented sex <br /> oprong three- full and effective accommodation of the interest and ability of underrepresented sex <br /> &#x2022;gives women more of an advantage because it allows them to be equall with the mens sports <br /> &#x2022;activity suits it better <br /> ocheerleaders cheer for other sports as well as their own compeition. <br /> &#x2022;Percentage wise <br /> oSince 1987, it has grown 17.6%, which is more than soccer football, or any other sport team. <br /> oThe difference is that the NCAA refused to put cheerleading in the category of a sport. Educational institutions declared cheerleading to be a legitimate athletic activity. This is why it has grown so much; the times and rules of cheerleading have changed. <br /> <br />
  • Will be considered a sport when: <br /> &#x2022;the primary purpose is to compete against other squads during a regular season <br /> &#x2022;rules govern the sport that explicitly quantify, with objective criteria, the conditions under which a winner is declared <br /> &#x2022;Postseason qualifications are earned based on the same model as other sports, such as basketball or gymnastics <br /> &#x2022;Regular practices are conducted under the supervision of a coach in preparation for such competition. <br /> <br />
  • &#x2022;When certain things were done at cheerleading competitions, questions on how safe it was started becoming an issue. <br /> &#x2022;After a while, noticing how many cheerleaders per year, chart included), they started making safety regulations <br /> oGuidelines according to AACCA: <br /> (1)Cheerleading squads should be placed under the direction of a qualified and knowledgeable advisor or coach. <br /> (2)All practice sessions should be supervised by the coach and held in a location suitable for the activities of cheerleaders (i.e., use of appropriate mats, away from excessive noise and distractions, etc.). <br /> (3)Advisors/coaches should recognize a squad&apos;s particular ability level and should limit the squad&apos;s activities accordingly. "Ability level" refers to the squad&apos;s talents as a whole and individuals should not be pressed to perform activities until safely perfected. <br /> (4)All cheerleaders should receive proper training before attempting any form of cheerleading gymnastics (tumbling, partner stunts, pyramids and jumps). <br /> (5)Professional training in proper spotting techniques should be mandatory for all squads. <br /> (6)All cheerleading squads should adopt a comprehensive conditioning and strength building program. <br /> (7)All jewelry is prohibited during participation. <br /> (8)An appropriate warmup routine should precede all cheerleading activities. <br /> (9)Prior to the performance of any skill, the immediate environment for the activity should be taken into consideration&#xA0; including, but not limited to&#xA0; proximity of non-squad personnel, performance surface, lighting and/or precipitation. Technical skills such as tumbling, partner stunts, pyramids and jumps should not be performed on concrete, asphalt, wet or uneven surfaces or surfaces with obstructions. <br /> (10)As a general rule, all programs should qualify cheerleaders according to accepted teaching progressions. Appropriate spotting should be used until all performers demonstrate mastery of the skill. <br /> (11)Supports, braces, etc., which are hard and unyielding or have rough edges or surfaces must be appropriately covered. A participant wearing a cast (excluding a properly covered air cast) shall not be involved in stunts, pyramids, tosses or tumbling. <br /> (12)Squad members must wear athletic shoes (no gymnastic slippers). <br /> (13)When discarding props (signs, etc.) that are made of solid material or have sharp edges/corners, team members must gently toss or place the props so that they are under control <br /> (14)All pyramids and partner stunts are limited to two persons high. "Two high" is defined as the base having at least one foot on the ground. <br /> (15)The top person in a partner stunt, pyramid or transition may not be in an inverted position and cannot transition to another stunt, the ground or a dismount in an inverted position. Exceptions to this rule are the following: <br /> (16)Double based suspended forward rolls where the top person has continuous hand-to-hand contact with two primary bases or with two posts who are controlling the top person are allowed to a cradle or the performing surface. They may not land in a loading position for a stunt. The top person cannot have contact with one base and one post. <br /> (17)The top person in a stunt may begin in an inverted position on the performing surface and be loaded into a non-inverted position shoulder height or below provided that they have constant contact with a base or spotter until they are in the non-inverted position. A base or additional spotter if necessary must be in a position to protect the head, neck and shoulder area of the top person. <br /> (18)Suspended splits in a transition are allowed provided there are a total of four bases that support the top person; at least three of the bases must support under the legs of the top person, and the fourth base may support under the legs or make contact with the hands of the top person. Top person must have hand contact with bases during transition. <br /> (19)Partner stunts and pyramids higher than shoulder stand level must have a continuous spotter for each person over shoulder stand level. Spotters are considered part of the squad with regard to the squad member maximum limitation. For single-based extended stunts, the spotter may hold at the ankle of the top person and / or the wrist of the base. If the spotter is supporting under the sole of the foot in any way, they are considered to be a base and would require an additional spotter. <br /> (20)When one person is bracing another (including overlapping of arms), one of the individuals must be at shoulder height or below. Exceptions to this rule are the following: <br /> (21)Extensions (double or single based) may brace other extensions. <br /> (22)Double Cupies/Awesomes (two cupies/awesomes being held by the same base) are allowed. If the stunt is dismounted to cradles, there must be three people for each top person being cradled. This exception does not include variations such as Double Heel Stretches. <br /> (23)If a person in a partner stunt or pyramid is used as a brace for an extended stunt, that brace must not be supporting a majority of the top person&apos;s weight. (To demonstrate this, the foot of the top person&#x2019;s braced leg must be at or above the knee of their supporting leg.) <br /> (24)Extended Straddle Lifts must have an additional spotter for the head and shoulders of the top person (similar position to a Double Based Elevator/Extension Prep). <br /> (25)The bases of any extended stunt must have both feet in direct weight-bearing contact with the performing surface. <br /> (26)Hanging pyramids must have a continuous spotter for each shoulder stand involved in suspending another person. Hanging pyramids are not allowed to rotate. <br /> (27)In a Released Pyramid Transition the following rules apply: <br /> (28)At least 3 bases must be under the top person throughout the transition. <br /> (29)Bracers at shoulder level must have a spotter in place during the transition movement. Exception: Shoulder sits and double based thigh stands do not require an additional spotter. <br /> (30)The top person must be in hand/arm to hand/arm contact with at least one bracer during the entire transition. <br /> (31)The top person may not be supporting their weight on any other body part of the person(s) assisting (i.e. Shoulders of the bracer). <br /> (32)The top person must be continuous in motion and cannot be supported so that they pause at the top of the transition. <br /> (33)Basket tosses, toe pitch tosses, elevator/sponge tosses or similar tosses are limited to no more than four tossers and must be dismounted to a cradle position by two of the original bases, plus an additional spotter at the head and shoulder area. These tosses may not be directed so that the bases must move to catch the top person. The top person may not hold any objects (poms, signs, etc.) during the toss. (Rule 11 does not apply to a "Quick Toss.") <br /> (34)Participants may not pass over or under other participants from tosses. Exceptions to this rule are the following: <br /> (35)Single based tosses can go over another person. <br /> (36)Free falling flips or swan dives from any type of toss, partner stunt or pyramid are prohibited. <br /> (37)Partner stunts, pyramids and participants may not pass over, under or through other partner stunts or pyramids. <br /> (38)Single based stunts in which the top person is parallel to the performing surface and the bases&#x2019; arms are extended must have a continuous spotter at the head and shoulder of the top person. (i.e. Bird, Side T, Single Based Flatback, etc.) <br /> (39)Multi-based tosses that land in stunts (i.e. basket to elevator/extension prep, etc.) are allowed; however, they cannot significantly exceed the height of the intended stunt and cannot include a skill (twist, toe touch, etc.) during the toss. Multi-based tosses cannot land in a loading position. Multi-based tosses that include a skill (twist, toe touch, etc.) must be cradled. (Rule 16 does not apply to a "Quick Toss.") <br /> (40)A single based toss (one base touching during the toss movement) is allowed into a loading position to that original base. <br /> (41)Backward suspended rolls and single based suspended rolls are prohibited. <br /> (42)Cradle dismounts from partner stunts or pyramids shoulder height or above require one spotter in addition to the original base(s). <br /> (43)Cradle dismounts from multi-based tosses require one spotter in addition to the original base(s). <br /> (44)Cradle dismounts from partner stunts (other than basket tosses, elevator/sponge tosses or similar tosses) to another set of bases must be caught by three bases. Any type of gymnastics movement (1/2 turn, twist, toe touch, etc) is prohibited. <br /> (45)The total number of twists in a dismount from stunts or tosses cannot be greater than two rotations. Exception to <br /> (46)Side facing stunts and tosses (i.e. Arabesque, Scorpion, Kick Double Full Basket, etc.) may add a one-quarter twist in order to cradle to the front. <br /> (47)A minimum of two catchers are required when the top person falls away from the bases to a horizontal, flat-body position. <br /> (48)Tension drops are prohibited. <br /> (49)Helicopter tosses greater than a 180 degree rotation (half-turn) are prohibited. Helicopter tosses require 4 bases to be in position during the entire release. There must be a base at the head/shoulder area during the initiation of the toss as well as the catch. The bases are not allowed to change positions during the release. <br /> (50)Single based split catches are prohibited. <br /> (51)The use of mini-trampolines, springboards, spring-assisted floors or any other height-increasing apparatus is prohibited for competition or performance. These devices may be used for skill development and practice under the supervision of a coach trained in their use. <br /> (52)Basket tosses, elevator/sponge tosses and similar multi-base tosses are prohibited on surfaces other than a mat, grass or rubberized track. <br /> <br /> (53)Dive rolls are prohibited. <br /> (54)Flips greater than one rotation are prohibited. <br /> (55)Twists greater than one rotation are prohibited. <br /> (56)A forward three-quarter flip to the seat or knees is prohibited. <br /> (57)Participants may not tumble over, under, or through partner stunts or pyramids, or over or under individuals. <br /> (58)Participants may not tumble over a prop. Exception: A forward roll over a prop is legal. <br /> (59)Participants may not land in a partner stunt or in a catching position from an aerial tumbling skill. (Example : A back flip from a tumbling pass into a cradle is prohibited, however, rebounding from a back handspring into a cradle is allowed.) <br /> (60)Landings for all jumps including knee drops must bear weight on at least one foot. (Example : A toe touch jump or kick to a hurdler position, to the seat, knees, or landing with both feet back, or to a push-up position are prohibited.) <br /> (61)Any type of hurdler position or the position with both feet back (sitting, landing or lying) is prohibited with the exception of a "Z" sit. <br /> (62)Added 10/20/2009 - Airborne drops to a prone position on the performing surface are illegal. (Examples: A back flip or a jump landing in a pushup position is illegal. A handspring to a pushup position is legal as it is not airborne prior to the prone landing.) <br /> The following skills are prohibited at basketball and other athletic contests conducted on courts, except where the area is free of obstructions and non-cheer personnel, and all skills are performed on a matted surface. <br /> (63)Basket tosses, elevator/sponge tosses and other similar multi-based tosses. <br /> (64)Partner stunts in which the base uses only one arm to support the top person. <br /> (65)Released twists into or from stunts or pyramids. <br /> (66)Twisting tumbling skills. <br /> National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at Chapel Hill <br /> &#x2022;Latest facts are from 2007-2008 report <br /> o1,116 direct catastrophic injuries <br /> &#x2663;905 high school <br /> &#x2663;211 college sports <br /> &#x23A5;more experience in college <br /> &#x2022;high school <br /> o152 fatilities, 379 non-fatal injuries, and 374 serious <br /> &#x2022;college <br /> o22 fatilities, 63 non-fatal injuries, 126 serious <br /> <br /> <br />
  • This is a comparison of annual injuries for high school and college cheerleaders in 2005. <br /> <br /> &#x2022;Between 1982 and 2007, 103 fatal, disabling or serious injuries among female athletes, with 67 being cheerleading <br /> &#x2022;The next two being gymnastics and track <br /> &#x2022;2007 to 2008, college and high school sports, male and female, naming catastrophic as any severe or fatal injury during any participation in the sport <br /> &#x2022;newest numbers: 1,116 catastrophic injuries, 905 high school and 211 college <br /> &#x2022;High school sports <br /> o152 fatalities, 379 non-fatal, 374 serious <br /> &#x2022;College <br /> o22 fatilities, 63 non-fatal and 126 serious <br /> &#x2022;among all female sports <br /> o65.2% of high school and 70.5% accounted for by cheerleading <br /> &#x2022;to reduce these injuries <br /> ofix the safety precautions; Frederick O. Mueller of the study stated &#x201C;Continued data collection on all types of cheerleading injuries will hopefully show that these safety measures are working to reduce injuries.&#x201D; <br /> <br />
  • College female cheerleader fractured a cervical vertebra and suffered a concussion on March 5th, 2006. She fell 15 feet onto her head from a stunt during a basketball game. <br /> January, 2007, 15 year old high school cheerleader damaged her cervical vertebrae 6-7 and had a 5 hour surgery. This happened after flipping onto a cushioned landing, and now has a permanent titanium plate with screws in her spine. <br /> Hannah Schallas was kicked in the face during a stunt in which the flyer twisted out of, knocking her out, leaving her with a bruise lasting one month. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Lauren Chang was competing in the Minuteman Cheerleading Championships in Boston when she was kicked in the chest and pronounced dead a day later with a collapsed lung. She was twenty years old. <br /> Ashley Burn was only 14 years old when she died. She was performing an arabesque, double-twist dismount, and fell, resulting in a lacerated spleen. She was due to be a freshmen at Medford High School but didn&#x2019;t make it. <br /> <br /> There were 75 direct deaths reported among high school and college female athletes from the fall of 1982 to the spring of 2007. Forty-two of these deaths resulted from cheerleading injuries. High school deaths totaled 25, and college deaths totaled 17. The majority of the deaths that were not caused by cheerleading were the result of gymnastics. <br />
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  • UCA: <br /> Uca stands for Universal Cheerleaders Association. It was started by Jeff Webb in 1974. Starting from his own apartment in Memphis, Tennesee, it really has grown worldwide. During the summer of 1975, there was 4000 students attending 24 camps in the Midwest and South. <br />
  • Today, UCA has expanded to the Northeast as well. On average, there are 1,500 instructors across the country, all which have attended training camps in either Alabama, Texas, Wisconsin, South Carolina, California, and Pennsylvania. Staff is hired depending on their skills, personality and ability to teach. Instructors must be able to perfect everything, cheers, dances, stunts, you name it, they have it perfect for if they didn&#x2019;t, teaching it would become very difficult. <br /> Spirit is a very key role for UCA because they have to keep the campers positive all the time. (top banana). <br /> Tryouts: talk briefly about the tryout process, you were there, no need for notes. <br />
  • Tryouts: <br /> Gradual selection tryouts <br /> held a few days in a row, only atheletes still in the running, usually for teams with a large number trying out <br /> multiple-day tryouts <br /> combination of a Clinic, and the gradual selection for tryouts, each day is considered a tryout, but no decisions are made until the last day <br /> judged on <br /> jumps, stunting ability and potential, cheers and dances <br /> tight motions, etc... <br /> &#x201C;clean cut&#x201D; look <br /> camp <br /> UCA instructed camps <br /> learn cheers used for the season, whether it be basketball, football, or compeition <br /> squad bonds <br /> runs from may to march, usually, can go longer depending on how far in competition the squad goes <br /> football season and basketball season <br /> cheer on the sidelines <br /> cheer on the bleachers <br /> Competition doesn&#x2019;t have a particular season, the routine is worked on all year long during football and basketball season. Routines are either choreographed by professionals or even girls on the squad with help from coaches as well as assistant coaches. There is only 2 minutes and 30 seconds allowed in an entire routine <br /> POINT: all year long pretty much, working on a routine, for two minutes and thirty seconds. <br /> judging <br /> six levels <br /> gets higher due to amount of girls on the team, if the team is co-ed , and level of difficulty due to dance and stunts. <br /> <br /> deductions for every little thing as listed on the chart. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Football, basketball, and wrestling are usually the sports cheerleaders cheer for at most schools. In college, this is the same. Sometimes, you will find cheerleading teams cheering on soccer, but that is most likely because they do not compete, allowing more time to be able to cheer on spring sports. <br /> Football cheers <br /> 30 regulary to remember <br /> Basketball cheers <br /> 30 regularly to remember <br /> cheers are often being added to and changed all the time <br /> If squads cheer for wrestling, they either get a small portion of the bleachers or just a part of the mat. <br /> During all seasons, finding a gym is nearly impossible. Most schools do not have cheerleading gyms, it is usually newer schools where cheerleaders have their own personal gym. <br /> <br />
  • As cheerleaders, it is on them to work hard for the money needed for new uniforms, pom poms, signs, sneakers, ribbon to make bows, and any decorations needed throughout the year for various events. In order to raise money, cheerleaders use bake sales, car washes, candy sales, and t-shirt or clothing orders to be able to recieve the funds needed for all of which I have just stated. <br />
  • Cheerleaders in high school and college take on many events happening at the school. <br /> Breast Cancer Awareness Game <br /> Viking Army Game-Haiti Relief <br /> Homecoming/Spirit Week <br /> Senior Nights for football and basketball seasons <br /> Sochop <br /> Senior Citizen dances <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Mark Citarella is a Maryland National Guard Soldier and five-year veteran of the Baltimore Raven&#x2019;s cheerleading squad. Citarella leads an interesting life, combining two very different things, yet making them very different. He is able to spread what he knows about cheerleading around the world when he is on duty. He found cheerleading to be quite difficult when he joined as a senior in college in 1999. During that time, Citarella was stationed in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Something he will never forget and what really made it worthwhile was when he got to carry the flag out onto the field during a football game right after 9/11. Today, Citarella is the head cheerleading coach at Loyola University in Maryland. <br /> Discuss: <br /> how cheerleaders combine two worlds all the team by meeting new squads and reaching out to them. <br />
  • The difficulty level for middle school cheerleading is vastly different from high school and college cheerleading, just as college and high school differ ever so much. In middle school cheerleading, they do not take on as many event to plan such as homecoming. Also, when judged, since the level of difficulty is lower, there scores are out of less points. <br />
  • Athletes from grades 9 to 12. <br /> Cheerleading squads should be placed under the direction of a qualified and knowledgeable advisor or coach. <br /> All practice sessions should be supervised by the coach and held in a location suitable for the activities of cheerleaders (i.e., use of appropriate mats, away from excessive noise and distractions, etc.). <br /> Advisors/coaches should recognize a squad&apos;s particular ability level and should limit the squad&apos;s activities accordingly. "Ability level" refers to the squad&apos;s talents as a whole and individuals should not be pressed to perform activities until safely perfected. <br /> All cheerleaders should receive proper training before attempting any form of cheerleading gymnastics (tumbling, partner stunts, pyramids and jumps). <br /> Professional training in proper spotting techniques should be mandatory for all squads. <br /> All cheerleading squads should adopt a comprehensive conditioning and strength building program. <br /> All jewelry is prohibited during participation. <br /> An appropriate warmup routine should precede all cheerleading activities. <br /> Prior to the performance of any skill, the immediate environment for the activity should be taken into consideration&#xA0; including, but not limited to&#xA0; proximity of non-squad personnel, performance surface, lighting and/or precipitation. Technical skills such as tumbling, partner stunts, pyramids and jumps should not be performed on concrete, asphalt, wet or uneven surfaces or surfaces with obstructions. <br /> As a general rule, all programs should qualify cheerleaders according to accepted teaching progressions. Appropriate spotting should be used until all performers demonstrate mastery of the skill. <br /> Supports, braces, etc., which are hard and unyielding or have rough edges or surfaces must be appropriately covered. A participant wearing a cast (excluding a properly covered air cast) shall not be involved in stunts, pyramids, tosses or tumbling. <br /> Squad members must wear athletic shoes (no gymnastic slippers). <br /> When discarding props (signs, etc.) that are made of solid material or have sharp edges/corners, team members must gently toss or place the props so that they are under control. <br />
  • experienced cheerleaders <br /> both males and females more likely than high school <br /> <br /> The use of any height-increasing apparatus (e.g. mini-trampoline, etc.) other than a spring floor is prohibited for performance. <br /> The top person in a partner stunt, pyramid or transition cannot be released from bases with the intent to land or be caught in an inverted body position. <br /> An individual may not jump, flip or dive over, under, or through partner stunts, pyramids or individuals from basket tosses, similar tosses, partner stunts or other tosses from hands. <br /> Drops (knee, seat, thigh, front, back and split) from a jump, stand or inverted position are prohibited unless the majority of the weight is first borne on the hands/feet which breaks the impact of the drop. <br /> Jewelry of any kind is prohibited (e.g., navel jewelry, tongue jewelry, earrings, necklaces, etc.) Medical bracelets are allowed provided they are taped to the body. <br /> Soft-soled athletic shoes must be worn while cheering or competing. Gymnastics shoes, jazz shoes and/or boots are prohibited. <br /> Basket and Elevator/Sponge Tosses are prohibited on surfaces other than grass (real or artificial) or a mat. <br /> Flipping skills into or from stunts, tosses or pyramids are prohibited on surfaces other than grass (real or artificial) or a mat. <br /> Two and one half high pyramids are prohibited on surfaces other than grass (real or artificial) or a mat. <br /> <br />
  • <br /> started in 1995, competes in own league with different set of rules <br /> most elite cheerleaders in that specific region, no affiliation with particular schools, cheerleaders from any school can participate <br /> must pay to be on this team <br /> different divisions: <br /> open <br /> any number of males and females, any age <br /> large co-ed: <br /> four or more males plus females, generally a maximum of 20 athletes on the floor, from grades 9 to 12 <br /> small co-ed: <br /> three or fewer males plus females, generally a maximum of 20 athletes on the floor, from grades 9 to 12 <br /> super varsity <br /> all female, 21 to 30 athletes, from grades 9 to 12 <br /> large varsity <br /> all female, 16 to 20 athletes, grades 9 to 12 <br /> medium varsity <br /> all female, 13 to 15 athletes, grades 9 to 12 <br /> small varsity <br /> all female, 12 or fewer athletes grades 9 to 12 <br /> junior <br /> male and female, both all-girl and co-ed divisions, grades 9 and under <br /> <br /> All athletes must be supervised during all official functions by a qualified director/coach. <br /> 2. <br /> Coaches must require proficiency before skill progression. Coaches must consider the athlete, group, and team skill levels with regard to proper performance level placement. <br /> 3. <br /> &#xA0;All teams, gyms, coaches and directors&#xA0;must have an emergency response plan in the event of an injury. <br /> 4. <br /> Athletes and coaches may not be under the influence of alcohol, narcotics, performance enhancing substances, or over-the-counter medications while participating in a practice or performance that would hinder the ability to supervise or execute a routine safely. <br /> 5. <br /> Athletes must always practice and perform on an appropriate surface. <br /> 6. <br /> Soft-soled shoes must be worn while competing. No dance shoes/boots, and/or gymnastics slippers (or similar) allowed. Shoes must have a solid sole. <br /> 7. <br /> Jewelry of any kind including but not limited to ear, nose, tongue, belly button and facial rings, clear plastic jewelry, bracelets, necklaces and pins on uniforms are not allowed.&#xA0; Jewelry must be removed and may not be taped over. (Exception: medical ID tags/bracelets, and uniform rhinestones. Rhinestones are&#xA0;not allowed&#xA0;when adhered to the skin as opposed to a uniform. Temporary tattoos are also allowed.) <br /> 8. <br /> Any height increasing apparatus used to propel a competitor is prohibited. (Exception: spring floor) <br /> 9. <br /> Flags, banners, signs, pom pons, megaphones, and pieces of cloth are the only props allowed. Props with poles or similar support apparatus may not be used in conjunction with any kind of stunt or tumbling. All props must be safely discarded out of harms way (e.g. throwing a hard sign across the mat from a stunt would be illegal).&#xA0; Any uniform piece purposefully removed from the body and used for visual effect will be considered a prop. <br /> 10. <br /> Casts that are hard and unyielding or have rough edges must be appropriately covered with a padded material.&#xA0; Clarification: The appropriately padded material must be such that it protects both the athlete and fellow athletes from injury. <br /> 11. <br /> On the level grid, all skills allowed for a particular level encompass all skills allowed in the preceding level. <br /> 12. <br /> Required spotters for all&#xA0;skills must be your own team&apos;s members.&#xA0; <br /> 13. <br /> Drops including but not limited to knee, seat, thigh, front, back, and split drops from a jump, stunt, or inverted position are&#xA0;not allowed&#xA0;unless the majority of the weight is first borne on the hands or feet, which breaks the impact of the drop.&#xA0; Shushinovas are allowed. <br /> 14. <br /> Competition routines shall not exceed 2 minutes and 30 seconds.&#xA0; <br /> 15. <br /> Athletes must have at least one foot, hand or body part (other than hair) on the performing surface when the routine begins. Exception: Athletes may have their feet in the hands of base(s) if the base(s) hands are resting on the performing surface <br /> <br />
  • open teams <br /> can consist of both males and females who are either still enrolled in school or have graduated. <br /> older people can still continue to cheer out of high school or college <br /> <br />
  • Four years ago, I started a tradition called &#x201C;Cheergiving&#x201D;. I even made a song for it as shown above. There are a lot of things cheerleaders do to become closer as a team and become a family such as team bonding games. These games consist of: <br /> Little Sally Walker <br /> Trust Fall <br /> Pass the Body <br /> To Be or Knot to Be <br /> Truths and Lie <br /> Ball of String <br /> <br />
  • Steve Willis has been training me to get ready for college tryouts as well as teach me some things I never knew about cheerleading before. This is his first year as the head coach with Albright College. He lead his team all the way to UCA nationals in Florida last year and helped the stunt pair Aaron Frederick and Becca Fink win first place at the Reach the Beach competition in Ocean City, Maryland. He graduated from West Chester University earning his B.S. in Earth and Space Science. He currently teachers at Norristown High School. As well as coaching at Albright, he spent three years on the coaching staff of Liberty Cheer Institute, which is an All-star program that has competed on the national level and took the champion title in 2006 for the Americheer Senior Prep Level 2. <br />
  • Ive been working with the coach from Albright College and he has been teaching me about the physics of being able to lift off of another human being for co-ed stunting, and he taught me that each placement of my body will determine how I will end up. For example, how high I will go, and how long I will be able to support myself. <br />
  • Even when twisting, the center stays the same, allowing the motions to be resulted from the position of the arms. The tighter the arms are for tucking, the faster and more able to tuck is the result. <br />
  • Flixs are when you have never done co-ed stunting before so you prepare for height, force, and being able to resist his energy. <br />
  • Listed are skills that are evaluated at each tryout: <br /> Coed Team <br /> Cheer - taught at the tryout <br /> Tumbling Skills <br /> * Standing Back-Handspring - required skill in order to tryout <br /> Standing Back-Tuck <br /> Standing Back-Handspring Tuck <br /> Tumbling Pass - most elite pass you can perform without a spot <br /> Stunting - this portion of the tryout is based on potential rather than <br /> on what you can perform because I understand that alot of girls have <br /> never coed stunted. <br /> All-Girl Team <br /> Cheer - taught at the tryout <br /> Dance - taught at the tryout <br /> Tumbling Skills <br /> * Standing Back-Handspring - required skill in order to tryout <br /> Standing Back-Tuck <br /> Standing Back-Handspring Tuck <br /> Tumbling Pass - most elite pass you can perform without a spot <br /> Stunts - you will tryout for a specific position either a base, top, or <br /> back-spot (you may tryout for more than one position) <br />
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  • We will be making spirit sticks for our class activity. Each group, three groups total, will have one stick that they must decorate with the supplies I give out. They must write one positive thing about someone in their group and put it inside of the stick. This is what Upper Merion&#x2019;s cheerleading team does at camp as well as many other teams. <br />
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Sgp slidesmbowes Sgp slidesmbowes Presentation Transcript

  • Cheerleading And Redefining SPIRIT!! A projec t by M ich el le B o wes
  • From this... TO THIS!
  • Why this?
  • Views on Cheerleading
  • WHAT YOU DIDN’T KNOW... • “Here we go, Princeton, Here we go’ (Clap, Clap) • NCA and Lawrence Herkimer • 1970-Competition "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009
  • STEREOTYPES
  • CHEERLEADERS IN HISTORY actor Steve Martin President Bush as Head Cheerleader at Andover High School Senator Trent Lott at University of Mississippi actor Samuel L. Jackson "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009
  • How did women take over then? • WW2 • “Wholesome image” • 1976-Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009
  • Sport or not a Sport? *Three Prong Test *Grew 17.6% since 1987 *Gym Space "Is Cheerleading a Sport?" Facts on File News Services (Apr. 2006): Issues and Controversies. Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://wfdnvr6.webfeat.org:80/>
  • Will be Considered a Sport when... Karen Durkin. “Don’t Call an Activity a Sport.” USA Today 16 Oct 2009: A.10. SIRS Researcher. Web. 03 December 2009.
  • TOP DANGEROUS “FEMALE” SPORT AACCA 2009-2010 safety regulations National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released 26th report of cheerleading related injuries "Safety Rules for 2009-2010." AACCA. N.p., n.d. Web. "Cheerleading still most dangerous sport." Live Science. MSNBC, 28 June 2009. 2 Feb. 2010. Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://www.msnbc.com> <http://www.aacca.org/content.aspx?item=Safety/ 09-10-High-School-Cheerleading-Rules.xml>
  • Pennington, Bill. "As Cheerleaders Soar Higher, So Does the Danger.'" Sirs Knowledge Source. New York Times, 3 Dec. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://www.sks.sirs.com>
  • “Ouch!” “But I was thrown in the air, the cheerleader who was supposed to catch me lost his balance and fell back. I was inverted and in the air with nothing to stop me from coming straight down on my head. I hit and hear my neck crack.”- Jessica Smith, age 18 "Is Cheerleading More Dangerous Than Football?" "Cheerleading still most dangerous sport." Live Science. Health Bistro. N.p., 26 Jan. 2010. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. MSNBC, 28 June 2009. Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http:// <http://www.healthbistro.com www.msnbc.com>.
  • In Loving Memory Lauren Chang Worcester,Boston Ashley Burn Medford, http://ghenbiu.com/google-trends/14-year-medford- Massachusetts cheerleader-ashley-burn.html http://blog.lib.umn.edu/zimme550/cheerinjury2/2009/05/introduction_to_the_issue.html http://wbztv.com/local/cheerleader.killed.in.2.702670.html
  • GRIPS *Basket Toss *Single Base *One-Leg *360 turns *Full, Half, and Step Ups *Chairs
  • Basket Toss
  • SINGLE BASE
  • ONE LEG
  • 360 Turns
  • Full, Half, and Step-ups
  • Chairs
  • The Man Who Started it All... "UCA." Where America Cheers. Jeff Webb Varsity Brands, n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://www.uca.com>
  • “Where America Cheers”
  • 2 minutes and 30 Seconds. Tryouts Camp Fall, Winter, Spring Football Season Basketball Season Competitio n Season Music Time Judging www.unitedcheerfoundation.com Wilson, Leslie. The Ultimate Guide to Cheerleading. New York: Three Rivers, 2003. Print.
  • School Sports Supported "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009.
  • “CAR WASH, COME GET YOUR CAR WASHED!” “When they are performing this important supporting role, they should not be used to enable a school to cut existing, viable, successful athletic teams.” -Author Unknown Wilson, Leslie. The Ultimate Guide to Cheerleading. New York: Three Rivers, 2003. Print.
  • Applying Cheerleading to Events "Got Spirit? Lets Hear It." Cheerleading.Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://cheerleading.about.com/od/ showyourspirit/a/071402a.htm>
  • Combining Two Worlds • “Many don’t notice the hard work and efforts of the other team on the field, the cheerleaders.” • Mark Citarella, “A Sense of Duty and Community” Gregory, Lisa. "A Sense of Duty and Community." Focus on People: n. pag. • http://www.loyolagreyhounds.com/cheerleaders.html      History Reference Center. Web. Dec. 2009.
  • Middle School "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009
  • HIGH SCHOOL "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009
  • College "Safety Rules for 2009-2010." AACCA. N.p., n.d. "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Web. 2 Feb. 2010. Services, 14 Apr. <http://www.aacca.org/content.aspx?item=Safety/ 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009 09-10-High-School-Cheerleading-Rules.xml>
  • State Teams http://usasf.net/safety/cheerrules/
  • Township Programs/ Community Teams "Cheerleading." Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. 3 Dec. 2009
  • Team Building http://www.oakharborcheer.com/TeamBuildingGames.html
  • Albright College Head Cheerleading Coach: Steve Willis http://www.albrightathletics.com/coaches.aspx?rc=26&path=cheer
  • The Human Body to Cheerleading
  • F L I X S
  • Qualifications to try out for college teams http://wooha101.tripod.com/
  • April 27th
  • CHEER FORUM video
  • Class Activity
  • Works Cited Ace Allstars. Disney Channel. Cheerlibrary. Web. 13 May 2010. <http:// www.cheerlibrary.com///ace-allstars-on-disney-channel>. “Cheerleader Dies after Worcester Competition Stunt.” Boston Area News 18 Apr. 2008: n. pag. Web. 31 Mar. 2010. <http:// wbztv.com//.killed.in.2.702670.html>. “Cheerleading .” Issues and Controversies. Facts on File News Services, 14 Apr. 2006. Web. Dec. 2009. “Cheerleading still most dangerous sport.” Live Science. MSNBC, 28 June 2009. Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://www.msnbc.com>. Durkin, Karen. “Don’t Call an Activity a Sport.” USA Today. SIRS Researcher, 16 Oct. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://proquest.com>.
  • Egbert, Barbara. Action Cheerleading. New York: Sterling, 1984. Print. Feibel, Carolyn. “Cheerleading Becomes the Main Event.” Cheerleader Magazine 17 Apr. 2005: n. pag. SIRS Researcher. Web. Dec. 2009. <http:// www.cheerleadingmagazine.com/.php?id=4>. Goldsberry, Allison. “14 Year Old Medford Cheerleader Ashley Burn.” Ghenbiu Personal Blog Oct. 2008: n. pag. Web. 19 Mar. 2010. <http://ghenbiu.com/trends/- year-medford-cheerleader-ashley-burn.html>. “Got Spirit? Lets Hear It.” Cheerleading. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http:// cheerleading.about.com.htm>. Gregory, Lisa. “A Sense of Duty and Community.” Focus on People: n. pag. History Reference Center. Web. Dec. 2009.
  • “Introduction to the Issue.” Cheerleading Injuries in High School and Collegiate Settings 6 May 2009: n. pag. Web. 12 Mar. 2010. <http://blog.lib.umn.edu/////_to_the_issue.html>. “Is Cheerleading a Sport?” Facts on File News Services (Apr. 2006): n. pag. Issues and Controversies. Web. 2 Mar. 2010. <http://wfdnvr6.webfeat.org:80/>. “Is Cheerleading More Dangerous Than Football?” Health Bistro. N.p., 26 Jan. 2010. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http:// www.healthbistro.com>. Love to know Cheerleading. Love to Know Corporation, 2006-2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2010. <http://cheerleading.lovetoknow.com/ >. “Milestones in the History of Cheerleading.” Controversies. Facts on File, 16 Apr. 2006. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://www. 2facts.com//>. Pennington, Bill. “As Cheerleaders Soar Higher, So Does the Danger.’” Sirs Knowledge Source. New York Times, 3 Dec. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://www.sks.sirs.com>. “Safety Rules for 2009-2010.” AACCA. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://www.aacca.org/.aspx?item=Safety/-10-High- School-Cheerleading-Rules.xml>. “UCA.” Where America Cheers. Varsity Brands, n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <http://www.uca.com>. Wilson, Leslie. The Ultimate Guide to Cheerleading. New York: Three Rivers, 2003. Print.
  • THE BOTTOM LINE... • Spirit is not something that can be found just anywhere. It is up to the Cheerleaders who put their bodies and abilities before themselves for the benefit of the team, and for the school. Without cheerleaders in high schools, there really is no way of telling what would happen to the definition of spirit, would it fall into a deep black hole, or would students be able to keep the spirit flowing? • I hope now students realize how important cheerleading is to their student body, but also, how much of an athletic sport it truly is. It is one of the many sports out there that uses mind, body, and will power. I hope the credibility of cheerleading is shown just like any other sport.