Standard Indicator Lesson Plan Ppt

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Standard Indicator Lesson Plan Ppt

  1. 1. Can You See the Heat? Do things that give off light also give off heat?
  2. 2. Science Standards: <ul><li>4.3.11 Investigate, observe, and explain that things that give off light often also give off heat. </li></ul><ul><li>http://dc.doe.in.gov/Standards/AcademicStandards/StandardSearch.aspx </li></ul>
  3. 3. Materials <ul><li>Materials in Science Box </li></ul><ul><li>Science Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Thermometer </li></ul><ul><li>Electric Candle Lamp and Light Bulb </li></ul><ul><li>Tealight </li></ul><ul><li>Observation worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Materials Student will Provide </li></ul><ul><li>Pencil </li></ul><ul><li>Eraser </li></ul><ul><li>Matches or lighter (with the assistance of an adult!!) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Definitions: <ul><li>Light - Something that makes things visible or affords illumination </li></ul><ul><li>Heat - A form of energy characterized by random motion at the molecular level </li></ul><ul><li>Energy - The ability to do work. There are many different types of energy, such as kinetic and potential energy, light, sound, and nuclear energy. </li></ul><ul><li>Temperature - The property of matter which reflects the quantity of energy of motion of the component particles </li></ul><ul><li>Matter - The term used for any type of material. It is anything that has mass and takes up space </li></ul>
  5. 5. Background Information <ul><li>Heat is a measurement of the total energy in a substance. That total energy is made up not only of the kinetic energies of the molecules of the substance, but total energy is also made up of the potential energies in the molecules. </li></ul><ul><li>Energy can be expressed in many different forms, including light and heat. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Walk-About <ul><li>Now that we know a little about light and heat, we are going to take a “walk-about” around the room. </li></ul><ul><li>Walk around the classroom and take note of things that give off light and things that give off heat. </li></ul><ul><li>What do you notice about the things that give off light? </li></ul><ul><li>-Record your thoughts in the Science Journal provided </li></ul><ul><li>What do you notice about the things that give off heat? </li></ul><ul><li>-Record your thoughts in the Science Journal provided </li></ul>
  7. 7. Pre-Activity <ul><li>Now that you have taken your walk-about, you are going to create a list of light sources. Please list the things both in the classroom and outside the classroom that you know give off light in the table provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Next, list things that give off heat in the table provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Looking at the chart, do you see some items that give off light AND heat? Please list those items in the table provided. There are a few items already listed to help you get started. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Table Light Heat Light AND Heat Fire Fire Fire
  9. 9. Activity <ul><li>You will be scientists today on your own quest. Your job is to investigate and observe three things that are sources of both light and heat. </li></ul><ul><li>Your first task is to see if the sun is a source of both light and heat. You will use the thermometer to determine if the sun gives off not only light, but heat as well. </li></ul><ul><li>Your next experiment will be to see if a light bulb gives off both light and heat. </li></ul><ul><li>Your final observation will be to determine if a candle gives off both light and heat. **This process must be completed with a responsible adult!** </li></ul>
  10. 10. Step 1of Sun Observation <ul><li>Remove the thermometer from the box. </li></ul><ul><li>Observe the number next to the red line on the thermometer and record the temperature on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Place the thermometer provided on a window, using the suction cup, in a sunny spot. Allow the thermometer to remain there while you conduct the next two experiments. </li></ul><ul><li>Before moving on to the next activity, predict whether or not the temperature will raise on the thermometer while it is stuck on the window. </li></ul><ul><li>Please record your prediction on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Light Bulb Test <ul><li>Remove the box containing the electric candle lamp. </li></ul><ul><li>Open the box and remove the lamp and light bulb. </li></ul><ul><li>Examine the light bulb. Do you think the light bulb is currently a source of heat? </li></ul><ul><li>Please record your thoughts on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Screw the light bulb into the lamp and plug in the lamp. The light bulb should now be glowing. </li></ul><ul><li>Now that the light bulb is lit, do you think it will be a source of heat? </li></ul><ul><li>Please record your prediction on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet. </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully, touch the light bulb. Do you feel heat coming from it? </li></ul><ul><li>Please record your findings on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Candle Test <ul><li>**This observation cannot be completed without a responsible adult*** </li></ul><ul><li>Remove the candle from the box. </li></ul><ul><li>As the candle is now, unlit, do you think that it is a source for heat? Please hold your hand over the wick of the candle. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe your findings on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Have an adult light the candle for you. </li></ul><ul><li>Now that the candle is lit, do you think it will be a source of heat? </li></ul><ul><li>Record your prediction on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul><ul><li>CAREFULLY , with the supervision of an adult , hold your hand above the candle to observe whether or not heat is radiating from it. </li></ul><ul><li>Please record your findings on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Step 2 of Sun Observation <ul><li>View the temperature of the thermometer now that it has been on the window in the sun. </li></ul><ul><li>Has the temperature changed? </li></ul><ul><li>Please record your findings on the Can You See the Heat? worksheet provided. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Did You See the Heat? <ul><li>Nice work! You have finished all of the experiments and the worksheet should be complete. </li></ul><ul><li>Please discuss with your fellow scientist the predictions that you made and the results of your findings. </li></ul><ul><li>Were your predictions accurate? </li></ul><ul><li>Were you surprised by any of the results? </li></ul>
  15. 15. Review Questions <ul><li>Please write down and answer the following questions in the Science Journal found in the box. </li></ul><ul><li>Are the sun, a candle, and a light bulb all sources of light? </li></ul><ul><li>-How do you know? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the sun, a candle, and a light bulb all sources of heat? </li></ul><ul><li>-How do you know? </li></ul><ul><li>Are all light sources also heat sources? </li></ul>
  16. 16. Resources <ul><li>Clip Art </li></ul><ul><li>http:// chemistry.about.com/sitesearch.htm?terms =definition%20of%20light%20&SUName= chemistry&TopNode =99 </li></ul><ul><li>http:// dictionary.reference.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://dc.doe.in.gov/Standards/AcademicStandards/StandardSearch.aspx </li></ul>

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