Design It for Learning - Summary Handout
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Design It for Learning - Summary Handout

on

  • 1,115 views

Summary handout on how we learn and the multimedia learning principles covered in the presentation - Colorado Association of Library Conference, October 15, 2011.

Summary handout on how we learn and the multimedia learning principles covered in the presentation - Colorado Association of Library Conference, October 15, 2011.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,115
Views on SlideShare
1,115
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Design It for Learning - Summary Handout Design It for Learning - Summary Handout Document Transcript

  • Design It for Learning: Using Multimedia Effectively in Presentations and More  CALCON11 | October 15, 2011   Mary Beth Faccioli, MLIS  faccioli_m@cde.state.co.us  Beginning Concepts   Transfer: New knowledge and skills must be retrieved from long‐term memory during  performance.   Multimedia learning: Learning from words and pictures.  How We Learn  1) Learning is active.  Learning occurs when learners engage in cognitive processing:  selecting relevant material, organizing it into a coherent structure, and integrating it with  prior knowledge.  2) Capacity is limited.  Only a few pieces of information can be processed in working memory  at one time.  3) We process in dual channels.  We have separate channels for processing visual/pictorial  information and auditory/verbal information.  The Principles Multimedia Principle: Words and pictures are better than words alone.   Why? Cognitive load is balanced between dual channels; learner actively makes  associations between words and pictures to deepen learning.   What we see in practice: Too much text.   What we can do: Incorporate graphics that support instructional goals.  Coherence Principle: Interesting yet irrelevant material can hurt learning.   Why? It overloads working memory.   What we see in practice: Decorative or confusing images; unnecessary music or sounds.   What we can do: Limit use of these elements. 
  •  Redundancy Principle: The same information presented in multiple forms hurts learning.   Why? Requires unnecessary processing—comparing and reconciling—of both narration  and on‐screen text.   What we see in practice: Lengthy text phrases are read aloud to learners.   What we can do: Don’t underestimate the power of your oral presentation.  Narrate, use  supporting graphics, present key ideas with text to support memory.   Related: Spoken words with pictures are preferable to written words with pictures  (modality principle).  Split Attention Principle: Don’t require learners to divide attention between multiple sources of information.    Why?  Difficult to hold multiple sources of information in working memory while trying to  select, organize and integrate.   What we see in practice:   a) Written text and spoken words are out of alignment (i.e., completely different).  b) Text and pictures are far from each other in time or space.   What we can do:   a) Ensure written text and spoken words align.  b) Ensure words and pictures are contiguous in time and space.      From Clark, R.C. and Mayer, R. E. (2008). Elearning and the Science of Instruction (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.