Government, Economy & Revolution 2.0

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A discussion about the opportunities and difficulties presented by the idea of digital democracy through the lens of the post-industrial revolution. Presented at Barcamp Armenia 2009 in Yerevan.

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Government, Economy & Revolution 2.0

  1. Digital Democracy 1 Intros
  2. Digital Democracy Governments, economies, and revolutions in the 21st century (and what to do about them) 1 Intros
  3. Digital Democracy Governments, economies, and revolutions in the 21st century (and what to do about them) 2 Intros
  4. Digital Has the internet changed everything? 3 You all believe this, otherwise you probably wouldn’t be here.
  5. Digital Has the internet changed everything? 3 You all believe this, otherwise you probably wouldn’t be here.
  6. Democracy What does this mean anymore? 4 *all eligible members of the society (citizens) have equal access to power. *soviet democracy - workers' councils called quot;sovietsquot;, consisting of worker-elected delegates, form organs of power possessing both legislative and executive power. (arguably changed w/ Stalin)
  7. Democracy What does this mean anymore? 4 *all eligible members of the society (citizens) have equal access to power. *soviet democracy - workers' councils called quot;sovietsquot;, consisting of worker-elected delegates, form organs of power possessing both legislative and executive power. (arguably changed w/ Stalin)
  8. Democracy What does this mean anymore? 4 *all eligible members of the society (citizens) have equal access to power. *soviet democracy - workers' councils called quot;sovietsquot;, consisting of worker-elected delegates, form organs of power possessing both legislative and executive power. (arguably changed w/ Stalin)
  9. Representative http://www.flickr.com/photos/dunechaser 5 *rep=elected officials *direct=initiative, referendum and recall. Referendums can include the ability to hold a binding referendum on whether a given law should be scrapped. This effectively grants the populace a veto on government legislation. Recalls gives the people the right to remove from office elected officials before the end of their term. *is it possible to have mass communication with the government where people are more expressive of their ideas and government is more responsive?
  10. Representative Direct http://www.flickr.com/photos/dunechaser 5 *rep=elected officials *direct=initiative, referendum and recall. Referendums can include the ability to hold a binding referendum on whether a given law should be scrapped. This effectively grants the populace a veto on government legislation. Recalls gives the people the right to remove from office elected officials before the end of their term. *is it possible to have mass communication with the government where people are more expressive of their ideas and government is more responsive?
  11. Representative Direct http://www.flickr.com/photos/dunechaser 5 *rep=elected officials *direct=initiative, referendum and recall. Referendums can include the ability to hold a binding referendum on whether a given law should be scrapped. This effectively grants the populace a veto on government legislation. Recalls gives the people the right to remove from office elected officials before the end of their term. *is it possible to have mass communication with the government where people are more expressive of their ideas and government is more responsive?
  12. Arc tic O cean Greenland Sea Beaufort Sea Norwegian Sea GREENLAND (DENMARK) ICELAND NORWAY U.S.A. SWEDEN RUSSIA FINLAND Hudson Bay ESTONIA Labrador Sea Bering Sea LATVIA DENMARK Sea of Okhotsk Gulf of Alaska RUSSIA LITHUANIA U.K. CANADA BELARUS IRELAND POLAND NETHERLANDS GERMANY BELGIUM TRANSNISTRIA (MOLDOVA) CZECH REP. LUXEMBOURG SLOVAKIA UKRAINE LIECHTENSTEIN Nor th Atlantic O cean KAZAKHSTAN MOLDOVA SWITZERLAND AUSTRIA HUNGARY MONGOLIA SLOVENIA ROMANIA CHECHNYA (RUSSIA) FRANCE ITALY CROATIA SERBIA BOSNIA & HERZ. ABKHAZIA (GEORGIA) MONTENEGRO BULGARIA MONACO UZBEKISTAN GEORGIA ANDORRA SAN MARINO MACEDONIA KYRGYZSTAN AZERBAIJAN KOSOVO (SERBIA) PORTUGAL ARMENIA GREECE NORTH KOREA TURKMENISTAN SPAIN TURKEY UNITED STATES OF AMERICA TAJIKISTAN ALBANIA NAGORNO Nor th Paci c O cean NORTHERN KARABAKH CYPRUS MALTA SOUTH KOREA CHINA (ARMENIA/AZERBAIJAN) KASHMIR (PAKISTAN) SYRIA CYPRUS TUNISIA AFGHANISTAN LEBANON KASHMIR (INDIA) IRAQ ISRAELI OCCUPIED/PAL. AUTHO. East MOROCCO IRAN JAPAN ISRAEL China Sea TIBET (CHINA) JORDAN NEPAL KUWAIT PAKISTAN BHUTAN ALGERIA LIBYA BAHRAIN Gulf of Mexico BAHAMAS EGYPT QATAR MEXICO Nor th Paci c O cean WESTERN SAHARA (MOROCCO) U.A.E. TAIWAN INDIA PUERTO RICO (U.S.A.) SAUDI ARABIA BURMA HONG KONG (CHINA) CUBA LAOS MAURITANIA BANGLADESH JAMAICA OMAN ST. KITTS & NEVIS MALI South China Sea HAITI ANTIGUA & BARBUDA BELIZE NIGER YEMEN Bay of Bengal DOM. REP. HONDURAS CHAD SENEGAL ERITREA THAILAND Caribbean Sea DOMINICA VIETNAM CAPE VERDE MARSHALL ST. LUCIA GUATEMALA SUDAN THE GAMBIA GRENADA PHILIPPINES ISLANDS ST. VINCENT & GRENADINES CAMBODIA EL SALVADOR NICARAGUA BURKINA DJIBOUTI BARBADOS FASO GUINEA BISSAU GUINEA BENIN NIGERIA TRINIDAD & TOBAGO SOMALILAND (SOMALIA) COSTA RICA SRI LANKA MICRONESIA ETHIOPIA CÔTE GHANA VENEZUELA GUYANA SIERRA LEONE CENTRAL AFRICAN D’IVOIRE KIRIBATI SURINAME PANAMA NAURU REPUBLIC CAMEROON BRUNEI FRENCH GUIANA (FRANCE) TOGO LIBERIA COLOMBIA MALDIVES PALAU MALAYSIA SOMALIA EQUATORIAL GUINEA UGANDA ECUADOR SAO TOME & PRINCIPE KENYA TUVALU SINGAPORE GABON RWANDA CONGO (KINSHASA) BURUNDI CONGO (BRAZZAVILLE) PERU INDONESIA PAPUA SOLOMON NEW GUINEA TANZANIA ISLANDS SEYCHELLES EAST TIMOR Indian O cean BRAZIL COMOROS ANGOLA SAMOA ZAMBIA VANUATU MAURITIUS BOLIVIA ZIMBABWE FIJI MALAWI NAMIBIA MADAGASCAR MOZAMBIQUE TONGA BOTSWANA PARAGUAY S outh Atlantic O cean AUSTRALIA CHILE SWAZILAND ARGENTINA LESOTHO SOUTH AFRICA URUGUAY S outh Pac i c O cean Tasman Sea NEW ZEALAND Survey Findings e Map of Freedom re ects the ndings of Freedom for open political competition, a climate of respect for rights are absent, and basic civil liberties are widely and House’s Freedom in the World 2008 survey, which civil liberties, significant independent civic life, and systematically denied. Freedom Status Country Breakdown Population Breakdown (in billions) rates the level of political rights and civil liberties in independent media. Freedom House is an independent nongovernmental FREE 90 (47%) 3.03 (46%) 193 countries and 15 related and disputed territories Partly Free countries are characterized by some organization that supports the expansion of freedom during 2007. Based on these ratings, countries are restrictions on political rights and civil liberties, worldwide. PARTLY FREE 60 (31%) 1.19 (18%) divided into three categories: Free, Partly Free, and often in a context of corruption, weak rule of law, NOT FREE 43 (22%) 2.39 (36%) Not Free. www.freedomhouse.org ethnic strife, or civil war. A Free country is one where there is broad scope A Not Free country is one where basic political TOTAL 193 (100%) 6.61 (100%) Liberal vs. Illiberal 6 *illiberal - it has regular, free, fair, and competitive elections to fill the principal positions of power in the country, but it does not qualify as Free in civil liberties and political rights *currently seeing a rise in governments censoring online communications.
  13. Changing Standards? O B A MA 7 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  14. Vote Different http://www.flickr.com/photos/callipygian/ 8 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  15. Vote Different 5 Elements Strategy: 1. Empowered volunteers 2. Social networks 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations http://www.flickr.com/photos/callipygian/ 8 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  16. Vote Accountability I elected you according to your issues, will you actually keep your promises? 9 representative democracy: not necessarily accountable to voters
  17. Government Accountability 10 Recovery.gov is collecting and aggregating info from all recipients of federal stimulus/bailout money. They will then be republishing it all in machine readable format. However, this introduces a layer of abstraction, and in strict terms, an opportunity for corruption. Transparency advocates push for access to data at the source — in this case, directly from each individual recipient. This is, of course, not practical at the moment, and many new transparency-related services are doing the hard work of transforming the data to make it accessible (in a geoserver-ish kind of way).
  18. Government Accountability 10 Recovery.gov is collecting and aggregating info from all recipients of federal stimulus/bailout money. They will then be republishing it all in machine readable format. However, this introduces a layer of abstraction, and in strict terms, an opportunity for corruption. Transparency advocates push for access to data at the source — in this case, directly from each individual recipient. This is, of course, not practical at the moment, and many new transparency-related services are doing the hard work of transforming the data to make it accessible (in a geoserver-ish kind of way).
  19. Citizen Accountability 11 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  20. Citizen Accountability 11 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  21. Citizen Accountability 11 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  22. Citizen Accountability 11 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  23. Transparency “If I knew this, I could do that.” If I knew government spending on social services, I could create a map to inform resettled refugees of the best access to services for their community.  If I knew the leaders of community centers and churches in my neighborhood, I could invite them to my coop board meeting to talk about building mutually beneficial community relationships. 12 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  24. Solutions http://www.flickr.com/photos/whiteafrican/2736565604/ What are your thoughts and ideas? Do you see barriers or solutions? Tweet #digidem 13 V. key finding 4 - Educational Opportunities & Hope for Future 1. The youth featured in this report have sought to overcome these obstacles in their quest for education, employment and other options unavailable in their homeland. Those who are able to achieve further education are empowered by their newfound knowledge and skills, which increase their capacity and motivation to work for their communities. 2. diversity of opinions, but they are connected in schools and online 3. tech is also connecting them to broader ideas around the world and support
  25. Solutions Digital Democracy Democracy • Empowerment of the • Being heard individual • Minority rights • Fall of hierarchies • Accountability and • Wider participation transparency • Democratization of • Advocacy for change information • Access http://www.flickr.com/photos/whiteafrican/2736565604/ What are your thoughts and ideas? Do you see barriers or solutions? Tweet #digidem 13 V. key finding 4 - Educational Opportunities & Hope for Future 1. The youth featured in this report have sought to overcome these obstacles in their quest for education, employment and other options unavailable in their homeland. Those who are able to achieve further education are empowered by their newfound knowledge and skills, which increase their capacity and motivation to work for their communities. 2. diversity of opinions, but they are connected in schools and online 3. tech is also connecting them to broader ideas around the world and support
  26. Active Citizenry Defined by citizens 14 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  27. Active Citizenry Defined by citizens 14 The 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s grassroots strategy has ushered in a new era of utilizing technology to engage and empower masses to bring “change.” The strategy combined five core elements: 1. A web-empowered volunteer network (ie. iPhone application) 2. Social network presence (ie. Facebook) 3. Bloggers 4. YouTube viral videos 5. Micro-donations Proving itself successful, this model of change is now being replicated. Yet there are few organizations that understand how to implement this kind of project. While most are currently trying to catch up, we have built strong connections with our target population and explored their internal technological capacities, external network capabilities and their needs and interests in this type of work.
  28. Digital Democracy Governments, economies, and revolutions in the 21st century (and what to do about them) 15 Intros
  29. Industrial Revolution Out with the old, in with the new 16 *steam-powered ships, railways, and later in the 19th century with the internal combustion engine and electrical power generation *tech- Textile manufacture / Metallurgy/ Mining / Steam power / Chemicals / Machine tools / Gas lighting / Glass making / agriculture *transport - Coastal sail Navigable rivers / Canals / Roads / Railways *social effects - Factories and urbanisation / Child labour/ Housing / Luddites **Shirkey - “Things like public libraries and museums, increasingly broad education for children, elected leaders--a lot of things we like--didn't happen until having all of those people together stopped seeming like a crisis and started seeming like an asset. It wasn't until people started thinking of this as a vast civic surplus, one they could design for rather than just dissipate, that we started to get what we think of now as an industrial society. “
  30. Post-Industrial Revolution Will mass collaboration change the way we operate? 17 **shirkey - cognitive surplus *80-20 rule Red Lake gold mine covers 55,000 acres of western Ontario / Goldcorp, which owns the mine / chief executive, Rob McEwen / 1999 gold drying up / they abandoned the industry's tradition of secrecy, making thousands of pages of complex geological data available online, and offering $575,000 in prize money to those who could successfully identify where on the Red Lake property the undiscovered veins of gold might lie. Retired geologists, graduate students and military officers around the world chipped in. They recommended 110 targets, half of which Goldcorp hadn't previously identified. Four-fifths of them turned out to contain gold. Since then, the company's value has rocketed from $100m to $9bn,
  31. NGOs & Civil Society Updating community organizing & journalism 18 *Obama was a community organizer *More bloggers jailed than journalists *Socioscope NGO Armenia - how to communicate with the marzes (shirak, armavir, lori)?? remember! all technology is technology. having text messages come in and paper go out can be an effective way of creating community. engage with the tools that exist and make sure that plans are cross-platform
  32. Digital Democracy Governments, economies, and revolutions in the 21st century (and what to do about them) 19 Intros
  33. Saffron Revolution www.uscampaignforburma.org Mobile phones were used by monks and other citizen journalists to send information to the outside world. 20 E - Let's start with the Saffron Revolution. In Sept. 2007, (explanation of protests). Demands. They were the largest protests the nation had seen since 1988. 20 years ago, the military killed over 3,000 protesters. This time, the loss of life was much less because of cell phones, which played a role in both reporting and coordinating. M - Closed society. On the reporting side, monks carried camera phones and they and other citizen journalists sent mobile images, video and voice information to the outside world. E - Coordination also happened through mobiles, thanks to trusted networks between contacts inside and contact on border. example: joining protest 1km away and not knowing.
  34. Twitter Revolution Twitter organized a flashmob. Being linked to other social networks staged a mass protest. 21 *results? activist charged and sought. violent backlash. growing fear of social protest in CIS. *digital refugees *anti-communist demonstrators set a bonfire on the steps of parliament, Tuesday April 7, 2009, in Chisinau, Moldova, during protests against the declared results of Sunday's parliamentary elections. Many thousands of demonstrators attempted to storm the presidential palace and parliament in a violent demonstration against what they said were fraudulent elections. Associated Press/John McConnico *quot;Help Twitter the Revolution in Moldovaquot; protest outside the UN - http://www.flickr.com/photos/creepysleepy/3429118253/
  35. Zimbabwean Elections Mobile photography and the daily news. 22 results? activist charged and sought. violent backlash. growing fear of social protest in CIS.
  36. Kenyan Elections Mobile mapping and violence security. 23 results? activist charged and sought. violent backlash. growing fear of social protest in CIS.
  37. Practical Challenges Citizens Government $ Corporations $ 24 Censorship campaigns in UK, Australia, Canada give extra legitimacy to campaigns in China, Thailand, Vietnam Free and open source. the values of democracy in the technology itself. Pirated software - viruses, corporate hold on data F/OSS - supporting community Open government is the political doctrine which holds that the business of government and state administration should be opened at all levels to effective public scrutiny and oversight. In its broadest
  38. D 2 Digital Democracy Working with local partners to connect people through new technologies that encourage education, communication and civic participation. Mark Belinsky - MBelinsky@dtwo.org - @mbelinsky DTWO.ORG 25 Intros

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