Business Week 2011 - Georgiadou
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Business Week 2011 - Georgiadou

on

  • 545 views

Business Week 2011 - 13 May

Business Week 2011 - 13 May

Statistics

Views

Total Views
545
Views on SlideShare
484
Embed Views
61

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

1 Embed 61

http://www.mbasociety.gr 61

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Business Week 2011 - Georgiadou Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Go Mobile, go globalUniversity of Piraeus
    13/05/2011
    www.pwc.gr
  • 2. Content
    International experience
    Cultural factors
    PwC Global Mobility programme
    2
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 3. What do we mean with international experience?
    3
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 4. What are the drivers of global mobility
    4
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 5. What are the benefits for the organizations?
    5
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 6. What are the benefits for you?
    6
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 7. Who is the right candidate for an international assignment?
    Three important personality traits:
    • Flexibility
    • 8. Judgment
    • 9. Maturity
    7
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 10. Content
    International experience
    Cultural factors
    PwC Global Mobility programme
    8
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 11. What is culture
    9
    13/5/2011
    • Culture is a set of beliefs and values about what is desirable and undesirable in a community of people and a set of formal or informal practices to support the values.
    • 12. An individual is not just a member of one cultural group, but of many groups.
    Global Mobility
    Nationality
    Religion
    Gender
    Social Back-ground
    Company
    Ethnicity
    Profession
    Education
  • 13. Cultural misinterpretations
    We are looking through the lens of our own cultural expectations. Unconsciously we expect other people to think, feel and act the way we do. When they don‘t conform to our expectations, we put our own interpretations on their behavior. But when you are working across cultures, interpretation often becomes misinterpretation.
    10
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 14. Cultural misinterpretations
    11
    13/5/2011
    • Unconsciously, you bring your own cultural frame of interpretation to any situation. Postpone interpretation until you know enough about the other culture.
    • 15. Around 50-60% of behavior is influenced by national culture
    “To know one’s self is wisdom
    But to know one’s neighbor is genius.”
    Global Mobility
  • 16. The culture shock curve
    PwC
    The Culture Shock Curve
    Positive
    mood
    Negative
    mood
    Honey-
    moon
    Disorientation
    Adjustment
    Recovery
    Hostility
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 17. PwC
    We don‘t see things as they are. We see things as we are.
    Visual reality, behavior
    Norms & rules
    Values
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 18. Power Distance
    Small Power Distance
    • Hierarchy means inequality of roles, established for convenience
    • 19. Superiors consider subordinates to be „people like me“ and vice versa
    • 20. Superiors are accessible
    • 21. All should have equal rights
    • 22. Those in power should try to look less powerful than they are
    PwC
    Large Power Distance
    • Hierarchy means essential inequality
    • 23. Superiors consider subordinates to be a different kind of people and vice versa
    • 24. Superiors are inaccessible
    • 25. Power-holders are entitled to privileges
    • 26. Those in power should try to look as powerful as possible
    Source: Motivation, Leadership and Organization, Hofstede, Organizational Dynamics
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 27. Individualism
    PwC
    High Individualism
    • Everybody is born alone
    • 28. Identity is based in the individual
    • 29. The emphasis is on individual initiative and achievement, leadership is the ideal
    • 30. There is a need for written rules and regulations
    Low Individualism
    • Everyone is born as part of an extended family and group
    • 31. Identity is based in the social system
    • 32. The emphasis is on belonging to organisations, membership is the ideal
    • 33. There should be as few rules as possible
    Source: Motivation, Leadership and Organization, Hofstede, Organizational Dynamics
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 34. Femininity vs. Masculinity
    PwC
    Masculinity
    • Gender roles in society are clearly differentiated
    • 35. Performance is what counts
    • 36. You live in order to work
    • 37. Money and things are important
    • 38. One admires the successful achiever
    • 39. Men should be assertive. Women should be nurturing
    Femininity
    • Gender roles in society are more fluid
    • 40. Quality of life is important
    • 41. You work in order to live
    • 42. People and environment are important
    • 43. One sympathises with the unfortunate
    • 44. Men can also assume nurturing roles
    Source: Motivation, Leadership and Organization, Hofstede, Organizational Dynamics
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 45. Uncertainty avoidance
    PwC
    High Uncertainty Avoidance
    • The uncertainty inherent in life is felt as a continuous threat that must be fought
    • 46. There is a drive to conform
    • 47. Risks are managed or avoided
    • 48. There is a need for written rules and regulations
    • 49. Deference/respect is automatically given to authorities
    Low Uncertainty Avoidance
    • The uncertainty inherent in life is more easily accepted
    • 50. Deviation is not considered threatening, tolerance is shown
    • 51. There is more willingness to take risks in life
    • 52. There should be as few rules as possible
    • 53. The authorities are there to serve the citizens
    Source: Motivation, Leadership and Organization, Hofstede, Organizational Dynamics
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 54. Polychronic - Monochronic
    PwC
    Monochronic
    • Do one thing at a time & concentrate on the job
    • 55. Take time commitments (deadlines, schedules) seriously
    • 56. Adhere religiously to plans
    • 57. Schedule coordinates activity, appointment times are rigid
    Polychronic
    • Do many things at once, are subject to interruptions
    • 58. Consider time commitments an objective to be achieved, if possible
    • 59. Change plans often and easily
    • 60. Interpersonal relations coordinate activity, appointment times are flexible
    Source: Motivation, Leadership and Organization, Hofstede, Organizational Dynamics
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 61. High vs. low context cultures
    High-Context
    • Establish social trust first
    • 62. Value personal relations and goodwill
    • 63. Negotiations slow and ritualistic
    • 64. Agreement by general trust
    • 65. Less verbally explicit communication, less written/formal information
    • 66. More knowledge is below the waterline - implicit, patterns that are not fully conscious, hard to explain even if you are a member of that culture
    PwC
    Low-Context
    • Get down to business first
    • 67. Value expertise and performance
    • 68. Negotiations as efficient as possible
    • 69. Agreement by specific, legalistic contract
    • 70. Rule oriented, people play by external rules
    • 71. Written/formal information, direct language
    • 72. More knowledge is above the waterline - explicit, consciously organized
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 73. High vs. low context cultures
    PwC
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 74. Data and dialogue orientation
    Dialogue-oriented
    Latin Americans
    Italians, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Mediterranean
    Arabs, Africans
    Indians, Pakistanis
    Chileans
    Eastern Europeans
    Slavs
    Chinese, Japanese, Koreans
    British, Australians, Benelux
    Scandinavians
    North Americans, New Zealanders, South Africans
    Germans, Swiss, Finns
    Data-oriented
    PwC
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 75. Communication styles
    Sequential communication: One person speaks, while the others wait for him/her to finish before they speak. This leads to a task-oriented, direct and focussed discussion style
    Intermittent communication: One person speaks, which is followed by a pause, allowing time for the group to reflect. Then another person speaks and there may be more silence before another person comments.
    PwC
    SEQUENTIAL COMMUNICATION
    Examples: Germany, USA, Sweden
    Speaker 1: ****** ****** ******
    Speaker 2: ******* ***
    Speaker 3: *********
    INTERMITTENT COMMUNICATION
    Examples: Japan and Britain
    Speaker 1: ****** *
    Speaker 2: * ***
    Speaker 3: * ********
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 76. Communication styles
    Simultaneous communication:
    People frequently go from one subject to another and think nothing of interrupting each other. This style is considered to be creative and relationship-enhancing. Interruption is not considered rude but rather a sign of emotional interest in the conversation.
    PwC
    SIMULTANEOUS COMMUNICATION
    Examples: France, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Greece
    Speaker 1: ************* ****** ****** *********
    Speaker 2: ***** ******** ********* ********
    Speaker 3: ******** ********* ********* **********
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 77. Content
    International experience
    Cultural factors
    PwC Global Mobility programme
    24
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 78. PwC Global Mobility programme
    • 2500 PwC people on international assignments around the globe
    • 79. Four types of International assignments for staff: a) Strategic Deployed, b) Development Deployed, c) Short term assignments and d) International Transfers.
    • 80. Level of PwC investment differs by assignment type
    • 81. Basic elements of our mobility programme: Business case and Repatriation plan.
    25
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 82. EPIC programme
    • EPIC is Early PwC International Challenge
    • 83. It has been started on 1st July 2008 and has over 450 assignees deployed to 40 countries.
    • 84. All high performing employees below the level of Manager are eligible for a two year international assignment.
    • 85. Employees would generally participate in an EPIC assignment in their 3rd, 4th , or 5th year with the firm.
    26
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 86. Global Mobility in Greece
    • It is a talent development tool for our high performing employees.
    • 87. Global Mobility programme is re - launched on 1/7/2010 in Greece
    • 88. Current size: Five PwC people at Los Angeles, New York and Washington D.C. for two years. Eight were sent to New York from January – April 2010. Three will start their assignments on Luxemburg and Rotterdam on September 2011.
    • 89. Leadership is supporting the programme and our goal is to increase the number of assignees the next two years.
    27
    13/5/2011
    Global Mobility
  • 90. Thank you! 
    © 2011 PricewaterhouseCoopers SA and PricewaterhouseCoopers Business Solutions SA. All rights reserved. In this document, “PwC” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers SA and PricewaterhouseCoopers Business Solutions SA, which is a member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each member firm of which is a separate legal entity.