URA Task Force - PDNA

615 views
538 views

Published on

Portland (Oregon) Downtown Neighborhood Association presentation to Portland Development Commission Urban Renewal Area Task Force

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
615
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

URA Task Force - PDNA

  1. 1. Jennifer  Geske Chair,  Land  Use  &  Transporta7on  Commi9ee September  16,  2009
  2. 2. Portland  Downtown  Neighborhood  Associa5on • Boundary – Parts  of  South  Park  Blocks, Downtown  Waterfront,  River District  and  North  Macadam Urban  Renewal  Areas • Membership – Anyone  who  lives,  works,  or goes  to  school  downtown • Diverse  community  with different  perspec7ves • Thriving  in  the  face  of constant  changes September  16,  2009
  3. 3. Community  History  & Percep7on  with  Urban  Renewal • Urban  renewal  built  many  ameni7es  that  a9ract  PDNA members  to  downtown • Community  aRtude  towards  urban  renewal: – Suppor7ve – Tool  to  shape  downtown’s  future • Ameni7es  in  the  neighborhood  versus  neighborhood ameni7es  –  PDNA  as  stakeholder September  16,  2009
  4. 4. PDNA  Downtown  Vision • Vision  -­‐  regional  center  showcasing leadership  in  sustainable  economic development  and  livability  while  also being  a  diverse  community  providing accessible  housing,  transporta6on, public  spaces,  cultural  ameni6es  and business  opportuni6es  to  all • Characteris7cs – Diversity – Balance – Accessibility – Community September  16,  2009
  5. 5. Key  Issues/Barriers • Affordability  –  middle  class, families,  small  business  owners • Community  building – Integra7on  of  day  users  (students, business  community) – Free/available/centrally  located community  gathering  space • Connec7vity  barriers  –  I-­‐405, Naito  Parkway,  Burnside • Livability  –  reality  &  percep7on September  16,  2009
  6. 6. Blight • Dividing  corridors  –  spur development  along  the  corridors • Rehabilita7on  of  exis7ng buildings • Underu7lized  sites  –  surface parking  lots,  single-­‐story buildings,  day-­‐use  only  on  ground floor. September  16,  2009
  7. 7. Cri5cal  Needs • Mixed-­‐income,  mixed-­‐use  development • Affordable  housing  for  low-­‐/middle-­‐income families,  workforce  and  seniors • Public  open  spaces – Implement  Park  Avenue  Vision – Public  open  spaces  west  of  10th with  recrea7onal  facili7es • Dividing  corridors • Community  building • Will  not  happen  without  TIF or  other  subsidies September  16,  2009
  8. 8. Opportuni5es • Opportuni7es – Urban  center  as  a  logical  place  to pilot  design  incen7ves  and sustainability  technologies – Downtown  use  pa9ern  supports mixed-­‐use/mixed-­‐income development September  16,  2009
  9. 9. Job  Crea5on • Implement  exis7ng  economic  development  ini7a7ves: – City’s  Economic  Development  Strategy – Downtown  Retail  Strategy • Create/retain  highly  trained  residen7al  workforce – Live/Work  downtown  in  jobs  matching  training – A9ract  poten7al  employers  with  diverse  talent  pool September  16,  2009
  10. 10. Job  Crea5on • Business  support  program  –  coordinate  between PBA,  SBA,  educa7onal  ins7tu7ons • A9ract  more  residents  to  support  retail September  16,  2009
  11. 11. Housing  Full-­‐spectrum  of  housing  ranges  Preserva7on  of  sec7on  8  housing  Crea7on  of  affordable  family,  workforce,  senior housing  Manage  transi7on  from  affordable  to market  rate  housing  Mixed-­‐income  development  Balance  housing  types  in  each  area  Avoid  concentra7on  Private/public  open  spaces  Integrated  with  development  projects September  16,  2009
  12. 12. Improved  Livability • Quality  Places – South  Park  Blocks • Green  streets/fes7val  streets  –  Park  Avenue  Vision • Remove  Parking  –  improve  pedestrian/family friendliness • Make  Park/9th  bike  boulevards • Integrate  cultural  ameni7es  and  make  cultural events  accessible  to  all  demographics  -­‐  TKTS  booth for  same-­‐day  discount  7ckets  to  cultural  events – Along  I-­‐405  Corridor • Improve  over-­‐passes  for  pedestrian  and  bicycle safety/experience  –  cycle  track  on  SW Jefferson/Columbia • Park/public  space  to  spur  development • Parks – ‘Micro’  parks  west  of  10th  Avenue  incorporated  in development  projects September  16,  2009
  13. 13. Improved  Livability • Family  Friendliness – Affordable  family-­‐sized  housing – Accessible  public  open  spaces/recrea7onal  facili7es – Schools  –  develop  grade  school  &  allow  space  for  future  middle  school at  Lincoln  HS  site – Daycare  facili7es  at  mixed-­‐used  buildings • Crime  Reduc7on – Storefront  improvements – Community  involvement September  16,  2009
  14. 14. Sustainability • PSU  eco-­‐district,  Montgomery  green  street – Connect  with  South  Park  Blocks  and  Park  Avenue Vision • Sustainable  building  technologies – New  developments – Upgrade  exis7ng  buildings • Community  effort  for  sustainable  eco-­‐system • Integrate  community  perspec7ve  in  Oregon Sustainability  Center • Economic  sustainability • Social  sustainability September  16,  2009
  15. 15. Leveraging  Current  Assets And  Adjacent  Areas • More  centralized  presence  of major  ins7tu7ons – PSU  &  UO • I-­‐405  crossings – Connec7vity  with  adjacent neighborhoods September  16,  2009
  16. 16. Development/Funding  Priori5es • Focus  on  cataly7c  projects – Increase  property  values – Maximize  development  poten7al  of  adjacent  areas • Tax  exempt  projects  are  important – Parks,  streetscapes,  infrastructure,  etc.  –  improve  development poten7al • Mixed-­‐income,  mixed-­‐use  development – Provide  taxable  values  in  affordable  housing  projects September  16,  2009

×