3. how to make tea in a cafe or restaurant - sunshine beach state high school - 11.10.2013

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Helping students to understand how to serve good quality tea in a café or restaurant. The slides also explain about the different types of tea, the differing temperatures and steeping times and the …

Helping students to understand how to serve good quality tea in a café or restaurant. The slides also explain about the different types of tea, the differing temperatures and steeping times and the different types of teaware that they may see in hospitaliTEA.

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  • This presentation describes how to make tea in a café or restaurant.At the end of the presentation we will have a quick demonstration on how to make tea in a café or restaurant followed by a Chinese Gong Fu Tea Ceremony.
  • When serving tea, remember to close the canister/packaging so that moisture, light, oxygen that could re-enter the packaging is kept to a minimum.
  • Re-heated water:If a kettle is used to make tea, do not reboil the water as this will boil the oxygen out of the water.Oxygen is required for the water’s taste, otherwise it will taste stale.Always use freshly drawn water.
  • If using water from a coffee machine, the water tends to be around 95oC.If making tea in a teapot, add cold water to the bottom of the teapot before adding hot water.If making tea in a cup or mug, add a little cold water at the bottom to bring the temperature down.
  • This is a table that summarises temperatures and approximate steeping times for each tea category.
  • We will explain each of the different tea ware types in the following slides
  • Teapot with metal infuser is the most common form of tea ware.Advantages:It is convenient (the leaves are contained in one place – easy to remove and wash out later).The teapot looks aesthetically pleasing (in that the metal infuser is hidden away inside).If the teapot has a good spout then it’s easy for the customer to pour out too.Having an infuser makes the teapot easier to clean.Disadvantage:The full flavour of the tea is not fully realised if the hot water level is only touching the bottom of the leaves. This is a common problem if the infuser doesn’t touch the bottom of the teapot (such as the teapot on the left).Some tea such as oolong have large leaves, therefore if you make a tea from a single serving teapot, the metal infuser inside might not give enough room for the leaves to unfurl, and hence the full flavour of the tea is not fully realised.Glass teapots whilst very pretty to look at, can break easily. Most cafés and restaurants prefer ceramic.
  • Infuser without teapot served on a dishInfuser sometimes has a handle and some don’tAdvantages:It is convenient (the leaves are contained in one place – easy to remove and wash out later).No teapot requiredIf served in a glass cup, it is pleasing to the eye for the customer.Disadvantage:Can be messy for the customer if they want to take the infuser out of the cup (although you can see from this picture that the cup infuser and infuser dish is all served on one plate, which would be less messier than if the three items were served individually.Metal infuser doesn’t look as nice as a teapot where the infuser is hidden away.Same problem for larger leafed tea such as oolong (as mentioned in previous slide)
  • The Tea ball is placed inside a teapot or inside a cup. If the tea ball is placed inside a cup, a dish may be given for the customer to place the ball into (although for most places, the saucer is likely to be used).Advantages:It is convenient (the leaves are contained in one place – easy to remove and wash out later).If the tea ball is placed inside a teapot it will look aesthetically pleasing to the customer (as the tea ball is hidden away inside).If placed in a cup, it is easy for the customer to take the tea ball out and place on a dish/saucerDisadvantage:Some tea, such as oolong teas have very large leaves, therefore the leaves have very little space inside to unfurl. This means that the full flavour of the tea may not be fully realised.The clasp (which closes the tea ball) can be a little tricky to use if service staff haven’t used them before (although you do get used to it after a while).
  • Infuser pincer is a similar concept to a tea ball except that the chain on a tea ball is replaced with a pincer device.Advantages:It is convenient (the leaves are contained in one place – easy to remove and wash out later).Teapot not requiredThe infuser pincer can actually be used as a stirrer as well as an infuserDisadvantage:Some tea, such as oolong teas have very large leaves, therefore the leaves have very little space inside to unfurl. This means that the full flavour of the tea may not be fully realised.The pincer is quite difficult to open especially when new but gets easier when used regularly.Not as aesthetically pleasing as a teapot.
  • Concept of infuser sticks is the same as the Infuser pincer.Advantages / disadvantages are also the same.
  • A t-sac is an empty tea bag. Loose tea leaves are placed inside them and then placed inside a teapot, a takeaway cup.Advantages:It is convenient (the leaves are contained in a tea bag – easy to remove)T-sac are not bleached so the tea leaves and t-sac can be composted (or thrown in the bin)There are several sizes – from single servings, to teapots.Disadvantage:Some tea, such as oolong teas have very large leaves, therefore the leaves have very little space inside to unfurl. This means that the full flavour of the tea may not be fully realised. A much bigger sized t-sac could be used.The T-sac is not sealed, so the contents of the teabag can sometimes seep into the cup or teapotThe edge of the T-sac protruding out of the teapot doesn’t look as pretty as an infuser which is hidden away.
  • Tea is added to the cafetière and presented to the customer.Customer can push the plunger down when they are ready to drink the tea.Advantages:It is convenient (the leaves are contained in one place – easy to remove and wash out later).Very pretty to look at – customer can admire the tea leaves inside the press.Disadvantage:If the café/ restaurant sells coffee and tea, the tea presses should not be used for coffee. Even if they are cleaned properly, because of the fine mesh, it is likely that there could still be coffee granules that haven’t been washed out. Therefore the tea will taste of coffee.Tea leaves will continue to steep after the plunger is depressed which causes the tea to become excessively bitter. This is especially a problem for more delicate teas such as green teas.
  • A teapot and strainer can come in many shapes and sizes. It is typically seen in high end establishments especially when serving High Tea or Afternoon tea but you can see from the right hand picture that there is also a practical (and less ostentatious) type of strainer available too.Advantages:Loose leaf tea is allowed to steep and unfurl in the teapot. When the customer pours the tea into the cup through the strainer, the loose tea is captured and thus the customer will have a tea leaf-free cup of tea.Easy to clean after the customer has gone as the leaves are caught in the strainer.Disadvantage:Some tea strainers are more difficult to use then others (see middle picture!)Tea leaves will continue to steep in the teapot which causes the tea to become excessively bitter. This is especially a problem for more delicate teas such as green teas. Black teas that are left stewing in the pot can often leave a oily film in the cup (tannin).For the service staff, there are several items that needs to be brought to the table for a customer: teapot (with the tea), sugar (if it isn’t already on the table), tea strainer and milk. However having a tray should make this easier.The teapot will need to be emptied of the loose leaf tea after the customer has gone so is not as convenient to clean as a teapot with an infuser.
  • It is important to warm both the teapot and the tea cup before serving to the customer.Tea brews much better in a warm teapot and helps the water to stay hotter. Some teas do not taste as nice when it is colder.As a general rule, when making tea in a teapot, use 1 teaspoon for the teapot and 1 teaspoon per person.For excellent customer service, service staff may want to tell the customer how long the tea has been steeped so far (this is especially useful for teas that require shorter steeping times, such as green tea).In a coffee shop, the coffee cups are warmed at the top of the coffee machine for the same reason. They want the coffee to be at a constant temperature. This is the same for the tea.

Transcript

  • 1. How to make tea in a café or restaurant
  • 2. Course Content • How to Store Tea • How to Make Tea • Water • Temperature • steeping times • Tea ware
  • 3. Loose tea Guideline • How to store tea – Store tea away from light, heat, strong smells and air – Shelf life of tea is approximately 6 – 12 months – Use re – sealable packaging or a canister (not glass) – Store in a dark cupboard away from strong smells.
  • 4. Water • How to make tea - water Water Good Bad Recommendation/Explanation Freshly drawn water  Use filtration first if water is hard Mineral bottled water  Has the same effect on tea as using hard water without filtration Bottled spring water  Subject to contamination Purified bottled water  Only good if infused with oxygen but expensive Re – heated water  Loss of oxygen, which is required to make good tea
  • 5. Temperature • How to make tea – temperature – Each different category of tea requires a different temperature to make a good tea – Put the kettle on, watch the water gauge and observe three differing temperatures or use a thermometer
  • 6. Tea Category Temperature Steeping Time Green / White 70- 85oC (158-185oF) 2-3 minutes Oolong 90oC (194oF) 30 secs – 1 min Black, Pu’erh 100oC (212oF) 3-5 mins Herbal Infusions 100oC (212oF) 5-10 mins Steeping Time 6
  • 7. Tea ware • Different tea ware can be found in a café or restaurant • Teapot with infuser • Infuser (without teapot) • Tea ball • Infuser Pincer • Infuser stick (various shapes) • Teapot and T-sac • French Press • Teapot and strainer
  • 8. Tea ware • Teapot with infuser • Teapot with an infuser inside the teapot
  • 9. Tea ware • Infuser (without teapot) • Served on a little dish
  • 10. Tea ware • Tea ball (tea egg) • Loose tea leaves are placed inside the tea ball
  • 11. Tea ware • Infuser Pincer • Similar to a tea ball
  • 12. Tea ware • Infuser stick (different shapes) • Similar to an Infuser Pincer
  • 13. Tea ware • Teapot and T-sac • T-sac (empty tea bag) is placed inside the teapot, cup or takeaway cup
  • 14. Tea ware • French Press • Used just like a cafetière
  • 15. Tea ware • Teapot and strainer • Customer pours tea from teapot. Strainer catches the leaves.
  • 16. Warming Tea Ware • How to make tea – Warming tea ware
  • 17. How to make tea - Summary • Use the right amount of tea • Best water type available • Correct temperature • Ideal steeping time • Prepare the teapot and cup by warming them first.
  • 18. Demo: Chinese Gong Fu Tea Ceremony Making Tea in cafe or restaurant