E commerce Tactics - A Zappos.com Analysis

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This is an individuals presentation I gave in my E-Commerce Marketing class during my Fall, 2012 semester. …

This is an individuals presentation I gave in my E-Commerce Marketing class during my Fall, 2012 semester.

We had to choose a brand, monitor, and analyze all their e-commerce tactics (extending beyond their website into all channels that supported it).

More in: Technology , Business
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  • Source: http://www.dmnews.com/service-helps-loyalty-initiatives/article/168127/\n\n\n
  • Most channels are focused on creating content that drives consumers back to the Zappos website. Whereas Customer Service (phone & chat) and DM material work both ways.\n\n-Retention focused channels: FB, Twitter, YouTube, Blogs, Email, Customer Service (phone & chat), magalog\n-Acquisition focused channels: print, display, search\n
  • When a search is performed on a search engine like Google, Zappos automatically detects that the user is on a mobile device. Therefore, they are redirected to a mobile specific site (which is as rich as their regular site, and user-friendly). There is a prominent push to get users to download the app since almost ensures a longer and deeper relationship with the consumer. But, the push to the mobile app does not mean that Zappos compromises on the mobile site content quality; it would instead hurt their brand.\n
  • Branding Analysis (logo/fonts/colors) Score: 9\n\nThe logo consistently appears in the same area, with the same colors , and is the same size. The logo also compliments the overall branding. The only fault here is that the Zappos logo stills sports a shoe imprint even though the brand has expanded beyond selling just shoes into all kinds of clothing - however it should be recognized that such rebranding is difficult because the brand to lose some of it’s equity if it the logo is not as recognizable and may not be worth the rebranding.\n\nThe fonts used throughout are consistent and/or complimentary to one another and are consistent with branding.\n\nThe colors are consistent, but many. They include: light blue, dark blue, white, beige, black, green, orange, grey. The numerous colors used throughout the site can be overwhelming at times.\n\nThe appropriate trademarks and logos are used throughout.\n\n\nHomepage Analysis (Search box, Shopping Cart, Footer, Email sign up) Score: 8\n\nThe search box is clearly located at the top of the website (on the left instead of the right, but away from the newsletter sign up).  Also, The shopping cart is clearly found on the top right side of the site. However, the top section of the site is overly crowded and can be overwhelming.\n\nThe Newsletter sign-up is buried at the bottom. \n\nThe footer contains all the company info and policies, but is overcrowded with many other links making difficult to locate the necessary information.\n\n\nNavigation Analysis (breadcrumb trail/minimal clicks/search results) Score: 9\n\nA summary of the click through steps to purchase is summarized below\nThe stages to get to purchase are (current customers logged in & multiple items)):\nclick on item - select size/color - click on ‘add to shopping cart’ - click on ‘proceed to check out’ in shopping cart view - click on ‘submit my order’ in order summary & shipping selection view\n*[can click on ‘proceed to checkout’ from anywhere on the site when one hovers over the shopping cart]\n*[can click on ‘express checkout’ after ‘add to shopping cart’\n\nThe stages to get to purchase are (current customers NOT logged in & multiple items):\nclick on item - select size/color - click on ‘add to shopping cart’- sign in - click on ‘proceed to check out’ in shopping cart view - click on ‘submit my order’ in order summary & shipping selection view\n\nThe stages to get to purchase are (new customers & multiple items):\nclick on item - select size/color - click on ‘add to shopping cart’- register and click on ‘submit’ - click on ‘proceed to check out’ in shopping cart view - click on ‘submit my order’ in order summary & shipping selection view\n\nThe site has features that try to minimize the number of clicks and there are no unnecessary clicks. However, a big fault of theirs is that they force site visitors to register before purchase.\n\nA breadcrumb trail is utilized as soon as the user enters to view the desired product which makes it easier to navigate and orient themselves on the site.\n\nMore importantly, as one navigates the site using the navigation bar on the left, to make it easier to locate the right item, they have included a convenient, and easy to use filter above the results.\n\nTaxonomy Analysis (tagline, taxonomy, copy) Score: 8\n\nThe taxonomy used  is consistent in tone and style; they use an inviting, friendly, and enthusiastic tone. However, there is TOO MUCH COPY, which can definitely overwhelm visitors looking for something specific. This seems to be because they want to be transparent. \n\nThis transparency ties in with tagline which ultimately ties in with their value proposition and competitive advantage - superior service. Having too much copy, while great for the reasons stated above, is negated if visitors can not locate the data. \n\nThe tagline, which focuses on superior service, is supported throughout the site with easily accessible links and info to their customer service agents (Live Help chat & CS phone number). This also is supported by their free shipping and returns policy clearly stated throughout.\n\nOverall, the taxonomy always related to the company’s 3 C’s (culture, clothes, customer service).\n\nMerchandising (product details, customer review, photos, background, product styling) Score: 9\n\nZappos includes a lot of product details, reviews, product descriptions, tags (customer can add their own tags), & ratings. There also seems to be a lot of information here that can be overwhelming, even though it is helpful when delved into.\n\nThe photos/vidoes that are used to present the products are consistent with the target (aged 25 - 49 years old). Because Zappos showcases so many brands, consumers are looking for the best views and perspectives to make the right purchase decision, which they do very clearly and consistently so as to have as even a platform as possible when browsing.\n\nThey use both rich media and alternate image views for almost all shoes showcased on the site. Alternate views are used for all products showcased on the site.\n\n
  • Strategic rights:\n1. Visitors are pretty much forced to register with an e-mail.\n2. As seen above, visitors opt in\n3. This includes: password changes, order placement, return labels, return status, etc. This is an essential email tactic that they must observe.\n
  • Strategic wrongs:\n1. While the newsletter is a great way to source e-mails and build zappos’ lists, it is a missed opportunity to have practically unnoticeable at the bottom of the page\n2. Despite having ordered previously (and returned the order) I never received any incentive by e-mail to revisit or reorder.\n3. The e-mails are packed with information! It’s overwhelming and impossible to go through it all (the sample email above has been truncated to remove personal info - meaning there’s lots more in there).\n4. Zappos could be driving higher visit frequency if they were more proactive about emailing customers who have not signed up for their newsletter. \n5. Customers cannot select how often they would like to receive e-mails, they are forced to receive it once a week.\n
  • For branded keywords, Zappos is dominating the field of vision above the first fold.\n\nFor generic terms, Zappos has a decent presence but needs to, perhaps, bid higher, improve SEO, or tweak the ad copy to encourage an increase in click through rates which will in turn improve their ad positions and increase the number of times Zappos appears in organic search, and more importantly, above the fold.\n
  • A rank of 80.6 is above average\n\nStrategic Rights: All these help the site’s ability to be indexed properly by search enginges.\n1. Compete measures the number of visitors from the US\n\nStrategic Wrongs: All of these hurt the site’s ability to be indexed by search engines.\n
  • This program is basically used as a supplemental marketing channel for additional sales. There doesn’t seem to be any real push to grow the program and I couldn’t find any analysis/feedback on their program.\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. The ads are dynamic in that they auto scroll through options. They are interactive in that one can scroll through the ads themselves. This is definitely eye catching.\n2. Retargeting occurred after visiting the Zappos site. It is a great way to encourage brand recall and repeat visits because you are seeing products that you’re already known to be interested in.\n
  • Strategic Wrongs:\n1. Display advertising should be used to increase brand presence and drive awareness not only to retarget.\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. This promotes engagement with the brand and aims to change perceptions about the brand. The QR codes on print ads direct readers to site where they can view videos, select and outfit to dress the models in, and then are directed to a page where the clothes can be purchased. \n2. The Zappos 3 C’s are: clothing, customer service, company culture. There is an inherent need for Zappos to drive this message so that consumers understand that Zappos is more than just shoes.\n3. The ad is lighthearted and stands out, just as the brand does overall because of it’s unique culture and service delivery.\n
  • Strategic Wrongs:\n1. I’ve placed this here as well because, despite the need for Zappos to increase awareness of their other product offerings, there seems to be a bit of inconsistency in the message Zappos drives especially showcased in these print ads; their logo connotes the sale of shoes, their tagline focuses on service, and the company’s 3 C’s focus on service, their products, AND who they are. It’s hard to understand where the 3 C’s fits in defining the Zappos brand.\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. This is essential; a mobile optimized site would be cumbersome and difficult for visitors to utilize because of the amount of available content.\n2. The site is stripped down to the essentials since visitors on a mobile device will want to get straight to the item they are looking for.\n3. Despite so much content (ie the endless number of products available) the mobile site is straight forward and simple to browse through.\n4. It is extremely relevant to have this push since it is the most likely moment where a customer would consider downloading the app, which is especially important because it helps develop a long term relationship with the customer & conversion rates tend to be high in that channel.\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. The site is stripped down to the essentials since visitors on a mobile device will want to get straight to the item they are looking for.\n2. Despite so much content (ie the endless number of products available) the mobile app is also very straight forward and simple to browse through.\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. Zappos employees ensure they are lighthearted and supportive of their customers.\n2. Content is focused on their core values, the 3 C’s, and drive that in the way they engage with fans. Zappos has created tabs that help fans to make purchase decisions, provide them with all the info they need.\n3. They are quick to respond to any posts, questions, and comments.\n\nStrategic Wrongs:\n1. There are many posts that have very little engagement.\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. Zappos employees ensure they are lighthearted and supportive of their customers.\n2. They just do customer service here which supports the brand’s core values strongly (ie the 3 C’s - customer service, culture, clothing).\n3. They are quick to respond to any tweets (questions, comments, complaints).\n\nStrategic Wrongs:\n1. the 2 accounts are: @Zappos_Service & @Zappos - confusing!\n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. The essence of the brand is readily apparent in all their communication, even UGC.\n2. The content is lighthearted, has shareable value, and is related to their core values. \n
  • Strategic Rights:\n1. Zappos employees ensure they are lighthearted and helpful in their posts.\n2. Content is focused on their core values, the 3 C’s - culture and clothing, and drive that in the way they engage with fans.\n\nStrategic Wrongs:\n1. As a result, they have very little engagement in this channel.\n
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  • Strategic Rights:\n1. helpful, lighthearted tone\n2. information to connect with customer service is readily available\n
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  • Many colors that make the homepage (and any page on the site) feel more crowded than necessary.\n
  • Many colors that make the homepage (and any page on the site) feel more crowded than necessary.\n
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Transcript

  • 1. E-COMMERCE TACTICS E-COMMERCE MARKETING | PROFESSOR MILLER | MAYA MIKATI
  • 2. Agenda• The Target• Roadmap• Customer Experience Best Practices• Channels • E-Mail • Search & SEO • Associates (Affiliates) Program • Online Advertising • Print • Mobile • Social Media • Direct Mail • Customer Service • Multi-Channel Experience• Recommendations
  • 3. The Target Cont’d The “Happy Hunter”• 25 to 49 years old• median household income of $75,000-plus• well-educated• married with kids *but there are subsegments
  • 4. Roadmap magalog associates (affiliates)print program display DM material
  • 5. Roadmap Cont’d mobile search app mobile site * refer to Appendix 1
  • 6. Customer Experience Best Practices Branding Analysis 9 8 Taxonomy Analysis 8 Homepage Analysis 9 Navigation Analysis 9 Merchandising Analysis Overall Score: 8.6
  • 7. E-Mail Strategic Rights Sample E-mail • Source e-mails, to build their lists: • at purchase • newsletter sign-up Register • Getting the right permissions to use e-mails • Used to communicate updates on account & orders • Look & Feel and tone is on brand
  • 8. E-Mail Strategic Wrongs • Newsletter sign-up box is Sample E-mail buried at the bottom of the site in the footer Newsletter sign-up • No winback or re- marketing e-mail strategy • Too much copy • No communication if not signed up for the newsletter • No newsletter frequency selection
  • 9. Search Branded Keywords (google) Organic Paid (mainline) Paid (rail) Zappos x (first position) x (first position) n/a Zappos shoes x (first position) x (first position) Zappos clothes x (first position) x (first position) Zappos bags x (first position) x (first position, note: boots n/a advertised instead) Generic Keywords (google) Organic Paid (mainline) Paid (rail) shoes x (bottom of the page, third to last x (first position) position) clothes x (sixth position) bags x (first position) x (fourth position) * refer to Appendix 1I
  • 10. Search - SEO Strategic Rights Strategic Wrongs • High compete rank • Keyword density on Homepage is low • HTML syntax errors make the site • Images are all tagged difficult to index • High number of indexed • Not all Meta Keywords are relevant (ex: index & zeta) pages • Meta description included • SM accounts don’t seem to link back to site * source: woorank.com
  • 11. Associates (Affiliates) Program • Used to encourage third parties to find creative ways to help promote and drive sales • Paid on a Cost per Action basis (12% commission rate for every sale made) • Simple and free sign up processes
  • 12. Online Advertising Strategic Rights • Rich media utilized • Interactive • Dynamic • Retargating utilized
  • 13. Online Advertising Cont’d Strategic Wrongs • Little to no display advertising used to increase brand awareness
  • 14. Print Strategic Rights • Integrated campaign (with mobile) • Messaging is focused on one of the 3 C’s • Look & Feel and tone is on brand
  • 15. Print Strategic Wrongs • Messaging is focused on one of the 3 C’s
  • 16. Mobile - Site Strategic Rights • Mobile specific site • Relevant • User centric • Includes a push to download the app
  • 17. Mobile - App Strategic Rights • Relevant • User centric
  • 18. Social Media - Facebook Strategic Rights Strategic Wrongs • tone & style is consistent with brand • messaging has not been • content, that is relevant to optimized the brand, is being created • need to build fan base • employees are always engaging with fans content created: product announcements, contests, entertainment, catalog apps, shopping aids fan engagement: • post frequency: 1 - 2 posts per day • contests/promos: recently announced the winner to their Holiday Ad Contest • community interaction: admins respond to questions and comments
  • 19. Social Media - Twitter Strategic Rights Strategic Wrongs • tone & style is consistent with brand • content is razor focused on • two Zappos accounts created customer service -@Zappos is no longer active • employees are always engaging with fans content created: customer service fan engagement: • post frequency: many times per day • community interaction: admins respond to questions, comments, and complaints
  • 20. Social Media - YouTube (TV) Strategic Rights • tone & style is consistent with brand • content is engaging and entertaining and focused on the 3 C’s content created: shop these styles, TV ads, UGC contests fan engagement: • post frequency: varies
  • 21. Social Media - Blogs Strategic Rights Strategic Wrongs • tone & style is consistent with brand • Hidden, unknown • content is focused on two of the 3 C’s - culture & clothing content created: customer service fan engagement: • post frequency: many times per day • community interaction: admins respond to questions, comments, and complaints
  • 22. Direct Mail Strategic Rights • simple and consistent with the brand
  • 23. Customer Service - Chat & Phone Strategic Rights • tone of voice is consistent with the brand • easily accessible and no long waits
  • 24. Multi Channel Experience• All the touchpoints utilized fit the target’s media consumption habits• There is synergy amongst the varied channels• Seamlessness across locatechannels could be improved the • Blogs are difficult to • Not all Social Networks are linked to (ex: YouTube from Facebook)
  • 25. Recommendations• E-mail: • communicate more often with those who have not registered for the newsletter so as to retain customers • employ winback strategies to: - decrease shopping cart abandonment rates - and/or increase site visitor numbers • make e-mails clean and concise• Search • SEO needs to improve slightly so that Zappos appears more often in organic searches for generic keywords • bid strategy, copy, and/or SEO needs to be improved so that Zappos appears more often in SEM ads for generic keywords• SEO • Improve keyword density on homepage • Ensure that all Social Media networks link back to Zappos.com • Revise Meta Keywords so that they are relevant to the brand • Improve HTML code to ensure there are no errors that might hinder indexing• Display Advertising • Develop display ads for a pure awareness campaign • Utilize behavioral targeting to drive higher CTR’s, increased repeat visits, and ultimately increased conversions.• Social media • Facebook messaging needs to be optimized • Zappos should consider F-Commerce • Blogs need to be more apparent in order to drive engagement• Overall • Continue to appeal to all levels of tech savvy-ness by using multiple channels and touchpoints
  • 26. Thank you!
  • 27. Appendix 1 push to download app
  • 28. Appendix II - Customer ExperienceBest Practiceslogo (returns to homepage) top section (search bar &shopping cart): overcrowded Homepage & Branding
  • 29. Appendix II - Customer ExperienceBest Practices Merchandising Navigation (breadcrumb trail & filters) alternate views & rich media product info tags & reviews
  • 30. Appendix III - Branded Keywords
  • 31. Appendix III - Generic Keywords
  • 32. Appendix IV - Facebook Content Tone & Style Engagement
  • 33. Appendix IV - Twitter Tone & Style Content
  • 34. Appendix IV - YouTubeTone & Style Content *interesting content shop this style
  • 35. Appendix V - BlogsContent - Culture Content - Clothing