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LEAD PRESENTATION

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Transcript

  • 1. LEAD Max Wortman Period 5
  • 2. LEAD – 6P14 Electrons: 82 Neutrons: 125 Protons: 82 Atomic Mass: 207.2 Melting point: 327.6º C
  • 3. Basic Information
    • Lead is a basic group element with symbol “Pb” and atomic number 82.
      • Derives from Latin word plumbum
    • Lead is a soft, malleable poor metal.
    • It is also counted as a heavy metal.
    • A soft blue-grey metal
    • Lead, when exposed to air, turns to a dull, gray color.
    • Found in a natural environment.
    • Labeled as a “post-transition metal”
    • Still used in consumer products.
      • Such as paint and gasoline
  • 4. History
    • Lead has been commonly used for thousands of years because it is widespread, easy to extract and easy to work with.
    • The Romans had the largest lead mining economy in history.
    • Lead’s symbol “Pb” is an abbreviation of its Latin name “plumbum” for soft metals.
    • Unfortunately, no one knows who discovered lead.
    • There is evidence that the first discovery of lead was 9,000 years ago.
  • 5. How does lead get into the environment?
    • Deterioration of lead-based paint
    • Leaded gasoline
    • Lead mines or smelters 
  • 6. How are people exposed to lead?
    • Dust, paint, and/or soil
    • Contaminated food, water, or alcohol
    • Some imported home remedies and cosmetics
  • 7. Lead in home environments:
    • Pre-1978 homes with deteriorated leaded paint
    • Children at greatest risk
    • Most exposure through leaded dust in home
    bare soil porch windows doors walls tracked in Lead in dust
  • 8. How are people exposed to lead in work environments?
    • Swallowing lead dust
    • Breathing contaminated air
    • Lead contacting skin
    • Workers can expose their families if they bring lead home on their clothes or skin
  • 9. What jobs involve lead?
    • Lead smelting or mining
    • Construction/ remodeling
    • Automobile repair
    • Plumbing
    • Police officers/military
    • Many others
  • 10. Lead in drinking water
    • Lead can enter water by leaching from
      • Lead-containing pipes
      • Brass faucets
      • Solder
    • Boiling does not get rid of lead
    • Running cold water before use may reduce exposure
  • 11. Lead in commercial products
    • Lead is still used in products such as:
      • Bridge paint
      • Computers
      • Solder
      • Ceramic glazes
      • Jewelry
      • Automotive batteries
    • Imported or older pre-regulation products
  • 12. Lead in food products
    • Food or beverages may be contaminated through
      • Production
      • Packaging
      • Storage
  • 13. Effects of lead
    • No known threshold for effects of lead
    • Affects all organ systems
    • Developmental neurologic effects
    • Affects fetal viability, and fetal and early childhood development
    • Maternal lead may affect child’s neurologic development
  • 14. FIN
  • 15. FIN Max Wortman Period 5