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WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics
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WTF is social marketing? Campaigns, behaviour change and behavioural economics

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  • Strategy and policy represent… Behavioural changes must be sustained!
  • Tools adapted from commercial/trad marketing and applied to behavioural issues Concept or philosaphy – a way of approaching a specific issue focusing on the audience’s perspective.
  • Anchors: % of African countries in the UN – two groups of people given two numbers – 10 and 65 – 10 group guessed 25% – 65 group guessed 45. Examples of phone numbers or social security. When we have limited information – we use anchor points. Heuristics: 9/11 example – people can remember when it happened, how many people died (2948) – not how many people died the same year from cigarettes (400,000) – but affected travel decisions, resulted in increased RTA deaths. Prospect: We value a loss at twice that of a gain – people expecting £60k and got £50k is not as happy as someone expecting £40k and gets £50k. Gambling metaphor. Applications: 30 day money back or try before you buy. Talk about GDP measurement model and flaws. Endowment effect: students sleeping out for tickets – “ikea effect”. Loss aversion and the status quo effect.
  • Anchors: % of African countries in the UN – two groups of people given two numbers – 10 and 65 – 10 group guessed 25% – 65 group guessed 45. Examples of phone numbers or social security. When we have limited information – we use anchor points. Heuristics: 9/11 example – people can remember when it happened, how many people died (2948) – not how many people died the same year from cigarettes (400,000) – but affected travel decisions, resulted in increased RTA deaths. Prospect: We value a loss at twice that of a gain – people expecting £60k and got £50k is not as happy as someone expecting £40k and gets £50k. Gambling metaphor. Applications: 30 day money back or try before you buy. Talk about GDP measurement model and flaws. Endowment effect: students sleeping out for tickets – “ikea effect”. Loss aversion and the status quo effect.
  • Customer or consumer orientation - A strong ‘customer’ orientation with importance attached to understanding where the customer is starting from, their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, along with the social context in which they live and work. Behaviour and behavioural goals  - Clear focus on understanding existing behaviour and key influences upon it, alongside developing clear behavioural goals. These can be divided into actionable and measurable steps or stages, phased over time. 'Intervention mix' and 'marketing mix'  - Using a mix of different interventions or methods to achieve a particular behavioural goal. When used at the strategic level this is commonly referred to as the 'intervention mix', and when used operationally it is described as the 'marketing mix’. Audience segmentation - Clarity of audience focus using audience segmentation to target effectively. ‘ Exchange’ - Use of the ‘exchange’ concept – understanding what is being expected of  people, and the real cost to them. ‘ Competition’ - Use of the ‘competition’ concept. This means understanding factors that impact on people and that compete for their attention and time.
  • Note: thanks to Jeff French for this fantastic example!
  • 6.9 billion people on the planet – 6 billion decision makers making 100s of decisions a day – but short of time and with limited information. Becoming mainstream, reflected in party manifestos and policy making.
  • Why we smoke, drink, have unprotected sex, play the lottery, gamble with other people’s money.
  • Anchors: % of African countries in the UN – two groups of people given two numbers – 10 and 65 – 10 group guessed 25% – 65 group guessed 45. Examples of phone numbers or social security. When we have limited information – we use anchor points. Heuristics: 9/11 example – people can remember when it happened, how many people died (2948) – not how many people died the same year from cigarettes (400,000) – but affected travel decisions, resulted in increased RTA deaths. Prospect: We value a loss at twice that of a gain – people expecting £60k and got £50k is not as happy as someone expecting £40k and gets £50k. Gambling metaphor. Applications: 30 day money back or try before you buy. Talk about GDP measurement model and flaws. Endowment effect: students sleeping out for tickets – “ikea effect”. Loss aversion and the status quo effect.
  • Transcript

    • 1. So… WTF is socialmarketing?Max St John – April 2010
    • 2. def. “The systematic application of marketing, alongside other concepts and techniques toachieve specific behavioural goals, for a social good”
    • 3. or (better)... “Consumer behaviour is our bottom line”
    • 4. starting pointidentifying behavioural challengesdeveloping behavioural interventions
    • 5. the rootssocial policy marketing_social sciences _commercial_social reform _public sector_social campaigning Allied with: behavioural economics, health promotion, public health, behavioural psychology, environmental advocacy.
    • 6. three factorsset of tools or technologiessocial marketing via the core concept of marketingto create a socially just and fairer society
    • 7. why it matters: joyless growth
    • 8. why it matters: an unequal society
    • 9. core principles: focus on behaviourtypically want people to do one of four things: _accept a new behaviour _reject an undesirable behaviour _modify and existing behaviour _abandon an old, undesirable behaviour
    • 10. core principles: people first mindsetin-depth understanding of audience: deep truthssystematic audience understandingbeneficiary is the individual, group or society: not us.
    • 11. principle elements _Customer or consumer orientation _Behaviour and behavioural goals _Intervention mix and marketing mix’ _Audience segmentation _‘Exchange’ _‘Competition’
    • 12. Where demographics fail Demographic male born 1948 British 2nd marriage affluent well known family
    • 13. the individual in a wider contextIndirectly influence Global context Wider society Communities and neighborhoods Friends and family Individual Directly influence
    • 14. what is behaviour? Not a single action But ‘a series of actions over time’ The result of conscious decisions but often driven by learned patterns or unconscious decisions Behaviour is ‘inherently dynamic’. Variation and inconsistency is common
    • 15. behavioural modelsTermination Pre- Contemplation Maintenance Contemplation Action Preparation
    • 16. ways of influencing behaviour Inform Communicate Remind Make aware Trigger Educate Teach Engage Inspire Skill Support Service Provide Assist Model Design Alter environment Change context Engineer Control Regulate Legislate Monitor Police
    • 17. Some examples
    • 18. Making it fun What about this...?
    • 19. behavioural economics “Decision making under uncertainty.”
    • 20. the differencestandard economic model behavioural economics_rational _?_governed by selfishness_treat all assets as fungible_motivated by expected utility maximisation_consistent time preferencesaccording to discounted utility
    • 21. economics meets psychologywhy we shop and buy things the way we dowhy we behave the way we dohow we make choiceshow choices affect marketshow to influence choices
    • 22. two kinds of behaviourreflective automatic/limbic_thinking _emotional_rational _intuitive_self aware _unconcious_”turbulence is fine” _”we’re all gonna die”_deductive _associative_mr spock _homer simpson
    • 23. behavioural economicsanchorsheuristicsprospect theoryloss aversion / the endowment effectetc

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