Product Development (brand identity profile) Case Study Part 3 D

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Brand Identity Profile

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Product Development (brand identity profile) Case Study Part 3 D

  1. 1. 1 Product development part 3D of 7 part Case Study
  2. 2. Luxury brand Case Study2
  3. 3. Notes3
  4. 4. Luxury Brand4 Business Development Case Study Part 3 D November 2012 Max Ruckman, Black & Decker HHI Bill O’Connor, Source, Inc. Bruce Eckman www.maxruckman.com
  5. 5. Brand visualization5 Brand Visual Assessment door hardware communications
  6. 6. Door Hardware communication6 object as artifact was a predominant metaphor
  7. 7. Door Hardware communication7 brand narratives emphasize history of craftsmanship, expert technique, historical accuracy
  8. 8. Door Hardware communication8 some brands relied on transparent reading of the object-as- functional- product
  9. 9. Door Hardware communication9 the question asked at the time was whether the realism of the latter brand visuals symbolically negated the verbal claims?
  10. 10. Door Hardware communication10
  11. 11. Elements of the brand stories11
  12. 12. Elements of the brand stories12
  13. 13. Elements of the brand stories13 history, innovative techniques and timeless design are prominent sources of quality and authenticity
  14. 14. Elements of the brand stories14
  15. 15. Elements of the brand stories15 many of the brands names evoke family names, presumably the source of tradition...
  16. 16. Elements of the brand stories16
  17. 17. Elements of the brand stories17
  18. 18. Elements of the brand stories18 brands who claim broader symbolic grounds tend to do so verbally rather than visually
  19. 19. Elements of the brand stories19 they are names which have little meaning other than what we give them
  20. 20. Elements of the brand stories20
  21. 21. Elements of the brand stories21
  22. 22. Kitchen and bath hardware general observations22
  23. 23. Kitchen and bath hardware general observations23 there is very little attempt to communicate brand values figuratively or metaphorically (relying instead on explicit verbiage)
  24. 24. Kitchen and bath hardware general observations24 why are the faucets so pristine, gleaming, polished and complete? because of their situation in baths and kitchens (symbolically dirty places?) why are symbols of strength, craftsmanship, art, nature, so downplayed?
  25. 25. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview25 Brand identity profile process review
  26. 26. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview26
  27. 27. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview27
  28. 28. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview28 brand identity profile model elements brand essence core identity extended identity value proposition relationship
  29. 29. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview29 typically, a brands strategic identity will require 6-12 dimensions in order to adequately describe what the brand is aspiring to be strategically, i.e., the strategic brand identity
  30. 30. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview30 such a large set of dimensions is unwieldy so it’s better to separate these into core identity dimensions and extended identity dimensions
  31. 31. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview31 Core identity
  32. 32. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview32 Core identity
  33. 33. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview33 Core identity
  34. 34. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview34 Core identity
  35. 35. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview35 Core identity
  36. 36. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview36 Core identity
  37. 37. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview37 the attributes that are characterized as extended identity dimensions support the brand but are not essential to its meaning extended identity
  38. 38. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview38 often the core identity statement is a very terse description of the brand and the terseness can generate ambiguity extended identity
  39. 39. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview39 extended identity dimensions add texture and completeness, clarity and scale to the brand identity extended identity
  40. 40. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview40 it’s principally from the extended identity dimensions that much of the band personality is created. whereas the cultural identity dimensions need to be present and reflected in everything that the brand does and says, the extended identity dimensions can be deployed when needed extended identity
  41. 41. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview41 brand symbols are part of the brand‘s extended identity dimensions extended identity
  42. 42. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview42 the value proposition reflects the values the brand offers and prospects that are different from values offered by other brands in the category Value proposition
  43. 43. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview43 these values can be functional, emotional or self-expressive Value proposition
  44. 44. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview44 the functional benefits express what the brand is...e.g., bmw: „the ultimate driving machine„, banana republic: „casual luxury„ Value proposition
  45. 45. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview45 the emotional benefits of a brand relate to its ability to make the buyer or user feel something during the purchase process or use experience... those "emotional points of contact" that we always talk about Value proposition
  46. 46. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview46 extremely strong brand identities almost always include strong emotional benefits Value proposition
  47. 47. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview47 the way someone feels safe” in a volvo Value proposition
  48. 48. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview48 the way someone feels “important” when shopping at nordstrom Value proposition
  49. 49. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview49 the way someone feels rugged when wearing levis Value proposition
  50. 50. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview50 the way one feels (in a sensory memory way) the memories of eating sun maid raisins as a kid Value proposition
  51. 51. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview51 the third part of the value proposition in what the pundits refer to as self-exposures benefits Value proposition
  52. 52. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview52 this benefit exists when the brand provides a vehicle by which the brand user can proclaim a particular self image Value proposition
  53. 53. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview53 as you might expect, these tend to be high ego-involvement brands ralph lauren banana republic (safely hip) bmw target (low cost, high style) humvee volvo Value proposition
  54. 54. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview54 the self-expressive aspect of the value proposition is not available to nor necessary for every brand Value proposition
  55. 55. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview55 strong brands create a sense of relationship with their customers relationship
  56. 56. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview56 the relationship often resembles a a mother figure personal relationship a buddy (bud-lite) (betty crocker) like a friend an adviser (saturn) (your stockbroker) a mentor (microsoft) relationship
  57. 57. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview57 the importance of the relationship construct is to keep the brand on track with its virtual and verbal messages, its tone, its associations i.e.. most of those dimensions that get lumped together as brand personality relationship
  58. 58. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview58 Brand essence
  59. 59. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview59 Brand essence
  60. 60. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview60 Brand essence
  61. 61. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview61 Brand essence
  62. 62. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview62 Brand essence
  63. 63. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview63 Brand essence
  64. 64. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview64 Brand essence
  65. 65. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview65 Brand essence
  66. 66. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview66 Brand essence
  67. 67. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview67 Brand essence
  68. 68. Brand identity profile (BIP) Overview68 Brand essence
  69. 69. Brand identity profile (BIP)69 Research application, brand identity profile and preliminary brand visualization actual project parousia review
  70. 70. Parousia project Brand identity70 authentic tells the story clearly Core identity
  71. 71. Parousia project Brand identity71 authentic evokes the history of craft, materials, style & function Core identity
  72. 72. Parousia project Brand identity72 authentic not about reproductions; honest Core identity
  73. 73. Parousia project Brand identity73 reliable partner informing, endorsing & respecting the arbiter; helping the arbiter deliver the dream Core identity
  74. 74. Parousia project Brand identity74 driven by detail accurate to the cultural reference, represents the craft; delivers world-class product, service Core identity
  75. 75. Parousia project Brand identity75 stirs the imagination delights the senses with the aesthetic of form, finish & function Core identity
  76. 76. Parousia project Brand identity76 stirs the imagination delights the spirit by referencing the past to create something new, by the joy of discovering and owning sustainable style Core identity
  77. 77. Parousia project Brand identity77 stirs the imagination promotes the brand experience Core identity
  78. 78. Parousia project Brand identity78 enables home owners self expression -affirmation of authorship, creative accomplishment; affirmation of the dream extended identity
  79. 79. Parousia project Brand identity79 commitment to design for the love of the craft delivers beautiful artifacts drawn from the culture extended identity
  80. 80. Parousia project Brand identity80 luxury: substantial, laden with symbolic & story meanings, sensual, indulgent extended identity
  81. 81. Parousia project Brand identity81 Brand symbols
  82. 82. Parousia project Brand identity82 functional benefits single source state-of-the-art performance that leads the market locks: best security Value proposition
  83. 83. Parousia project Brand identity83 functional benefits faucet: ceramic valves, maintenance free Value proposition
  84. 84. Parousia project Brand identity84 aesthetic pleasure in craftsmanship & material sensory pleasure in style, sound and feel of the products Emotional benefits
  85. 85. Parousia project Brand identity85 Self - expressive benefits
  86. 86. Parousia project Brand identity86 storyteller explorer relationship
  87. 87. positioning87 Original Positioning Statement target: for the luxury home builder and remodeler frame of reference: desiring architecturally styled hardware point of difference: the (brand) offers the most innovative, fashionable designs positioning
  88. 88. positioning88 Revised Positioning Statement target: the interior designer wanting to offer a new perspective to his/her clients frame of reference: parousia is the brand of residential door hardware and faucets point of difference: offers history, craftsmanship and style to make the homeowner‟s dream come true positioning
  89. 89. Positioning Critique89 Criteria 1 Criteria 2 Criteria 3 Size Identity Interest Is it as large as “identity” Would target recognize Does this target definition Target Market and “interest” will allow? him/herself and care about make clear why they would being part of group? want our point of difference? Size Simplicity Relevance Would a reasonable share Would the target market a) Does this category of this category be an understand what products have a conscious in Frame of Reference attractive business? ours would replace? target life? b) Is our point of difference important within the category? Fact Based Desirable Preemptive Can our product deliver it? Is it wanted by target At realistic levels of Point of Difference without further support, can we own this explanation? point of difference in target’s mind? Cohesive Simplicity/Credibility Compelling Do all parts actively Is it easy enough: Does it state a premise The Whole Positioning support each other? a) To understand? worth a purchase? Statement b) To believe in (with the proof we can offer)?
  90. 90. Positioning Critique90 Criteria 1 Criteria 2 Criteria 3 Size Identity Interest Is it as large as Would target Does this target Target Market “identity” and recognize him/herself definition make clear “interest” will allow? and care about being why they would want part of group? our point of difference? Target to the interior designer who wants to offer a new perspective to his/her clients
  91. 91. Positioning Critique91 Criteria 1 Criteria 2 Criteria 3 Size Simplicity Relevance Would a reasonable Would the target a) Does this share of this market understand category have a Frame of category be an what products ours conscious in Reference attractive business? would replace? target life? b) Is our point of difference important within the category? Frame of Reference the brand of residential HPP door hardware and faucets
  92. 92. Positioning Critique92 Criteria 1 Criteria 2 Criteria 3 Fact Based Desirable Preemptive Can our product Is it wanted by At realistic levels of Point of deliver it? target without support, can we own Difference further explanation? this point of difference in target’s mind? Point of Difference offers history, craftsmansip and style to make the homeowner’s dream come true.
  93. 93. Positioning Critique93 Criteria 1 Criteria 2 Criteria 3 Cohesive Simplicity Compelling /Credibility The Whole Do all parts actively Does it state a support each other? Is it easy enough: premise worth a Positioning a) To understand? purchase? Statement b) To believe in (with the proof we can offer)? Target to the interior designer who wants to offer a new perspective to his/her clients Frame of Reference the brand of residential HPP door hardware and faucets Point of Difference offers history, craftsmansip and style to make the homeowner’s dream come true.
  94. 94. Luxury Brand94 Business Development Case Study Part 3 D November 2012 Max Ruckman, Black & Decker HHI Bill O’Connor, Source, Inc. Bruce Eckman www.maxruckman.com

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