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Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
Mission to dialogue
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Mission to dialogue

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  • 6. <ul><li>In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. </li></ul><ul><li>He was in the beginning with God. All things came to be through him, and without him nothing came to be What came to be through him was life, and this life was the light of the </li></ul><ul><li>human race; the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome </li></ul><ul><li>John 1:1-5 </li></ul><ul><li>GOD BEGAN THE DIALOGUE BY COMING FROM ETERNITY INTO TIME AND SPACE TO BE ONE OF US </li></ul>
  • 7. <ul><li>The idea of feasting together is something significant from a biblical perspective as well. In the Garden of Eden already God gave Adam and Eve all the fruit of the trees and green plants for food, and they ate in his presence (Gen 1:29-31). Later, the many sacrifices offered by the Israelites would involve a meal (eg., Ex. 12 ). Jesus often entered people's homes to dine with them ( Luke 19:1-10 ), and he provided thousands of people with a meal twice ( Mark 6:30-44; 8:1-10 ). The Lord's Supper is also a meal, and when we partake of it, we are again feasting in the presence of the Lord ( 1 Cor. 11:23-26 ). And later, when Christ returns, we will all feast together again at the wedding supper of the Lamb ( Luke 14:12-24, Rev. 19:9 ). </li></ul>
  • 8. Dine with Sinners - Matthew 9:10-12 <ul><li>Jesus ate dinner at Matthew's house. Many tax collectors and other bad people came and ate with Jesus and his followers. The Pharisees saw that Jesus was eating with these people. The Pharisees asked Jesus' followers, &quot;Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and other bad people?&quot; Jesus heard the Pharisees say this. So Jesus said to the Pharisees, &quot;Healthy people don't need a doctor. It is the sick people that need a doctor.&quot; </li></ul>
  • 9. <ul><li>While Jesus was having dinner at Levi's house, many tax collectors and &quot;sinners&quot; were eating with him and his disciples, for there were many who followed him. (Mark 2:15) </li></ul><ul><li>When Jesus reached the spot, he looked up and said to him, &quot;Zacchaeus, come down immediately. I must stay at your house today.&quot; ( Luke 19:5) </li></ul><ul><li>A woman of Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” (John 4:7-8) </li></ul>
  • 10. The Samaritan Woman <ul><li>John 4:1-41 </li></ul>
  • 11. <ul><li>Jesus comes to ‘others’ on their own terms and on their own ground. This means accepting and understanding the local customs and laws of hospitality that came with it. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Jesus was not limited by the cultural and social taboos set by his own community. Here was a woman and a Samaritan for that matter. Normally, Jewish custom would have cautioned distance but Jesus broke with tradition here. </li></ul>
  • 12. <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Having said the above, it is also significant to note that Jesus was sensitive to the cultural and social taboos of the other. Christian mission must always be sensitive to the cultural norms and sensitivities of the other, while at the same time being compatible with the gospel and being in communion with the Church’s mission. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>As noted earlier, Jesus began at a human level (not theological). Jesus expressed vulnerability by asking for assistance and hospitality. He was placing himself at the mercy of the other. Mission is never about power but about service. </li></ul>
  • 13. <ul><li>The proclamation of the word is never a monologue but a dialogue that must permit mutual exploration and scrutiny. As the dialogue progresses, Jesus leads the woman into a deeper level of dialogue. They move from a general topic to a more personal topic, from the superficial to the theological (“physical water” – “living water”). </li></ul>
  • 14. <ul><li>Dialogue which seeks to deepen mutual respect and understanding is always “in obedience to the truth and respect freedom” (Dialogue and Mission n. 3 and Dialogue and Proclamation, n. 9). </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue which is done in love must always be in service to the truth, as Pope Benedict reminded us in his third encyclical, Caritas in Veritate . </li></ul>
  • 15. <ul><li>“ Only in truth does charity shine forth , only in truth can charity be authentically lived. Truth is the light that gives meaning and value to charity ( Caritas in Veritate , n. 3).” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Truth , in fact, is lógos which creates diá-logos , and hence communication and communion. Truth, by enabling men and women to let go of their subjective opinions and impressions, allows them to move beyond cultural and historical limitations and to come together in the assessment of the value and substance of things.” ( Caritas in Veritate n. 4) </li></ul>
  • 16. <ul><li>The focus is on God and not the superiority of the religion. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>He recognises the common humanity which unites all peoples regardless of race, creed or colour. Nevertheless, Jesus does not dismiss the differences in religion (verse 22). </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>He does not equate them in a relativistic way. But ultimately, Jesus draws her attention to a higher value, God himself. Jesus emphasizes Truth as the goal for human search and dialogue (verse 23, cf, Caritas in Veritate , nn. 3-4). </li></ul>
  • 17. <ul><li>Jesus demonstrates an important feature of proclamation of the Word – he enters into the framework, teachings and understanding of the woman. </li></ul><ul><li>He did not impose his own framework on her as the starting point. </li></ul>
  • 18. <ul><li>Therefore, the story finally points to the most crucial condition for effective mission and the proclamation of the word. Dialogue and mission does not happen in a vacuum but in a relationship where a sense of bonding or connectedness has already been developed or established. </li></ul>
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