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SFMA Site Proposal
 

SFMA Site Proposal

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    SFMA Site Proposal SFMA Site Proposal Document Transcript

    • SHORELINE FARMERS MARKET ASSOCIATION Site ProposalShoreline Farmers Market Maximilian Dixon – Executive Director 4/11/2011
    • Summary Shoreline lacks a farmers’ market. There are three important development projects currently inthe works in Shoreline that make this an opportune time to incorporate one. These projects includeShoreline’s Aurora Corridor Project, the Town Center Subarea Plan, and the Park at Town Centerproject. The main consistent theme between them is the creation of a Town Center along Aurora,between N 175th and 185th streets, which also happens to be the proposed site location for theShoreline farmers’ market (Figure 5). Farmers’ markets are key components of a healthy community, society, economy andenvironment. The infrastructure and site built for the farmers’ market will also be used for hostingcountless other events and festivities, such as Celebrate Shoreline. All of this generated activity andcommerce will help anchor and shape the surrounding area into a thriving city center for Shoreline.This will draw people together from all of the neighborhoods as well as the surrounding areas. This site is ideal due to its high visibility, central location, proximity to public transportationlines, the Interurban trail and I-5, walkability, distance from other farmers’ markets, low cost andownership by government entities. All that is needed is for the City of Shoreline to include in the Parkat Town Center Master Plan the necessary infrastructure. This includes: restroom facilities, ramps orsurfaces flush with the street to accommodate handicap access as well as vendor loading andunloading, appropriate hard surface area to accommodate 50 10’x10’ stalls with a 10’ wide pathbetween the stall rows, power outlets at both the north and south ends of the market infrastructure,running water facilities, adequate trash cans, safety barriers between the market and Aurora Ave Nand angled parking along Midvale Ave N. There are two proposed interim sites. One is located within close proximity of the permanentsite location (Figure 7). The other is located at the north end of the park, near N 185 th street (Figure 8.)
    • ContentsSummaryWhat, Where, and Why 1History of Shoreline 2Existing Site Conditions 3Information Sources 3Methodology and Analysis 4Findings 7Recommendations 8Interim Site Locations 9References and Sources 10Appendix 11
    • What, Where, and Why Shoreline lacks a farmers’ market. There are three important development projects currently inthe works in Shoreline that make this an opportune time to incorporate one. These projects includeShoreline’s Aurora Corridor Project, the Town Center Subarea Plan, and the Park at Town Centerproject. The main consistent theme between them is the creation of a Town Center along Aurora,between N 175th and 185th streets. The proposed site for the farmers’ market is located within this veryTown Center, in the park between Aurora Ave N, Midvale Ave N. and N 178th street (Figure 5). Farmers’ markets are key components of a healthy community, society, economy andenvironment. They support and promote local, organic, and sustainable farming. Farmers’ marketsprovide a direct marketing channel for local farmers. This allows them to keep roughly 80 cents fromevery dollar spent on their food vs. 20 cents in other retail outlets. Farmer’s market sales inWashington State increased 45% from 2006 to 2007, to total $55 million. “Farmers’ markets alsoattract additional spending at neighboring businesses and attract new small businesses and jobs aswell, creating a more resilient and vibrant local economy” (1). The infrastructure and site built for thefarmers’ market will also be used for hosting countless other events and festivities, such as CelebrateShoreline. All of this generated activity and commerce will help anchor and shape the surrounding areainto a thriving city center for Shoreline. This will draw people together from all of the neighborhoods. Farmers’ markets are also vital sources of fresh, nutritious food for low income families andseniors who often suffer due to very limited access to these kinds of food. “In 2008, approximately$1.4 million in Women, Infants and Children (WIC) vouchers, Senior Farmers Market Nutrition (SFMNP)vouchers, and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Food Program (SNAP) were redeemed at farmers’markets in Washington” (1). Thousands of pounds of fresh, unsold produce are also donated to Local [1]
    • food banks, soup kitchens and shelters each year (1). All of this supports the necessity for developing afarmers’ market in Shoreline.History of Shoreline Shoreline didn’t start being developed until the early 1900’s when access was improved. TheSeattle-Everett Interurban Rail line was built in 1906 and the North Trunk Road was paved with bricksin 1913. Commercial centers formed around the Interurban Rail stops at N 175th and Aurora and N185th and Aurora (this is the exact area proposed for the farmers’ market site). “By the late 1930’s,commercial development concentrated along Aurora which saw steadily increasing use as part of theregion’s primary north-south travel route – U.S. Highway 99” (2). In 1939 the Interurban was closedand traffic on 99 increased significantly. In the late 1940’s people began to see Shoreline as a unifiedregion, instead of just stops along 99. The name “Shoreline” was coined by a student. It describes thecommunity that goes from “city line (Seattle) to county line (King/Snohomish) and from the shore ofPuget Sound to the shore of Lake Washington.” Shoreline officially became a city in 1995 when itincorporated. The total population is approximately 55,000 (2). Around 2000 Shoreline began the Aurora Corridor Project, which is the redevelopment of thethree miles of Aurora Avenue N (State Route 99) that runs through Shoreline. In 2007 the Citycompleted the first mile (N 145th to N 165th Streets). This project is widening Aurora and its sidewalks,revitalizing the Interurban Trail, as well as improving business access, transit lanes, lighting, and awhole host of other things. “These changes will help promote economic development andreinvestment, and improve vehicular and pedestrian safety, traffic flow, transit speed and reliability,corridor aesthetics, and environmental quality” (2). [2]
    • Existing Site Conditions There are two key projects happening in Shoreline. One is the Park at Town Center. The idea isto “create a signature celebratory park space for the City of Shoreline” that would “feature a majorgathering space for civic events” to “celebrate the new Shoreline Town Center” (2). The park is a long,thin parcel of land between Aurora Ave N and Midvale Ave N, and N 175th and 185th streets. It consistsof the Interurban trail, grass, utility poles and a smattering of young trees. There are no public facilities,such as restrooms and water. This combination of property is owned by Seattle City Light and the Cityof Shoreline. The improvement project is currently in the public comment and design phase, whichpresents the perfect opportunity to incorporate infrastructure for a farmers’ market (an ongoing “civicevent”) into the master plan. The other key project is the Town Center Subarea Plan. “In April 2009, the City Council adopteda Citywide Vision that identifies the lands along Aurora Avenue N between N 175 th and 185th Streets asthe core of an emerging Town Center” (2). The newly built City Hall is located within this area, as wellas the revitalized Interurban Trail. The idea is to develop this “core” area as the center of Shoreline inregards to business, government, and community events. An emphasis will be on zoning for mixed-usegrowth and improved walkability, transportation flow and neighborhood connectivity.Information Sources For this proposal I used data and information from three main sources. The first source was theCascade Harvest Coalition, including their web site. They provided the Marketing Research andStrategy manual. The second source was the City of Shoreline. This included the following: City ofShoreline web site, the Park at Town Center public workshop, the Transportation Master Plan, a [3]
    • Celebration Space Roundtable Summary and a meeting with Dan Eernissee, Economic DevelopmentManager of the City of Shoreline. The third source was the Washington State Farmers MarketAssociation, which included their web site. Two additional sources of information were Google Earthand the MapQuest web site. I also personally visited the proposed site location to evaluate it and makeobservations.Methodology and Analysis The first step with finding the best location for a farmers’ market in Shoreline was to doresearch on what a successful farmers’ market location needed. While searching online I came acrossthe Cascade Harvest Coalition web site. One of their key programs is Marketing Research andStrategies for Puget Sound Farmers’ Markets. After contacting them I was directed to their “MarketingResearch and Strategy for Growing Sales Opportunities at Puget Sound Farmers Markets” manual. Itlisted the top requirements for a successful farmers’ market location. I added one more requirementto the list that was not in the manual, proximity to other farmers’ markets.Here is the list: 1. Visibility. Can people see the farmers’ market from a distance? 2. Public transportation. Are there bus or train stops near? 3. Highway access. Is it easy for farmers to get to? 4. Centralized location. Is there business and/or other community activity around the market site? 5. Proximity to other farmers’ markets. Is this site far enough away from other markets? 6. Ownership. Who owns the space? 7. Cost. Is it expensive to use the space? 8. Customer accessibility. Is the market easy for customers to get to, and get in and out of? 9. Parking. Is there plenty of parking nearby? [4]
    • 10. Farmer and truck accessibility. Is there enough space for trucks to get in and out, turn around and park? 11. Is there enough space for farmers to set up their displays? 12. Is the site accessible to handicapped people? 13. Bathrooms and telephones. Are there public facilities? 14. Running water. Is water available to wash and cool produce? 15. Shade/shelter. Is there any protection from the weather? I started with the first three requirements: visibility, public transportation, and highway access.This means being clearly seen from a reasonable distance by the most amount of people, as well beingclose to public transit stops and freeway access. The obvious choice was a site located next to thebusiest road in Shoreline that also had major bus lines and stops and walkable accessibility. In order tofind areas matching these I searched for reliable data on Shoreline traffic flows, bus lines, bicycleroutes, freeway proximity and where the Interurban trail is located. From the City of Shoreline web siteI was able to find the Transportation Master Plan. Contained within it are the City of Shoreline TrafficFlow Map (Figure 1), the Existing Transit Stop Coverage Areas Map (Figure 2), and the Major BicycleCorridors Map (Figure 3). Both Figure 2 and 3 were modified slightly by me using Microsoft Paint toadd the Shoreline Farmers Market location to them. With Figure 1, I was able to narrow down the site location to three areas, along Aurora Ave N.,N 145th Street (East of Aurora Ave N.), and Lake Ballinger Way (East of Aurora Ave N.). They receivedthe heaviest flows of traffic in Shoreline. With Figure 2, I was able to further narrow it down to twoareas. Lake Ballinger Way was eliminated due to a lack of bus lines and stops. With Figure 3, I was ableto narrow it down to one area. N 145th Street was eliminated due to both a lack of bicycle routes andlack of proximity to the Interurban trail. This left only one area, along Aurora Ave N. [5]
    • The fourth requirement is a centralized location. This means being in the heart of the city. Ilooked at a map of Shoreline and picked an area along Aurora Ave. N roughly in the middle. SinceShoreline spans between N 145th street and N 205th street (Lake Ballinger Way), I chose N 165th to N185th streets. This would give me a wide enough area to work with and still be centrally located. In order to further narrow down the site location I again went to the City of Shoreline web siteto find information on any current development projects and to locate where the Town Center was. Ifound out that there are three important development projects currently in the works in Shoreline.These projects are: Shoreline’s Aurora Corridor Project, the Town Center Subarea Plan, and the Park atTown Center project. All of these projects are focused on the area along Aurora Ave. N, between N165th and N 185th streets. It also turned out that the first major commercial centers formed within thisarea and the new City Hall building is located nearby on N 175th street. The fifth requirement is proximity to other farmer’s markets. For this information I searchedthe Washington State Farmers Market Association web site. They have a map of all the farmer’smarket locations within Washington State. I used it to locate the ones near the Shoreline Town Center.I have provided a map that I created using an existing Google map (Figure 4). The closest markets are:Lake Forest Park, Edmonds, Mountlake Terrace, Seattle Meadowbrook, and Seattle Phinney. I thenused MapQuest to figure out exactly how far each of these farmers’ markets was from the TownCenter at Aurora Ave. N and N 175th street. The closest one was Mountlake Terrace at a distance ofapproximately 3.5 miles.Distances from proposed site of Shoreline farmers’ market: 1. Mountlake Terrace – 3.41 miles. 2. Lake Forest Park – between 3.94 and 5.5 miles depending on which route you traveled. 3. Edmonds – between 4.8 and 5.27 miles depending on which route you traveled. 4. Seattle Phinney – between 5.68 and 5.94 miles depending on which route you traveled. [6]
    • 5. Seattle Meadowbrook – 6.28 miles. Requirements six and seven are property ownership and cost. The site would need to belocated in an area where the property owner(s) would give permission for one to be held and beavailable at a low cost. After reading about the City projects it became obvious that the Park at TownCenter project was ideal. Not only was the City in the process of revitalizing the park, but also theycould easily give permission to hold the farmer’s market within the park at low or no cost. Also afarmers’ market meets all of Seattle City Light’s requirements for a park revitalization project that werementioned at the Park at Town Center Public Workshop. Requirements eight through fifteen could only be assessed by actually visiting the Park at TownCenter. Customer accessibility is good. Parking appears to be adequate along Midvale Ave N. as well asat nearby City Hall. The grass covered ground is level, which is ideal for putting down pavers or othermaterial that will act as the hard surface for the site. Access to the site is easy and available alongMidvale Ave N. and possibly Aurora. There is enough space to have a 20’ Fire lane that goes betweenboth rows of booths. Farmer and truck accessibility is good. The space is adequate enough for farmersto put up their displays. The site is also handicap accessible. All that was lacking are requirementsthirteen through fifteen. There are currently no public facilities. There is no running water. And there isno shade or shelter. These will have to be included within the revitalization project of the Park at TownCenter.Findings The proposed site location is the only location within Shoreline that meets and or has thepotential to meet all of the top requirements for a successful farmers’ market. All that is currently [7]
    • missing are requirements thirteen through fifteen. These need to be developed as part of theinfrastructure that will be included within the Park at Town Center project. Having a farmers’ marketwithin the park also fits the City of Shoreline and Seattle City Light’s requirements and vision for a parkrevitalization project. The infrastructure for the farmers’ market will support other festivals, markets,celebrations, and other events. This fits the City of Shoreline’s vision for the Town Center Subarea Plan.It will draw people in from the surrounding neighborhoods to interact, shop, and participate in localactivities. A farmers’ market has the potential to help boost foot traffic, local brand recognition, andbring more customers to local businesses. I have included a map that I created, using Google Earth andMicrosoft Paint, of the site location in the appendix (Figure 5). Although the data is as current as I could find and I did my best to verify information, there isdefinitely room for error. The City of Shoreline Transportation Master Plan is six years old so the dataneeds to be updated. MapQuest may not be completely accurate depending on how they calculatedistances and address locations. The addresses for the farmers’ markets that I got from theWashington State Farmers Market Association web site may not be completely correct. There may beerrors within the City of Shoreline project and history information pages from their web site. The toprequirements for a successful farmers’ market location as stated by the Cascade Harvest Coalition maybe faulty and not apply in each and every situation. And finally, I may have made mistakes regardingmy observations when visiting the site location.Recommendations Implement the necessary infrastructure for a farmers’ market within the Park at Town CenterMaster Plan. This includes: restroom facilities, ramps or surfaces flush with the street to accommodatehandicap access as well as vendor loading and unloading, appropriate hard surface area to [8]
    • accommodate 50 10’x10’ stalls with a 10’ wide walkway between the stall rows and along the northand south ends, power outlets at both the north and south ends of the market infrastructure, runningwater facilities, adequate trash cans, safety barriers along Aurora Ave N and angled parking alongMidvale Ave N. As a historic touch, the nine pallets of salvaged red brick could be inserted into thewalkways in artistic designs. The infrastructure should be located between the City of Shoreline parcel and Midvale Ave N.This matches up nicely with most of the design scheme titled Shoreline on the Move, that wasintroduced by the Berger Group at the March 9th Park at Town Center Public Workshop (Figure 6).There is one major exception. We do not advocate moving the Interurban Trail. That would be far tooexpensive and is unnecessary.Interim Site Locations Creating the Park at Town Center Master Plan will take time. Building the necessaryinfrastructure for the event space will take even longer. Included in the index are two options forinterim Shoreline Farmers’ Market site locations within the park. The first is located on either side ofthe Interurban Trail, near the proposed permanent site (Figure 7). It would use the Interurban Trail asthe access walkway between the market stalls. Restroom facilities would be accessible at City Hall. Wecould also provide portable water stations. The second is located at the north end of the park, withinthe west side of the Starbucks and John L. Scott business complex parking lot (Figure 8). Restroom andwater facilities would be accessible at the businesses within the complex. There is however limitedspace at this site for market stalls (15-20 maximum). [9]
    • References and Sources 1. Cascade Harvest Coalition http://www.cascadeharvest.org/ 2. City of Shoreline http://www.shorelinewa.gov/ 3. Washington State Farmers Market Association http://www.wafarmersmarkets.com/ 4. MapQuest http://www.mapquest.com/ 5. City of Shoreline. Creating a great celebration space in Shoreline – Roundtable Summary. 2010. 6. Meeting with Dan Eernissee, Economic Development Manager of the City of Shoreline 7. Park at Town Center Public Workshops, January 25th and March 9th 2011. 8. Google Earth 9. City of Shoreline. Transportation Master Plan. 2005. 10. Personal visit to site location 11. Cascade Harvest Coalition. Marketing Research and Strategy for Growing Sales Opportunities at Puget Sound Farmers Markets. 2008. [10]
    • AppendixFigure 1 – City of Shoreline Traffic Flow Map 2009. [11]
    • Figure 2 – Existing Transit Stop Coverage Areas. [12]
    • Figure 3 – Major Bicycle Corridors. [13]
    • Figure 4 – Farmers’ Market Proximity Map. [14]
    • Figure 5 – Map of Shoreline Farmers’ Market Site Location. [15]
    • Figure 6 – Shoreline on the Move. [16]
    • Figure 7 – Shoreline Farmers’ Market Interim Site Location 1. [17]
    • Figure 8 – Shoreline Farmers’ Market Interim Site Location 2. [18]