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Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
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Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
Provost report 2010 2011 final-
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  • 1. 2010-2011 Annual ReportOffice of Community and Economic Development
  • 2. Table of ContentsSTAFF ................................................................................................................................................4OFFICE OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (OCED) .......................................................5 OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................................................... 5 Mission ................................................................................................................................................... 5 Goals ...................................................................................................................................................... 5 Programs................................................................................................................................................ 62010-2011 ACCOMPLISHMENTS .........................................................................................................8 PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................................................................... 8 Fresno State Connect ............................................................................................................................. 8 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center ...................................................................................... 8 Smart Valley Places ................................................................................................................................ 9 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley ................................................................................. 9 Valley Legacy ....................................................................................................................................... 11 Small Business Development Center .................................................................................................... 11 Regional Jobs Initiative ........................................................................................................................ 11 Introduction to Economic Development Certificate Program.............................................................. 12 ValleyInternships.com.......................................................................................................................... 12 Bulldog Academy ................................................................................................................................. 12 ADMINISTRATION......................................................................................................................................... 12 Improved Efficiencies ........................................................................................................................... 12 Additional Office Space ........................................................................................................................ 12 Technology ........................................................................................................................................... 13 HUMAN RESOURCES..................................................................................................................................... 13 COMMUNICATIONS/OUTREACH ..................................................................................................................... 14 New Programs and Brand Development ............................................................................................. 14 Social Media Development .................................................................................................................. 14 2
  • 3. Reports ................................................................................................................................................. 15 Print Collateral and Presentation Materials ........................................................................................ 15 Speaking Engagements........................................................................................................................ 16 Contact Database ................................................................................................................................ 17 Websites .............................................................................................................................................. 17 Collaboration Tools .............................................................................................................................. 17 Media Relations ................................................................................................................................... 17 Co-Branding/Joint Communications .................................................................................................... 17LEGISLATION AND ADVOCACY ........................................................................................................................ 18GRANTS/FUNDING ....................................................................................................................................... 18 Grant Research and Dissemination ..................................................................................................... 18 Grants Awarded ................................................................................................................................... 18 Grants Pending .................................................................................................................................... 18 Sponsorships and Donations ................................................................................................................ 19APPENDIX A SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY RURAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER - INVITATION ................................................ 20APPENDIX B SMART VALLEY PLACES - FACT SHEET ......................................................................................... 21APPENDIX C SMART VALLEY PLACES - INVITATION TO LAUNCH EVENT ............................................................... 22APPENDIX D PRESENTATION - PARTNERSHIP BOARD MEETING, MAR 11, 2011 ................................................. 23APPENDIX E VALLEY LEGACY - PROGRESS REPORT .......................................................................................... 24APPENDIX F CAL VALLEY TECH IHUB PROPOSAL ............................................................................................. 25APPENDIX G INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATE PROGRAM - INVITATION ......................... 26APPENDIX H COMMUNICATIONS/OUTREACH - DIAGRAM ................................................................................ 27APPENDIX I OFFICE OF COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - FACT SHEET ................................................ 28APPENDIX J OFFICE OF COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - PRESENTATION ........................................... 29 3
  • 4. StaffOffice of Community and Economic Development California State University, Fresno Mike Dozier | Interim Director Christine Nutting | Associate Director Jen Paul | Communications Director Melanie Allen | Administrative Coordinator Angelica Cano | Fiscal / Marketing Assistant Sally Cardell | Grants / Budget Analyst Stacie Dabbs | Public Affairs Manager Shelby Gonzales | Grants / Budget Manager Ismael Herrera | Program Manager Marcia Martin | Communications Coordinator 4
  • 5. Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED)OverviewMissionAn on-campus division dedicated to aligning the University’s intellectual capacity and innovation-driveneconomic development initiatives to improve the competitiveness and prosperity of the region.Goals • Increase Economic Innovation throughout the eight-county region • Develop effective systems that promote Business and Industry Strategy • Enhance Public Policy in favor of the eight-county region • Create strategic partnerships focused on Community Development • Develop educational programs that empower the Leaders of tomorrowOur role is to link, align and leverage the University and its resources to the needs of the community,which is done through several programs. 5
  • 6. ProgramsFresno State Connect: To further the University’s role in community engagement, the Office ofCommunity and Economic Development acts as the clearinghouse of information regarding theUniversity’s collective value and instrumental role in the local community and will identify and promoteFresno State’s extensive inventory of knowledge and experts who can fulfill the needs of business.San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center: Acting as a resource hub, the San Joaquin Valley RuralDevelopment Center facilitates technical assistance to underserved rural communities by connectingthem to an array of experts who can provide resources and solutions for fulfilling their communityneeds.Smart Valley Places: Building on the San Joaquin Valley Regional Blueprint and its smart growthprinciples and California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley and its six initiatives, Smart Valley Placesis our region’s road map to creating more transportation choices, equitable-affordable housing, 6
  • 7. economic competitiveness, and healthier, safe and walkable neighborhoods. This will ultimately shapefuture growth trends that will impact not only the health and prosperity of the region, but the entirestate of California. www.SmartValleyPlaces.orgCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley: Set in motion in 2005 with an executive order fromGov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley is an unprecedentedpublic-private partnership sharply focused on improving the region’s economic vitality and quality of lifefor the 3.9 million residents who call the San Joaquin Valley home. The Partnership is addressing thechallenges of the region by implementing measurable actions on six major initiatives to help the Valleyemerge as California’s 21st Century Opportunity. www.SJVPartnership.orgValley Legacy: The purpose of the Valley Legacy grant is to bring the San Joaquin Valleys K-12 system,higher education, and workforce investment board systems into alignment to better prepare youngpeople for occupations in high-growth industry sectors in the Valley including water technology,renewable energy, food processing, agricultural technology and biotechnology - all industries that areclosely tied to agribusiness, the heart of the regional economy - as well as manufacturing and supplychain management.Small Business Development Center: This is a collaborative partnership between the Office ofCommunity and Economic Development, University of California, Merced, and the Central ValleyBusiness Incubator. Together, these organizations provide an infrastructure to foster Small BusinessDevelopment Center (SBDC) activity, and reach businesses throughout the San Joaquin Valley. SBDCprovides one-on-one business consulting, workshops, research and online learning services.Regional Jobs Initiative: RJI is based on the idea that regional economies are made up of a series ofrelated industries, or clusters, which benefit one another. Since inception, 12 industry clusters havebeen formed with significant backing from industry leaders, supporting public agencies, and otherpartners. Leadership for the RJI coalition is coordinated by the Office of Community and EconomicDevelopment and key staff loaned from participating organizations. www.FresnoRJI.orgCal Valley Tech: CVT, an innovation hub (iHub), is managed by the Central Valley Business Incubator andpartnered with Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviation and Economic Development. Thiscollaboration grew out of the SBDC Partnership between CVBI, the University of California, Merced, andthe Office of Community and Economic Development. The CVT iHub leverages assets such as researchparks, technology incubators, universities, and federal laboratories to provide an innovation platform forstartup companies, economic development organizations, business groups, and venture capitalists. Thisservice gives greater access to key partners and resources for technology transfer and commercializationas well as positions CVT as the sole iHub in the region. There are a total of 12 iHubs throughoutCalifornia. caltechvalley.comIntroduction to Economic Development Certificate Program: A collaborative project between theCalifornia Academy for Economic Development and California State University, Fresno –UniversityBusiness Center, Division of Continuing and Global Education, and Office of Community and EconomicDevelopment. This program is for new professionals entering the field of economic development,existing professionals, elected officials, and community leaders who want to advance their career andbetter serve their community. www.csufresno-econdev.org 7
  • 8. ValleyInternships.com: Research shows that connecting college students to meaningful internshipopportunities increases the chance they will stay in our community after graduation. By strengtheningthe connection between our local colleges and universities and the San Joaquin Valley businesscommunity, we are creating a mechanism where college students can obtain meaningful internshipswith local employers. ValleyInternships.com is a collaborative effort to facilitate connections betweenthe highly regarded educational institutions and businesses within the Valley region.www.ValleyInternships.comBulldog Academy: Fresno State is nationally recognized and plays a significant role in our community;however, it is difficult for the public to get involved. Who do you contact? Where do you go on campus?The purpose of the Bulldog Academy is to provide a forum where people can come learn about how theUniversity works, what the different functions are for the various colleges, review some of theUniversity’s research and applied knowledge abilities, and show the public its strategic direction.2010-2011 AccomplishmentsProgram DevelopmentFresno State Connect• Program plan has been developed.• Implementation plan has been developed.• University asset inventory is in development; leveraging existing technologies is being explored.• Implementation is in progress.• Website is on hold as University Communications is transitioning website templates.San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center• San Joaquin Valley Redevelopment Center officially launched Feb. 25, 2011, at a Small Communities Network quarterly workshop in Livingston, Calif. (Appendix A) o More than 90 representatives of regional rural communities were in attendance. o The event was video recorded and distributed to regional rural community leaders and stakeholders. To view the recording, click here (note: playlist contains 6 videos).• California Coalition for Rural Housing awarded a $5,000 contract in April 2011 to administer Small Communities Network and connect member communities to technical assistance and resources, as needed. o Facilitated Small Communities Network work group conference calls for regional rural community leaders and stakeholders:  May 11, 2011- Central Valley Health Policy Institute presentation "Exploring the Relationships Between Place and Health Inequity in Californias Heartland"  June 8, 2011- GRID Alternatives presentation “Solar Affordable Housing Program” o Facilitated Small Communities Network quarterly workshop focused on providing regional rural community leaders and stakeholder information, solutions, and innovations on water and wastewater infrastructure, June 24, 2011, Corcoran, Calif.• Activities included in the following grant applications: o James Irvine Foundation grant pending submission July 2011 o EDA Economic Adjustment Assistance grant submitted June 2011 8
  • 9. o USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture grant submitted March 2011 o HUD Rural Innovation Fund grant submitted February 2011 o USDA Rural Community Development Initiative grant submitted December 2010• Within one year, number of partnering organizations increased from 12 to 24.• 15 rural communities have received some level of technical assistance since October 2010.• 3 organizations provided presentation to a regional Community Service District on next steps for modernizing their water infrastructure.• Monthly planning meetings have occurred since October 2010.• On May 26, 2011, accomplishments were featured during a panel presentation at the “Place Matters” conference hosted by the Central Valley Health Policy Institute in Fresno, Calif.• Marketing materials developed and distributed to limited number of regional rural community leaders and stakeholders.• Website is in development; launch is dependent upon availability of funding.• Continued to assist U.S. Department of Agriculture with resource mapping for rural communities.Smart Valley Places• More than 20 partners including 14 cities and several nonprofit organizations. (Appendix B)• Work plan developed and approved by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).• 14 Cities Planning Projects initiated.• Community Leadership Program initiated.• Invited to and participated in Living Cities Boot camp in Boston, Mass.• Held a Smart Valley Places Launch event with California State University, Fresno, regional partners and funding agencies. (Appendix C)• Website developed and launched; maintenance plan set up with consultant.• Through request for proposal (RFP) process, The Planning Center | DC&E was hired to staff the Smart Valley Places governing body (Compact Executive Committee) through the course of the grant, bringing with it the expertise of Bill Fulton.• Developed Consortium Agreement that was approved by HUD, all 19 members of governing body.• Launched HUD’s Preferred Sustainability Status program in the San Joaquin Valley and processed several requests from Valley partners to make them eligible for additional grant application bonus points.California Partnership for the San Joaquin ValleySecretariat• Awarded a $4 million regional planning grant under the federal Sustainable Communities Initiative in late 2010. Smart Valley Places was officially launched in February 2011 along with 14 Valley cities, four regional nonprofit organizations, California State University, Fresno, the Regional Policy Council and the California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation. See Smart Valley Places section for additional information.• Created and launched the Sustainable Communities Work Group, with leadership provided by the San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy Council, to address regional land use and transportation issues and challenges.• Established the San Joaquin Valley Housing Collaborative as the new Housing Work Group and assisted with the reorganization of the Board of Directors to assure active regional participation in addressing the Valley’s housing challenges. 9
  • 10. • Worked with Valley stakeholders to support the state’s application for additional funding for high- speed rail in the Valley.• Initiated monthly conference calls with federal and state legislative staff to discuss issues and challenges of regional importance and maintain open communication between Valley stakeholders and our elected officials.• Invited by California Emerging Technology Fund to apply for a California Public Utilities Commission Regional Consortium grant to further broadband and information technology deployment throughout the Valley. Applying to become Regional Broadband Consortium.• Conducted Partnership Board reboot as all board members were re-appointed or newly appointed. Conducted strategic planning session with the Board.• Implemented the Partnership Communications Plan, which provides a strategy for promoting the efforts and successes of the Partnership throughout the Valley by making presentations to leading public and private organizations, preparing and distributing informational material, and maintaining an up-to-date website and social media sites. Please see the Communications/ Outreach section for additional information.• Coordinated four quarterly Board meetings. (Appendix D)Work Groups• Obtained millions of dollars in funding for the San Joaquin Valley to support air quality goals ($300 million of Prop 1B funding alone).• San Joaquin Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan Framework completed October 2009.• Initiated convergence of interests between five Bay-Delta counties, eight Valley counties, with San Joaquin County serving as “hinge county; historical first – all 12 counties worked proactively together on common water policy issues.• Increased utilization of advanced communications services (ACS) by all residents through several digital literacy programs throughout the Valley.• Built upon ACS infrastructure for telemedicine and eHealth to promote other applications for education and economic development to increase access and affordability.• San Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization formed partnerships and helped Valley jurisdictions receive support from energy block grant funding from the Department of Energy and California Energy Commission.• Valley Clean Air Now “Tune In-Tune Up” program established to reduce mobile source pollutants generated by older "out of tune" cars. Results indicate a cost effectiveness of $1,524 per ton of reduced exhaust emissions.• Conducted three Exemplary Practices in Education Leadership Conferences in January of 2009, 2010, 2011.• Within the Economic Development Work Group, the Lyles Center executed community college entrepreneurship programs and established a Technology Development unit to work with early stage entrepreneurs.• For the first time in the Valley, brought together higher education institutions to increase college- going rates in the region and generate awareness of higher education opportunities.• Completed regional Preschool Assessment and Planning project. 10
  • 11. Valley Legacy• 20 partnering agencies• 10 leadership meetings• Midway report published in March 2011 to insure the pilot program was recorded; 500 copy distribution. (Appendix E)• Video produced to promote this collaborative approach to education transformation; distributed through various marketing channels; has had 170 views. To view, click here.• Second video currently in production to capture program participants, their experience in the program and how it has impacted their lives.• Opportunities for sustainability, once the grant ends, are being reviewed with all grant team leaders.• Continued with implementation of a two-year $2 million Workforce Investment Act grant from the governor’s 15% discretionary fund.• Report and video provided to Valley legislators and community stakeholders for educational purposes and to build a foundation for future funding requests.Small Business Development Center• Assisted in promoting training events and resources.• Facilitated Governor’s Business Matchmaking Event in Fresno.• Participated in planning Valley Small Business Awards Luncheon.• Received an additional year of funding to be fiscal administrator for regional Small Business Development Center (SBDC).• Invited to participate in SBDC’s accreditation process.• Worked with Central Valley Business Incubator to expand incubation services throughout the SBDC boundaries.Regional Jobs Initiative• Hosted three RJI Implementation Team Meetings.• Published quarterly industry cluster reports.• Increased cross-cluster collaboration efforts.• Continued to enhance the participation of rural communities within the RJI.• Implementation Team attended two strategic planning sessions for purpose of how to best support the evolution of the RJI.• RJI Network continues to track legislative initiatives and policy development pertinent to Fresno County and the targeted industry clusters.• During the year, a comprehensive core committee was formed for the Tourism Cluster which is made up of members from various agencies and sectors including Aquarius Aquarium Institute, California Restaurant Association – Fresno Chapter, City of Clovis, City of Fresno, Clovis-Fresno Convention & Visitors Bureau, County of Fresno, East Side Municipal Government, Fresno Chaffee Zoo, Fresno Coalition for Arts, Science & History; Fresno Hotel/Motel Association, Fresno State, Fresno Yosemite International Airport, National Parks Service, Shaver Lake Chamber of Commerce, and West Side Municipal Government.• During the year, International Center for Water Technology in partnership with Central Valley Business Incubator secured a Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board grant to continue the work of the Water Cluster. The grant provides funding to continue the annual Career Expo, Supervisor Training, cluster meetings and member recruitment. 11
  • 12. Cal Valley Tech• Continue to explore funding opportunities for the iHub and its partners. Funding is intended for aligning the activities of Cal Valley Tech iHub with focus on Blue Tech (water and energy), and Agriculture teaching.• Wrote and re-submitted iHub proposal with a focus on Water, Energy and Ag-Tech, July 2010. Proposal was accepted. (Appendix F)• Participated in monthly iHub meetings.Introduction to Economic Development Certificate Program• Hosted a successful inaugural program. (Appendix G)• Certified 40 graduates.• Website developed.• Promotion materials developed and distributed.• Coordinated planning for second course to be Oct. 17-20, 2011.ValleyInternships.com• Partnered with International Center for Water Technology to leverage portal.• Donations received to offset development costs.• Website in progress.Bulldog Academy• Program developed.• Implementation plan developed and in progress.• Met with key University leadership.• Presentations in development.• Website in development.• Registration in development.AdministrationImproved EfficienciesDuring the 2010-11 Program Year, OCED standardized operating procedures were updated, with anemphasis on fiscal and marketing /communications processes. Additionally, hired Grants and BudgetAnalyst as the volume of grants we received has increased greatly; we want to ensure we remaincompliant while also preparing for future funding requests. The Associate Director and the Grants andBudget Manager worked diligently to review internal process, design new systems around grantcompliance and internal monitoring, develop a new budget and expense tracking system, create afinancial forecasting system, develop subcontracting management processes for allocating time andcosts, and developed a sponsorship and donation program to allow for, and assist in, managing thesefunds.Additional Office SpaceDue to the receipt of several grants, additional staff became necessary this year. Additional space wasprovided on campus to house the OCED fiscal department. 12
  • 13. TechnologyThis year OCED encountered several opportunities to enhance our use of technology. As systemschanged on campus, the necessity for new computers became apparent. Most of the office computershad to be updated to be compliant with university standards. Most of the costs were billed to grants sothe fiscal impact was minimal. However, staff reported their ability to do their jobs more efficiently hasincreased. Additionally, a new copier was leased that improved output. However, we were able tonegotiate a cheaper price saving our office several thousands of dollars a year.Human ResourcesThe OCED office recognizes that healthy employees make a successful organization and have adoptedthe following ‘culture statement’: The OCED team prides itself on an entrepreneurial atmosphere, producing Quality work. We are committed to promoting an environment in which perspectives are understood, respected, and valued. An essential component of this atmosphere is teamwork. OCED consists of highly trained, forward-thinking teammates integral to our continued success. Through the free-flow sharing of information in an open and honest manner the team is able to maintain high-quality outcomes and be helpful and supportive to one another.The current and new staff at OCED is recognized throughout the community for their leadership roleswith the various projects. Balancing professional development opportunities for staff is a high priority,as several staff members have recently, or, are currently obtaining advanced degrees. 13
  • 14. Communications/OutreachThe communications team continues to build and fine-tune the communications management system toensure effective outreach and communications with key stakeholders throughout the Valley. OCED has amultidimensional communications platform that has significantly enhanced outreach, education andcommunity relationship management. (Appendix H)New Programs and Brand DevelopmentThis academic year, numerous new programs were developed and launched. Each program requiredbrand development to ensure clear and effective communications. The Smart Valley Places brand wasdeveloped, and special attention was given as it is part of the California Partnership for the San JoaquinValley’s family of brands. This also is true for the new program ValleyInternships.com. These twoprograms are eight-countywide and support the Partnership’s six initiatives. A logo, website, socialmedia, letterhead, boiler plate, and fact sheet were created for each program.Other new programs include Fresno State Connect, Bulldog Academy, San Joaquin Valley RuralDevelopment Center and the Introduction to Economic Development Certificate Program. In an effort toadhere to communications guidelines of California State University, these programs incorporate theFresno State gold medallion and other university requirements. All these materials were approved byUniversity Communications prior to dissemination.Social Media DevelopmentCurrently, the OCED manages four Facebook profiles: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley,Regional Jobs Initiative, Smart Valley Places, and Coalition for a California Financial Workout Plan. Eachpage has seen an increase in “likes” over the past months, as OCED has tried to ensure moreconnectivity among its various communications outlets. Each has acquired “fans”: Partnership - 404, RJI- 332, SVP - 83 and California Coalition - 60.As of June 1, 2011, Facebook reported 500 monthly active users on the Partnership page alone.Likewise, our last post yielded 334 impressions – or instances – that Facebook users had access to thepost. Data based on June 1, 2010, and June 1, 2011, shows that the California Partnership for the SanJoaquin Valley Facebook page has fans in various countries, including Italy, Costa Rica, Canada, Uruguayand Germany. This is incredibly important as our department looks to expand its impact and scope.OCED also has increased its Twitter presence. Currently, three of our initiatives have profiles on thesocial networking site: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley, Regional Jobs Initiative andSmart Valley Places. We’ve begun using Twitter as a two-way resource – to push out information to ourfollowers as well as connect to similar organizations and news media for relevant issues.Similarly, our department has begun transmitting information in video format. In the last year, both aYouTube and a Vimeo account were created to allow followers to experience our information in amultitude of systems. In the next year, using a combination of all of the aforementioned formats andnetworks, the OCED communications team hopes to connect with a younger demographic and look forand foster opportunities of more interaction with the public. 14
  • 15. Through analytics it is clear that these channels provide an additional method of reaching desiredaudiences while creating a two-way conversation.Facebook:• www.facebook.com/sjvpartnership• www.facebook.com/fresnorji• www.facebook.com/smartvalleyplaces• www.facebook.com/cafinancialworkoutplanTwitter:• www.twitter.com/PartnershipSJV• www.twitter.com/FresnoRJI• www.twitter.com/SVP_CAYouTube:• www.youtube.com/OCEDFresnoVimeo:• www.vimeo.com/OCEDFlickr:• www.flickr.com/partnershipwiaReportsTwo annual reports were published during the 2010-2011 academic year: California Partnership for theSan Joaquin Valley and Regional Jobs Initiative. Each report was a comprehensive communication piecewhich discussed activities of the initiative, accomplishments and future plans. Each external stakeholderand community partner was represented and acknowledged for their contribution to the collaborative.Annual reports were disseminated throughout the Valley including to community leaders, academicleaders and public elected officials, and private and public agencies.Print Collateral and Presentation MaterialsAs community outreach and education is one of the primary functions of OCED, significant time wasdedicated to producing print collateral and presentation materials. A key focus this past year was todevelop communication pieces on OCED and how each program aligns, links and leverages to meet theoffice’s five goals. (Appendix I) An overview of OCED and its various programs was developed to increasecommunication and understanding of the office’s role within the university and community. As printmaterial and a PowerPoint presentation (Appendix J), these tools will be essential as OCED continues toapply for grant funding, foundation support and new partnerships.Additional print collateral and presentation materials were developed and distributed for the SanJoaquin Valley Rural Development Center, Smart Valley Places, California Partnership for the San JoaquinValley, Regional Jobs Initiative, ValleyInternships.com, and the Introduction to Economic DevelopmentCertificate Program. 15
  • 16. Speaking Engagements07.28.10 CALED Professional Advisory Service, Lompoc, provide three-day review and recommendation of Economic Development Program08.09.10 Atwater City Council, Atwater08.19.10 Tulare County Association of Governments, Tulare08.19.10 Clovis Area Brokers, Clovis08.25.10 Economic Development Corporation Business Matchmaking, Fresno10.11.10 Introduction to Economic Development Course, Economic Development Strategy Presentation, Fresno10.13.10 Central California Society for Information Management, Fresno10.21.10 Decision Maker Roundtable Discussion: Strategies for a Resilient and Prosperous Fresno, hosted by the Local Government Commission, Fresno10.22.10 Valley Land Use Conference, Clovis Veterans Memorial Building, Clovis11.09.10 Fresno County Board of Supervisors, Fresno11.10.10 Governors 2010 Small Business Conference, Panel Moderator, Fresno11.18.10 Leadership Clovis, Economic Vitality Day, Fresno - Presentation11.18.10 Leadership Fresno, Regional Collaboration Presentation, Fresno01.04.11 Rural Innovation Fund meeting, Firebaugh01.07.11 Rural Development Center meeting with City of San Joaquin, San Joaquin01.10.11 Agriculture Research Services, Agriculture Technology Innovation Program meeting, Chair01.11.11 Fresno State - Student Affairs Roundtable, Fresno01.13.11 Center for Advanced Research & Technology Annual Showcase, Clovis01.21.11 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center meeting, City of Tranquility01.27.11 Team Selma meeting, Selma02.01.11 Valley One Voice, Sacramento02.14.11 Testimony before the House Sub-Committee on Rural Development, Washington DC02.16.11 Smart Valley Places launch, California State University, Fresno02.25.11 Small Communities Network/Rural Development Center Launch, Livingston03.04.11 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center meeting, City of Easton, Easton03.09.11 Stockton Chamber of Commerce REXPO Conference, Moderator, Stockton03.17.11 Career Expo, Fresno03.25.11 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center Presentation - San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy Council, Fresno Councils of Government, Fresno03.30.11 Federal Agencies Task Force for Strong Communities/Strong Cities, Fresno04.15.11 Mega Region Summit, Panel Presentation, Oakland04.28.11 CALED Conference, Panel Presentation05.06.11 Broadband Conference, Panel Presentation, Clovis05.17.11 Small Business Association Small Business Awards, Introduction of Key Note Speaker05.27.11 Tulare County Economic Development Corporation Annual Meeting, Key Note Speaker06.21.11 Regional Broadband Consortium Meeting, Presentation06.23.11 UC Merced Small Business Development Center Annual Planning Retreat, Participation 16
  • 17. Contact DatabaseThe database organizes stakeholders by sector and industry. Through various strategies, includingcontact lists for each program and the “sign-up” function through the website, potential stakeholdersmay become involved in various programs. OCED currently has 5,224 stakeholders in the database.Increasing the number of stakeholders is a priority for OCEDWebsitesOCED manages several websites which continue to be improved and connected throughout the cybercommunity. The communications team consistently updates for relevance, including an active calendaras well as a document library with pertinent reports, board agendas and minutes, and additionalresource documents.Additionally, social marketing has been integrated into the websites to insure maximum utility andimpact.Collaboration ToolsIntranets were developed to increase the collaboration and education for the various grants OCEDmanages.Media RelationsTraditional methods of communication efforts with the media will continue including press releases,media advisories, and editorial content and interviews. All OCED programs have received considerablemedia recognition for its work. OCED also has partnered with University Communications to leverageresources and insure maximum impact.08.13.10 3rd Quarter Board Meeting – Tulare County, August 2009.16.10 NSP – not as easy as 1-2-3, Neighborhood Stabilization Program10.14.10 San Joaquin Valley awarded $4M, Smart Valley Places11.17.10 4th Quarter Board Meeting – Madera County, December 311.26.10 Bakersfield Californian. Opinion: Ah, but some Valley cities are trying (Interview in Fresno)03.03.11 1st Quarter Board Meeting – San Joaquin County, March 1103.22.11 Valley Legacy has Successful First Year04.18.11 New coordinator appointed for Smart Valley Places – Compact Executive Committee06.27.11 Media Advisory: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Board Meeting, Kings County, July 1106.30.11 2nd Quarter Board Meeting – Kings County, July 11Co-Branding/Joint CommunicationsAligning OCED’s communication efforts with other community organizations and with UniversityCommunications is an ongoing objective. By engaging organizations throughout the eight-county region,this will broaden OCED’s outreach and increase the brand’s credibility. OCED will continue to encourageprogram partnerships and co-branding aligned events with appropriate organizations while ensuring thevarious programs are given public recognition for its role. 17
  • 18. Legislation and Advocacy• Participated in Fresno County’s One Voice and the Regional Policy Council’s Valley Voice trips to Washington, D.C. and Sacramento to advocate for programs and funding to benefit the RJI, the• Partnership and the OCED.• Served as a guest host for several Maddy Forum weekly radio shows on KFSR 90.7FM, the University radio station.• Advocated for several programs and efforts throughout the region with letters of support from OCED, the RJI and/or the Partnership.Grants/FundingWe are pleased to report that OCED generated external support in fiscal year 2010-2011. Please notethat the grants awarded funding goes directly to pay for expenses related to that grant. They do notinfuse additional capital into our office. However, they do offset some fixed costs the OCED bears at apro-rated amount.Grant Research and DisseminationOCED continuously researches grant opportunities for the benefit of OCED, collaborative opportunitiesand community partners. Identified grants are disseminated to partners.Grants Awarded• $1,000,000 – Valley Legacy Grant for Integrated Workforce Development Strategy for Regional Industry Clusters in the San Joaquin Valley. This $2 million grant covers a two-year period at $1 million a year (November 2009 through March 2012). The funding source is Workforce Investment Act and Workforce Investment Area discretionary. OCED receives $270,000 a year to administer the grant; we are in the last year.• $4,000,000 – Smart Valley Places is a regional planning grant provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as part of the federal Partnership for Sustainable Communities to create a regional plan for sustainable development for the San Joaquin Valley. This is a three-year grant administered by OCED in partnership with 14 cities and numerous partners. This grant was launched Feb. 1, 2011.• $5,000 – Small Communities Network• $5,000 – Income for the Introduction to Economic Development Certificate program• $43,000 – Small Business Development CenterGrants Pending• $150,000- (a year, for three years) California Public Utilities Commission Regional Consortium Grant.• $250,000- (a year, for three years) Private funding for the support of unfunded activities of the Partnership and Secretariat from the James Irvine Foundation.• $75,000- Private funding for the sustainability of the San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center from the Wells Fargo Foundation.• $250,000- (a year, for three years) U.S. Economic Development Administration grant for the sustainability of the Partnership, Broadband and San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center. 18
  • 19. Sponsorships and Donations• Partnership Board Meeting Sponsors 2010-2011 02.26.10 Kern County Board of Supervisors 05.21.10 Merced County Association of Governments 08.20.10 City of Tulare, City of Visalia, International Agri-Center, Tulare County Association of Governments, Tulare County Economic Development Corporation 12.03.10 Central Valley Independent Network, Madera County Board of Supervisors 03.11.11 Greater Stockton Chamber of Commerce, Kaiser Permanente Central Valley, San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors, Valley CAN• $500 Valley Internships• We are exploring privatization programs, specifically fee-for-service and sponsorships and donations to better use University resources. 19
  • 20. APPENDIX ASan Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center Invitation 20
  • 21. SAVE THE DATE! Small Communities Network Workshop #4 Introducing the Rural Development Center February 25, 2011 Livingston, CACalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, and CaliforniaCoalition for Rural Housing are proud to sponsor an interactive day designed to shape the future of the RuralDevelopment Center: a consortia of more than 15 partner organizations dedicated to providing technicalassistance and capacity building to small cities and unincorporated communities in the San Joaquin Valley andfoothills. We hope you’ll join us. Registration is free and lunch is included. Rural Development Center Partners• California Association for Local Economic Development• California Coalition for Rural Housing• Center for Economic Research and Education of Central California• Center for International Trade Development, State Center Community College District• Construction Management Program, College of Engineering, Fresno State• Community and Regional Planning Center, Fresno State• Central Valley Business Incubator• Fresno Area Hispanic Chamber of Commerce WHY SHOULD YOU• Fresno County Council of Governments COME TO THIS WORKSHOP?• College of Health and Human Services, Fresno State This workshop will provide a chance to• Office of Community and Economic Development, Fresno State have one-on-one conversations with the• University Business Center, Fresno State above mentioned partners to access essential assistance for your community. The Rural Development Center is still Workshop Sponsors taking shape and the partners’ ultimate goal is that it serves the needs of YOUR communities.Please contact us with any questions or to receive registration information:Felicity Lyons, California Coalition for Rural Housing916-443-4448, felicity@calruralhousing.orgIsmael Diaz Herrera, Office of Community and Economic Development, Fresno State559-294-6023, isherrera@csufresno.edu
  • 22. APPENDIX BSmart Valley Places Fact Sheet 21
  • 23. FACT sheet February 2011Overview concentrated poverty andSmart Valley Places is an unemployment with a predominantlyunprecedented consortium of 14 low-skilled and poorly educatedurban cities from throughout the workforce; neglected ruraleight-county region of the San Joaquin communities; severe deficits ofValley, California, in partnership with affordable and diverse housingfour regional nonprofit organizations, opportunities; undiversified andCalifornia State University, Fresno, the uncompetitive urban economies;California Central Valley Economic very poor air quality and significantDevelopment Corporation, and the water supply and quality issues; withSan Joaquin Valley Regional Policy a sprawling growth pattern of low-Council which represents all eight density, auto-dependent suburban-Metropolitan Planning Organizations oriented development that continuesin the San Joaquin Valley. It is to consume significant amounts ofcoordinated by the California irreplaceable farmland. Smart Valley Places represents the commitment that will guide the cities in the SanPartnership for the San Joaquin Valley and much needed capital required to Joaquin Valley for the next 20 plus(Partnership), and driven by the reverse these harsh interdependent years. Through a number of innovativeCompact of 14 San Joaquin Valleycities with populations of 50,000 or realities that have long plagued the components there will be realistic,greater. Building on the Partnership’s San Joaquin Valley and create an sustainable urbanization plans thatStrategic Action Proposal and the San attractive place to live, work and bridge jurisdictions by focusing growthJoaquin Valley Regional Blueprint’s do business. in urban areas to preserve agriculturesmart growth principles, Smart and minimize suburbanization, plusValley Places is the region’s roadmap Outcomes address local and regional mass transit,to creating more transportation With a $4 million Sustainable energy and housing issues.choices, equitable-affordable Communities Initiative Regionalhousing, economic competitiveness, Planning Grant awarded by the Additionally, through the work of theand healthier, safe and walkable U.S. Department of Housing and partnering nonprofit organizations,neighborhoods, ultimately shaping Urban Development in partnership the region will benefit from thefuture growth trends that will impact with the U.S. Department of implementation of a regional plan fornot only the health and prosperity Transportation and the U.S. civic engagement to build technicalof the region, but the entire state of Environmental Protection Agency, understanding of smart growth andCalifornia. the Smart Valley Places consortium implementation capacity amongThe San Joaquin Valley has long will ultimately create a single local leaders, government staff andsuffered as an area of significant integrated plan for regional growth stakeholders, particularly in low- income and minority communities. Smart Valley Places, in conjunction with the substantial federal investment to begin California’s high-speed rail system in the San Joaquin Valley, truly is the region’s opportunity to transform itself and demonstrate that the San Joaquin Valley is the key to California’s healthy, prosperous and sustainable future.
  • 24. February 2011 SAN JOAQUINCompact Cities Project COUNTY Lodi StocktonLodi: Climate Action Plan and Implementation; MantecaDevelopment Code Update and Implementation; Lower ModestoMokelumne River Watershed Stewardship Plan Implementation STANISLAUS Turlock COUNTY MERCED MADERAStockton: Climate Action Plan, Implementation, and Related COUNTY Merced COUNTYSustainable Programs. FRESNO COUNTYManteca: General Plan, Land Use, Conservation and Safety Element Clovis FresnoUpdate; Climate Action Plan and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory;Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan Update TULARE COUNTYModesto: General Plan Amendments to Land Use and Circulation Elements Visalia TulareTurlock: Comprehensive General Plan Update/EIR; Downtown Design Hanford Porterville KINGS COUNTYGuidelines and Zoning Regulations Update DelanoMerced: Form Based Zoning CodeMadera: Development of Master Infrastructure Plans and Water Management Plan with KERN COUNTYIntegrated Water Reclamation StrategiesClovis: Comprehensive General Plan UpdateFresno: General Plan, Development Code and MEIR Update and I-PLACE3S GIS TechnologyVisalia: Community Outreach Newsletter Distribution and Community Workshops; Third Year General Plan UpdateConsultant Funding; Expanded Light Rail Connectivity PlanTulare: Transit-Oriented Development ProjectPorterville: Economic Development Strategic Plan; Update and Develop New Design Standards and Specifications;High-Density Housing Upzone ProgramHanford: Downtown East Precise PlanDelano: Green Building Program; Healthy Delano and Wellness Element to the General Plan; Sustainable DelanoElement to the General PlanRegional PartnersRegional Policy Council For more information:Community and Regional Planning Center Mike Dozier, DirectorCalifornia Central Valley Economic Development Corporation Office of Community andCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Economic Development California State University, Fresno 5010 N. Woodrow Ave.Community Leadership Partners Suite 200, M/S WC142California Coalition for Rural Housing Fresno, CA 93740Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program (559) 294-6021 Office (559) 294-6024 Office FaxLocal Government CommissionAmerican Farmland Trust www.facebook.com/smartvalleyplaces www.smartvalleyplaces.org
  • 25. APPENDIX C Smart Valley PlacesInvitation to Launch Event 22
  • 26. The Office of the Provost at California State University, FresnoInvites You to Join Us as We LaunchSmart Valley Places Smart Valley Places is an unprecedented consortium of 14 urban cities from throughout San Joaquin Valley, four regional nonprofits, and California State University ,Fresno. It is federally funded by a $4 million Sustainable Communities Initiative Regional Planning Grant awarded to the San Joaquin Valley, together with California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation, and the San Joaquin Regional Policy Council, to ultimately create a single integrated plan for regional growth that will guide Valley cities for the next 20 years and beyond.Wednesday, February 16, 20114:30 to 7 p.m.Smittcamp Alumni House at California State University, FresnoMap/DirectionsRegister Now | Space is LimitedPlease register no later than Tuesday, February 1, 2011.Capacity for this event is 120 guests.Registration will only be accepted online.For more information, contactJen Pauljenpaul@csufresno.edu559.294.6021
  • 27. APPENDIX DCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Presentation - March 11, 2011 Board Meeting 23
  • 28. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley
  • 29. The Partnership• Unprecedented public-private partnership – focused on improving the region’s economic vitality and quality of life for the 4 million residents who call the San Joaquin Valley home• Addressing the challenges of the region by implementing measurable actions – on economic, environmental, and social levels to help the San Joaquin Valley emerge as California’s 21st Century Opportunity
  • 30. History• Partnership was formed June 2005 with Executive Order by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger• Led by an appointed, diverse and experience-rich Board• Engaged hundreds of people in the eight-county San Joaquin Valley to focus on action strategies• Created 10-year Strategic Action Proposal in October 2006• Governor Schwarzenegger and the State Legislature approved $5 million in the State Budget for 2006-2007 to jump-start implementation of the Strategic Action Proposal
  • 31. OrganizationThe Partnership Is Focused On Action Through Ten Work Groups:• Advanced Communications Services• Air Quality• Economic Development• Energy• Health and Human Services• Higher Education and Workforce Development• Housing• PreK-12 Education• Sustainable Communities• Water Quality, Supply and Reliability
  • 32. The Opportunity• The Partnership’s six major initiatives: 1. Grow a diversified, globally competitive economy supported by a highly skilled workforce; 2. Create a model K-12 public education system; 3. Develop high-quality health and human services; 4. Attain clean air standards; 5. Implement an integrated framework for sustainable growth; and 6. Build a 21st Century transportation mobility system.
  • 33. The Partnership’s Six Initiatives
  • 34. The San Joaquin ValleyComprises eight countieswith 62 cities
  • 35. Evolution of the Partnership2009• New Executive Order issued extending the Partnership indefinitely.• Original $5 million award expended. Work Groups and Secretariat reviewed ways to streamline and retool work plans.• New administrative staff assumed Secretariat role.2010• Received $2 million Valley Legacy Grant which funds, in part, 7 Work Groups and Secretariat.• Some Work Groups Re-organized.• Adopted Board meeting emphasis on private sector needs.Q1, 2011• Received $4 million Smart Valley Places Grant.• Change in Governor, Board Executive Committee and Board Seats.• Review again SAP, Work Group goals and Conveners.
  • 36. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Advanced Communication Services (ACS)Supporting Agency: Great Valley CenterAccomplishments:• Increased utilization of ACS by all residents through several digital literacy programs throughout the Valley.• Built upon ACS infrastructure for telemedicine and eHealth to promote other applications for education and economic development to increase access and affordability.Future Goals:• Increase the availability of affordable ACS in rural and other underserved areas by working with providers and organizations.• Seek funding to support new ACS initiatives and programs in order to increase digital literacy and broadband access throughout the Valley.
  • 37. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Air QualitySupporting Agency: The Maddy InstituteAccomplishments:• Obtained millions of dollars in funding for the San Joaquin Valley to support goals ($300 million of Prop 1B funding alone).• The Valley Clean Air Now’s (“CAN”) “Tune In-Tune Up,” was established to reduce mobile source pollutants generated by older, "out of tune" cars. Early results indicate a cost effectiveness of $1,524 per ton of reduced exhaust emissions.Future Goals:• Achieve U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 by the current date, or as soon as practicable thereafter.• Implement incentive mechanisms to accelerate adoption of air quality mitigation technologies.
  • 38. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Economic DevelopmentSupporting Agency: California Central Valley EconomicDevelopment Corporation (CCEDC)Accomplishments:• Aggressively promoted Central California as an attractive business location through various trade shows, trade missions, an e-newsletter, the web and a direct mail campaign.• Within the ED Work Group, the Lyles Center executed community college entrepreneurship programs and established a Technology Development unit to work with early stage entrepreneurs.Future Goals:• Foster innovation and entrepreneurial ventures.• Foster growth in the cluster industries.
  • 39. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: EnergySupporting Agency: San Joaquin Valley Clean EnergyOrganization (SJVCEO)Accomplishments:• SJVCEO was established in 2007 and incorporated in 2008.• SJVCEO formed partnerships and helped Valley jurisdictions receive support from energy block grant funding from the Department of Energy and California Energy Commission.Future Goals:• Continue to support jurisdictions energy block grant funded efforts.• Host forums with Valley Stakeholders to strengthen the ability of the Valley to compete on competitive clean energy proposals.
  • 40. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Higher EducationSupporting Agency: Central Valley Higher Education Consortium(CVHEC)Accomplishments:• Brought together higher education institutions in the Valley for the first time to increase college-going rates in the region and generate awareness of higher education opportunities.• Increased availability of information and resources to students and parents.Future Goals:• Coordinate a regional approach at San Joaquin Valley community colleges to enable students to more easily complete degree requirements at member institutions.• Maintain and grow collaboration among CVHEC participating institutions to continue development of college-going culture.
  • 41. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: HousingSupporting Agency: San Joaquin Valley Housing CollaborativeAccomplishments:• Hosted Several events throughout the Valley to educate and assist residents and community leaders dealing with the foreclosure crisis and affordable housing issues.• June 2010: SJVHC was approved as a 501 (c)(3) and became the lead for the Partnership Housing Workgroup.Future Goals:• Look for ways to be financial self-sustaining: this may include a fee for membership structure and also will include going after bank foundation grants and other philanthropic funding.• Continue work to stabilize housing economy in the San Joaquin Valley.
  • 42. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: PreK-12 EducationSupporting Agency: Central Valley Educational LeadershipInstitute (CVELI)Accomplishments:• Held three Exemplary Practices in Education Leadership Conferences were held in January 2009, 2010 and 2011.• Completed regional Preschool Assessment and Planning project.Future Goals:• Continue annual Exemplary Practices in Education Leadership Conference as need and partner/sponsor support continues.• County offices of education continue to monitor achievement gains and school and district needs, and continue to collaborate on priority academic issues: early childhood education, academic achievement/closing the achievement gap, supporting English Learners, and preparing students for college and careers.
  • 43. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Sustainable Planning (formerly Land Use,Agriculture and Transportation work groups)Supporting Agency: SJV Regional Policy CouncilAccomplishments:• Developed a SJV Regional Blueprint.• Developed a SJV Regional Goods Movement Action Plan.Future Goals:• Develop a Regional Transit action plan, including prioritization of projects. Identify and secure funding sources.• Facilitate endorsement of Blueprint Roadmap Implementation Strategy. Encourage counties and cities to update local General Plans consistent with Regional Blueprint. Integrate Regional Blueprint principles into related policy activities.
  • 44. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Water PolicySupporting Agency: California Water InstituteAccomplishments:• San Joaquin Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan Framework completed October 2009.• Convergence of interests between 5 Bay-Delta counties and 8 San Joaquin counties. San Joaquin County serving as the “hinge” county.Future Goals:• Complete Phase II San Joaquin Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan Framework. Work funded by federal government.• Continue Delta Counties – San Joaquin Valley “finding common ground” water policy engagement.
  • 45. AccomplishmentsSecretariat:• Tracking and communication of ARRA funding• Development of the Rural Development Center (RDC)• Received award for two major grants• Awarded iHub designation• Developed multi-media platform• Leverage and integrate the Partnership with other initiatives within the Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 46. Strengths Developed• Recognized regionally as a voice for the Valley: regional, bi-partisan and inclusive• Large but can be agile• Demonstrated accomplishments and early wins• Known for “getting things done”• Excellent cross collaboration• Dedicated, diverse and effective thought leaders, drivers and connectors, aligning their resources toward common goals• Board members represents the goals of the Partnership regardless of their agency or employer• Strong administrative infrastructure in place
  • 47. Presence in the Valley Smart Rural Valley Outreach SAP – Individual Valley High Legacy Work County Places (46 Speed Rail Grant Groups Support Grant incorporated, 220 (12 sites over 7(14 cities in 8 counties) unincorporated, counties) cities) SECRETARIAT Funded Support Unfunded Support 1. Fiscal management 1. Communications - and reporting internal and 2. Grant external administration 2. Event planning 3. Board and Work Group support 4. Legislative support
  • 48. Challenges and Constraints• Perception that we are another layer of governance• Perception of “Fresno-centric”• Resource and fiscal constraints – Secretariat – less horizontal support available – Work Groups – less vertical goal implementation and administrative support, i.e. disbanding of the HHS Work Group• Inherent “only child syndrome” – less sharing of toys and the sandbox throughout region and agencies• With so many moving parts, keeping both internal and external communications effective and streamlined can be difficult
  • 49. Lessons Learned• Discuss natural conflicts• Communication and outreach is not a one size fits all model• Board’s direct involvement and representation with the work groups and grants/initiatives is essential• Need a sustainability plan, including obtaining unrestricted funds• Administrative resources and constraints need to be a fit for the goals of the Board and what it takes to accomplish them
  • 50. Recommendations for Board DiscussionFuture work Find fit between our initiatives and the Governor’s,  SAP, major initiatives, future direction, relationships to buildCommunications Re-engage Work Groups and Conveners Re-convene the HHS Work Group Board members are Partnership Ambassadors Continue to utilize Secretariat Communications and Summit to position our strength in the minds of stakeholdersLeverage Resources Develop an ad-hoc “Funding/Development Committee” Develop an Advisory Committee Create a Sustainability Plan
  • 51. Planning for the FutureDiscussion Between ChairSwearengin and Board
  • 52. For updates and more information, visit: www.sjvpartnership.org www.facebook.com/sjvpartnership www.smartvalleyplaces.org www.facebook.com/smartvalleyplaces
  • 53. APPENDIX EValley Legacy, a Workforce Investment Act grant Progress Report 24
  • 54. Valley LegacyAligning Education with Future Workforce Opportunities
  • 55. Dear Valley Citizens and Stakeholders,As the San Joaquin Valley is facing difficult economic times, it has become more critical thanever before that we as a region continue our collaboration efforts. Through the CaliforniaPartnership for the San Joaquin Valley, the public and private sectors are driving towardimproving the quality of life for our residents. Valley Legacy, a Workforce Investment Areagrant, funded by the Economic Development Department, is another effort that the regionhas entrusted the Partnership to implement while maximizing and leveraging availableresources.Valley Legacy is a year into its two-year development plan. Developing a solid infrastructureand ramping up these programs was a vital step, which is evident by the early successesillustrated throughout this halfway report. These accomplishments are not the Partnership’salone, and, therefore, we do not celebrate them alone. We have the privilege and benefit ofpartnering with passionate individuals and organizations whose work ethic and dedicationfor the Valley is the driving force toward improving our region on multiple fronts. We haveexperts and volunteers investing their time and talents, and they are truly making a difference.Thanks to their efforts, the promise of the Partnership is being fulfilled and the Valley’s futureworkforce is being prepared for unique, challenging opportunities.Mike Dozier, SecretariatOffice of Community and Economic DevelopmentCalifornia State University, FresnoThe WIA grant is funded by:
  • 56. Building the FoundationThe California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley(Partnership) was in a prime position to provide the necessaryplatform for the implementation of Valley Legacy. Since 2007,the Partnership, its board and the 10 existing work groupshave had demonstrated success by building a multidimensionalprivate/public partnership. With an established infrastructure,common goals, and an existing administration unit in place,the Partnership provided an open system fully prepared tomaximize the Valley Legacy opportunity through synergy andstewardship.A key component of the Partnership is its Secretariat, theadministration unit. The Office of Community and Economic The Office of Community andDevelopment (OCED) at California State University, Fresno Economic Development atserves as the Secretariat, driving initiatives and acting as the California State University, Fresnocommunications hub for the Valley. OCED is the Partnership’s www.csufresno.edu/OCED/index.shtmlExecutive Staff and has a significant role in Valley Legacy.• Ensure action plans are developed and implemented.• Act as the fiscal agent for more than 20 subcontractors and provide administrative services.• Manage all internal and external communications and reporting.• Leverage resources by connecting grant subcontractors to numerous external partners.Through the unity of the Partnership and the executivestaffing of OCED, this grant will assist in the coordination ofeducation and training efforts of the K-12, Higher Education,Economic Development, and Workforce Developmentpartners. Valley Legacy is preparing the Valley’s futureworkforce for high-wage, high-demand jobs in the targetedindustry sectors. This is done through 20 sub contractors,including 7 of our existing Partnership work groups. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 1
  • 57. Transforming Education that is designed to maximize success in passing standardized tests. That’s a worthy goal; but most students come out of highThe purpose of Valley Legacy is to bring the San Joaquin school with no preparation for careers in the Valley. Most ofValley’s K-12 system, higher education, and workforce those who don’t go on to college end up at some low-paying,investment board systems into alignment to better prepare dead-end job. Some students then go to the County Workforcepeople for occupations in high-growth industry sectors in the Investment Boards (WIBs) which act as a ”second-chance”San Joaquin Valley. system to train people for jobs with career advancement; but the WIBs receive funding to assist only a small percentage• Agribusiness, including food processing and biotechnology of those who apply. What needs to be improved is the “first-• Water technology chance” system.• Renewable energy• Manufacturing High-school students need to graduate with options: the option• Supply chain management to go to a 4-year college; to go to a community college; enter directly into the Valley workforce; or even to start their ownIn the current K-12 system, young people receive an education business. 2 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  • 58. University of the Pacific Stockton Stockton Adult School Waterford SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY High School Ceres Waterford Ceres STANISLAUSDeliverables Adult School Patterson COUNTY Patterson MERCED High School COUNTYValley Legacy utilized the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Los Banos MADERA Sanger Pacheco COUNTYgrant to develop 12 demonstration projects positioned High School High School Sanger Reedleythroughout the Valley: FRESNO Reedley City College COUNTY1. Sector-Based Articulation: This is a fully coordinated Corcoran TULARE COUNTY academic and training program — from high schools KINGS Pixley through colleges and universities — which provides a Corcoran COUNTY Pixley Adult School High School curriculum with the rigor and relevance needed to yield Delano Union Delano qualified employees with immediate value for targeted Elementary KERN COUNTY industry sectors. Bakersfield Bakersfield Demonstration Sites: College • Corcoran High School • Patterson High School • Sanger High School2. Basic Education Proficiency: There are two workforce- 4. Green Economy & Workforce: This ensures that the readiness programs that address areas of significant green economy and workforce are part of this new deficiency in the Valley: English Language Learners and occupational development in the Valley, consistent with Digital Literacy. the needs of agribusiness, the goals of AB 32 — the Demonstration Sites: Global Warming Solutions Act, the air quality goals of the • Ceres Adult School Partnership and the energy independence goals of the San • Delano Union Elementary Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization. • Pacheco High School • Pixley Adult School • Stockton Adult School • Waterford High School3. Business Incubation & Entrepreneurship Development: “The purpose of Valley Legacy is This establishes a network of entrepreneurship development programs; E-Centers will focus on the to demonstrate success and then targeted regional industries. institutionalize this first-chance Demonstration Sites: system throughout the Valley.” • Bakersfield College • Reedley City College Peter Weber, Board Member • University of Pacific California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 3
  • 59. Deliverable 1 Central Valley Educational Leadership InstituteSector-Based Articulation California State University, FresnoGoalThe purpose of the Sector-Based Articulation project is todemonstrate best practices in high school career and technicaleducation (CTE) programs in high-priority industries. The “We are grateful to have so manyparticipating high schools and programs are: collaborators in this project, including school districts, colleges, local• Corcoran High School (Kings County): Renewable Energy Workforce Investment Agencies, and Ag Manufacturing programs• Patterson High School (Stanislaus County): Agribusiness industry representatives serving as and Logistics and Distribution and Management programs guest speakers, advisory members• Sanger High School (Fresno County): Biotechnology and and field trip sites, and collaborating Ag Manufacturing programs groups helping to provide information and support to the schools andExpected Impact students.”Through the support of a dedicated project coordinator withexpertise in high school career pathways, and the addedresources of collaborating industry representatives, each site will Marcy Masumoto, EdDhave developed and/or enhanced their programs to the greatest Project Directorextent possible. Students are exposed to critical elements of Central Valley Educationaleach of the industries, gaining career-related skills, and learning Leadership Instituteabout the potential job market and requirements for success to California State University, Fresnoenter the workforce and/or higher education.Successful ComponentThe projects are being documented by a university researchteam and will be showcased at the regional 2012 ExemplaryPractices in Education Conference in January and describedin a case study that will identify the critical steps involvedin exemplary articulated career exploration programs. Othereducators will learn from the successes and pitfalls encountered.In addition to the experiences and knowledge participatingstudents will have gained, the case study will be a significantoutcome as high schools face reductions in funding for CTEprograms and increased pressures to focus solely on academics.These programs will be examples to others of what is possiblewith limited resources and time. 4 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  • 60. Deliverable 2.1 Central Valley Educational Leadership InstituteBasic Education Proficiency California State University, FresnoEnglish Language LearnersGoalThe purpose of this deliverable is to demonstrate best practicesin English language development for English Learners throughEnglish Learner Institutes (ELI) in two high schools and “A unique feature of this workone adult school. The intent of each ELI is to enhance the in the high schools is a ‘studentacademic program for English Learners (EL) to better prepare voice’ leadership component for ELthem for the workforce and/or higher education, with each students who support their peers insite potentially serving as a “demonstration project” for otherschools. attaining higher levels of academic achievement through improvementParticipating schools include: planning and activities that positively• Ceres Adult School (Stanislaus County) impact English Learners on their• Pacheco High School (Merced County) campuses.”• Waterford High School (Stanislaus County)Expected Impact Marcy Masumoto, EdDCentral Valley Educational Leadership Institute at California Project DirectorState University, Fresno, the lead agency, is working with Pivot Central Valley EducationalLearning Partners to strategically improve the systems and Leadership Instituteinstruction for EL in participating sites. Through data analysis California State University, Fresnoand process improvement, and professional development and www.csufresno.edu/cvelicoaching of site and teacher leaders, project staff help theschools make significant changes in their instructional practicesto improve the academic success of EL. Goals are (1) to supporteducators at participating adult and high schools as they workto close the achievement gap, and (2) to support EL students asthey obtain English proficiency and excel academically.Successful ComponentThe local Workforce Investment Agencies in Stanislaus andMerced counties have been partners in this project and haveprovided significant support with enrollment and supportservices for students and their families. They also have providedrelevant career exploration, job preparation and industry-related information to help students understand how to pursuea career and/or higher education, how to look for and apply forjobs, and the value of being bilingual in the workplace. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 5
  • 61. Deliverable 2.2Basic Education ProficiencyDigital LiteracyGoalBenefits and opportunities of technology are often unavailableto rural communities located in the San Joaquin Valley.National, state and local leaders have expressed concern that “Valley Legacy understands thelarge parts of rural America are losing out on jobs, economic importance of the Internet anddevelopment, emergency preparedness and civic participation high-speed technology trainingbecause of inadequate access to the Internet. To increase the as an effective tool for economicutilization of technology and decrease barriers, Valley Legacyworks to increase the knowledge and use of computers and development. We are honored to bethe Internet in three Valley communities — two rural largely a part of this effort to educate andHispanic communities: Delano, Kern County, and Pixley, train Valley residents with the goal ofTulare County; and one urban community: Stockton, San improving their quality of life.”Joaquin County. Dejeune SheltonExpected ImpactProgram students learn to: access the Internet, creating and Interim Directorusing email accounts and social networking sites; use various Great Valley Centersoftware applications such as Word and Excel; write a business www.greatvalley.orgplan; build a resume; look for work and submit job applicationsonline; set up and use online banking; and enroll andparticipate in distance learning courses to further educationand business training. Desired impacts of the program includeincreased collaboration and communication between localschool districts, Workforce Investment Boards and otherresource organizations; the facilitation of lifelong learning;improved economic status; and an improved general quality oflife. A successful component of this model includes the amountof communication coming from the California Partnershipfor the San Joaquin Valley and the partners involved in ValleyLegacy. Through team meetings, email updates and phone calls,there is a strong understanding of the program, team work,development of new partnerships, and fluid communication,which ensures program success.Successful ComponentThe success of this program is evident through the people itserves. Numerous students have completed the program andnow have computer skills. They can communicate onlinewith family members through webcam, email and use it to dohomework. 6 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  • 62. Deliverable 3Business Incubation &Entrepreneurship DevelopmentGoalThe goal of the Lyles Center’s grant deliverable is to developand implement two-year demonstration EntrepreneurshipCenter (E-Center) sites. E-Centers will serve to build support “The impact of this effort is significant.for small businesses and business start-ups by providing The Lyles Center, along with eacheducation resources and coaching, mentoring and referral of these sites and communityservices for entrepreneurs in the regions being served. partners, are preparing individualsExpected Impact across the Central Valley to pursueEntrepreneurship is a foundational strategy for economic self-employment, leading to thedevelopment and self-sufficiency in the San Joaquin Valley. It emergence and growth of more smallprovides individuals with a greater degree of control over their business startups; which will lead usemployment situation. Students are motivated to continue their into economic recovery.”education when presented with the opportunity to start theirown businesses. Students, especially those from disadvantagedor underrepresented backgrounds, turn to entrepreneurship as Genelle Taylortheir best opportunity to create success for themselves utilizing Associate Directortheir talents and the best of their abilities. Entrepreneurship Lyles Center for Innovation andprovides the opportunity for self-employment in a region that Entrepreneurshiphas not, historically, attracted Fortune 500 companies. www.lylescenter.comSuccessful ComponentThe Lyles Center established an Entrepreneur Pathway programthree years ago. The Pathway program has been successfulin building curricula, classroom content, and communitysupport for the delivery of knowledge, skills, and actionsfor students seeking self-employment. The program is builtaround curricula and learning that has explicit and standardknowledge delivered in the class setting with programs designedto build entrepreneurial skills. E-Center development is anatural progression from the efforts and relationships alreadydeveloped. Some of the training workshops include: BusinessPlan Overview, Management, Leadership, Operations,Accounting/Bookkeeping and Marketing & Sales/Service. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 7
  • 63. Deliverable 4 Through these relationships, SJVCEO has been able to provideGreen Economy & Workforce several green business tours to aspiring high-school students participating in Valley Legacy. Our future workforce has already been exposed to this career option, their interest sparked.Goal This is the most important first step in motivating students toAs the world progresses toward more sustainable trends, the choose green careers and education.green economy is having a direct impact on our workforce andthe training required for success. Current educators do nothave established resources to develop the growing demand ofworkforce skills, and green jobs are not fully understood by ourfuture workforce. During the two-year term of this grant, there “Our project acts as a centralare three specific goals. (1) Establish a central repository of information gathering site, a place forinformation for use by education and business to develop newoccupational opportunities for a Green Economy. (2) Research others in the effort to go for details.and develop a regional scan of skills needed to compete in a It continues to evolve and will likelygreen economy and be successful in the green workforce. gain other components as the project(3) Review each of the four grant pilots to assure consistency nears completion.”with the needs of agribusiness, AB 32, the air quality goals ofthe Partnership, and the energy independence and clean energy Mike Nemethgoals of the San Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization Program Manager(SJVCEO). There has been significant progress towardaccomplishing these three goals. SJVCEO continues to drive San Joaquin Valleyforward. Clean Energy Organization https://sites.google.com/site/wiasjvceo/homeExpected ImpactThe result of our progress toward goal one – establishing arepository of information – is a new website that will serve as atool for educators and job seekers. The site provides job links,research materials, and a wealth of resources to supplement andinspire curriculum for high- school and community collegecourses. This website will be used by teachers, students and jobseekers looking for and wanting to share information on cleanenergy. This will be utilized to inspire the budding entrepreneurand influence a student’s higher education choices which is asignificant step in preparing the Valley’s future workforce.The site is a working information system. Currently, it hasamassed a long list of experiments, lesson plans, white papers,reports and studies on everything from how to make a miniwind turbine, to jobs, to the next trend in renewable energy.Successful ComponentAs a parallel effort, green businesses have been identifiedthroughout the Valley and strong relationships have developed. 8 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  • 64. Special thanks to the individuals and organizations for their willingnessto collaborate and invest in our Valley.Leadership Council Demonstration Sites:• Dr. John Welty, President, • Bakersfield College California State University, Fresno • Ceres Adult School • Corcoran High School• Dr. William Covino, Provost, • Delano Union Elementary California State University, Fresno • Pacheco High School• Mike Dozier, Interim Director, • Patterson High School Office of Community and Economic Development • Pixley Adult School• Ismael Diaz Herrera, Program Manager, • Reedley City College Office of Community and Economic Development • Sanger High School • Stockton Adult School• Shelby Gonzales, Budget Manager, • University of Pacific Office of Community and Economic Development • Waterford High School• Blake Konczal, Executive Director, Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board• Pam Lassetter, Assistant Director, Workforce Investment Boards: Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board • Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board• Christine Nutting, Associate Director, • Kern County Employers’ Training Resource Office of Community and Economic Development • Kings County Job Training Office • Madera County Workforce Assistance Center• Jeff Rowe, Workforce Development Director, • Merced County Workforce Investment Board Stanislaus County Alliance WorkNet • San Joaquin County Workforce Investment Board• Peter Weber, Board Member, • Stanislaus County Alliance WorkNet California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley • Tulare County Workforce Investment BoardPartnering Organizations: CENTRAL VALLEY HIGHER EDUCATION CONSORTIUM Central Valley Educational Leadership Institute California State University, Fresno Central California Workforce Collaborative California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 9
  • 65. Published by:Office of Community and Economic DevelopmentCalifornia State University, Fresno5010 N. WoodrowFresno, California 93740559.294.6021www.facebook.com/sjvpartnershipwww.sjvpartnership.org
  • 66. APPENDIX FCal Valley Tech iHub Proposal 25
  • 67. Central San Joaquin Valley Innovation Hub Presented by: Central Valley Business Incubator & Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviation and Economic DevelopmentKirk T. Nagamine Mark J. HendricksonChief Executive Officer DirectorCentral Valley Business Incubator Merced County Department of Commerce,1630 E. Shaw Avenue Aviation and Economic DevelopmentSuite 163 2507 Heritage DriveFresno, CA 93710 Atwater, CA 95301Telephone: (559) 292-9033 Telephone: (209) 385-7686Fax: (559) 294-6537 Fax: (209) 383-4959 Website: www.caed.merced.ca.usWebsite: www.cvbi.org
  • 68. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub July 22, 2010Table of ContentsTable of Contents........................................................................................................................1Executive Summary……………………………………………………………………………………2Introduction.................................................................................................................................3 iHub Certification Criteria..................................................................................................3Co-Leads………………………………………………………………………………………………....4Partnerships................................................................................................................................5Leveraging Resource Strengths……………………………………………………………………..9Boundaries: The Geography of the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub.................................10Economic Indicators and the Need for Diversification..........................................................10iHub Coordinator.......................................................................................................................11Purpose: a Water, Energy and Agricultural Technology iHub..............................................11 A Solid Foundation with Existing Programs and Services...............................................11 A Proposed Area of Growth: Healthcare Technology……………………………………...12 Building on Current Strengths..........................................................................................13Central Office.............................................................................................................................13Goals/Benchmarks....................................................................................................................13Budget........................................................................................................................................14Incentives to Support iHub Companies .................................................................................15Evaluation..................................................................................................................................15Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 1
  • 69. Executive SummaryStatement of PurposeThe objective of the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will be to promote technological innovation in theareas of Water, Energy, and Agriculture, and to develop these innovations into sustainable businessesthat will benefit the citizens of California and the world.StructureThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will be jointly led by the Central Valley Business Incubator (CVBI)and the Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviation and Economic Development (Merced CountyCAED). The iHub will accelerate innovation, commercialization, tech transfer and the development andlaunch of new technology based businesses in the Water, Energy and Agriculture industries.The initial Central San Joaquin Valley iHub Board of Directors will consist of representatives of the CVBIand the Merced County CAED, as well as representatives of the region’s two major universities, UCMerced and CSU Fresno, and a representative of the UC Merced Small Business Development CenterRegional Network (UCM SBDC).The Central San Joaquin Valley iHub also has the support andparticipation of numerous leading public and private organizations throughout the region.Initial Central San Joaquin Valley iHub activities will be supported by the existing staff and facilities of theCVBI and the Merced County CAED. One core activity will be the establishment of a new businessincubator in proximity to the UC Merced campus. This incubator, which will be modeled after thesuccessful Claude Laval Water, Energy and Technology (WET) Incubator currently in operation on thegrounds of CSU Fresno, will serve the faculty, students, and researchers of UC Merced, andentrepreneurs from throughout the region. Additionally, as the health sciences research capability at UCMerced grows, in conjunction with the establishment of the planned UC Merced Medical School,healthcare innovation will become an important iHub strength.BenchmarksThe major economic challenge facing our communities – chronic, double-digit unemployment – is regionalin nature and requires collaboration among government entities and private sector organizations. Ourmission is guided by the understanding that companies with fewer than 20 workers create up to 80% of allnew jobs. An iHub designation will result in a direct and positive impact in the region of the Central SanJoaquin Valley, including the counties of Fresno, Kings, Madera, Merced and Tulare.Projected benchmarks associated with the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub include: Increased development of small tech business Increased commercialization of research conducted by UC Merced and CSU Fresno Increased development of industry clusters, promoting cross-industry growth synergiesRelevanceBy helping startup businesses to launch successfully, CVBI, Merced County CAED and its partners arecreating an investment in the long-term economic health of our region. By building a sustainableeconomy, we are helping to reduce unemployment. By creating more quality jobs, we are helpingfamilies move away from social programs and the poverty cycle, and toward self-sustaining life. The iHubdesignation will add to that structure and continue to build upon the existing infrastructure.Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 2
  • 70. Introduction―never perfected an invention that I did not think about in terms of the service it might give others...I find Iout what the world needs, then I proceed to invent.‖ - Thomas Edison, Inventor and ScientistHome to five of the top ten agricultural producing counties in the world, and the birthplace of manyirrigation and agriculture production innovations, the Central San Joaquin Valley literally feeds the world.Yet, water and energy challenges continue to confront the region. Water and Energy are keys tosustaining the Central San Joaquin Valley’s ability to provide the world’s food supply.Necessity is the mother of invention. The Central San Joaquin Valley has the resources, talent and driveto develop the ideas that stem from a deep understanding of the issues that confront the region and theneed to find solutions. The natural resources of the region make the Central San Joaquin Valley the idealenvironment to develop and test important Water, Energy and Agricultural technologies. The region has,for example, well established industry clusters, especially relative to water. The International Center forWater Technology (ICWT) and the Center for Irrigation Technology (CIT) at CSU Fresno are among theleading water and fluid science technology research, development and testing programs in the worldtoday.The region is also home to the newest and tenth University of California campus, UC Merced. UC Mercedhosts the globally-renowned Sierra Nevada Research Institute (SNRI), as well as the University ofCalifornia Advanced Solar Technologies Institute (UC Solar) and the UC Merced Energy ResearchInstitute (UCMERI). The faculty, staff, and students of UC Merced are dedicated to developing newknowledge and innovative technologies that address the needs of the Central San Joaquin Valley and theworld, and to fulfilling UC Merced’s mission of research, education, and public service.The Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will be jointly led by Central Valley Business Incubator (CVBI) andthe Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviation and Economic Development (Merced CountyCAED). The iHub designation will enhance our region’s current emphasis on these three industry clustersby accelerating the process of transferring scientific research to practical application to commercialization.The Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will support and accelerate these and other innovations bygenerating increased capacity to leverage the natural resources of the region and creating a nexus ofinnovation and business development that will usher positive change in the region, and beyond.iHub Certification CriteriaAs demonstrated throughout this proposal, the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub meets the certificationcriteria, as follows: Anchored by two universities: UC Merced and CSU Fresno Business support organizations: o Economic development organizations: (5) Fresno, Kings, Madera, Merced, and Tulare County Economic Development Corporations o Workforce development/training organizations: (5) Fresno, Kings, Madera, Merced, and Tulare County Workforce Investment Boards o Incubator/business accelerator: CVBI, Lyles Center, UCM SBDC and UC Merced Center for Entrepreneurship o Chambers of Commerce: (6) Fresno, Hanford, Madera, Easter Madera County, Merced, and Tulare o Networking organizations that support innovation: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley and Regional Jobs Initiative Educational consortium, including technology transfer: CIT, ICWT, CWI, Lyles Center, UC Merced Center for Entrepreneurship, UC Solar, UCMERI and SNRICentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 3
  • 71. Venture capital networks: Central Valley Fund Research institutions: UC Merced and CSU Fresno Municipal economic development divisions / departments: All municipalities located within the boundaries of the five-county Central San Joaquin ValleyCo-LeadsCentral Valley Business Incubator (CVBI) The Central Valley Business Incubator, a non-profit, 501(c)(3), is a first-level economic driver that has helped more than 4,000 entrepreneurs and business-owners ramp up and launch new enterprises in the San Joaquin Valley resulting in: o More than 2,300 new, verifiable jobs in the Central Valley o More than $21 million in capital generated o More than 240 new, small businesses launched CVBI provides business incubation services and technical assistance at no charge to qualified, low- moderate income and rural populations; offers free and discounted services to community benefit organizations; promotes social responsibility via incorporation of the triple-bottom-line, and offers full- service and fee-based incubation to onsite, tech-based enterprises and entrepreneurs. Through the course of its 14-year history, CVBI has developed a rich selection of targeted programs and today offers the following Technical Assistance Services: o Online business feasibility analysis and face-to-face counseling o Online business planning guidance and training, free to disadvantaged microenterprise and offered in both English and Spanish o Broad-based training and coaching in each of the eight core business elements: management; operations; accounting/bookkeeping; financing; marketing/public relations; sales; human resources and legal o Free business training workshops o On-site member services for up to five high-growth start-up enterprises at each of CVBI’s two facilities o Full-service coaching and preferential lease rates to high-growth start-up enterprises located at off-site executive office complexes with which CVBI has operating agreements o Affiliate member support services for existing and newly launched enterprise o Counseling, connections and support for opportunities to access investment funds (microloans, Angel Funds and venture capital)Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviation and Economic Development(Merced County CAED) The Merced County CAED has a number of programs and services designed to assist businesses who are expanding or starting. Located in the Castle Commerce Center, it plays important roles in the redevelopment of Castle Air Force Base, the coordination of the Central Valley foreign trade zone activities and moving the county into the high tech arena. Its services include: business development, marketing strategies, business operations, financing options, as well as one-on-one assistance and training classes for entrepreneurs. The Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) was created as a tool to supplement SBA and private financing. It provides gap financing to businesses for projects that create jobs. The Agricultural Waste Management Loan Program is available to assist with wastewater improvements to animal confinement facilities. The Enterprise Zone Program targets economically distressed areas throughout California, such as Merced County. Special state and local incentives encourage business investment and promote the creation of new jobs. The purpose of the program is to stimulate development by providing tax incentives to businesses and allow private sector market forces to revive the local economy. The director of the Merced County CAED serves as the administrator for the seven-county United States Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ). The FTZ includes all five of the Central San Joaquin Valley counties. The FTZ is a designated area which, for customs purposes, is considered outside theCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 4
  • 72. United States. Foreign or domestic merchandise may enter this enclave without a formal customs entry or the payment of customs duties or government excise taxes. If the final product is exported from the United States, no U.S. customs duty or tax is levied. The Castle Commerce Center is also home to Castle Airport, an emerging commercial-industrial center capable of handling the largest of aircraft in the world. With a runway length of 11,802 feet, direct access to railroad and highways and regional proximity to three major California seaports, Castle Airport is a prime location from which to export agricultural products globally.PartnershipsThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will leverage the strengths and collaborative nature of existingregional partners. It is anchored by UC Merced and CSU Fresno’s extensive research capabilities, CVBI’sentrepreneurial leadership, and a variety of regional partners and resource agencies. As shown inAttachment A, the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub is created by collaboration across traditional sectors.Partnership documentation, in the form of letters of commitment and support, is attached for the followingpartners:University of California, Merced UC Merced is one of four campuses that make up the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), a UC Institute for Science and Innovation. As an integral part of the Central San Joaquin Valley Innovation Hub (iHub), UC Merced brings a number of key assets to the program, including: o Demonstrated experience with innovation programs: UC supports faculty entrepreneurship and the creation of start-up companies founded on the inventors new technology. Such companies represent an important and viable path to product commercialization and to local economic development and job creation. UC technology transfer officers will seriously consider inventor desires to start companies in its technology licensing decisions, provided that the arrangements conform to the Universitys conflict of interest and conflict of commitment policies. The technology transfer officers will also work proactively with these start-ups to optimize their future success. o Demonstrated experience with technology transfer/licensing and intellectual property management: The UC Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) provides leadership and strategic direction for the system-wide University of California technology transfer program and is responsible for administration of intellectual property on behalf of UC Merced. OTT functions include the development and administration of intellectual property policy, including the University of California Patent Policy, the evaluation of inventions, prosecution of patents, licensing of intellectual property, monitoring of licenses and other intellectual property agreements, distribution of resulting income, and provision of support to other campus units in copyright, trademark, and research funding agreements. Experience in these areas will be critical to the iHub’s long term success. UC Merced will provide these services and expertise directly to UC Merced faculty and students, who are interested in innovation, technology transfer, and the creation of new companies to license, develop and market technologies invented at UC Merced. UC Merced can also share this experience with iHub management so that it can be disseminated to companies and entrepreneurs throughout the iHub’s area of operations. In addition to UC Merced’s innovation and technology transfer expertise, there are a number of programs located on the campus, and the campus’ Castle facility, which will benefit greatly from the iHub’s establishment. These organizations will collaborate directly with the iHub on the commercialization of new green and renewable energy technologies and the creation of new companies and entrepreneurs. These organizations include the following:University of California Advanced Solar Technologies Institute (UC Solar) UC Solar is a new multi-campus research institute made up of faculty from the University of California’s Merced, Berkeley, and Santa Barbara campuses. UC Solar was established with a $2.25Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 5
  • 73. million grant from the University Of California Office Of Research and officially launched in 2010. Headquartered at UC Merced, UC Solar creates technologies that make solar energy systems more efficient, more affordable and the best choice for the people of California and the world. In addition, UC solar educates and develops tomorrow’s solar energy leaders and entrepreneurs. Initial UC Solar research areas include advancing the state-of-the-art in solar concentration (for photovoltaic and thermal systems), employing nanotechnology in both collector/concentrator and device structures, and developing new devices that capture useable energy in the UV portion of the solar spectrum.UC Merced Energy Research Institute (UCMERI) UCMERI’s 15 faculty members include mechanical engineers, materials scientists, physicists, environmental engineers, biochemists, computer scientists and social scientists from the Schools of Engineering, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts. UCMERIs broad-based cross-disciplinary research focuses on many aspects of the renewable energy spectrum, including energy efficiency, bio-fuels, nanotechnology and the development of a global energy curriculum. UCMERI educates the energy industry and the next generation of energy scholars, practitioners and policymakers. From research to innovation to commercialization, UCMERI will have a transformative effect on California’s Central Valley and the global energy landscape.Sierra Nevada Research Institute (SNRI) SNRI’s mission is to discover and disseminate new knowledge that contributes to sustaining natural resources and promoting social well being in the San Joaquin Valley and Sierra Nevada regions of California, and related regions worldwide, through integrated research in the natural, social, and engineering sciences. SNRI faculty, researchers, and students conduct basic and applied research using the San Joaquin Valley and the Sierra Nevada as their ― outdoor laboratory.‖ Core SNRI Research areas include: Ecology and Ecosystem Science; Climate and Hydrology; Environmental Economics, Policy and Management; and Air Pollution and Public Health.UC Merced Center for Entrepreneurship Working with students from the Schools of Engineering, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, the proposed Center for Entrepreneurship at UC Merced will prepare todays students to become tomorrows business leaders. The Center for Entrepreneurship will stimulate the application of theory and new research results to real-world problems, stimulate entrepreneurship, and collaborate with external organizations that can bring problems to the center for resolution. Faculty, students and partners from industry or public organizations can form teams to work on real problems or to develop ideas on how to bring new technologies or services to the marketplace. New business ideas and business models can be tested, with the center as a nursery for new ideas. The Center for Entrepreneurship’s mission is to create new sustainable economic activities to support a fast growing population expansion in an underserved, mainly rural region.California State University, Fresno As an integral partner of the Central San Joaquin Valley Innovation Hub (iHub), CSU Fresno brings a number of key assets to the collaboration, including a number of campus departments whose expertise in water, energy and agricultural technology will compliment the iHub’s ability to commercialize new technologies and create new companies and entrepreneurs. These departments include the following:Office of Community and Economic Development, CSU Fresno (OCED) OCED is dedicated to aligning the CSU Fresno’s intellectual capacity and innovation-driven economic development initiatives to improve the competitiveness and prosperity of the San Joaquin Valley region. In supporting economic development innovation, OCED collaborates with regional industry clusters to develop a strategic approach to development, technology transfers, workforce development initiatives, infrastructure needs, and collaborative industry relations. Two direct results of OCED’s activities are the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley (Partnership) and the Regional Jobs Initiative (RJI). Both initiatives are based on the idea that regional economies areCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 6
  • 74. made up of a series of related industries, or clusters, that benefit one another. Both initiatives continue to convene experts and leaders committed to sustainable community and economic development, environmental stewardship, and human advocacy for the San Joaquin Valley region.International Center for Water Technology, CSU Fresno (ICWT) ICWT is a public-private partnership dedicated to the development and application of advanced technologies that enhance water use for urban, environmental, and agricultural purposes. CSU Fresno, in collaboration with a growing consortium of members in the water technology industry, joined together to form ICWT. Through applied technology, ICWT’s goal is to provide efficient first use and effective reuse of water supplies worldwide. Whether a company is a "start-up" venture with a new idea, or an established manufacturer with proven technology, ICWT provides assistance with a wide range of professional services. In addition to providing a world class, year-round water technology demonstration facility, ICWT advances water and fluid science technologies worldwide through four major activities: business development assistance, research and development, industry testing and certification, and education and training.Center for Irrigation Technology, CSU Fresno (CIT) CIT is the only independent laboratory in the United States specializing in testing and evaluating irrigation equipment. CIT plays a leading role in the development of national and international standards for irrigation equipment and testing procedures. The CIT lab, field, and educational activities address both agricultural and turf/landscape irrigation and drainage. With over 30 years of experience, CITs expertise and sphere of activity are recognized worldwide.Jordan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, CSU Fresno (Jordan College) Jordan College offers high quality undergraduate, graduate and continuing education programs and conducts applied research and public service in selected areas of agriculture, food sciences, industrial technology, and family sciences. Programs combine a science, technology and management focus with experiential learning. Research, scholarly and creative activities involve faculty, staff and students in projects to improve the educational process, discover new knowledge, find solutions to significant societal and industry problems, communicate findings to industry and society at large, and improve and develop new skills.Lyles Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Lyles Center) As one of the leading entrepreneurial centers in California, the Lyles Center located at CSU Fresno assists both students and community members in pursuit of their entrepreneurial goals by delivering assistance through applied learning, professional consulting, and managed problem solving. The Lyles Center helps entrepreneurs develop successful companies through integral professional consulting services and programs that included: Intellectual Property Management, Technology Development and Commercialization, Market and Technology Assessment, Business Plan Review and Evaluation and Internships and Coaching. Seven Community College campuses in the five- county region are linked to the Lyles Center through entrepreneurship education and the development of Entrepreneurship Centers that will provide regional communities with access to knowledge and training in entrepreneurship and innovation.University Business Center, Craig School of Business, CSU Fresno (UBC) The UBC serves as the outreach arm for the Craig School of Business at CSU Fresno, offering professional development programs and state of the art meeting facilities. The UBC focuses on providing businesses and professionals with services and resources to foster growth, job creation and economic prosperity. The UBC also offers professional development opportunities including small business development services, customized corporate training programs, and business education.UC Merced Small Business Development Center Regional Network (UCM SBDC) The UCM SBDC is a fully accredited national program that promotes the development and growth of small businesses by providing high quality, low-cost management and technical assistance to business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs to a region that includes the five counties of the CentralCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 7
  • 75. San Joaquin Valley. The UCM SBDC provides its resources and services at each of the following Service Centers located within the Central San Joaquin Valley: o CVBI SBDC (serving Fresno and Madera Counties) o The Alliance SBDC-Los Banos Incubator (serving Merced County) o The Alliance SBDC-Merced Satellite (serving Merced and Mariposa Counties) o Tulare/Kings SBDC (serving Tulare and Kings Counties) The UCM SBDC supports the region’s economic growth by building capacity of three critical elements: 1) access to innovative entrepreneurs with ideas for new products, 2) access to university expertise and research to assist entrepreneurs in developing their products for market, and 3) assistance to obtain the federal SBIR/STTR awards and other early stage grants to fund research and development of innovative ideas. The UCM SBDC program is focused on addressing these issues and building a support infrastructure, technical assistance and tools that promote and enhance commercialization outcomes. The mission of the UCM SBDC is to promote the development and growth of small businesses by providing high quality business assistance through entrepreneurial training, free one-on-one business consulting, research, business plan assistance, financial and loan preparation assistance to include financial projections. This mission has resulted in consulting with more than 10,263 clients, creating and/or retaining more than 3,063 jobs and generating $130,192,847 in new capital investment with business clients and entrepreneurs. For the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub, the UCM SBDC SBIR;/STTR Assistance Program can provide training and counseling to small businesses to help them secure SBIR/STTR funding to commercialize new technologies. The network will be a conduit with UC Merced, CSU Fresno and the business community to provide assistance. o Initiative 1: Technology Licensing and Technology Transfer Goal: Increase technology licensing and technology transfer assistance by the UCM SBDC over the next five years and move from a stand-alone service provider to a well-integrated part of the iHub tech transfer and tech licensing collaboration and continuum. o Initiative 2: SBIR/STTR Assistance Goal: Increase collaborations between UCM SBDC, the Lyles Center, UC Merced, and CSU Fresno’s SBIR/STTR Program in order to increase awareness, grant awards and capital investment for innovation. o Initiative 3: Innovation & Effectiveness Goal: To assist Central California’s small businesses to develop and commercialize technology by identifying client/potential client technology development and commercialization needs and create products/services to meet those needs. The UCM SBDC will also assist researchers and inventors with their entrepreneurial efforts with the goal of obtaining commercialization of their technology. A cornerstone of the strategy to be used is the Goldsmith Technology Commercialization Model. By adopting a proven model, the team will able to move more quickly in refining current products and services as well as identifying gaps that would guide new service offerings. The UCM SBDC Innovation Center’s programs are in the following categories: o Stimulating technology entrepreneurship o Opportunity assessment (the technology, the market and the management team) o Planning, financing and accomplishing research and development o Developing the business plan and helping to secure startup funding and growth capital o Incubating the ventures that result (mentoring and helping to develop various growth phases)San Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization (SJV CEO) SJV CEO is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in the San Joaquin Valley by significantly increasing the regions use and reliance on clean energy (energy efficiency and renewable energy sources). It serves as a catalyst to pull together and support efforts to demonstrate how the San Joaquin Valley can use clean energy resources to meet current and future energy needs. SJV CEO works with local governments in two ways: (1) a local government partnership in Kings and Tulare Counties with Southern California Edison and Southern California Gas Company to promote energy efficiency and awareness and reduce energy use; and (2) working with 40Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 8
  • 76. jurisdictions throughout the San Joaquin Valley to secure federal and other funding and assisting them to implement energy efficiency projects that can benefit all in the region.Leveraging Resource StrengthsEconomic Development Corporations (EDCs) The EDCs in each of the following five counties will provide resources and services to the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub: o Economic Development Corporation serving Fresno County o Kings County Economic Development Corporation o Madera County Economic Development Commission o Merced County Economic Development Corporation o Economic Development Corporation serving Tulare County The EDCs exist to market their respective county as the premier location to expand and grow core industries, while promoting job creation, increased investment, and diversification of local economies. The EDCs provide businesses with the resources necessary when evaluating, planning and implementing a site location/expansion in their respective county. The EDCs facilitate the site selection process by: (1) Connecting with the region’s key decision makers in economic development, financial, government, regulatory and real estate; (2) Providing proprietary research/data; (3) Conducting site searches and site tours; and (4) Facilitating planning and consultation meetings. The EDCs strive to not only facilitate site selection for new businesses, but also assists in the retention and expansion of businesses that are already located in their respective county.Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs) The WIBs in each of the following five counties will provide resources and services to the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub: o Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board o Kings County Job Training Office o Madera County Workforce Assistance Center o Workforce Investment Board of Merced County o Workforce Investment Board of Tulare County The WIBs serve as a catalyst to mobilize and integrate all private and public partners to effectively educate, train and place individuals with the necessary resources and skills to fulfill employer needs. For the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub, the WIBs will offer access to their comprehensive workforce investment system through its One-Stop Centers. Their One-Stop Centers and Satellite Resource Centers connect job seekers to valuable employment and training services that include: use of resource room equipment, job search skills workshops, information on training and education, referrals to partnering agencies and community resources and labor market information on growth industries. Additionally, the WIBs will provide access to job posts, job search engines, assistance in locating training, and access to employment study results for Central San Joaquin Valley counties. The WIBs also provide short-term training for high-growth, high-demand industries.Central Valley Fund (CVF) CVF provides private capital for small to mid-sized businesses. With a focus on the San Joaquin Valley, CVFs capital is used to finance later stage growth, strategic acquisitions, ownership transitions, and recapitalizations. CVF provides the layer of a company’s capital structure between senior debt and common equity, often referred to as mezzanine capital. CVF mezzanine investments can be in the form of subordinated debt or preferred equity and structured to accommodate the specific needs of the business. CVF provides all portfolio companies with local personal attention—a rarity in the consolidating marketplace.Merced College The Employer-focused Training Center (ETC), which is part of Merced Colleges extended campus, engages in a wide range of activities in support of local businesses that include on-site training,Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 9
  • 77. modular curricula, literacy or skill-enhancement training, and contract facilitation with the Private Industry Training Department. The ETC offers programs in: Computers in Business, Medical Technology, Legal Technology, and Medical Assisting.Innovation Place Network Merced College and the Cities of Los Banos and Merced collaborate with the Merced County Economic Development Corporation to leverage resources to establish and expand incubator services in the region. The Innovation Place Network facilitates new wealth generation from small businesses and entrepreneurs with an emphasis on commercializing and marketing innovative technology from Merced College, UC Merced and local business. The goal of the Innovation Place Network is to achieve community prosperity through small business development. Small business support is crucial to new employment and wealth generation.Chambers of Commerce (Chambers) The Chambers of Commerce are organizations of interested businesses that desire the promotion of economic vitality for their respective county. Directed by an elected board of directors and advised by honorary directors, the Chambers promote a strong local economy through legislative advocacy, economic development, and community stewardship. The Chambers are an active partner with business, government and community leaders as it collaborates to promote a strong local economy. The Chambers offer a venue for ideas to be shared and where community consensus can be reached. The six Chambers within the five-county Central San Joaquin Valley are: o Greater Fresno Area Chamber of Commerce o Hanford Chamber of Commerce (Kings County) o Madera Chamber of Commerce o Eastern Madera County Chamber of Commerce o Greater Merced Chamber of Commerce o Tulare Chamber of CommerceMunicipal Resources For the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub, cities will assist in business retention and expansion efforts and provide regional sustainability. They will provide an array of resources including: business assistance programs, license and permit assistance, and utility services. The 35 cities within the five- county Central San Joaquin Valley have expressed their support and will with business locations and other assistance on a case-by-case basis.Boundaries: The Geography of the Central San Joaquin Valley iHubThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub is defined as the five-county region generally referred to as theCentral San Joaquin Valley, which includes Fresno, Kings, Madera, Merced and Tulare counties(Attachment B). The five-county region has a total population of approximately 1.9 million, which includes35 cities and an unincorporated population of 522,479.Economic Indicators and the Need for DiversificationAccording to the California Employment Development Department, in 2008, the Central San JoaquinValley (Fresno, Madera, Merced, Kings, and Tulare Counties) experienced an unemployment rate of 15.7percent, 3.4 percent higher than the State average of 12.3 percent. Rural communities in the five-countyregion fared worst, with some communities experiencing unemployment rates of 30 percent and above.A disparity also exists between per capita income in the Central San Joaquin Valley and the restCalifornia as a whole. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Commerce reported an average per capita incomeof $41,805 for the State of California. The average per capita income for the San Joaquin Valley was 36.4percent lower at $26,570.Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 10
  • 78. In regards to median household income, the Central San Joaquin Valley was also at a disadvantage tothe rest of the State. The U.S. Census Bureau reported in 2008 that California’s median householdincome was $61,017. The Central San Joaquin Valley’s median household income, however, was 27.5percent lower at $44,236.The Central San Joaquin Valley also had more of its population living in poverty in 2008. According to theU.S. Census Bureau’s Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates, 20.6 percent of the Central SanJoaquin Valley’s total population was living in poverty. The comparable statistic for the State was 13.3percent.iHub CoordinatorThe Central Valley Business Incubator (CVBI) and Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviationand Economic Development (Merced County CAED) will serve as the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub’scoordinators and will assume day-to-day responsibilities for coordinating services and resources, as wellas maintaining the partnership. Both organizations have been approved as the coordinators by thepartners of the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub.Purpose: a Water, Energy, Agricultural and Healthcare Tech iHubThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will support companies in Water, Energy and AgriculturalTechnology at all points during their development lifecycle to enhance local technology-based economicdevelopment, and to create jobs and wealth in the region. These leverage existing UC Merced and CSUFresno research strengths, align with regional priorities, and build on existing programs and services.A Solid Foundation with Existing Programs and ServicesThe Central San Joaquin Valley region already has resources actively deployed for Water, Energy andAgricultural Technology companies. Key existing programs and services that will serve as thefoundation of the iHub include specific clusters such as: Water Technology: ―B Industries‖ are concerned with and focus on environmental sciences to lue conserve natural environment and resources, and to curb the negative impacts of human involvement. This cluster also includes emerging technologies that help the environment by reducing the amount of waste produced by human activities. o The International Center for Water Technology (ICWT) at Fresno State was established to provide education and research to assist in developing and adopting innovative solutions and technologies that improve water use efficiency. The program’s broad mandate includes water supply and quality; flood protection; and environmental enhancement. Activities focus on extended education, laboratory and field research, and policy development. While the program targets opportunities and issues within the San Joaquin Valley region, solutions and experiences are applicable worldwide. Energy Technology: there are various businesses involved in wind, solar and hydraulic energies. This cluster also includes alternative energy and fuel sources such as biodiesel and ― Green Industries‖ of private and public organizations. o UC Merced has two research institutes focused on developing new renewable energy technologies: the University of California Advanced Solar Technologies Institute (UC Solar) and the University of California Merced Energy Research Institute (UCMERI). These institutes are dedicated to developing new green technologies that are more efficient, more affordable and the best choice for the people of California and the world. o San Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization (SJV CEO) is a collaborator of the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley (Partnership) for renewable energy. SJV CEO’s vision is to help improve the quality of life in the eight-county region by significantly increasingCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 11
  • 79. the use and reliance on clean energy. SJV CEO provides information on state-of-the-art clean energy best practices, projects underway in the region, opportunities to increase the regions clean energy use, and resources to help fund successful projects. Agricultural Technology: there are various businesses involved in food production, including farming and contract farming, seed supply, agrichemicals, farm machinery, wholesale and distribution, processing, marketing and retail sales. o Jordan College conducts applied research and public service in selected areas of agriculture, food sciences, industrial technology, and family sciences. Programs combine a science, technology and management focus with experiential learning. Research, scholarly and creative activities involve faculty, staff and students in projects to improve the educational process, discover new knowledge, find solutions to significant societal and industry problems, communicate findings to industry and society at large, and improve and develop new skills. o The Center for Irrigation Technology (CIT) is the only independent laboratory in the United States specializing in testing and evaluating irrigation equipment. CIT plays a leading role in the development of national and international standards for irrigation equipment and testing procedures. The CIT lab, field and educational activities address both agricultural and turf/landscape irrigation and drainage. With over 30 years of experience, CITs expertise and sphere of activity are recognized worldwide.A Proposed Area of Growth: Healthcare TechnologyThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will also provided a fundamental platform for further innovation andcommercialization of Healthcare technologies. UC Merced currently provides the Central San JoaquinValley with a foundation for Healthcare Technology, through the continual development of the followinginitiatives:Health Sciences Research Institute (HSRI) The goal of HSRI is to catalyze important new research on complex human health issues within the Central Valley region, and globally. Spanning emphases such as health psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, molecular cell biology, stem cell biology, bioengineering, computational biology, and informatics. HSRI will be inclusive, while remaining focused on human health issues by applying state-of-the-art technologies, and innovative approaches to understand multicultural health, prevention, and multiple determinants of health and well being. Broadly defined, the mission of the HSRI is thus to promote all research in the human health sciences at University of California, Merced. HSRI research is focused on the following themes: Biomolecular Basis of Health and Disease, Chronic Disease, Prevention and Control, and Health Disparity, Immunology and Infectious Disease, and Stem Cell Biology.UC Merced Medical School UC Merced has also received broad support for the establishment of a Medical School based in the San Joaquin Valley. As proposed, the instructional program at the UC Merced School of Medicine will be founded on a community-based distributed model of medical education, with select local health care facilities serving as instructional sites for quality clinical training. The first two years of the student program will be based in Merced and the final two years will take place in existing regional health care facilities at clinical campuses. The first clinical campus is slated to be in Fresno where the infrastructure exists to offer core rotations and electives to medical students through the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program. Additional clinical campuses in the north and south Valley are planned for the future. A UC Merced Medical School will provide numerous benefits, including addressing the critical shortage of physicians in the Valley, increasing access to health care for Valley residents, addressing specific health problems commonly found in the Valley, and improving the overall health status of Valley residents.Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 12
  • 80. Building on Current Strengths 1. Create expanded access to credit for entrepreneurs and small business owners through financial management training, fiscal planning and accounting. 2. More comprehensive engagement with fledgling businesses and entrepreneurs through a network of trainers, mentors, and counselors to improve their chances for success in building high growth businesses in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 3. Proactive involvement and collaboration of public sector entities to provide full service entrepreneurial opportunities for business within industry clusters. 4. Foster competitive research and development that will break barriers to public/private collaboration on the commercialization of technology. 5. Expanded mentoring of business start-ups at UC Merced, CSU Fresno and at community colleges located in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 6. Higher diversification of the economic base of the Central San Joaquin Valley through job creation by business start-ups and developing a culture of innovation through collaboration.Central OfficeThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub’s central office will be located at the Claude Laval Water, Energy,and Technology Incubator (WET) at 2911 E. Barstow Avenue, M/S OF 144, Fresno, CA 93740. Thephone number at the CVBI Launching Pad is: (559) 292-9033.Already a point of entry for entrepreneurs and established businesses to develop and test ideas, the WETprovides a venue to transfer scientific research to practical application to commercialization. This facilityalso offers affordable office space to early-stage companies, as well as ― drop-in‖ meeting space forCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub member and sponsor companies, as discussed above under ― Solid AFoundation.‖Goals/BenchmarksAs discussed above, the programs that will form the core of the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub’sofferings are already in the process of expanding. As a result, core program components of this iHubproposal can be considered Foundational Components that are already established and being executedin our region. Currently Expanding Components are those that are in progress. Lastly, FutureDevelopment Components are those for which the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub and its partners aretargeting. Accordingly, the goals/benchmarks for the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub are presentedbelow.iHub Deliverables iHub iHub Currently iHub Future Foundational Expanding Development Components Components ComponentsBusiness Incubation Water, Energy & Tech Development of Merced Development of(Counseling, R&D, Center in Fresno Water, Energy & Tech additional Tech-SpecificInnovation and Tech Center in Merced Centers that leverageTransfer, etc) the natural resources of-Blue Tech 10 Businesses Virtual Incubation to the region-Green Tech 3 Businesses support small and rural-Ag Tech 8 Businesses communitiesCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 13
  • 81. -Business Counseling & 300 500 1,000Guidance (in person)-Online Business 50 100 150PlanningEconomic Development-New Companies 5 10-New Jobs 8 15Research/Development University-based-Ag Tech Research &-Water Tech Development testing-Energy Tech for private industry &-Other applied research 10 Companies/Projects 15 Companies/Projects 30 Companies/Projects Testing Testing TestingIndustry Cluster Water Cluster Water Cluster Water ClusterSupport and Growth (130 companies) (135 companies) (140 companies) Bi-Annual Water Energy Cluster Energy Cluster Conference (30 companies) (35 companies) Technology Showcase Food Proc./Ag Cluster Food Proc./Ag Cluster and Competition (20 companies) (25 companies) Annual Water Conference Logistics Cluster (20 companies)Logistics and Ag Repurposing formerTransportation Castle Air Force Base to support & enhance the needs of the regional Ag Industry, supporting the creation of additional jobs and resources in support of Ag Tech.BudgetShort-Term Economic SustainabilityInitial Central San Joaquin Valley iHub activities, including the organization of planning meetings andother collaborative activities, will be supported by the existing staff and facilities of the CVBI and theMerced County CAED. The annual operating budgets of the Central San Joaquin Valley iHub Co-LeadOrganizations are provided below. iHub Co-Lead Organization Annual Operating Budgets CVBI Merced County CAED $972,194 $6,039,810The Central San Joaquin Valley iHub will be structured for financial sustainability by the development andimplementation of a realistic business plan. The plan will provide a framework for implementing aconsistent budgeting process, using sound accounting methods, continuously monitoring each of theseprocedures, and making adjustments when necessary. Senior staff will review the business plan annually,making sure that financial projections are consistent with the iHub’s daily operations.Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 14
  • 82. Long-Term Economic SustainabilityAs a successful iHub, our long-term strategy will focus on a significant marketing and outreach campaignto attract private sector investments and private foundation grants to bolster the revenue generated fromexisting tenants utilizing the current and planned incubator programs. Grants for facilities and operationalsupport are available through multiple government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy,the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Small Business Administration, and the U.S. Department ofCommerce. Significant funding is also available at the state level.Incentives to Support iHub CompaniesIncentives available to Central San Joaquin Valley iHub-supported companies vary across our region.The following is a summary of the range of incentives currently available.Financing Incentives Recycle Market Development Zones Community Development Block Grants Sewer Credits SCIP Bond Financing Electrical Utility Tax Sharing for Mega California Capital Loan Guarantee users Central Valley Fund Potential Sales Tax Sharing for San Joaquin Valley APCD Qualified Projects Revolving Loan Funds Merced Irrigation District – PV Buydown Industrial Development Bonds Program Net Operating Loss Carryover Small Business Loan Guarantee Human Resources Incentives / Support Capital Investment Incentives Employment Training Panel Program LAMBRA and Enterprise Zones Workforce Investment Board Redevelopment Commercial Job Referral and Placement Rehabilitation Loans B.E.A.R Action Network Referral to and coordination withOperational/Development Incentives Workforce Investment Board, State Renewable Energy Manufacturing Employment Training panel, and RJI Credit Implementation Team Expedited permitting with staff assigned specifically to individual projects Tax / Fee Incentives Industrial Development and Recovery Fee Deferrals Zone Boards Redevelopment Areas/Tax Increment Commercial Revitalization Program Financing Central California Economic Business License Discounts for Large Development Corporation Sales Tax Generators Economic Revitalization Manufacturing New Hire Tax Credits Property Tax Rebate Research and Development Tax Credit Manufacturing Equipment Credit Pollution Control FinancingEvaluationThe Central San Joaquin Valley iHub’s performance to the goals and benchmarks detailed above will beconducted by each partner with reference to its own set of deliverables, measured against specific statedbenchmarks, and validated through standard record-keeping. In the case of the core programs that CVBIwill contribute as part of the iHub’s support mechanisms, the Program Director for each of the programswill provide information regarding performance to goals/benchmarks. The consolidated evaluation of theiHub – incorporating the activities of Central San Joaquin Valley iHub and its partners—will be reported toBT&H by CVBI and Merced County DCAED through an annual progress report.Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 15
  • 83. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub PROPOSAL AND APPLICATION Attachment A Central San Joaquin Valley iHub Ecosystem: Partners and CollaboratorsCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 16
  • 84. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub Ecosystem: Partners and CollaboratorsCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 17
  • 85. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub PROPOSAL AND APPLICATION Attachment B Boundary MapCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 18
  • 86. Central San Joaquin Valley iHubCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 19
  • 87. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub PROPOSAL AND APPLICATION Attachment C Memorandum of UnderstandingCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 20
  • 88. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 21
  • 89. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub PROPOSAL AND APPLICATION Attachment D Personnel ResumesCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 22
  • 90. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 23
  • 91. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 24
  • 92. Barbara Rodiek 514 E. Michigan Ave Fresno, CA 93704 (559) 696-8563 brodiek@comcast.netCAREER OBJECTIVEA leadership position responsible for overall strategy and execution of product and brand developmentthat allows me to contribute to an organization’s corporate, philanthropic and financial success byleveraging my organizational, communication and community relations skills.LEADERSHIP PROFILE Extensive experience in a variety of leadership roles responsible for communications, branding and creative and cost-efficient messaging  Proven successes in television, building increased public awareness of a wide array of issues; making television programming a centerpiece of a company’s PR engine A track record of successful PR campaigns using multi-media and special productions A rich reputation of building exceptional teams that deliver with scant resourcesUNIQUE SKILLS Understanding Customers: An intuitive understanding of the audience and how it responds to messages; and a savvy insight about how sponsors perceive value. Identify success criteria. Optimizing Media: Judiciously use the various media available to leverage the impact of a message and to create an effect as if a much larger budget and resources were at play. Strategic Outlook: Develop strategies to multiply overall impact of a message to provide long term awareness using a variety of proven methods. Install metrics to manage effective outcomes. Building Teams: Organize and build creative and dedicated teams that share a common vision and deliver, often under challenging conditions, exceptional results, frequently above expectation Creative Productions: Using available resources produce high impact stories and messages, especially for TV. Develop synergistic messages using other media. Constantly innovate Success is created through team collaboration built on positive support, thorough communication and a shared vision and reward.PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Comcast Cable Manager / Local Origination, Fresno - 1999 –Present • Increased employee participation and support of several key corporate initiatives – most recently driving the annual United Way Campaign. Despite downturn in economy, increased overall employee contributions by more than 9%. • Effectively improved area wide communications. Employee surveys listed communication as a top issue consistently. Proposed an idea of setting up an employee-exclusive channel usingCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 25
  • 93. resources already available. Within months the system was in place reaching messages to 98% of targets. • Significantly increased productivity and return with fewer resources. Change of ownership resulted in drastic cutbacks and constantly changing directives that were whipsawing local origination (LO). The department headcount was halved with no management oversight. Led this transition and prioritized production goals despite scant resources to honor franchise and community commitments. Despite ongoing chaos and lack of budgets, not only kept production on track to meet franchise commitments, but increased productivity. Additionally, made significant community outreach, repairing damaged community relations. Barbara Rodiek (559) 696-8563 brodiek@comcast.net – page 2 of 2 California State University, Fresno Lecturer /Mass Communications, Fresno - 1998 – Present as needed Develop/teach advanced video production class. Course grading/performance metrics revamp has provided students with solid production goals in video production processes, challenging/empowering them to take risks and gain confidence in their work . KSEE-24, Fresno, CA (An NBC TV affiliate); KERO-23, Bakersfield, CA Newscast Director – combined, between - 1989 - 1999 • At KSEE24- upon on-boarding quickly discovered that the production team was demoralized by the ongoing culture of finger pointing and a lack of leadership. The station’s signature morning show perennially placed second, affecting advertising revenue. After departure of the old-guard, revamped how the team worked by empowering each member to be accountable. Creating new work norms, eliminated blame from the Discrepancy Reports (DRs) filed after each broadcast. Within 18 months the show became top-rated, unseating the long-standing incumbent, setting a new tone for morning shows.OTHER EXPERIENCE CSU-Fresno Hackney Neighborhood Watch Central Valley Stories of Central Valley Coalition Horse Preservation & Block Captain Service for Animals Breeding Program Increased levels of (Intergenerational Board Member Helped create media safety and a sense of communication Chair Media campaign increasing community; Hosted celebrating stories of Committee; Stage media presence by Meet and Greet with WWII) – Helped secure Announcer and Media 100%. local candidates; Greatly corporate sponsorship Liaison for Super increased camaraderie and increase awareness Adoption. Created in neighborhood. of programs. newsletter and drove winter lecture series.EDUCATIONM.A., Mass Communication, California State University (CSU), Fresno, Fresno, CAB.A., Mass Communication & Journalism, (Broadcast) with minor in Animal Science, CSU, Fresno, CACentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 26
  • 94. TECHNICAL SKILLS• Complete video production including nonlinear editing; videographer, audio mix, script writing,graphics and more on a variety of formats; broadcast experience.• Office Suite, Quark, Adobe, PowerPoint, Page Maker, Excel, File Maker Pro and more.KEY SKILLS• Excellent written and oral communication; able to communicate both up and down the chain ofcommand; comfortable speaking to one to 100; media experience.• Conflict resolution and team building skills. Having a box full of tools is only one part of the strategy to succeed. Optimal growth comes from knowing which tool to use, and when; and that skill comes only with experience! (Find out how I can contribute to the CVBI’s success. Call me! Barbara Rodiek 559/696-8563)Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 27
  • 95. Travis A. Sheridan1630 E. Shaw Ave, Ste 163Fresno, CA 93710559.292.9033 x 105travis@cvbi.orgEDUCATIONUniversity of La Verne, College of Education and Organizational LeadershipDoctor of Education (ABD), Organizational LeadershipFocus Areas: Organizational Politics; Leadership as a Brand; Change Management; Innovation; Facilitation; InternalBrandingAlliant International University, College of Organizational StudiesMaster of Arts (2002), Organizational BehaviorFocus Areas: Succession Planning; Appreciative Inquiry; Staff DevelopmentFresno Pacific UniversityBachelor of Arts, Psychology (2000)Minor in Conflict Resolution and PeacemakingEXPEREINCEJuly 2007 to Present Director of Member ServicesCentral Valley Business IncubatorDevelop and deliver business planning curriculum (serving 40 % more start-up in 2008)Secure program sponsors and raise unrestricted funds (increased total program revenue by 133% and decreasedexpenses by 70%)Assist entrepreneurs with raising capital and pitching to investors (helped secure $4.5 million in capital in 2008)Serve as company spokesperson in CEO absenceMoved the organization from awareness strategy to engagement strategyDeveloped a process to increase the level of board engagementSource and secure community partners which result to new revenue streamsSeptember 2001 to Present Adjunct Business InstructorState Center Community College DistrictExperience teaching the following classes:o Introduction to Management (Three-Site Distance Learning)o Human Relations (Traditional Format and Two-Site Distance Learning)o Planning and Leadershipo Customer Serviceo Personnel Issueso Ethics and Valueso Communications and Conflict ManagementCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 28
  • 96. July 2006 to July 2007 Director of Public Relations & Organizational ChangeASTONE AgencyManaged public relations business unit and supervised staff of six located across CaliforniaServed as member of the due diligence team assessing staffing capacity and suggesting reductions in force whennecessary to eliminate redundancies related to mergers and acquisitionsDeveloped systems that lead to greater efficiencyManaged relationships with local, regional, and national mediaServed as company spokesperson in absence of CEODeveloped strategic communications plans for clientsWrote proposals and pitched new business opportunitiesAugust 2004 to July 2006 Executive Director, FresnoSan Joaquin Valley College, Fresno CampusManaged campus with 20 year history and 700 students, 16 programs, and 100 employeesResponsible for new program development, assessing market conditions to determine feasibilityManaged the P&L and $2 million annual budgetWorked directly with corporate office on marketing strategy and program emphasisDeveloped internal awareness and involvement campaign that resulted in reduced attrition and increase jobplacement ratesOversaw the coordination of public relations events that resulted in increased enrollmentsConducted staff and management development trainingPrepared for WASC reaccreditation site visitEnsured compliance with Dept of Ed regulations and internal policiesConducted program reviews and program-specific accreditation oversightSupervised the following staff: Dean of Students, Academic Dean, Evening Dean, Facility Manager, Registrar,Enrollment Services Director, Extern Coordinator, Financial Aid Manager, Campus Administrative Assistant, ISTechnicians, and Employment Services RepresentativesNovember 2001 to August 2004 Financial Center Executive Vice PresidentCitiBank, North AmericaManaged a $50MM financial center with 2500 clientsSupervised management and non-management personnelLead and encouraged staff through Cal Fed/Citibank merger; had lowest merger-related turnoverConducted scheduled operational and sales audits to ensure compliance with regulationsManaged financial center budget to meet margin growth goal of 18% for 2004Facilitated annual planning session with business partners and financial center management staffMade outside business calls to deepen existing or create new banking relationshipMonitored the branch P&L to respond to profitability trends.Analyzed sales reports and developed strategic plans to achieve goalsReviewed SBA loan packagesJanuary 2000 to November 2001 Human Resources GeneralistEducational Employees Credit UnionDirected the Board of Directors and CEO/President in the development of succession plan for CEO/PresidentpositionDeveloped a 360-degree assessment instrument used for executive management, Tabulated and analyzedperformance evaluations, Conducted internal and external benefits and compensation surveys, Conductedportions of new hire orientation, Credit Union staffing responsibilities: planning, recruitment, and selectionCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 29
  • 97. BOARD/COMMITTEE SERVICECreative Fresno (2005 to Present)Board Chair/President (2007 to Present)Board Vice Chair (2006 to 2007)Board Member (2005 to 2006)Educational Employees Credit Union (2006)Associate VolunteerCONSULTATIONASTONE Agency Staff Retreat (Summer 2007)Post-merger cultural assimilation retreatiR (Individual Relationships): The Difference between “Changing the World” and “Changing their World”.Conflict and communication strategiesTeam buildingDELCAN Branding Project (Fall 2007)Develop co-branding opportunity to communicate global capacityDetermined archetypal brand identitySuggest messaging and visual brandOutlined internal branding strategyASTONE Agency Staff Retreat (Winter 2007)Post-merger cultural assimilation retreatTeam buildingVision consensus buildingMadera Rescue Mission (Spring 2008)Board training, Stakeholder engagement and redefined identityBranding workshop for board of directorsSuggest messaging and engagement processAssist with development of business planCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 30
  • 98. Annabel M. Smith 3227 N. Sonora Lane, Fresno, CA 93722 Phone559.271.1404 Email:annabelbaez@yahoo.comEmployment Objective:To work in a fast paced environment where I can use my analytical skills to the benefit of the businessQualifications:Excellent communication, organizational and analytical skillsFunction well in a high-pressure atmosphereExcellent problem solving skillsAbility to work as an individual and as part of a teamAbility to work with diverse groups of peopleKnowledgeable and certified in various software programs used for correspondence, reports, statistical compilation,analysis, and database.Professional Experience:Central Valley Business Incubator, Inc. Dates 1/07 to CurrentAdmin/Grant ManagerAssume responsibility of administrative procedures and management of two facilities. Process A/R, prepare and make deposits.Process A/P, insure bills are approved and coded to appropriate funding sources. Reconcile all accounts and maintain financialrecords. Manage grant contracts and agreements in compliance with policies and procedures and adherence to contract requirements,as well as submit all reports and requests to appropriate funding sources in a timely manner. Perform all Human Resource functionsnecessary for the organization and maintain confidential records. Coordinate office services such as purchasing, payroll, and recordscontrol. Interpret operating policies and exercise independent judgment in resolution of administrative problems; participate in thedevelopment of budgets; coordinate collection and preparation of financial and operation reports. Facilitate internal audits fromfunders as well as annual preparation for outside auditors and tax preparation.Provide administrative and secretarial support to C.E.O including special projects, office work flow, and appointments,correspondence, budgets, and data compilation. Perform duties of a sensitive and confidential nature.Central Valley Business Incubator, Inc. Dates 9/06 to 12/06Administrative AssistantAssumed responsibility and management of the front desk, including intake process; greeted and directed customers and clients;answered, screened and directed incoming calls; monitored schedules and confirmed room reservations; maintained CVBI database;received, sorted, distributed, incoming and outgoing mail; ensured the facility was well-maintained and presentable at all times as wellas scheduled and coordinated outside facility maintenance as required; processed all A/R and prepared deposits; processed all A/P,insured bills where approved and coded to appropriate funding sources; reconciled all accounts and maintained back updocumentation; ordered office supplies and maintained inventory; functioned as administrative/clerical support to CVBI team;performed all other duties as assigned.Arbor Employment & Training - Workforce Connection Dates: 4/05 to 09/06Business Retention SpecialistDesign and develop monitoring tools to assist Business Account Specialist Unit with the maintenance of their pre/post caseloads.Track and monitor BAS units follow-up calls and biweekly contacts with both employers and customer. Maintain detailed records ofall BAS and ERS placements, OJT contract and LI agreements in compliance with policies and procedures and adherence to contractrequirements. Populate New Fresno Website with new job ready customers by linking their resumes to customer employmentobjectives, providing staff with an accessible job workforce. Prepared service management reports and performed other job duties asassigned.Fresno County Dept. of Employment & Temporary Assistance Dates: 2/05 to 4/05Office Assistant IIAssisted Lead Job Specialist with pilot job search and training program; contacted and met with cash aid recipients for updates on jobsearch. Tracked and monitored job search progress. Collected timesheets from various worksites on a monthly basis as well asdelivered bus passes and tokens to recipients as needed; kept detailed records of all customer contacts; performed other duties asassigned.ACS State & Local Solutions - Vendor Payment Services Dates: 9/03 to 1/05Accounting ClerkPrepared and coded invoices for payment; researched and resolved A/P and A/R issues; processed daily check runs; maintainedfinancial records in an organized and logical manner; assisted financial staff with clerical duties including, A/R, A/P, photocopying,filing, typing, report preparation, faxing, etc; performed other duties as assigned.Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 31
  • 99. ACS State & Local Solutions - Vendor Payment Services Dates: 10/02 to 9/02Customer Service RepresentativeResponded to customer inquiries and complaints; maintained detailed case notes of all customer contacts; gathered Information fromcustomers to properly resolve individual situations; communicated appropriate options for resolutions; investigated and resolvedcomplaints.Internal Revenue Service Dates: 1/01 to 10/02Data TranscriberData Entry and FilingSelect Personnel - Gap Inc. Dates: 9/00 to 12/00Administrative AssistantAssisted in inventory control, product inspection, data entry and labeling. Received, filled and shipped orders.Mervyns Department Store Dates: 5/98 to 10/00Customer Service AssociateProvided assistance to a wide range of customers; handled cash and balanced register; restocked sales floor; stocked incomingmerchandise to the warehouse, using the FIFO method for accounting purposesHighlights of Continuing Education and Professional TrainingSB 1608 Americans with Disabilities Act: What New Accessibility Law Reforms Mean to Employers 2009QuickBooks Accounting System – Certified 2008Taxes for Nonprofits and Faith-Based Organizations 2007Excellent Customer Service – Workforce Connection, presented by Jacqueline L. Riles, Ph.D. 2005Resolving Conflict – Workforce Connection, presented by Jacqueline L. Riles, Ph.D. 2005Motivating Yourself & Others – ACS Training, presented by Paul Clayton 2005Microsoft Office User Specialist Certification – Excel Expert and Word Proficient 2002Education:Fresno City College - Accounting Major - in progress Microcomputer Education Center- Certificate of Achievement with Honors - Computerized AccountingCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 32
  • 100. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub PROPOSAL AND APPLICATION Attachment E Letters of SupportCentral San Joaquin Valley iHub 33
  • 101. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 34
  • 102. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 35
  • 103. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 36
  • 104. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 37
  • 105. Central San Joaquin Valley iHub 38
  • 106. APPENDIX GIntroduction to Economic Development Certificate Program Invitation 26
  • 107. NE W!Introduction toEconomic DevelopmentCertificate ProgramOffered at Fresno State MONDAY—THURSDAY OCTOBER 11-14, 2010· IEDC Accredited· Valuable Professional Network Course Topics:· Cutting-edge Economic Development • Introduction to Economic Development Tools and Trends • Business Retention & Expansion • Real Estate Development & Reuse This program is designed for those new to the • Entrepreneurial & Small Business economic development field, current professionals, Development Strategies elected officials and community leaders who • Finance wish to advance their careers and better serve • Managing the Economic Development their communities. You’ll learn about emerging Organization economic development concepts while developing • Marketing & Attraction a statewide network of connections and resources. • Strategic Planning • Workforce Development • Economic Impact Analysis • Redevelopment • The deadline to register is September 30, 2010. Presented By: California State University, Fresno Office of Community and Economic Development, in • Registration fee is $700 for partnership with the Division of Continuing and Global CALED members and $800 Education, University Business Center, California for non-members. Association for Local Economic Development, and the California Academy for Economic Development. For more information, visit www.csufresno-econdev.org or call 559.294.6021.
  • 108. APPENDIX HCommunications/Outreach Diagram 27
  • 109. Partnership Processing Communications • Working with information, • Clear understanding of multiple • Sending results, collect data, obtain• Data Collected, captured changing, calculating, synthesizing scenarios feedback• Relationship management, trust • Cross Boundary/Jurisdiction • Real time assessed information and • Increase Fact-based decision making building leveraging, asset assessment implications • Increase participation and support• Participate/host in essential • Identifying and connecting • Increase transparency and educate decision making meetings implications and impacts from one best practices/lessons learned work group to others • Increase impact of Partnership efforts • Assessing information and and maximize Valley assets alignment with overall • Educate stakeholders and community goals/objectives leadership on Partnership efforts and how to get involved Input Output People Citizens, Cities, Counties, Government, Companies, Communities
  • 110. APPENDIX IOffice of Community & Economic Development Fact Sheet 28
  • 111. O ce of Community and Economic Development California State University, Fresno An on-campus division dedicated to aligning the University’s intellectual capacity and innovation-driven economic development initiatives to improve the competitiveness and prosperity of the region.• Increase Economic Innovation throughout the eight-county region• Develop effective systems that promote Business and Industry Strategy• Enhance Public Policy in favor of the eight-county region• Create strategic partnerships focused on Community Development• Develop educational programs that empower the Leaders of Tomorrow Our role is to link, align and leverage the University and its resources to the needs of the community, which is done through several programs. Fresno State Connect: To further the University’s role in California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley: Set in community engagement, the O ce of Community and motion by an executive order from Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Economic Development acts as the clearinghouse of information the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley is an regarding the University’s collective value and instrumental role unprecedented public-private partnership sharply focused on in the local community and will identify and promote Fresno improving the region’s economic vitality and quality of life for State’s extensive inventory of knowledge and experts who can the 3.9 million residents who call the San Joaquin Valley home. ful ll the needs of business. e Partnership is addressing the challenges of the region by implementing measurable actions on six major initiatives to help San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center: Acting the Valley emerge as California’s 21st Century Opportunity. as a resource hub, the Rural Development Center provides solutions for public agencies in small, underserved communities Valley Legacy: e purpose of the Valley Legacy grant is to by connecting them to experts who can provide specialized bring the San Joaquin Valley’s K-12 system, higher education, consulting to which they would otherwise not have access. and workforce investment board systems into alignment to better prepare young people for occupations in high-growth Smart Valley Places: Building on the San Joaquin Valley industry sectors in the Valley including agribusiness (food Regional Blueprint and its smart growth principles, Smart Valley processing and biotechnology), water technology, renewable Places is our region’s road map to creating more transportation energy, manufacturing and supply chain management. choices, equitable-a ordable housing, economic competitiveness, and healthier, safe and walkable neighborhoods. is will Small Business Development Center: is is a collaborative ultimately shape future growth trends that will impact not only partnership between the O ce of Community and Economic the health and prosperity of the region, but the entire state Development at Fresno State, University of California, Merced, of California. continued on reverse
  • 112. and the Central Valley Business Incubator. Together, these Powering The New Californiaorganizations provide an infrastructure to foster Small BusinessDevelopment Center (SBDC) activity and reach businessesthroughout the San Joaquin Valley. SBDC provides one-on-onebusiness consulting, workshops, research and online learningservices.Regional Jobs Initiative: RJI is based on the idea thatregional economies are made up of a series of relatedindustries, or clusters, which bene t one another.Since inception, 12 industry clusters have beenformed with signi cant backing from industryleaders, supporting public agencies, and otherpartners. Leadership for the RJI coalition iscoordinated by the O ce of Communityand Economic Development and key staloaned from participating organizations.Cal Valley Tech: CVT, an innovation hub(iHub), is managed by the Central ValleyBusiness Incubator and partnered withMerced County. is iHub leverages assetssuch as research parks, technology incubators,universities, and federal laboratories to providean innovation platform for startup companies,economic development organizations, businessgroups, and venture capitalists. is service givesgreater access to key partners and resources as wellas positions CVT as the sole iHub in the region. ere are a total of 12 iHubs throughout California.Introduction to Economic Development Certi cate Program: Acollaborative project between the California Academy for EconomicDevelopment, the California Association for Local EconomicDevelopment, and California State University, Fresno. is programis for new professionals entering the eld of economic development, collaborative e ort to facilitate connections between the incredibleexisting professionals, elected o cials, and community leaders who educational institutions and businesses within the Valley region.want to advance their career and better serve their community. Bulldog Academy: Fresno State is nationally recognized and playsValleyInternships.com: Research shows that connecting college a signi cant role in our community; however, it is di cult for thestudents to meaningful internship opportunities increases the public to get involved. Who do you contact? Where do you go onchance they will stay in our community after graduation. By campus? e purpose of the Bulldog Academy is to provide a forumstrengthening the connection between our local colleges and where people can come learn about how the University works, whatuniversities and the San Joaquin Valley business community, we are the di erent functions are for the various colleges, review some ofcreating a mechanism where college students can obtain meaningful the University’s research and applied knowledge abilities, and showinternships with local employers. ValleyInternships.com is a the public its strategic direction. O ce of Community and Economic Development California State University, Fresno 5010 N. Woodrow Avenue, Suite 200 M/S WC 142 Fresno, California 93740 559.294.6021 o ce | 559.294.6024 fax | www.csufresno.edu/oced
  • 113. APPENDIX JOffice of Community & Economic Development Presentation 29
  • 114. Office of Community & Economic DevelopmentFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 115. Office ofCommunity &Economic Development Mission- An on-campus division dedicated to aligning the universitys intellectual capacity and innovation-driven economic development initiatives to improve the competitiveness and prosperity of the region.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 116. Five specific goals:1. Increase Economic Innovation through the eight-county region.2. Develop effective systems that promote Business and Industry Strategy.3. Enhance Public Policy in favor of the eight-county region.4. Create strategic partnerships focused on Community Development.5. Develop educational programs that empower the Leaders of tomorrow.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 117. Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 118. Fresno State Connect Mission- To further the University’s role in community engagement, the Office of Community and Economic Development acts as the clearinghouse of information regarding the University’s collective value and instrumental role in the local community and will identify and promote Fresno State’s extensive inventory of knowledge and experts who can fulfill the needs of business.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 119. San Joaquin ValleyRural Development Center Purpose - Provide rural communities across the eight-county San Joaquin Valley a practical one-stop clearinghouse of technical assistance and project management services that will enable them to address a variety of pressing community needs.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 120. Three specific goals:1. Develop, maintain and facilitate a one-stop clearinghouse of resources that rural communities can utilize.2. Strengthen rural communities capacity to address pressing community needs.3. Increase rural communities informed decision- making by providing objective, third-party expertise.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 121. Economic Business Services Clean Energy Finance Development A Mezzanine Consulting Service Health & Human Housing Planning Services Rural Unincorporated Rural Small Small Rural Community Rural Special Communities Cities Based Communities Districts Network Organizations Project Design & Trade Water Transportation Construction Development InfrastructureFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 122. • California Central Valley Economic Business Development Corporation (represented by Services Economic Development Corporation serving Fresno County) • Central Valley Business Incubator • Fresno Area Hispanic Chamber of Commerce • Lyles Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship-Technology Commercialization Program, Fresno State • University of California, Merced Regional Network-Small Business Development Center • University Business Center, Craig School of Business, Fresno StateFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 123. • California Central Valley Economic Clean Energy Development Corporation (represented by Economic Development Corporation serving Fresno County) • Rural Community Assistance Corporation • San Joaquin Valley Clean Energy OrganizationFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 124. • California Association for Local Economic Economic Development Development • California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation (represented by Economic Development Corporation serving Fresno County) • Center for Economic Research and Education of Central California, Fresno State • Central Valley Business Incubator-Small Business Development Center • Office of Community and Economic Development, Fresno StateFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 125. • Northern California Community Loan Fund Finance • Rural Community Assistance Corporation • University of California, Merced Regional Network-Small Business Development Center • U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development • California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank (I-Bank)Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 126. • College of Health and Human Services, Health & Human Services Fresno State • Community Water Center • California Coalition for Rural Housing Housing • Rural Community Assistance Corporation • Self-Help Enterprises • Community and Regional Planning Center, Planning School of Social Sciences, Fresno State • San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy CouncilFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 127. • Construction Management Program, Lyles Project Design & College of Engineering, Fresno State Construction • Northern California Community Loan Fund • Center for International Trade Development, Trade State Center Community College District Development • U.S. Commercial Service, U.S. Department of Commerce • San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy Council TransportationFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 128. Water • Community Water Center Infrastructure • California Water Institute, Fresno State • Rural Community Assistance Corporation • Self-Help EnterprisesFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 129. Smart Valley Places Mission- Smart planning for a new San Joaquin ValleyFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 130. SMART VALLEY PLACES Smart Valley Places Smart planning for a new San Joaquin Valley • Unprecedented consortium of 14 urban cities from throughout the eight-county region of the San Joaquin Valley • Partners – Four regional nonprofits – California State University, Fresno – California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation – San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy Council • Represents all eight metropolitan planning organizations
  • 131. SMART VALLEY PLACES Smart Valley Places • Builds on – Six initiatives of California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley – San Joaquin Valley Regional Blueprint and its smart growth principles
  • 132. SMART VALLEY PLACES Smart Valley Places • Smart Valley Places is our region’s road map to creating more – transportation choices – equitable-affordable housing – economic competitiveness – healthier, safe, walkable neighborhoods
  • 133. SMART VALLEY PLACES Smart Valley Places Will ultimately shape future growth trends that will impact not only the health and prosperity of the region, but the entire state of California
  • 134. California Partnership for theSan Joaquin Valley Mission- A public-private partnership focused on achieving a prosperous economy, quality environment, and social equity throughout Californias great San Joaquin Valley.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 135. A NEW VALLEY The Partnership • Unprecedented public-private partnership – focused on improving the region’s economic vitality and quality of life for the 4 million residents who call the San Joaquin Valley home • Addressing the challenges of the region by implementing measurable actions – on economic, environmental, and social levels to help the San Joaquin Valley emerge as California’s 21st Century Opportunity
  • 136. A NEW VALLEY Organization Led by an appointed, diverse and experience-rich Board and focused on action through 10 work groups: • Air Quality • Advanced Communications Services • Economic Development • Energy • Health and Human Services • Higher Education and Workforce Development • Housing • PreK–12 Education • Sustainable Planning • Water Quality, Supply and Reliability
  • 137. A NEW VALLEY The Opportunity The Partnership’s six major initiatives: 1. Grow a diversified, globally competitive economy supported by a highly skilled workforce; 2. Create a model K-12 public education system; 3. Develop high-quality health and human services; 4. Attain clean air standards; 5. Implement an integrated framework for sustainable growth; and 6. Build a 21st century transportation mobility system.
  • 138. A NEW VALLEY Six Initiatives of the Partnership
  • 139. A NEW VALLEY The San Joaquin Valley Comprises eight counties with 62 cities
  • 140. Valley Legacy Mission- Align existing systems to better prepare future workers for occupations in high-growth industry sectors of agribusiness (includes food processing and biotechnology), water technology, renewable energy, manufacturing, supply chain management.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 141. VALLEY LEGACY Valley Legacy Aligning Education with Future Workforce Opportunities • Demonstration projects are spread across seven counties, using grant monies to train workers in basic job skills, vocational English language skills, and computer literacy. • Entrepreneurship development centers are being established across the Valley to train people for self-employment. • Project targets jobs in water technology, renewable energy, food processing, agricultural technology and biotechnology - all industries that are closely tied to agribusiness, the heart of the regional economy - as well as manufacturing and supply chain management.
  • 142. VALLEY LEGACY Four Initiatives of Valley Legacy
  • 143. VALLEY LEGACY The Work • Sector-Based Articulation – Fully coordinated academic and training program, from high schools through colleges and universities – Provides a curriculum with the rigor and relevance needed to yield qualified employees with immediate value for Business Incubation & Entrepreneurship Development Green Economy & Workforce Sector- Based Articulation • Participating work groups – PreK-12 Education – Higher Education and Workforce Development – Economic Development – Energy – Water Quality, Supply and Reliability
  • 144. VALLEY LEGACY The Work • Basic Education Proficiency – Two workforce-readiness programs to address areas of significant deficiency • English Language Learners • Digital Literacy • Participating work groups – English Language Learners • PreK-12 Education • Higher Education and Workforce Development – Digital Literacy • Advanced Communications Services
  • 145. VALLEY LEGACY The Work • Business Incubation and Entrepreneurship Development – Establish a network of entrepreneurship development programs • E-Centers focus on targeted regional industry clusters throughout the eight-county region • English Language Learners • Digital Literacy • Participating work groups – Economic Development – Higher Education and Workforce Development
  • 146. VALLEY LEGACY The Work • Benefits extend far beyond two-year life of grant – Business incubators turning out new businesses means fully articulated education system will produce future employees – Programs that provide English language training, basic skills remediation, computer literacy will be in place – Significant increase of qualified applicants for high-wage, high-demand jobs improving job search and career obtainment of Valley job seekers – Ultimate payoff: produce a lower unemployment rate and improved economy
  • 147. Small Business Development Center A collaborative partnership between the Office of Community and Economic Development at Fresno State, University of California, Merced, and the Central Valley Business Incubator. Together, these organizations provide an infrastructure to foster Small Business Development Center (SBDC) activity and reach businesses throughout the San Joaquin Valley. SBDC provides one-on-one business consulting, workshops, research and online learning services.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 148. Regional Jobs Initiative RJI is based on the idea that regional economies are made up of a series of related industries, or clusters, which benefit one another. Since inception, 12 industry clusters have been formed with significant backing from industry leaders, supporting public agencies, and other partners. Leadership for the RJI coalition is coordinated by the Office of Community and Economic Development and key staff loaned from participating organizations.
  • 149. Cal Valley Tech iHub CVT, an innovation hub (iHub), is managed by the Central Valley Business Incubator and partnered with Merced County. is iHub leverages assets such as research parks, technology incubators, universities, and federal laboratories to provide an innovation platform for startup companies, economic development organizations, business groups, and venture capitalists. This service gives greater access to key partners and resources as well as positions CVT as the sole iHub in the region. There are a total of 12 iHubs throughout California.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 150. Introduction to Economic DevelopmentCertificate Program A collaborative project between the California Academy for Economic Development, the California Association for Local Economic Development, and California State University, Fresno. This program is for new professionals entering the field of economic development, existing professionals, elected officials, and community leaders who want to advance their career and better serve their community.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 151. ValleyInternships.com Research shows that connecting college students to meaningful internship opportunities increases the chance they will stay in our community after graduation. By strengthening the connection between our local colleges and universities and the San Joaquin Valley business community, we are creating a mechanism where college students can obtain meaningful internships with local employers. ValleyInternships.com is a collaborative effort to facilitate connections between the incredible educational institutions and businesses within the Valley region.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 152. Bulldog Academy at Fresno State Fresno State is nationally recognized and plays a significant role in our community; however, it is difficult for the public to get involved. Who do you contact? Where do you go on campus? The purpose of the Bulldog Academy is to provide a forum where people can come learn about how the University works, what the different functions are for the various colleges, review some of the University’s research and applied knowledge abilities, and show the public its strategic direction.Fresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development
  • 153. Office of Community & Economic DevelopmentFresno State – Office of Community and Economic Development

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