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Presentation for a Course offered at the EAHIL Workshop in Dublin, 2 June 2009

Presentation for a Course offered at the EAHIL Workshop in Dublin, 2 June 2009

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  • interesting presentation
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  • very good presentation Chris I download it on my blog, do you mind?

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  • Many thanks for posting this, Chris. I was sorry I couldn't make your presentation as this is an area of interest to me, especially how it relates professionally. However, now that I can listen to this in my own time I will do so. Hope you had a good conference. Richard
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  • Hi, I‘m Chris Mavergames and I‘m the Web Operations Manager/Information Architect for the CC.

Web 2.0 and Health Information Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Web 2.0 and Health Information Chris Mavergames Web Operations Manager/Information Architect The Cochrane Collaboration EAHIL Workshop, Dublin Castle 2 June 2009
  • 2. Poll
    • How many of you use/have heard of the following?
    • Social networking: Facebook, LinkedIn
    • Microblogging: Twitter
    • Social bookmarking: CiteULike, del.icio.us, Connotea
    • Blogs, Wikis: medical and librarian blogs, Medpedia; Blogger, Wordpress, pbwiki (services)
    • Subscription services: RSS for anything
  • 3. Cutting through the jargon
    • What is Web 1.0?
    • Static pages, one-way interaction
    • Searching instead of finding
    • Passive approach to web pages – pages essentially online documents
    • Hyperlinks, email lists
    • One-size-fits-all content
  • 4. cochrane.org
  • 5. Cutting through the jargon
    • What is different in Web 2.0?
    • Dynamic pages, participatory interactions
    • Information comes to you (push vs. pull)
    • Customization of content, saved searches (iGoogle, “My NCBI“ at Pubmed)
    • More finding (or receiving), less searching
    • Interactive pages: commenting, subscribing, posting, adding, sharing, etc.
    • All about the content (the technology gets simpler!) – “Internet as platform“
  • 6. cochrane.org
  • 7. igoogle.com
  • 8. Some Web 2.0 applications and tools
    • Social networking: Facebook, LinkedIn
    • Microblogging: Twitter
    • Social bookmarking: CiteULike, del.icio.us, Connotea
    • Blogs, Wikis: medical and librarian blogs, Medpedia; Blogger, Wordpress, pbwiki (services)
    • Subscription services: RSS for
      • Podcasts
      • News
      • Saved searches
  • 9. More on Web 2.0
    • Push vs. Pull
      • Web 2.0 allows you to have information “pushed“ at you vs. you having to “pull“ it
    • Finding vs. searching
    • Via RSS, Twitterfeeds, Group updates, etc.
    • Web 2.0 keywords: interact, share, collaborate, remix
    • Internet as a platform (less downloading of software, more use of online services)
  • 10. Web 2.0 analogies and concepts
    • An analogy:
      • Web 1.0 = static on a radio
      • Web 2.0 = provides a tuner
    • “ tuning the web“
    • “ joining the conversation, already in progress“
    • Information can be very rich (C. Shirky - flickr pages as technical manuals, “hdr“ example)
  • 11. Social Networking services
    • Facebook, LinkedIn, 2Collab, and others
    • These services allow you to create an online profile so that you can interact with others:
      • Join groups that share your interests
      • Share links, notes, reading lists, videos, etc.
      • Comment on and discuss items shared by others
      • Use chat and messaging services
  • 12. facebook.com
  • 13.  
  • 14. linkedin.com
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17. 2collab.com
  • 18.  
  • 19. Why use these tools?
    • Networking with like-minded individuals in your field
    • Enhancing your productivity by learning from and sharing with others
    • Exploring new interests or research topics
    • Career and professional development
    • Don‘t underestimate the power of these tools!
  • 20. Microblogging - Twitter
    • S hare short, 140-character messages (“tweets“)
    • You follow people and they follow you
    • Filtering tools for Twitter allow filtering of keywords of interest to you
    • What is he talking about? Much easier to show you!
  • 21. twitter.com/cochranecollab
  • 22. twitter.com/mavergames
  • 23. tweetdeck.com
  • 24. twitter.com/tsc_oh
  • 25. Why Twitter?
    • Concept of “ambient awareness“, perfect example of ‚push‘ technology
    • You won‘t see every tweet, but you‘ll be ‚ambiently‘ aware of the conversation
    • Tweet a question, get an answer!
    • Share and find links to interesting sites
    • Search Google for “twitter apps“
    • Get Twitter on your mobile device
    • What‘s coming (hopefully) that will improve:
      • Grouping of “friends”
      • Text links in tweets
      • Allow tweeting to a grou p
      • Etc.
  • 26. Social Bookmarking
    • del.icio.us, CiteULike, Connotea
    • Allow users to share collections of links
    • User-generated tagging
    • Like a giant bookmarks database
    • CiteULike and Connotea are specifically for scholarly references
  • 27. citeulike.org
  • 28. del.icio.us
  • 29. Why use social bookmarking?
    • Discover new, relevant articles and websites
    • New links come to you via RSS or your account on these services
    • Access your bookmarks anywhere, from any browser
    • Export citations easily (CiteULike) and organize your scholarly papers
    • For traditional library setting: reference librarian can share their bookmarks easily with patrons
  • 30. Blogs, Wikis
    • Blog (weblog): example – Laika‘s MedLiblog
    • Wiki (What I Know Is) (backronym - The word wiki , halved from the Hawaiian phrase " wiki wiki " meaning "quick „ )
      • Collaborative resource creation
      • Takes advantage of the “hive“ of people on the web all with specific knowledge
      • Medpedia
      • Fun example: twictionary
    • Blogger, Wordpress, etc. (tools for creating blogs)
    • Pbwiki.com, wetpaint.com, etc. (tools for creating wikis)
  • 31. http://laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com/
  • 32. http://scienceroll.com/
  • 33. http:// www.medpedia .com/
  • 34. http://twictionary.pbwiki.com/
  • 35. http:// cochrane.org/ideas
  • 36. http:// mavergames.net
  • 37. Why use blogs?
    • Among many reasons...
    • Good summary of interesting articles in a particular field
    • Can receive updates via RSS (‚push‘)
    • Starting a blog allows you to network with other bloggers and “guest post“ on other blogs
    • Can serve as a homepage for your research work
    • And many other reasons...
  • 38. Why use wikis?
    • Among many reasons...
    • Very powerful knowledge gathering tool
    • Allows for collaborative work environments
    • Can use them for “crowd sourcing“ your work or for brainstorming ideas
    • Utilizing the “hive mind“ to gather ideas, facts
  • 39. Subscription services: RSS
    • You can obtain the following and much more via an RSS feed (Really Simple Syndication)
      • Podcasts
      • Saved searches
      • News feeds
      • Updates to sites, collections of bookmarks, flickr photos, etc. – could be anything!
    • Google Reader, Yahoo, Bloglines, etc.
  • 40. cochrane.org/podcasts
  • 41.  
  • 42. Podcast XML
  • 43. http://www.ajpm-online.net/
  • 44. cochrane.org/news
  • 45. www.google.com/reader
  • 46. My iGoogle page
  • 47. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/
  • 48. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/
  • 49. bmj.com
  • 50. http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/besttreatments
  • 51. http://www.webicina.com/rss_feeds/
  • 52. http://www.webicina.com/rss_feeds/
  • 53. Typical Web 2.0 scenario
    • I visit Laikas MedLiblog:
    Where I find this post:
  • 54. Typical Web 2.0 scenario
    • I visit the site:
    I subscribe to the feed:
  • 55. Typical Web 2.0 scenario
    • I decide to tweet it:
    • I get this response via Twitter:
  • 56. Typical Web 2.0 scenario
    • So, I visit the Facebook group and join.
    • Then, I post the following to the group page:
    • And so on...
  • 57. Further reading
    • Visit del.icio.us/mavergames for a complete list of links from this presentation (see tag “EAHIL”)
    • Follow The Cochrane Collaboration on Twitter! twitter.com/cochranecollab
    • Follow me on Twitter! twitter.com/mavergames
    • Get news via RSS from cochrane.org/news
    • In a few days, see slidecast of this presentation at slideshare.net/mavergames
    • Share, collaborate, remix, explore!
  • 58. Questions?
  • 59. Thank you! Chris Mavergames Web Operations Manager/Information Architect The Cochrane Collaboration Email: [email_address] Twitter: mavergames Blog: mavergames.net