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Joseph Smith's Ancestory
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  • 1. Smith Family Home
  • 2. “My grandfather Asael Smith, wrote the prophet, long ago predicted their would be a prophet raised up in his family, and my grandmother was fully satisfied that it was fulfilled in me. My grandfather died in ...New York after having received the Book of Mormon, read it nearly through and declared that I was the very prophet that he had long known would come in his family.”
  • 3. It was decreed in the councils of eternity long before the foundations of the earth were laid, that he, Joseph Smith, should be the man in the last dispensation of the world, to bring forth the word of God to the people, and receive the fulness of the keys and powers of the priesthood of the son of God. The Lord had His eyes upon him, and upon his father, and upon his fathers father, and upon his progenitors clear back to Abraham, and from Abraham to the flood, and from the flood to Enoch, and from Enoch to Adam. He has watched that family and that blood as it has circulated from its fountain to the birth of that man. (JD 7:289-90)
  • 4. The Smith’s of Topsfield Eighteen Years after John Howland debarked the Mayflower, there landed a boy of only twelve in Boston Harbor. He was alone and far from his native England. He had come from London. Why a boy of twelve would set out on such an adventure alone is unknown. But we shall all thank the God of Heaven for the adventurous spirit of this young man. Robert lived in Boston long enough to build three houses. With the money he earned working as a Taylor he purchased 208 acres of land in Boxford, 20 miles due north of Boston. Part of Robert’s farm was in Topsfeild Mass.
  • 5. Asael Smith "Sure I am my Savior, Christ, is perfect, and never will fail in one circumstance. To him I commit your souls, bodies, estates, names, characters, lives, deaths and all—and myself, waiting when he shall change my vile body and make it like his own glorious body."3 Church History in the Fulness of Times, p. 17 Asael Smith also predicted that "God was going to raise up some branch of his family to be a great benefit to mankind."4
  • 6. Where the next three generations of Smith’s were born. Robert Married Mary French . He and Mary had ten children. Their third son Samuel was a great patriot and fought in the revolutionary war. Samuel Married Rebecca Curtis and they had nine children. Two sons and seven daughters. The first son of Samuel carried on his fathers name. He was born in 1714. He was considered a gentleman and became a captain in the militia. He served as a Juror, grand Juror, Supervisor of the roads and on the committee for public safety. The latter organization grew out of the ‘Provincial congress’ over which John Hancock presided. For eight years he was a delegate to the provincial ‘Congress’.
  • 7. Samuel Jr. was the Father of Asael Smith grandfather of the Prophet. Asael was burned in a fire when he was young and the injury caused the muscles on one side of his neck to be shortened. So he walked with his neck tilted to one side this is probably what invited his nick name “Crooked neck Smith.” Asael defended and sheltered a much despised and persecuted Quaker. This Christian act brought the opprobrious disapproval of the community. This ended in a move to Tunbridge Vermont.. Here with his family of boys he cleared a large plot of virgin forest.
  • 8. Mary Duty
  • 9. Maternal Ancestry of Joseph... Solomon Mack Indentured servant Fought in the French Indian War Merchant ,Land owner, Farmer, Miller Shipmaster, Privateer Accidents, Hardships, Seizures Leg injury prevented him clearing land
  • 10. Solomon Mack Married Lydia Gates Had 8 Children Jason, Daniel, Lucy, Stephen, Lovinia, Lousia… Bought a ship was shipwrecked Lost ship in a Huricane Got sick
  • 11. Solomon Mack Returned to his family to find them evicted Suffered depression Rheumatism Became devoted to family Read the bible Wrote an Autobiography about his conversion to Christianity
  • 12. Smith Family Home
  • 13. Jason Mack Son of Soloman At the age of twenty he became a preacher of the gospel. And in a short time after this he formed an acquaintance with a young woman of wealthy parentage. fn She was the pride of the place in which she resided, not so much on account of her splendid appearance, as the soundness of her mind and her stately deportment, joined with an unaffected mildness of disposition and a condescension of manners,
  • 14. Jason and Ester which were admirably suited to the taste and principles of my brother. Jason became deeply in love with her, insomuch that his heart was completely hers, and it would have been as easy to have convinced him that he could exist without his head as that he could live and enjoy life without being united with her in marriage.
  • 15. Jason Mack & Ester Bruce On account of this intelligence it was agreed that the marriage of my brother, as my father desired that he should accompany him to Liverpool, should be deferred until their return. Accordingly, my brother left his affianced bride with a heavy heart and with this promise, that he would write to her and his sister conjointly, at least once in three months during his absence. In three months after his departure, according to agreement, a letter arrived which indeed met with a very warm reception, but it was never followed by another from him. A young man who kept the post office where she received her letters, formed in his heart a determination to thwart my brother, if possible, in his matrimonial prospects in order to obtain the
  • 16. prize himself. He commenced by using the most persuasive arguments against her marrying my brother; but not succeeding in this, he next detained his letters, and then reproached him for neglecting her. Being still unsuccessful, he forged letters purporting to be from a friend of Jason which stated that he (Jason Mack) was dead, and his friends might cease to expect him. He then urged his suit again, but she still rejected him and continued to do so until within four months of Jason's return, when she concluded that she had wronged the young man and that he was really more worthy than she had expected. The time also which Jason was to be absent having expired without his return, she believed that the reports concerning his death must be true.
  • 17. So she accepted the hand of this young man and they were united in the bonds of matrimony. As soon as Jason arrived he repaired immediately to her father's house. When he arrived there she was gone to her brother's funeral; he went in and seated himself in the same room where he had once paid his addresses to her. In a short time she came home; when she first saw him she did not know him, but when she got a full view of his countenance she recognized him and instantly fainted. From this time forward she never recovered her health, but, lingering for two years, died the victim of disappointment (Lucy Mack Smith, History of Joseph Smith by His Mother [Salt Lake City: Stevens & Wallis, Inc., 1945], 10 - 11.)
  • 18. Lucy Mack 4’11”
  • 19. The Joseph Smith, Sr., family moved several timesThe Joseph Smith, Sr., family moved several times in New England. (1) Following Joseph and Lucy's marriage in 1796 they lived and farmed in Tunbridge, Vermont. (2) In 1802 they moved to Randolph and opened a mercantileopened a mercantile establishment. (3) The next year they returned to Tunbridge. (4) Also in 1803, they sold the Tunbridge farm and moved to Royalton for a few months. (5) In 1804 they moved to Sharon township in Windsor County, where Joseph Smith,where Joseph Smith, Jr., was bornJr., was born. (6) They moved back to Tunbridge, where Samuel Harrison was bornSamuel Harrison was born. (7) In 1808 they again moved to Royalton, where Ephraim and William were bornEphraim and William were born. (8) In 1811 they moved to West Lebanon, New Hampshire, where a typhoid epidemic struck the familytyphoid epidemic struck the family. (9) In 1813 they moved to Norwich, Vermont, where they experienced three successive crop failuressuccessive crop failures. (10) Crop failures forced a final move to the Palmyra vicinity in New York in 1816. Church History in the Fulness of Times, p. 20
  • 20. Ginsing Root While Lucy was preoccupied with religion and salvation her husband was ebarking on an ill fated venture. Ginsing rot grew in Vermont. It was highly valued in China because of its supposed ability to heal and to enhance life, Joseph, who had experienced a series of financial setbacks, invested heavily in the herb. He was offered $3000 for it by a Mr. Stevens. Mr. Stevens had some Ginsing himself and so he sent his son on the ship to represent himself and Joseph Sr.. Young Steven’s sold the ginsing at a good profit, but misrepresented the returns, and gave Joseph Smith Sr. only a chest of tea. When Steven’s dishonesty was discovered, he fled to Canada with the money.
  • 21. Lucy’s Dowery Leaving Joseph and Lucy with $1,800 debt. Lucy recalled, “This farm which was worth about $1,500 my husband sold for $800 in order to make speedy payment. To this Lucy added $1,000 she had received as a wedding present. They were out of debt but penniless.
  • 22. Joseph Sr. Meets Lucy Joseph Smith Sr. met Lucy Mack while she was visiting her brother Stephen at Tunbridge. Joseph was 25, over six foot tall and a powerfully built man like his father. Lucy and Joseph Sr. lived on a family farm in Turnbridge for about 6 years. There first three children were born there. Possibly because of the stony soil Joseph Sr, and Lucy rented out the farm in Turnbridge and moved to Randolph in 1802 where Lucy fell ill with Tuberculosis, the disease that had taken the life of her sisters Lovina and Lovisa. Hearing the doctors say she would die she pleaded with the Lord:
  • 23. I made a solemn covenant with God that if he would let me live I would endeavor to serve him to the best of my abilities. Shortly after this I heard a voice say to me :‘Seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you. Let your heart be comforted. Ye believe in god. Believe also in me.
  • 24. Tunbridge Store
  • 25. Smith Family Home
  • 26. What do we know about the Smith Family?Foreordained Visionary Family (Joel 2:29-30) Patriotic-Solomon Mack Indentured-servant-poverty to wealth-Poverty … conversion Large family 11 children United Persecuted Poor and Industrious… Clearing the forests Maple syrup Oil Clothes Bake Goods Building Wells
  • 27. What do we know about Jesus Mortal family?
  • 28. Matthew 13:55-56 55 Is not this the carpenter's son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? 56 And his sisters, are they not all with us? Whence then hath this man all these things?
  • 29. What do we know about Jesus Family? He was the oldest son of at least 7 children 2 of his brothers would author scripture He had a wonderfully humble step Father who was visited by an angel His Mother was choice among women and grew up in the temple she had visions and divine visitations They were poor They labored Joseph and Mary with the boys and girls They lived the simple life in a small town
  • 30. Birth of Joseph About 100 years ago, Mr. F. M. Bareham wrote the following: Elder Spencer W. Kimball, Conference Report, April 1960, Afternoon Meeting, p.83
  • 31. Birth of Joseph…obscure among the hero’s… "A century ago men were following with bated breath the march of Napoleon and waiting with feverish impatience for news of the wars. And all the while in their homes babies were being born. But who could think about babies? Everybody was thinking about battles.
  • 32. A host of hero’s… "In one year between Trafalgar and Waterloo there stole into the world a host of heroes: Gladstone was born in Liverpool; Tennyson at the Somersby Rectory, and Oliver Wendell Holmes in Massachusetts. Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky, and music was enriched by the advent of Felix Mendelssohn in Hamburg."
  • 33. Birth of Joseph And we might add, and Joseph Smith was born in Vermont, four years earlier. Quoting Bareham further: "But nobody thought of babies, everybody was thinking of battles. Yet which of the battles of 1809 mattered more than the babies of 1809? We fancy God can manage his world only with great battalions, when all the time he is doing it with beautiful babies. "When a wrong wants righting, or a truth wants preaching, or a continent wants discovering, God sends a baby into the world to do it."
  • 34. 1805 Dec. 23 Birth of Joseph Smith in Sharon Township Windsor County Vermont 2 Nephi 3:14-15 If I knew how the little cuss was going to turn out I’d have smothered the little cuss.”
  • 35. 1811 Joseph Smith Sr. has a series of 7 inspired dreams 1812-13 Seven year old Joseph suffered from complications of typhoid And was operated on he remained on crutches for three years 1813 Joseph went to Salem Massachusetts to recover
  • 36. typhoid fever came into West Lebanon and “raged tremendously.” It was part of an epidemic that swept the upper Connecticut valley leaving six thousand people dead. One by one the Smith children fell ill. Sophronia, afflicted for three months, was near death but began to recover when Joseph and Lucy beseeched the Lord to spare her.
  • 37. agony for over two weeks. Throughout the ordeal his older brother Hyrum showed him great tenderness. Lucy recorded: “Hyrum sat beside him, almost day and night for some considerable length of time, holding the affected part of his leg in his hands and pressing it between them, so that
  • 38. his afflicted brother might be enabled to endure the pain.”24 The first two attempts to reduce the swelling and drain the infection in Joseph’s leg failed. The chief surgeon recommended amputation, but Lucy refused and urged the doctors, “You will not, you must not, take off his leg, until you try once more.”25 Providentially, “the only physician in the United
  • 39. States who aggressively and successfully operated for osteomyelitis” in that era was Dr. Nathan Smith, a brilliant physician at Dartmouth Medical College in Hanover, New Hampshire.26 He was the principal surgeon, or at least the chief adviser, in Joseph’s case. In his treatment of the disease, Dr. Smith was generations ahead of his time. Joseph insisted on enduring the operation without being bound or drinking brandy wine to dull his senses. He asked his mother to leave the room so she would not have to see him suffer. She consented, but when the physicians broke off part of the bone with forceps and Joseph screamed, she rushed back into the room. “Oh, mother, go back, go back,” Joseph cried out. She did, but returned a second time only to be removed again.27 After the ordeal Joseph went with his Uncle Jesse Smith to the seaport town of Salem, Massachusetts,
  • 40. hoping that the sea breezes would help his recovery. Due to the severity of the operation, his recovery was slow. He walked with crutches for three years and sometimes limped slightly thereafter, but he returned to health and led a robust life. According to his mother, Joseph’s operation may have been the only notable incident in his early boyhood
  • 41. Typhoid Epidemic 1813 Leg Operation (1812- 13) In 1813, in Amierica surgery was not a medical specialty. There were no surgeons as we know them today. Only a few who practiced medicine had ever attended medical school. Like early attorney’s and ministers doctors rode many miles over rough country rodes to their patients bedside. There was not a single institution in New England that could be called a hospitol in 1813. These were also prelisterian days of surgery. Before appreciation of bacterial infections, before antisceptic dressings...
  • 42. Surgical tools from the Early 1800’s
  • 43. What has God taught you from the disappointments in your life? Leg operation-Hyrum, Lucy, Joseph Sr. Mt. Tambora Financial Challenges Elder Holland Angels
  • 44. 1816 and Frozen to Death
  • 45. Sometime in 1816, Joseph Smith Sr., like many other New Englanders of the period, traveled west in search of a new beginning. He arrived in Palmyra village, New York, a few weeks after his departure from Vermont. He left His family in Vermont. to settle accounts and to prepare for their journey west to a new home. By 1818, he had accumulated enough money for a down payment on a hundred acre woodland area in the area of Farmington township. During the first year, he and his sons cleared 30 acres of heavy timber, prepared the ground for cultivation and planted wheat.
  • 46. 1816 Smith’s moved from Norwich Vermont to Palmyra NY Joseph walked 40 miles a day in snow with his bad leg 1818 Smith’s purchased a farm in Farmington township 1819 Revivals intensified in Palmyra vicinity 1819 Joseph Smith Sr. has his last visit from the messenger of his dreams and tells him he has one thing in his life that is still needful for Salvation (Ordinances)
  • 47. Visions of Joseph Sr. and Lucy (Joel 2:28; Amos 3:7) And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, and your young men shall see visions:
  • 48. Lucy and the Grove... After Joseph spoke with his oldest brother he stopped attending church with Lucy she “considerably hurt by this”, ...in her words she explains what she did, “I retired to a grove not far distant, where I prayed to the Lord in behalf of my husband--that the true gospel might be presented to him and that his heart might be softened so as to receive it, or that he might become more religiously inclined. After praying some time in this manner, I returned to the house much depressed in spirit, which state of feeling continued until I retired to my bed. I soon fell asleep and had the following dream:
  • 49. I thought that I stood in a large and beautiful meadow, which lay a short distance from the house in which we lived, and that everything around wore an aspect of peculiar pleasantness. The first thing that attracted my special attention in this magnificent meadow, was a very pure and clear stream of water, which ran through the midst of it; and as I traced this stream, I discovered two trees standing upon its margin, both of which wree on the same side of the stream. These trees were very beautiful, they were well proportioned and toward with majestic beauty to a great height. Their branches which added to their semmetry and glory, commenced near the top and spread themselves in luxurious granduer around. I gazed upon them with wonder and admiration; and after beholding them for a short time,
  • 50. I saw one of them was surrounded with a bright belt that shone like burnished gold, but far more brilliantly. Presently a gentle breeze passed by, and the tree encircled with this golden zone, bent gracefully before the wind, and waved its beautiful branches in the light air. As the wind increased it assumed the most lively and animated appearance, and seemed to express in its motions the utmost joy and happiness. If it had been an intelligent creature, it could not have conveyed by the power of language, the idea of joy and gratitude so perfectly as it did; and even the stream that rolled beneath it shared, apparently every sensation felt by the tree, for as the branches danced over the stream, it would swell gently then recede again, with a motion as soft as the breathing of an infant, but as lively as the dancing of a sun beam.
  • 51. The belt also partook of the same influence, and , as it moved in unison with the motin of the stream and of the tree, it increased continually in refulgence and magnitude, until it became exceedingly glorious. I turned my eye upon its fellow, which stood opposite; but it was not surrounded witht he belt of light as thte former, and it stood erect and fixed as a pillar of marble. No matter how strong the wind blew over it, not a leaf was stirred, not a bough was bent; but obstinately stiff it stood, scorning alike the zephyer’s breath, or the power of the mighty storm.
  • 52. I wondered at what I saw, and said in my heart, What can be the meaning of all this? And the interpretation given was, that these personated my husband and his older brother, Jesse Smith; that the stubborn and unyielding tree was like Jesse; that the other , more pliant and flexible, was like Joseph, my husband; that the breath of Heaven which passed over them , was the pure and undefiled gospel of the Son of God, which gospel Jesse would always resist, but which Joseph, when he was more advanced in life, would hear and receive with his whole heart, and rejoice therein; and unto him would be added intelligence, happiness, glory and everlasting life.(Lucy Mack Smith, History of Joseph Smith p. 43-45)
  • 53. The Smith’s of TopsfieldThe Smith’s of Topsfield  Eighteen Years after John Howland debarkedEighteen Years after John Howland debarked the Mayflower, there landed a boy of onlythe Mayflower, there landed a boy of only twelve in Boston Harbor. He was alone andtwelve in Boston Harbor. He was alone and far from his native England. He had comefar from his native England. He had come from London. Why a boy of twelve would setfrom London. Why a boy of twelve would set out on such an adventure alone is unknown.out on such an adventure alone is unknown. But we shall all thank the God of Heaven forBut we shall all thank the God of Heaven for the adventurous spirit of this young man.the adventurous spirit of this young man. Robert lived in Boston long enough to buildRobert lived in Boston long enough to build three houses. With the money he earnedthree houses. With the money he earned working as a Taylor he purchased 208 acresworking as a Taylor he purchased 208 acres of land in Boxford, 20 miles due north ofof land in Boxford, 20 miles due north of Boston. Part of Robert’s farm was in TopsfeildBoston. Part of Robert’s farm was in Topsfeild Mass.Mass.
  • 54.  Where the next three generations of Smith’sWhere the next three generations of Smith’s were born. Robert Married Mary French . Hewere born. Robert Married Mary French . He and Mary had ten children. Their third sonand Mary had ten children. Their third son Samuel was a great patriot and fought in theSamuel was a great patriot and fought in the revolutionary war. Samuel Married Rebeccarevolutionary war. Samuel Married Rebecca Curtis and they had nine children. Two sonsCurtis and they had nine children. Two sons and seven daughters. The first son of Samueland seven daughters. The first son of Samuel carried on his fathers name. He was born incarried on his fathers name. He was born in 1714. He was considered a gentleman and1714. He was considered a gentleman and became a captain in the militia. He served asbecame a captain in the militia. He served as a Juror, grand Juror, Supervisor of the roadsa Juror, grand Juror, Supervisor of the roads and on the committee for public safety. Theand on the committee for public safety. The latter organization grew out of the ‘Provinciallatter organization grew out of the ‘Provincial congress’ over whichcongress’ over which John HancockJohn Hancock presided. For eight years he was apresided. For eight years he was a delegate to the provincial ‘Congress’.delegate to the provincial ‘Congress’.
  • 55. Roberts son SamuelRoberts son Samuel  Robert's son Samuel moved to Topsfield where heRobert's son Samuel moved to Topsfield where he became an influential member of that community holdingbecame an influential member of that community holding several offices of trust. He married Rebecca, daughter ofseveral offices of trust. He married Rebecca, daughter of John Curtis. He is credited with a previous marriage butJohn Curtis. He is credited with a previous marriage but the record is not clear whether it was this Samuel or not.the record is not clear whether it was this Samuel or not. He was a carpenter by trade, but also was a land ownerHe was a carpenter by trade, but also was a land owner and spent much of his time tilling the soil. His son,and spent much of his time tilling the soil. His son, Samuel, Jr., paternal great-grandfather of Joseph andSamuel, Jr., paternal great-grandfather of Joseph and Hyrum Smith was born January 26, 1714, spent theHyrum Smith was born January 26, 1714, spent the greater part of his life in the service of the people. Atgreater part of his life in the service of the people. At various times he served as grand juryman, roadvarious times he served as grand juryman, road supervisor, assessor and selectman, moderator,supervisor, assessor and selectman, moderator, representative to the General Court,representative to the General Court,
  • 56. Roberts son SamuelRoberts son Samuel  House of Representatives, town clerk,House of Representatives, town clerk, member of the committee of safety frommember of the committee of safety from 1779 to 1785, delegate to the Provincial1779 to 1785, delegate to the Provincial Congress at Concord in 1774 and 1775;Congress at Concord in 1774 and 1775; and was chairman of the tea committee inand was chairman of the tea committee in 1773 when disputes arose with the Mother1773 when disputes arose with the Mother Country over taxation. He served in theCountry over taxation. He served in the Revolution and it is recorded of him thatRevolution and it is recorded of him that he gave service as follows:he gave service as follows:
  • 57. Roberts son SamuelRoberts son Samuel  "Samuel Smith, Private Capt. Benjamin"Samuel Smith, Private Capt. Benjamin Gould's Co., Col. Wade's regiment;Gould's Co., Col. Wade's regiment; entered service July 6, 1780, dischargedentered service July 6, 1780, discharged Oct. 18, 1780; service three months 17Oct. 18, 1780; service three months 17 days, including 12 days (240 miles) traveldays, including 12 days (240 miles) travel home; regiment raised in Essex Co. tohome; regiment raised in Essex Co. to reinforce the Continental Army for tworeinforce the Continental Army for two months. Roll dated Topsfield, Mass.months. Roll dated Topsfield, Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in the RevolutionarySoldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary War, Vol. XIV, p. 537War, Vol. XIV, p. 537
  • 58. John Hancock and Joseph WarrenJohn Hancock and Joseph Warren  1. This was a patriotic organization that grew out of the1. This was a patriotic organization that grew out of the "provincial congress" movement, that had John Hancock"provincial congress" movement, that had John Hancock for president. Dr. Joseph Warren, the hero of Bunker Hill,for president. Dr. Joseph Warren, the hero of Bunker Hill, was chairman of the committee. It was made the duty ofwas chairman of the committee. It was made the duty of the committee to collect military stores, with power to callthe committee to collect military stores, with power to call out the militia (Fiske's American Revolution, I.,out the militia (Fiske's American Revolution, I., Cambridge edition, p. 129; History of the United States,Cambridge edition, p. 129; History of the United States, Morris, p. 189); in a word, to prepare for the impendingMorris, p. 189); in a word, to prepare for the impending revolution. Feeling surprised that the "Committee ofrevolution. Feeling surprised that the "Committee of Safety" should have been perpetuated in Topsfield,Safety" should have been perpetuated in Topsfield, according to the town records-from which the aboveaccording to the town records-from which the above information was obtained-a letter was written to Mr.information was obtained-a letter was written to Mr. George Francis Dow, secretary of the Topsfield HistoricalGeorge Francis Dow, secretary of the Topsfield Historical Society, which elicited the following answer, bearing dateSociety, which elicited the following answer, bearing date of April 28th, 1909:of April 28th, 1909:
  • 59. John Hancock and Joseph WarrenJohn Hancock and Joseph Warren  B. H. Roberts, A Comprehensive History of The Church of JesusB. H. Roberts, A Comprehensive History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 6 vols., 1:, p.16Christ of Latter-day Saints, 6 vols., 1:, p.16  "Committees of Correspondence were organized as early as May,"Committees of Correspondence were organized as early as May, 1764. The first one being in Massachusetts. At the beginning the1764. The first one being in Massachusetts. At the beginning the correspondence concerned a federation of colonies, but as thecorrespondence concerned a federation of colonies, but as the Revolution drew near the towns appointed 'Committees ofRevolution drew near the towns appointed 'Committees of Correspondence' to keep in touch with the central committeeCorrespondence' to keep in touch with the central committee located at Boston. This central committee early in 1775 was styledlocated at Boston. This central committee early in 1775 was styled 'The Committee of Safety and Correspondence for Boston,' and'The Committee of Safety and Correspondence for Boston,' and similar committees in all the other towns in the province shortlysimilar committees in all the other towns in the province shortly began to adopt the name 'Committee of Safety.' That "Topsfield'sbegan to adopt the name 'Committee of Safety.' That "Topsfield's Committee" continued to be elected until March, 1785, is notCommittee" continued to be elected until March, 1785, is not surprising. The war was not over until the spring of 1783 andsurprising. The war was not over until the spring of 1783 and political conditions were in a very unsettled situation for severalpolitical conditions were in a very unsettled situation for several years. The committee was in a way the mouthpiece of the centralyears. The committee was in a way the mouthpiece of the central agency at Boston, and in turn represented the influence and politicalagency at Boston, and in turn represented the influence and political power of the town, as a unit in the government of the state."power of the town, as a unit in the government of the state."