Chronology of the Restoration Updated July 2013

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Fall 2013 Logan Institute of Religion Church History Class and LDS World Travel Mormon and LDS Church History Tour July 2013

Fall 2013 Logan Institute of Religion Church History Class and LDS World Travel Mormon and LDS Church History Tour July 2013

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  • 1. 1 Church History Chronology and Stories Complied and Adapted by Doug Maughan Ed.D. For Religion 341-Spring 2013 Introduction [BYU Studies – Joseph Smith Chronology] Joseph Smith lived a remarkable life. His experiences were expansive, as evidenced in this chronology that introduces readers to the energetic pace and broad scope of concerns that characterized his daily activities. His endeavors ranged from the normal and mundane to the unpredictable and sublime. This chronology sheds light on the Prophet in the following areas: Personal Life, Visions and Revelations, Writings, Ecclesiastical Duties, Legal Events, Travels, and Political Events. Seeing his life as a single sequence helps readers to place the events of his life in context and to uncover various connections and patterns. This chronology lists events that can be tied to specific days or weeks. Of course, other events could be added, including many that cannot be tied down to specific dates. Each entry contains a brief summary along with references for further information. These sources are historical documents, most of which have been published, though a few reside only in archives. A close examination of this chronology yields interesting insights. For example, on December 25, 1832, Joseph Smith received a revelation (D&C 87) containing prophecies about wars, most notably the forthcoming American Civil War. Only three days later, the revelation known as the “Olive Leaf” (portions of D&C 88) was received, containing “the Lord’s message of peace to us.” On June 29, 1840, William W. Phelps wrote a letter to the Prophet, admitting the wrongs he had committed against him and asking for his forgiveness. Less than two weeks later, on July 11, Joseph Smith gave instructions to the high council
  • 2. 2 about how to conduct disciplinary councils. Even if a cause-and-effect relationship cannot always be established between such events, these juxtapositions and continuities are revealing. The color-coding in this chronology helps categorize the Prophet’s activities and shows trends during these years. For example, in 1834, travel dominated Joseph’s life, as he was involved with Zion’s Camp; in 1835, entries related to Ecclesiastical Duties and writing activities occupied his life. In other years, such as 1842, his life was filled with a balance of activities from his many responsibilities. To see these trends in the color-coded categories presents a picture that mere words cannot convey. The outside margins of this chronology contain information to help place the Prophet in his era [entries are coded in black]. Some of these entries list his contemporaries, including several prominent politicians (Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson), notable writers (Victor Hugo, Edgar Allan Poe), composers (Ludwig van Beethoven, Johann Strauss), artists (Carl Heinrich Bloch, George Catlin), scientists (Charles Darwin, James Joule), and philosophers (Georg Hegel, William James). Other entries highlight inventions from the early nineteenth century (the lawnmower was patented in 1830 and the ice cream freezer in 1843). These innovations had their beginnings in Joseph Smith’s time. Still other entries note nineteenth-century historical events, such as the deciphering of Egyptian hieroglyphs using the Rosetta Stone in 1822, the incorporation of the city of Chicago in 1837 (three years before the incorporation of Nauvoo), or the forced relocation of the Cherokees on the Trail of Tears beginning in May 1838 (just months before Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs issued the Extermination Order to remove the Mormons from Missouri). Though much of this supplemental information can be found in history books and on the Internet, Chad M. Orton and William W. Slaughter have published a readily accessible and highly recommended study of Joseph Smith’s era that discusses many topics such as these.1 As extensive as this chronology already is, it is still a work in progress. A few dates and locations differ from what has been published in traditional histories because we have relied on primary sources for such information. Moreover, dozens of scholars are busily researching the Prophet’s life in connection with the Joseph Smith Papers Project. The series seeks to compile, annotate, and publish all known documents the Prophet wrote, dictated, or signed his name to. This research has located new documents and has added to our understanding of Church history. As further work is done, perhaps scholars will be able to pinpoint the dates of many other events in Joseph’s life for which reliable information is lacking today. 1 Chad M. Orton and William W. Slaughter, Joseph Smith’s America: His Life and Times (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005).
  • 3. 3 And earlier version of this Joseph Smith chronology was published at josephsmith.byu.edu in connection with the celebration of his bicentennial in 2005. On that website, still available, readers can search entries by day, month, and year. Also visitors may elect to receive daily emails showing Joseph Smith’s activities for that day. This issue of BYU Studies contains an updated and enhanced version of the online chronology. For example, a sampling of the Prophet’s many legal encounters has been added, stemming from the recent research by the editors of the forthcoming legal volumes in the Joseph Smith Papers—Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, John W. Welch, Morris A. Thurston, and Joseph I. Bentley. We express appreciation also to the Joseph Smith Papers Project, Dean C. Jessee, Larry C. Porter, Scott H. Faulring, Kelsey Draper Lambert, Alex Smith, Joseph Darowski, Kay Darowski, and many staff members at BYU Studies for their work on this chronology. “The fingerprints of God on the parchment of history, reveal a love story, fraught with enough faith, sacrifice and divine intervention, to ignite an everlasting flame of gratitude, and patriotism in the hearts of all who seek to understand the invisible hand of divine providence.” (Douglas Maughan , CES Utah North Area Inservice June 26, 2002) “I have always thought it helpful to the student to have an overview of the entire course to begin with. If he has an overview of the course or the subject, then the teacher can go back and fill in the details and a lot more will be taught. ♦ Teach Ye Diligently, Boyd K. Packer, 119 Ca. 1000 B.C. First Old Testament writings 300 B.C. Septuagint (Translation of the Old Testament into Greek) 130 B.C.
  • 4. 4 The Hebrew language stops being used by the masses. Only the highly educated can read the Old Testament in Hebrew. The first major Bible translation is done. The Old Testament is translated into the language of the day, Greek. This translation is called, “The Septuagint.” This is the Bible most in the first century probably read, including Jesus. 50 B.C. Old Testament Canon Established 0-33AD The Life and Ministry of Jesus Christ He organized a church with a “foundation of the apostles and prophets” ♦ Ephesians 2:20, Articles of Faith 6; JST Eph. 2:18-19; Eph. 4:11-14 33 AD Martyrdom of the Apostles ♦ The Great Apostasy, James Talmage; Foxe’s Book of Christian Martyrs Judas committed suicide (Matt. 27:3-5) 54 AD Philip was scourged thrown into prison and afterwards crucified at Heliopolis in Phyrgia 60 AD Matthew was slain with a Halberd (battle axe) at Nadabah Ehtiopia
  • 5. 5 ? James the Less was beaten and stoned by the Jews and had his brains dashed out with a fullers club ? Matthias (chosen to replace Judas) was stoned at Jerusalem, then beheaded ? Andrew (brother of Peter) was crucified at Edessa After 65 AD Mark was dragged to pieces in the streets of Alexandria 64-65 AD Peter crucified upside down in Rome Spring 65 AD Paul was beheaded at Rome by order of Nero 72 AD Thaddeus Crucified (Brother of James) at Edessa ?
  • 6. 6 Matthew was beaten and crucified by impatient idolaters of India ? Thomas (called Didimus) preached in Parthia and India where exciting the rage of pagan priests, he was thrust through with a spear. ? Luke is supposed to have been hanged on an olive tree by the idolatrous priests of Greece. 74 AD Simon Zelotes was Crucified in Britain 73 AD Barnabas (we have no details) 90’s A.D. The last book of the New Testament, Revelation, is completed by John on the island of Patmos. The Old and New Testament are now complete. 100-382 A.D. The Gospel spreads like wild fire throughout the known world. These people all need the Bible. Hand-written copies of the New Testament in Greek are produced all over the world to try to keep up with all the new followers of Christ. Over 20,000 of these copies exist to this day.
  • 7. 7 Still Alive John (see D&C 7) - History tells us that the venerable Apostle John who wrote the Book of Revelation, was sentenced by the Emperor Domitian of the Roman Empire, to be scalded to death in a cauldron of boiling oil; that this cruel sentence was carried out as fully as it was in the power of men to execute it. The cauldron of oil was heated to boiling heat, and the great apostle was submerged in the scalding fluid, but through Divine interposition he was delivered like Daniel from the “lion’s den,” and Shadrach, Meshack and Abednego from the “fiery furnace,” by the power of that God, whom he served and obeyed; so that he suffered no harm and simply looked like he had been anointed. The cruel Emperor was so enraged at this wonderful deliverance, that he instantly sentenced the doomed Apostle to banishment on the Isle of Patmos. ♦ Elder C.W.Stayner, Journal of Discourses, Vol. 20, 205; 100-1820 AD Evidences of the Great Apostasy Rejection and Removal of Priesthood Keys The Bible Ends and Manuscripts Corrupted Absence of Spiritual Gifts Primitive Church Organization lost Evils of the Great and Abominable Church Unenlightened kingdoms of the earth Retrogression of Civilization and Science 100-200 AD The Bible Ends and Manuscripts Corrupted During this long period of confusion Christianity could only be taught from handwritten manuscripts, which had been translated and laboriously copied from other languages than
  • 8. 8 those with which the translator was familiar. It is unreasonable to suppose that at a much later period these manuscripts could be collected together, again translated and written by hand into our own language without error, or deviation from the original. ♦ Anthony W. Ivins, Relationship of "Mormonism" and Freemasonry, 64 How we Lost the Plain and Precious Truths: 24 And the angel of the Lord said unto me: Thou hast beheld that the book proceeded forth from the mouth of a Jew; and when it proceeded forth from the mouth of a Jew it contained the fulness of the gospel of the Lord, of whom the twelve apostles bear record; and they bear record according to the truth which is in the Lamb of God. 25 Wherefore, these things go forth from the Jews in purity unto the Gentiles, according to the truth which is in God. 26 And after they go forth by the hand of the twelve apostles of the Lamb, from the Jews unto the Gentiles, thou seest the formation of that great and abominable church, which is most abominable above all other churches; for behold, they have taken away from the gospel of the Lamb many parts which are plain and most precious; and also many covenants of the Lord have they taken away. 27 And all this have they done that they might pervert the right ways of the Lord, that they might blind the eyes and harden the hearts of the children of men. 28 Wherefore, thou seest that after the book hath gone forth through the hands of the great and abominable church, that there are many plain and precious things taken away from the book, which is the book of the Lamb of God.1 Nephi 13:24-27 (Ehartman Misquoting Jesus, Margret Barker- We have seen this pattern of uninspired purge before in the time of Josiah…) Promise of the Lord- 56 Thou shalt ask, and my scriptures shall be given as I have appointed, and they shall be preserved in safety; (D&C 42:56) Emma also carried with her the manuscripts of Joseph's translation of the Bible carried in two cotton bags and tied under her long skirt which she received from Ann Scott. Ann had received the manuscripts from the Prophet's secretary James Mulholland (James giving the manuscripts to Ann in hopes the mobs wouldn't search her).
  • 9. 9 Understanding of Heavenly Fathers Plan was lost Baptism for the Dead (Moses 1:39) Whatever its source, the ancient church received it gladly, as it did another Jewish text attributed to Jeremiah and quoted by Justin and (no less than five times) by Irenaeus: "The Lord God hath remembered his dead among those of Israel who have been laid in the place of burial, and has gone down to announce to them the tidings of his salvation." ♦ Justin, Dialogue with Trypho 4, 6; in PG 6:645; Irenaeus, Against Heresies III, 20, 4; in PG 7:945; IV, 22; in PG 7:1046; IV, 33, 1; in PG 7:1208; it is also cited by Jerome, Commentarius in Evangelium Mattheum (Commentary on Matthew) 4, 27; in PL 26: 213. The Christians angrily accused the Jews of having expunged this passage from their scripture in order to damage the Christian cause, from which it would appear that the doctrine of salvation for the dead was a major issue in those early times, and a most precious possession of the church. ♦ Justin, Dialogue with Trypho 4, 6; in PC 6:645; cf. Jerome, Commentary on Matthew 4, 27; in PL 26:213. 150 AD Ptolemy: The earth is the center of the universe, and the sun and moon revolve around it. Such was the authoritative pronouncement of Ptolemy about 150 AD. His declaration was universally accepted. But there was one major problem: he was wrong absolutely wrong. Nonetheless, this theory of an earth centered universe flourished for fourteen hundred years as “gospel truth”. ♦ Tad Callister, The Inevitable Apostasy and Promised Restoration, 1, note p. 404-05. Pope Paul V declared, “That the earth moves daily is absurd, philosophically false and theologically at least erroneous in faith. J. Rueben Clark added, “this decree of Paul V was confirmed by Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644)” [On the Way to Immortality and Eternal Life, 337]. Even Martin Luther a opposed Copernicus and supported the Catholic viewpoint: “People give ear to an upstart astrologer who strove to show the earth revolves , not the heavens of firmament, the sun and the moon… This fool wishes to reverse the entire scheme of
  • 10. 10 astrology; but sacred scripture tells us that Joshua commanded the sun to stand still not the earth.” ♦ Manchester, A World Lit Only By Fire, 117 “Darkness shall cover the earth and gross darkness the people” (Isa. 60:2). For centuries, disease was rampant and poverty reigned. The Black Death killed some 50 million people during the 14th century. Was not this a season of terrible peril? I wonder how humanity survived. But somehow, in that long season of darkness, a candle was lighted. The age of Renaissance brought with it a flowering of learning, art, and science. There came a movement of bold and courageous men and women who looked heavenward in acknowledgment of God and His divine Son. We speak of it as the Reformation.” ♦ President Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Dawning of a Brighter Day,” Ensign (CR), May 2004, 81 June 325 Council of Nicea - Emperor Constantine called the Nicea Council, held way back in 325 A.D. when 318 bishops spent four weeks in discussion and debate over the divinity and personality of Jesus Christ and God. Think of that! Their minds were confused and corrupted or else they would have followed the simple teachings of the scriptures and there would have been no need of their spending four weeks in debate to decide that question. The Creed of Nicea, the "incomprehensible mystery" of which its originators seemed so proud precisely because it could not be understood, substituted for the personal God of love and for Jesus of the New Testament an immaterial abstraction. 350 AD New Testament Canon Established 382-1500 AD The known world eventually stops using the Greek language in favor of Latin. In 405 A.D. Jerome translates the entire Bible into Latin in Bethlehem, it is known as the Vulgate. The Vulgate is the all-time most used Bible translation in human history. Used more than the original Greek and the King James Version.
  • 11. 11 400-800 AD It is a well known historical fact that from about 400 to 800 A. D., a period known as the Dark Ages…there was a retrocession in the civilization of the Old World. Schools became almost extinct, war was continuous, literature was forgotten, priceless records were willfully destroyed, a chaotic condition pervaded the civilized world. Both the church and state were drunken with debauchery, licentiousness and unbridled ambition. During these centuries of confusion many different religious organizations, each professing to be the Church of Christ, had their origin. This confused condition continued until the period of the Renaissance, or Rebirth of Europe, under Henry I of Saxony, first of the Saxon kings. Anthony W. Ivins, Relationship of "Mormonism" and Freemasonry, 64 Retrogression of Civilization European sewage and sanitation regressed back to primitivism during this era. Human waste products were often thrown out the window and into the street or simply dumped in local rivers. (By contrast, ancient Rome had been significantly more advanced: “major cities of the Empire installed drainage systems to which latrines were connected”—and the “wealthy enjoyed such luxuries as indoor plumbing . . . even the indigent had access to public baths.”) With the streets strewn with garbage and running with urine and feces—and with the same horrifying conditions permeating the rivers and streams from which drinking water was drawn—vermin and germs multiplied, and disease of every kind, untreatable by the primitive medical knowledge of the day, proliferated. A Florentine writer of the era referred to it simply as “the exterminating of humanity.” Finally, the early Middle Ages witnessed a stupefying decline in levels of education and literacy from the Roman period. In the endemic warfare of the period, human beings lost the skill of writing and, largely, of reading. “In the time of Augustine’s youth [4th century AD] . . . even a Christian got a reasonably good classical education. A few generations later, literacy was a rarity even among the ruling classes.” For example, during the 8th century, Charlemagne maintained that even the clergy knew insufficient Latin to understand the Bible or to properly conduct Church services. ♦ Andrew Bernstein, The Tragedy of Theology: How Religion Caused and Extended the Dark Ages A Critique of Rodney Stark’s The Victory of Reason
  • 12. 12 "Beyond the city walls, lawlessness reigned absolute. . . Highwaymen plied their trade . . . with near impunity. Soldiers, when not engaged in Crusades, dynastic feuds, or papal ambitions, periodically swelled the ranks of highwaymen. Only walls provided a town with effective protection against its lawless environs. Since walls were expensive, town life crammed itself into as little space as possible. The streets, nothing more than narrow, open sewers, teemed with townspeople and disease; the first demographers documented death rates from infectious diseases that were twice as high inside the walls as they were outside. "Most people lived in tiny villages and worked small adjacent fields. Not until 1500 did farmers clear the wolf-infested forests. Everyone, from toddlers to the aged, performed backbreaking field work, usually unaided by the plow. Until A.D. 900, it was the rare peasant who could afford to harness horses and oxen with collars for fieldwork. "The squalor of medieval dwellings was unimaginable. According to the greatest of all Renaissance humanists, Erasmus of Rotterdam, 'Almost all the floors are of clay and rushes from the marshes, so carelessly renewed that the foundation sometimes remains for twenty years, harboring, there below, spittle and vomit and wine of dogs and men, beer . . . remnants of fishes, and other filth unnamable. Hence, with the change of weather, a vapor exhales which in my judgment is far from wholesome.' "Families slept together in one foul bed, and chimneys were almost unknown. Soot covered the walls of all but the newest huts. Lack of proper exhaust resulted in house fires that brought roaring death to large numbers of villagers, particularly women, who, clad in highly flammable dresses, tended wood-fired pits and stoves. "The past few paragraphs describe the circumstances of peasants who were relatively well-off. The less fortunate had little or no shelter at all. In the subsistence-level pre-modern society, famine and pestilence knocked constantly at the door. During times of extreme famine, cannibalism was not unknown; travelers were occasionally killed for their flesh, and there were even reports of gallows being attacked for sustenance. "Pestilence regularly engulfed the continent. The most famous episode occurred in 1347 . . . Within a few decades it [bubonic plague] had killed nearly one in three Europeans.” ♦ William Berenstien, Birth of Plenty 597 AD St. Augustine of Canterbury lands at Kent
  • 13. 13 700 AD The Psalms and some of the Gospels are the first to be translated in a new language called English. 735 AD On the day he died a man named Venerable Bede finishes the first complete translation of a New Testament book into English (the book of John). 1066 AD Norman Invasion 1213 AD King John of England Surrenders to the Pope
  • 14. 14 The Reformation and Age of Discovery A Candle lit in Darkness (No Modern light)… Prelude to the Restoration—Eph. 1:9-10; D&C 5:10; Dan. 2:44; Moses 7:58-62; 1 Ne. 13:10, 13, 15-16, 17, 18-20; 1 Ne. 13:35-40; 1 Ne.14:25-26; D&C 107:56; Ether 3:25-26; Joel 2:28-29; Isa. 2:1-2; Isa. 29; Isa. 49:1; Dan 7; Ezekiel 37:15-17; Gen. 49:26 1225-1274 Thomas Aquinas , the supreme theologian of Catholicism, was born near Naples in 1225 to a noble family, he was enrolled in the Benedictine monastery of Monte Cassino at the tender age of five, and at seventeen became a Dominican novice. Soon after this he was kid- napped and detained for nearly two years by his own brothers. At the instigation of his mother, they tried to turn him away from his vocation, and even tempted him with a woman. He drove her from his room with a brand snatched from the fire. After more than a year and a half of captivity, it became apparent that he would not relent, and he was released back to the Dominicans. After studies in Naples and Paris he was appointed as a master at the University of Paris in 1257. His period of writing was a brief sixteen years, but extraordinarily productive. On December 6 1273, while celebrating mass in the chapel of St Nicholas in Naples, he had a heavenly revelation: “I can do no more. Such things have been revealed to me that all that I have written seems to me as so much straw.” From that day he wrote no more. He died shortly afterwards, on March 7, 1274, at the age of 49. (Consider also Galileo, see Eph. 1:9-10; D&C 5:9-10) 1269 The Age of Discovery: The Polos stayed in Kubilai's court for a year- answering his questions about the rulers of Europe and the Christian religion. Kubilai Khan became sufficiently intrigued by Christianity to dispatch them back to Europe with a request to the Pope for 100 doctors of divinity to teach him and his people about this strange religion. In addition the Khan, who was a great collector of religious relics of all kinds, asked them to bring back a sample of holy oil from
  • 15. 15 Jerusalem. When the Polos arrived back in Europe they found that Pope Gregory had died and the religious situation was in a disarray. Finally after numerous arrangements for acquiring religious instructors fell through, the brothers concluded they had no choice but to return to Cathay and explain their failure to the Khan. However, according to researcher Richard Humble, they were able to obtain the holy oil he had requested, a feat which much impressed the Khan and deepened his trust in them (Marco Polo 111). 1305 “Babylonian Captivity” of the Papacy begins 1316-1334 The Sale of Indulgences Under John XXII "Bishops and cardinals amassed fabulous fortunes from the sale of tithes and indulgences. . . . John XXII, who wore the papal tiara from 1316 to 1334, exhibited a legendary appetite for gold cloth and fur. [that's right - cloth made of gold!] Noble families purchased appointments to the priesthood for small children, and twenty-year-old archbishops were not unknown. Of 624 papal dispensations of legitimacy granted in 1342-43, 484 went to the offspring of clergy. In parts of sixteenth-century England, the clergy were indicted for almost a quarter of all sex crimes, more than ten times their proportion of the population. From Birth of Plenty, 33-34 1327 Accession of Edward the III 1328
  • 16. 16 Birth of John Wycliffe born in the village of Hipswell in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England. 1329-84 John Wycliffe—English reformer who opposed the Catholic Church and the doctrine of transubstantiation. He felt that priests were not needed to mediate with God for people and initiated the translation of the Latin Vulgate Bible into English. (The Wycliffe Bible) Vernacular Bible Some paid whatever they could for the scriptures in English, “to taste the sweetness of God’s Holy Word…Some paid more, some paid less: some gave a load of hay for few chapters of St. Paul or St. James. Thousands (perhaps tens of Thousands) read of went into secret readings of them. . . . (Benson Bobrick, Wide as the Waters, The Story of the English Bible and the Revolution it Inspired, 73) 1338 Hundred years war begins 1347-1350 The Bubonic Plague—Between 1347 and 1350, for example, the bubonic plague—the infamous “Black Death”—spread by the fleas that infest rats, ravaged Western Europe, obliterating roughly 20 million people, fully one-third of the human population. Norman Cantor, the leading contemporary historian of the Middle Ages, states: “The Black Death of 1348–49 was the greatest biomedical disaster in European and possibly in world history.” 1374-1415
  • 17. 17 Jan Hus—Was a Martyr for the cause of reformation and Czech Nationalism. Stressed the role of scripture as authoritative for doctrine; defended the clergy but taught that only God can forgive sin. He condemned the corruptness of the clergy and the sale of indulgences. He embraced the teachings of Wycliffe and taught the gospel as he understood it from the scriptures. He was burned at the stake because of his religious beliefs, proclaiming "What I taught with my lips I now seal with my blood."2 . (Elder M. Russell Ballard, The Tapestry of God’s Hand Joseph Smith Memorial Fireside, Logan Institute of Religion – February 13, 2011) 1378 Great Schism begins 1381 Peasants’ revolt 1382-84 John Wycliffe, a theology professor at Oxford, is fired for believing the Bible rather than the Pope is our ultimate authority. Because of this conviction Wycliffe and his followers produced the first complete Bible in English. Wycliffe died of a stroke the same year his Bible was completed. The Wycliffe Bible is a translation from the Latin Vulgate. Associates of Wycliffe, after his death, finish his translation. The Church at the time said only the priests can rightly interpret the Bible so it was illegal to have the Bible in a language other than Latin. Many of Wycliffe’s associates were burned at the stake with their English translations tied around their necks. 1395 Wycliffe Bible Second Edition 2 see Martyrs, 140-143
  • 18. 18 1401 Act De Haeretico Comburendo; (2 Hen.4 c.15) was a law passed by Parliament under King Henry IV of England in 1401, punishing heretics with burning at the stake. This law was one of the strictest religious censorship statutes ever enacted in England. The statute declared there were "...divers false and perverse people of a certain new sect...they make and write books, they do wickedly instruct and inform people...and commit subversion of the said catholic faith". The sect alluded to is the Lollards, followers of John Wycliffe. De heretico comburendo urged "...that this wicked sect, preachings, doctrines, and opinions, should from henceforth cease and be utterly destroyed...", and declared "...that all and singular having such books or any writings of such wicked doctrine and opinions, shall really with effect deliver or cause to be delivered all such books and writings to the diocesan of the same place within forty days from the time of the proclamation of this ordinance and statute." "And if any person...such books in the form aforesaid do not deliver, then the diocesan of the same place in his diocese such person or persons in this behalf defamed or evidently suspected and every of them may by the authority of the said ordinance and statute cause to be arrested...". If they failed to abjure their "heretical" beliefs, or relapsed after an initial abjuration, they would "...be burnt, that such punishment may strike fear into the minds of others..."( Text of the Statutes of the Realm, 2:12S-28: 2 Henry IV). 1408 A law is passed in England banning the translation of the Bible into English. 1412 Joan of Arc—It was around 1424, when she was 12, that Joan said she began to have visions. ♦ James E. Faust, “Personal Epiphanies,” Fireside address was given at Brigham Young University on 7 January 1996.
  • 19. 19 1415 Council of Constance condemns Wycliffe as a heretic –They gave orders for his bones to be dug up and burned; Jan Hus is burned at the stake. The Council of Constance declared Wycliffe (on 4 May 1415) a stiff-necked heretic and under the ban of the Church. It was decreed that his books be burned and his remains be exhumed. The exhumation was carried out in 1428 when, at the command of Pope Martin V, his remains were dug up, burned, and the ashes cast into the River Swift, which flows through Lutterworth. 1428 – 1444 Years after Wycliffe died his bones were exhumed and burned for having translated the Bible into English (they were really mad). “To Lutterworth they come, Sumner, Commissarie, Official, Chancellour, Proctors, Doctors, and the Servants … take, what was left, out of the grave, and burnt them to ashes, and cast them into Swift a Neighbouring Brook running hard by. Thus this Brook hath conveyed his ashes into Avon; Avon into Severn; Severn into the narrow Seas; they, into the main Ocean. And thus the Ashes of Wickliff are the Emblem of his Doctrine, which now, is dispersed all the World over.” To make sure the skull and bones were burned to ashes, the executioner broke them up with a mattock. At last the ashes were carefully swept into a barrow and taken to the little bridge and cast into the Swift, a tributary of the Avon.The vexation was deep. And old The Catholic Church understood exactly what Wycliffe’s presence meant, that there was something insidious and unstoppable about this trouble making little man. (David Teems, Majestie: The King behind the King James Bible, P.220-222) 1440-1455 Johannes Gutenberg invents the Printing Press with moveable type. It is no longer necessary to make hand-written copies of the Bible.
  • 20. 20 1453 Fall of Constantinople to the Turks 1455 First printing of the Latin Bible with moveable type. 1456 Gutenberg Bible—A Latin Bible produced at Mainz, Germany. First book produced in moveable metal type. First bible that could be mass produced. Within just fifty years of his first press, over twelve million books had been printed in more than one thousand print shops. Five years after his invention , he was forced into bankruptcy. He died in relative obscurity about ten years later. ♦ Keith Wilson, From Gutenburg to Grandin, Prelude to the Restoration, 269-285 1483-1546 Martin Luther—Great German Reformer. In 1517 the spirit of Christ moved upon a Catholic priest living in Germany. Martin Luther was among the growing number of thoughtful clergymen who were disturbed by how far the church had strayed from the gospel as taught by Christ. Luther created a good deal of controversy when he publicly called for reformation by posting on his church door in Wittenberg a list of issues that he felt needed to be debated. He organized a church that abolished confession, and he translated the New Testament into German while in exile. Spoke against Holy Relics and worshipping saints. When Luther was ordered to give up his work, he boldly declared: “Unless I be refuted by Scriptural testimonies, or by clear arguments—for I believe neither the Pope nor the councils alone, since it is clear that they have often erred and contradicted one another—I am convinced by the passages of Scripture, which I have cited, and my conscience is bound in the word of God. I cannot and will not recant anything; since it is insecure and dangerous to act against conscience.” He died from an illness following exposure to icy weather. Martyrs, 159-166
  • 21. 21 Dieter F. Uchtdorph In fact, my son recently discovered that one of our family lines connects back to Martin Luther himself. 1481-1808 Martyrdom of Rank and file Christians 4 And it came to pass that I saw among the nations of the Gentiles the formation of a great church. 5 And the angel said unto me: Behold the formation of a church which is most abominable above all other churches, which slayeth the saints of God, yea, and tortureth them and bindeth them down, and yoketh them with a yoke of iron, and bringeth them down into captivity. 6 And it came to pass that I beheld this great and abominable church; and I saw the devil that he was the founder of it. 7 And I also saw gold, and silver, and silks, and scarlets, and fine-twined linen, and all manner of precious clothing; and I saw many harlots. 340,0000 tortured; 32,000 burned at the stake; nations captive to false doctrine and priest- crafts . . .♦ E. Ward, The Hand of Providence, 121 1484-1531 Huldreich Zwingli—Swiss reformer. Died in battle against the Catholics, he rejected much of Catholicism and Lutheranism, he believed that Christ was spiritually present at the Eucharist and that the secular ruler had a right to act in church matters. 1492-1536 William Tyndale— Educated at Oxford and Cambridge, he felt the only way to bring his countrymen to an understanding of the word of God was "if the Scripture were turned into the vulgar speech, that the poor people might read and see the simple, plain Word of God." He was denounced as a heretic and fled to Germany to complete the English translation of
  • 22. 22 the Bible and have it printed. (Elder M. Russell Ballard, The Tapestry of God’s Hand Joseph Smith Memorial Fireside, Logan Institute of Religion – February 13, 2011) Sailing from Antwerp to Hamburg off the Coast of Holland, Tyndale lost the first five books of his Old Testament translation when he was shipwrecked. He had to start over. (Wilcox, Fire in the Bones; p.126) He was arrested near Brussels, Belgium, in 1535 and condemned by Sir Thomas Moore and the Church of England. He was imprisoned for 18 months before being strangled by the hangman and his body burned.3 William Tyndale, who gave us the first printed English Bible, was brought before the church after having been betrayed by a supposed friend, strangled, and then burned at the stake. Such has been the fate of many martyrs who have dared declare the truth to a bigoted and unbelieving world. Hugh Latimer & Bishop Ridley Perhaps you have heard of the valiant protestor by the name of Hugh Latimer. He was an English reformer who was educated at the University of Cambridge. He was tried and condemned. There was another protestor or reformer by the name of Bishop Ridley who was also tried and condemned. He and Bishop Latimer were brought together and asked to recant their cries for people to be able to read the Bible in their common language. They refused. While tied at the stake, their last recorded words were these as Bishop Latimer turned to his companion Bishop Ridley and said: "Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out." At that point, the wood was torched, and the two men gave their lives.4 He became very active in the promulgation of his ideas and the sale of his publications. The Church forbade the publication of the scriptures, declaring both the writings and doctrines taught by Tyndale to be heretic. His reply was: "I defy the Pope and all his laws," and 3 see Martyrs, 176-184 4 see Martyrs, 233-237
  • 23. 23 declared that if God would spare his life he would make the plow-boy to know more of the scriptures than the Pope himself knew. Reformers did not restore the gospel “Such were the teachings and lives of the great reformers. Their deeds were heroic, their contributions many, their sacrifices great—but they did not restore the gospel of Jesus Christ.” —President Thomas S. Monson, First Counselor in the First Presidency, “They Showed the Way,” Ensign, May 1997, 51. 1492 Christopher Columbus… “The spirit of God came down and wrought upon the man ♦ 1 Nephi 13 “The Lord was well disposed to my desire, and he bestowed upon me courage and understanding. Knowledge of . . . the Lord unlocked my mind, sent me upon the sea, and gave me fire for the deed. Those who heard of my enterprise called it foolish, mocked me and laughed. But who can doubt but that the Holy Ghost inspired me? ♦ Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., 1930, pp.19-20; 1 Ne.13 “God will cause thy name to be wonderfully resounded throughout the earth; and will give thee the keys to the ocean which are held with strong chains.” ♦ J. H. Ward, The Hand of Providence, 1883, 80 1517 October 31, 1517 A young Roman Catholic monk named Martin Luther challenges the church hierarchy of his day, like Wycliffe, by nailing his 95 theses to the church doors in Wittenberg, Germany. This act sparks the Protestant Reformation. Part of the reformation passion is allowing every person to read the Bible in their own language. Martin Luther translates the Bible into German for his country.
  • 24. 24 1488 Birth of Miles Coverdale Ca. 1495 Birth of William Tyndale 1509 Ascension of Henry the VIII 1509-64 John Calvin—Genevan reformer. He devoted much of his energy to settling differences with Protestantism; claimed that even before the Creation God chose some of his creations for salvation and others for destruction. 1505-72 John Knox—He helped awaken Scotland to Lutheranism; studied under Calvin; attacked the Papacy, the Mass and the Catholic Idolatry; consolidated the Scot’s reformation with his writings. 1516 Erasmus’ edition of the New Testament 1517 Publication of Luther’s thesis on indulgences
  • 25. 25 1522 Commentary—Pope Adrian VI to the Diet of Nuremburg “At every level of church life…there were signs of grave disorganization and decay.”…every thing could be obtained for money…however hurtful it might be to the general welfare of the Church”. ♦ Benson Bobrick, Wide as the Waters, The Story of the English Bible and the Revolution it Inspired, 31 8 And the angel spake unto me, saying: Behold the gold, and the silver, and the silks, and the scarlets, and the fine-twined linen, and the precious clothing, and the harlots, are the desires of this great and abominable church. 9 And also for the praise of the world do they destroy the saints of God, and bring them down into captivity. 1 Nephi 13:4 – 9 Francesco Petrarch (a devout Catholic) described the Papal court as, “a receptacle of all that is most wicked and abominable. What I tell you is not from hearsay, but from my own knowledge and experience. In this city there is no piety, no reverence or fear of God, no faith, no charity, nothing that is holy, just, equitable, or humane.” ♦ Benson Bobrick, Wide as the Waters, The Story of the English Bible and the Revolution it Inspired, 34 1524-25 Peasants’ war in Germany 1525 William Tyndale, educated at Oxford and Cambridge and fluent in at least 6 languages including ancient Hebrew and Greek, completes a translation of the New Testament into English. He flees England to complete his translation in the friendlier protestant land of Germany. This is the first English translation of the New Testament produced from the original Greek.
  • 26. 26 1529 Sir Thomas Moore becomes Chancellor of England 1530 Tyndale’s Pentateuch 1533 Henry the VIII marries Anne Boleyn; Thomas Cranmer becomes archbishop of Canterbury 1534 Act of Supremacy; The first Act of Supremacy was a piece of legislation that granted King Henry VIII of England Royal Supremacy, which means that he was declared the supreme head of the Church of England. It is still the legal authority of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Royal Supremacy is specifically used to describe the legal sovereignty of the civil laws over the laws of the Church in England. 1535 Thomas Cromwell becomes Chancellor; Coverdale’s Bible 1536 Tyndale famously says he wishes a plowboy to know as much about God as the Pope. Tyndale is burned at the stake for translating the Bible into English. His dying words are, “Lord, open the King of England’s eyes!” Tyndale’s translation was so good 90% of it would reappear in the King James Version (the King of England’s Version). 1537 Matthew’s Bible
  • 27. 27 1539 An English translation called The Great Bible appears to try to give churches at least one English Bible in their possession. It is named “Great” because of its very large size. Act of Six Articles. 1540 Execution of Thomas Cromwell 1543 Nicolaus Copernicus (German: Nikolaus Kopernikus; in his youth, Niclas Koppernigk; Polish: Mikołaj Kopernik; Italian: Nicolò Copernico; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance astronomer and the first to formulate a comprehensive heliocentric cosmology, which displaced the Earth from the center of the universe. 1546 Ann Askew There were women protestors who were heroic. You may have heard the name of Ann Askew. Ann Askew was the daughter of Sir William Askew, the Knight of Lincolnshire. Listen to what she said: "I had rather to read five lines in the Bible, than to hear five masses in the temple. . . because the one did greatly edify me, and the other nothing at all." The King sent one of his representatives with a pardon for her if she would recant her beliefs. She answered that she had not come to deny her Lord and Master. Ann Askew was burned at the stake in 1546. Martyrs, 228 1547 Accession of Edward the VI
  • 28. 28 1552 Book of Common Prayer 1553 Accession of Mary Tudor 1556 Cranmer Burned at the Stake 1559 Accession of Elizabeth I Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity 1560 The Geneva Bible becomes the first English Bible where the entire Bible (not just the New Testament) is translated from the original Greek AND Hebrew. It is also the first translation done by a committee of people. At the end of the 1500’s England was torn between two Bible translations. Most people used the Geneva Bible but the clergy felt it was below them to use the commoners Geneva Bible. A solution was needed. 1563 Thirty-nine Articles; John Foxe’s Book of Martyrs 1568 Bishops’ Bible
  • 29. 29 1582 Rheims (Douai) New Testament 1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scott’s 1603 Queen Elizabeth dies and King James VI, who had ruled Scotland for 37 years, becomes King James I of England. 1604 Hampton Court Conference; King James summons the religious leaders of England together to settle on a common English translation that can be used by both clergy and the masses. 47 men stationed at Oxford, Cambridge and Westminster Abbey worked on the translation from original Greek and Hebrew manuscripts. The translators, additionally, relied heavily on the Tyndale and Geneva Bibles. Nearly 90% of Tyndale’s New Testament translation was used in the King James Version. 1605 Gunpowder plot; Gunpowder Treason Plot, or the Jesuit Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby. 1607 Founding of Jamestown (The Light and the Glory) 1609-10
  • 30. 30 Douai Old Testament 1611 The King James Version, known in England as the Authorized Version, is published for the first time. The purpose of the translators was not to make an entirely new translation of the Bible but, “to make a good one better, or out of many good ones, one principal good one.” 1620 Pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock ; The Lord was writing the story of the restoration and the birth of this nation long before the ink was dry on the parchment of the Mayflower compact. Hidden among those signatures were men and women whose foreordained descendant’s would fulfill the prophecies of the ancients, revolutionize religious and political thought, and change the course of history forever. God had his eyes upon these families from before the foundations of the earth. One of Gordon B. Hinckley’s ancestors, Stephen Hopkins, sailed on the Mayflower in 1620; he was the fourth signature on the Mayflower compact. (Note: Thomas Hinckley, progenitor of President Hinckley, became governor of Plymouth colony.) Seven of Joseph Smith’s progenitors sailed with the Pilgrims on the Mayflower; three of the seven signed the Mayflower Compact which contained the words “in the Name of God”. This would prove the beginning of American Religious Democracy. The Saints had arrived at the Peninsula of Living Waters. The first Hinckley to arrive in America was Samuel Hinckley, in 1635, fifteen years after the Mayflower’s landing at Plymouth bay. Samuel’s son, Thomas, would become the Governor of the Plymouth Colony from 1681-1692. He was considered “a man of more than ordinary ability and influence.” ♦ Governors of New Plymouth, 202 During their Atlantic voyage, John, fifth great grandfather of the Prophet Joseph, narrowly escaped drowning at sea. During a violent storm, the Mayflower was pitching and rolling with the waves. Young John was walking above the gratings on deck, and his youthful body was hurled into the briny sea. “But it pleased God,” wrote the ‘Pilgrim Chronicler’ “that he caught hold of the top sail Hilliard’s which hung overboard.” Holding with a vice like grip to the rope, he was plunged into the water. In the fury of the storm he hung on until some of his friends managed to rescue him by pulling him back into the boat. For days he suffered
  • 31. 31 after this harrowing experience. The ship finally arrived in Cape Cod on a Saturday. However they did not disembark until Monday so they could worship God on Sunday, “Him whom they had come to trust and serve.” As a youth John Howland was a servant of John Carver, first governor of Plymouth colony. John Howland died at Plymouth in February 1673. In his words he described why he had come to America: “to keep a good conscience and to walk in such a way as God has prescribed in His words is the thing to which I prefer to life itself.” ♦ Walter C. Erdman, Sources of Power in Famous Lives, (Nashville Cokesbury Press, 1937) 1630 Founding of Boston 1631 The Wicked Bible, sometimes called The Adulterous Bible or The Sinners' Bible, is a term referring to the Bible published in 1631 by Robert Barker and Martin Lucas, the royal printers in London, which was meant to be a reprint of the King James Bible. The name is derived from the compositors' mistake: the word not in the sentence "Thou shalt not commit adultery" was omitted, thus changing the sentence into "Thou shalt commit adultery". 1632 John Lathrup arrested, fettered and confined to the Newgate prison in Egerton England. Reverend Lathrup was a minister in the town of Egerton in the early 17th century. When he could no longer assent to what was taught by the Church of England, he became the leader to a large group of “Seekers,” so called because they were seeking for the a religion which taught the faith of the ancients with apostles, prophets, the Holy Ghost and a fulness of the truths found in the scriptures. The seekers who followed Lathrup were called Independents. For eight years they met in London until the persecution got so bad they could no longer meet publicly. The hiding place of the Independents was discovered by the Bishop of London. During the beginning of the evening service of Rev. Lathrup, the officers of the state church of London rushed in and arrested Rev. Lathrup and 42 members of the Independent faith. They were fettered and taken to the old Clink Prison in Newgate. Two
  • 32. 32 years later all were released except Rev. Lathrup. While he languished in the filthy old prison his wife succumbed to a terminal sickness. He was allowed to see her before her death and provide tender comfort as she passed away. After his wife’s internment he returned to the loathsome confinement of the Clink Prison. His children were now left without a father or mother, orphaned, wretched and starving, and uncared for by the community, perhaps because of the threat of state reprisal. When their destitute circumstances were made known to the Bishop of London, he had sympathy on John and released him. Rev. Lathrup fled with his children to America where he could worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience. In New England he became widely known as the “Beloved Pastor.” ♦ Archibald F. Bennett, Lathrup Genealogy, The Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine, Salt Lake City, Utah: The Utah genealogical Society, April 1929, 49-51 1638 Robert Smith. Joseph Smith’s first paternal ancestor to leave England for America, arrived in Massachusetts ♦ Joseph Smith and the Restoration, 15 1660’s The King James Bible is not immediately a success. It takes 50 years for the King James to surpass the Geneva Bible as the English Bible used by most people. The King James Version has endured the test of time. It has been referred to as, “the single greatest monument to the English language.” What makes the King James so good? In one word, elegance. It is not the most accurate, but it is the most beautiful. Since 1611 the KJV has been “fixed” about 100,000 times to give us the translation of the KJV we have today. Almost all of these “fixes” are minor spelling and punctuation changes. It is impossible to gauge how many King James Bibles have been sold; estimates are simply in the hundreds of millions. The King James will be the leading English Bible translation for more than 300 years until being surpassed in the late 1900’s by the New International Version (NIV) 1669
  • 33. 33 John Mack, Joseph Smith’s first maternal ancestor to leave England for America, arrived in Massachusetts 1681-1692 Governor of Plymouth Colony is Thomas Hinckley, ancestor of Gordon B. Hinckley, who married Ruth Merrick, great grand-daughter of Stephen Hopkins who sailed on the Mayflower in 1620 at age 35. He was the fourteenth signer of the Mayflower compact. 1686 King James II revokes the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Charter and installs Sir Edmunds Andros as Governor. 1689 Bostonians force Governor Andros to resign 1734 First Awakening 1756-1763 Seven Years War (French and Indian War) drains the British Treasury 1761 James Otis argues against the writs of assistance in a court trial at the Old State House.
  • 34. 34 1763 Faneuil Hall is dedicated to the “Cause of Liberty” by Otis 1765 Stamp Act passed. The Stamp Act of 1765 (short title Duties in American Colonies Act 1765; 5 George III, c. 12) was the fourth Stamp Act to be passed by the Parliament of Great Britain and required all legal documents, permits, commercial contracts, newspapers wills, pamphlets, and playing cards in the American colonies to carry a tax stamp. The Act was enacted in order to defray the cost of maintaining the military presence protecting the colonies. Britain also needed money to repay the suppliers from the War, which had been very costly, even though Great Britain had been victorious in 1763 (see Treaty of Paris (1763). Riots occur in Boston and other cities. An effigy of the stamp agent, Andrew Oliver, was hanged and then burned; his home was broken into, and his office, along with the stamps, was burned. The mob even went on to vandalize the home of Lieutenant Governor Thomas Hutchinson, destroying records and forcing him and his family to seek refuge at Fort William. (The elm tree used to hang Oliver's effigy later became known as the "Liberty Tree" (Wikipedia). The Stamp Act was Parliament's first serious attempt to assert governmental authority over the colonies. Great Britain was faced with a massive national debt following the Seven Years War. That debt had grown from £72,289,673 in 1755 to £129,586,789 in 1764* 1766 Stamp Act Repealed; great celebrations 1767 Townsend Acts Passed; Taxes on glass, paint, oil, lead, paper, and tea were applied with the design of raising £40,000 a year for the administration of the colonies. The result was the resurrection of colonial hostilities created by the Stamp Act. Reaction assumed revolutionary proportions in Boston, in the summer of 1768, when customs officials
  • 35. 35 impounded a sloop owned by John Hancock, for violations of the trade regulations. Crowds mobbed the customs office, forcing the officials to retire to a British warship in the Harbor. Troops from England and Nova Scotia marched in to occupy Boston on October 1, 1768. Bostonians offered no resistance. Rather they changed their tactics. They established non- importation agreements that quickly spread throughout the colonies. British trade soon dried up and the powerful merchants of Britain once again interceded on behalf of the colonies; non importation boycott begins. 1768 June 10 John Hancock’s ship Liberty is seized in a disagreement over payment of customs duties; Violent protests against unpopular British taxes. October 1 The British arrive in Boston to maintain order. 1770 Boston Massacre occurred when royal troops fired on a belligerent crowd. 1772 Committees of Correspondence formed to oppose “despotism” of Gov. Hutchinson in a dispute over his salary. 1773 Tea Act December 16 Boston Tea Party
  • 36. 36 1774 “Intolerable Acts” passed to punish Boston for the destroyed tea closed the town’s port and abolished all elected popular government. Gen. Thomas Gage was appointed Governor by King George III ; patriots practice military art and organize the Minute Men. September The First Continental Congress Meets in Philadelphia The American Revolution 1775 April 19, 1775 Lexington and Concord British troops march to Concord to seize rebel supplies. Alarm by Paul Revere and William Dawes (Robert Newman). The minute men stand on Lexington Green. After the Boston Tea Party, the confrontation on Lexington Green. On the morning after Paul Revere’s famous midnight ride, the “shot heard round the world” unleashed in Lexington and Concord later that day sparked the American Revolution. Siege of Boston begins ♦ Richard Neitzel Holzapfel , Old Palmyra, 32 June 17, 1775 The Battle of Bunker Hill. Americans fortify Charlestown overlooking Boston from the North. The British suffer over 1000 casualties as they take the American’s fort. July 2, 1775 Gen. George Washington arrives at Cambridge to take command of the Continental Army. 1776 January 1776
  • 37. 37 Common Sense was first published anonymously by Thomas Paine. It is regarded as the most influential piece of literature leading to the American Revolution. Paine wrote that “We have it in our power to begin the world over again.” March 4-5, 1776 Americans fortify Dorchester Heights, overlooking Boston from the south. March 17, 1776 Evacuation Day the British troops and government officials and loyalists sail out of Boston. Harbor, never to return. July 4, 1776 Declaration of Independence signed and adopted in Philadelphia. July 8, 1776 Personal Life—Birth of Lucy Mack 1781 Battle of Yorktown 1776-83 American Revolution 1783 May 18, 1783 Martin Harris is born 1787
  • 38. 38 The Constitution of the United States 1791 The Bill of Rights 1796 January 24, 1796 Personal Life—Joseph Smith Sr. married Lucy Mack 1797 Second Awakening: 1800 - 7% of American’s belong to an organized religion. ♦ Porter and Black, The Prophet Joseph, 23 1805-1829 1805 Birth of Joseph Smith in Sharon Township Windsor County Vermont. The Smith family lived in seven locations between Joseph’s birth and the first vision: Sharon, Tunbridge and South Royalton, Vermont; West Lebanon, New Hampshire; Norwich, Vermont; the village of Palmyra and Palmyra Township, New York. July 10, 1804
  • 39. 39 Personal Life—Emma Hale, wife of Joseph Smith and the first Relief Society president, was born. December 23, 1805 (Monday) Sharon, Vermont Personal Life—Joseph Smith Jr. was born to Lucy Mack Smith and Joseph Smith Sr. ♦ History of the Church, 1:2 1810 March 4, 1810 Personal life—Joseph’s brother, Ephraim, dies at the age of 11 days old ♦ (History of Joseph Smith, 350 1811 Personal Life—The Smith family moves to Lebanon New Hampshire. Joseph Smith Sr. has a series of 7 inspired dreams. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 22 1812 The War of 1812—Washington is burned, including the White House; Martin Harris fights in two battles. 1813 West Lebanon, New Hampshire Personal Life—After suffering from complications of typhoid, seven-year-old Joseph Smith’s leg was operated on by Dr. Nathan Smith of Dartmouth Medical School. In convalescence Joseph traveled with his uncle Jesse Smith to Salem, Massachusetts, to recover. He remained on crutches for three years ♦ Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 16; Wirthlin, BYU Studies 21:2: 131-54; Church History in the Fulness of Times, 23; History of Joseph Smith, 54 Late 1816 Palmyra, New York
  • 40. 40 Personal Life—Joseph Smith moved with his mother and siblings to Palmyra, New York, from Norwich, Vermont. Joseph Sr. had gone to Palmyra earlier in the year to investigate the move. ♦ Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 16; Porter, Origins of the Church, 10 1816 Personal Life—Smith’s moved from Norwich, Vermont to Palmyra, New York; Joseph walked 40 miles a day in the snow with his bad leg. Caleb Howard made him walk “in my weak state through the snow 40 miles per day for several days, during which time I suffered the most excruciating weariness & pain.” ♦ Manuscript History of the Church, cited in Dean C. Jessee, The Personal Writings of Joseph Smith , 666 1817 Personal Life—Joseph’s grandma, Lydia Mack, dies at age 83 1818 Illinois became the twenty-first state in the U.S. 1819 Revivals intensified in Palmyra vicinity 1819 Personal life—Joseph Smith Sr. has his last visit from the messenger of his dreams and tells him he has one thing in his life that is still needful for Salvation ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 26
  • 41. 41 February 6, 1819 Palmyra, New York Legal Events—Joseph Smith Jr. appeared as a credible witness in the case of Joseph Smith Sr. v. Jeremiah Hurlbut. The jury awarded the Smiths $40.78. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series February 22, 1819 Spain ceded Florida to the U.S. 1820 Thomas Jefferson wrote a letter to a friend about the need for restoration…. “I hope that the genuine and simple religion of Jesus Christ may be restored, for it hath become so muffled up in mysteries that it is concealed from the vulgar eyes. ♦ Ivan J. Barrett, Joseph Smith and the Restoration , 5 Commentary-- William J. Berenstein: Beginning around 1820, the pace of economic advance picked up noticeably, making the world a better place to live in. What happened? an explosion in technological innovation the likes of which had never before been seen. The lot of the average individual, measured as real per capita GDP, did not change at all during the first millennium after the birth of Christ. Over the next 500 years, between A.D. 1000 and 1500, things did not get much better. Before 1820, there had been only minuscule progress from decade to decade and century to century. After 1820, the world steadily became a more prosperous place…[The] growth of the global economy took off, bringing prosperity despite the repeated devastation of war, civil strife, and revolution. ♦ William J. Berenstein, The Birth of Plenty, pp 15, 18-19) We live in a period of history to which that misunderstood and much overused word, “awesome,” truly applies. This is the season of fulness and fulfillment. The world has been linked together as never before. Scientific understanding has reached ever greater heights and most of the technical inventions of mankind have occurred since 1820. Most of the per capita wealth of mankind has been generated since 1820, as have 85% of all the people that have ever lived. It is hard for a Latter-day Saint to think that this onrush of knowledge, invention, wealth, population, and political-economic integration since 1820 is but
  • 42. 42 coincidental. What an exciting time to live, an age in which prophets and seers of ancient time wished to have lived! ♦ Isa. 29:13-14; note from the Hebrew-Joseph… Spring 1820 Farmington, New York (it was not until April 16, 1822, that Manchester Township was divided off from Farmington) Visions and Revelations –God the Father and Jesus Christ appeared to the fourteen-year old Joseph Smith in answer to his prayer about which church he should join. ♦ History of the Church, 1:3-8; JS-H 1:5-26; Opening the Heavens, 1-7 The First Visitation –JSH Spring 1830 Joseph’s Theophony with the Father and the Son Manchester Township, Ontario County, New York John Alger Account [February 2, 1893] Brother John Alger said while speaking of the Prophet Joseph Smith, that when he, John, was a small boy he heard the Prophet Joseph relate his vision of seeing the Father and the Son, [and] that God touched his eyes with his finger and said "Joseph, this is my Beloved Son, hear Him." As soon as the Lord had touched his eyes with his finger he immediately saw the Savior. After meeting, a few of us questioned him about the matter and he told us at the bottom of the meeting house steps that he was in the house of Father Smith in Kirtland when Joseph made this declaration, and that Joseph while speaking of it put his finger to his right eye, suiting the action with the words so as to illustrate and at the same time impress the occurrence on the minds of those unto whom he was speaking. We enjoyed the conversation very much, as it was something that we had never seen in church history or heard of before. Heard Joseph testify of the First Vision, saying God the Father appeared first and touched his eye, enabling him to see the Son. ♦ A. Karl Larson and Katharine Miles Larson, Diary of Charles Lowell Walker, 2 vols. (Logan, Utah: Utah State University Press, 1980), 2:540. 22 The Father has a body of flesh and bones as tangible as man's; the Son also… (Doctrine and Covenants | Section 130:22)
  • 43. 43 Bruce R. McConkie Commentary: Now and then in a peaceful grove, apart from the gaze of men, heaven and earth share a moment of intimacy, and neither are ever the same. Such a moment occurred on that beautiful clear morning, in the spring of 1820 in a grove of trees near Palmyra New York. Man asked and God answered. Joseph Smith saw the Father and the Son. (Bruce R. McConkie, Ensign, November 1975, 18) 1820 August 23, 1820 Personal Life—Joseph’s grandfather, Solomon Mack dies at age 87 1821-1828 These eight years may be termed the preparatory period preceding the restoration of the Priesthood and the organization of the Church of Christ on the earth. The angel Moroni appeared to the Prophet Joseph Smith, Jr., several times and finally delivered to him the plates of the Book of Mormon. The translation of the sacred records was begun, and Joseph commenced to receive revelations. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology 1822 Hieroglyphs were deciphered by Thomas Young and Jean-François Champollion using the Rosetta Stone. 1823 September 21-22, 1823 Palmyra, New York
  • 44. 44 Visions and Revelations—The angel Moroni visited Joseph Smith three times in the night in the Smith family log home, telling Joseph Smith about the gold plates (the Book of Mormon) and the Lord’s divine mission for him. Some of his instruction about the coming of Elijah is recorded in D&C 2 ♦ JS-H 1:27-47; D&C 2, Rich, BYU Studies 10.3:257 September 22, 1823 (Sunday) Palmyra and Manchester, New York Visions and Revelations—The angel Moroni visited Joseph Smith again during the day and “related unto [him] all that he had related to [him] the previous night,” after which Joseph Smith went to the hill and first saw the plates. ♦ History of the Church, 1:14-16; JS-H 1:48-54 About November 19, 1823 Palmyra, New York Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s brother Alvin died at age 25. He had been ill with “bilious colic” and was given a dose of calomel, which may have killed him. ♦ History of the Church, 1:2, 16-17; Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 20 December 2, 1823 The Monroe Doctrine, proclaiming that European powers should not colonize or interfere with countries in the Americas was issued. 1824 Martin Harris built a new farm house and hired the Smiths to hoe corn at .50 cents a day May 7, 1824 Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 premiered in Vienna. September 22, 1824 Manchester, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith met with Moroni at Hill Cumorah one year after Moroni’s initial visits. ♦ JS-H 1:54; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 308
  • 45. 45 1825 Martin Harris hires Joseph Sr. and Hyrum to dig a well he learns of Joseph’s First Vision September 22, 1825 Manchester, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith met with Moroni at Hill Cumorah two years after Moroni’s initial visits. ♦ JS-H 1:54; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 308 October Personal Life—Joseph worked for Josiah Stowell, boarded with the Issac Hale family in Harmony and met Emma Smith. Joseph is accused of using magic and being a money digger. October 26, 1825 The Erie Canal opened, allowing passage from Albany, New York, to Lake Erie. November or December 1825 Manchester, New York Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s family moved into the frame home that Joseph’s brother Alvin had begun before his death in 1823. The home was completed sometime after October 25, 1825. ♦ Porter, Origins of the Church, 27. November 17, 1825 Harmony, Pennsylvania, and near South Bainbridge, New York Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s employment for Josiah Stowell at the mining excavations in Harmony, Pennsylvania, ended. Joseph then continued to work for Stowell at his farm near South Bainbridge, New York. ♦ History of the Church, 1:17; Porter, BYU Studies, 10.3:367 December 20, 1825 Manchester, New York Legal Events—The Smiths’ home and 99.5-acre farm were sold to Lemuel Durfee, who kept the Smiths as tenants. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1826 February 13, 1826
  • 46. 46 The American Temperance Society was founded, and by 1831 it had over two thousand chapters. March 20, 1826 South Bainbridge, New York Legal Events—Joseph Smith was tried and acquitted by Justice of the Peace Albert Neely Jr. of a charge of being a disorderly person, meaning not acceptably employed and “pretending to discover where lost goods may be found.” The law defined a disorderly person as a vagrant, or a seeker of “lost goods”. The prophet had been accused of both; the first charge was false and was made simply to cause trouble; Joseph’s use of the Seer Stone to see things others could not see with the naked eye brought the second charge. Josiah Stowell, Joseph’s employer, testified that Joseph could be trusted. (It is believed that Joseph found a seer stone digging a well for Willard Chase.) ♦ Madsen, BYU Studies 30.2:106; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series September 22, 1826 Manchester, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith met with Moroni at Hill Cumorah three years after Moroni’s initial visits. ♦ JS-H 1:54: Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 308 1827 January 18, 1827 South Bainbridge, New York Personal Life—Joseph Smith was married to Emma Hale by Esquire Zacharia Tarble, Justice of the Peace. ♦ History of the Church, 1:17; Jessee, BYU Studies 17.1:32. August 12, 1827 William Blake, English poet and artist, died. September 22, 1827 Manchester, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received the gold plates from the angel Moroni on the hill where they were buried. ♦ History of the Church, 1:18; JS-H, 1:59; H of JS, p 102-3
  • 47. 47 Reminiscence: Lucy Mack Smith and the Breastplate After Receiving the gold plates— He handed me the breastplate spoken of in his history. It was wrapped in a thin muslin handkerchief, so thin that I could see the glistening metal and ascertain its proportions without any difficulty. It was concave on one side and convex on the other, and extended from the neck downwards as far as the center of the stomach of a man of extraordinary size. It had four straps of the same material for the purpose of fastening it to the breast, two of which ran back to go over the shoulders, and the other two were designed to fasten to the hips. They were just the width of two of my fingers (for I measured them), and they had holes in the end of them to be convenient in fastening. The whole plate was worth at least five hundred dollars. After I had examined it, Joseph placed it in the chest with the Urim and Thummim. History of Joseph Smith by his mother, Chapter 23 December 1827 Personal Life—Joseph moves to Harmony Pennsylvania December 1827 to February 1828 Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith copied characters from the book of Lehi on the plates and translated them using the Urim and Thummim. ♦ History of the Church, 1:19 1828 February 8, 1828 Jules Verne, French author, was born. February 1828 Martin Harris visited Charles Anthon in New York City February-June 1828 116 pages translated and Lost Manuscript
  • 48. 48 February 15, 1828 Harmony Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith gave Martin Harris a transcript of characters from the book of Lehi on the gold plates and their translation, which Harris took to show scholars in Albany and New York City. ♦ History of the Church 1:20; Welch, Opening the Heavens, 86, Kimball, BYU Studies 10.3:325 April 12, 1828 Harmony, Pennyslvania Writings—Martin Harris returned to Joseph Smith’s home in Harmony, where he began to help with the translation of the 116 Book of Mormon pages from the book of Lehi that were later lost. Joseph Smith commences translation of the Book of Mormon with Martin Harris as his scribe, Harmony Susquehanna County, Pennsylvannia. (Story of Martin making it dark as Egypt) ♦ History of the Church 1:20; Welch, Opening the Heavens, 86 May 19, 1828 Congress passed the Tariff of 1828, which Southerners called the “Tariff of Abominations.” June 14, 1828 Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith completed the translation of the book of Lehi, and Martin Harris took the 116 manuscript pages to Palmyra, New York, to show selected members of his family as bound by covenant. ♦ History of the Church, 1:20-21; Welch, Opening the Heavens, 88. June 14, 1828 Martin Harris leaves Harmony with 116 pages (the Book of Lehi). Pages are stolen, altered, and it is suggested that they were burned. June 15, 1828 Harmony, Pennsylvania Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith’s first child, a boy later named Alvin, was born but died within hours. ♦ Porter, Origins of the Church, 146; Welch, Opening the Heavens, 87; Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 24, p 125 About July 1, 1828 Manchester, New York Writings—Joseph Smith arrived at his father’s farm and learned from Martin Harris that the 116 manuscript pages of the book of Lehi had been lost. ♦ History of the Church, 1:20-21; Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 24; Preface, Book of Mormon (1830)
  • 49. 49 About July 8, 1828 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received through the Urim and Thummin Doctrine and Covenants 3, a revelation calling him to repentance after entrusting Martin Harris with 116 pages of translation from the book of Lehi, which were lost. ♦ History of the Church, 1:21- 23; D&C 3 July Writings—D&C - 3 - Lost 116- Joseph’s First recorded Revelation Summer 1828 Writings— D&C 10 - Wicked Designs - Foreknowledge of God (see Words of Mormon 1:7); Joseph learns that the manuscripts are lost—loses power to translate. ♦ History of Joseph Smith, 129) About July 9, 1828 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 10, a revelation about the designs of wicked men who had made alterations to the 116 lost manuscript pages. ♦ History of the Church, 1:23-28; D&C 10 July Interpreters and plates are taken from the prophet by the angel Moroni September 9, 1828 Leo Tolstoy, Russian writer, was born. September 1828 Joseph regained the gift to translate and the Urim and Thummim received from Moroni ; Emma served as scribe ♦ History of Joseph Smith, 135 1829 1829 British Parliament gave Catholics full political rights in Great Britain.
  • 50. 50 1829 Ireland’s government restored religious freedom. 1829 The accordion was patented by Cyrill Demian in Vienna. 1829 During this year the translation of the Book of Mormon was completed by Joseph Smith, Jun., who was assisted by Oliver Cowdery as scribe; the plates were shown to the Three Witnesses and the Eight Witnesses; the Aaronic Priesthood was restored to the earth by John the Baptist, and, later, the Melchizedek Priesthood by Peter, James and John; Joseph Smith, Jun., and Oliver Cowdery also commenced to preach and baptize About February 1, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 4, a revelation for his father, Joseph Smith Sr., containing qualifications for missionary service. ♦ History of the Church, 1:28; D&C 4 February 26, 1829 Levi Strauss, clothing designer, was born. March 2, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—At the urging of Martin Harris, who sought assurance that Joseph Smith had the gold plates, Joseph received the revelation found in Doctrine and Covenants 5. Three witnesses to the Book of Mormon are promised. ♦ History of the Church, 1:28-31; D&C 5 March 4, 1829 Andrew Jackson succeeded John Quincy Adams as U.S. President. April 5, 1829 (Sunday) Harmony, Pennsylvania Personal Life—Joseph Smith met Oliver Cowdery for the first time ♦ History of the Church, 1:32; Welch, Opening the Heavens, 163
  • 51. 51 April 6, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Legal Events—Joseph Smith incurred a debt in purchasing a small home and land from his father-in-law, Isaac Hale. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series About April 7, 1829 (Tuesday) Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith, Jr., resumed the translation of the Book of Mormon, assisted by Oliver Cowdery as scribe, at Harmony. Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery received through the Urim and Thummim Doctrine and Covenants 7, a revelation answering their inquiry as to whether John the Beloved had tarried in the flesh or had died. ♦ History of the Church, 1:35- 36; D&C 7 April 10, 1829 William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, was born. About April 10, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 8, a revelation for Oliver Cowdery granting to him the gift of translation. ♦ History of the Church, 1:36-37, D&C 8 April 14, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith commenced the second week of dictating the translation of the Book of Mormon to Oliver Cowdery. ♦ History of the Church, 1:35-36 About April 16, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 9, a revelation directing Oliver Cowdery to be content to write rather than attempt to translate. ♦ History of the Church, 1:37-38, D&C 9 April 21 to about May 10, 1829 Harmony, Pennyslvania Writings—Joseph Smith continued dictating the translation of the Book of Mormon to Oliver Cowdery. ♦ History of the Church, 1:35-36, 39 May 1829 Writings—D&C 11 to Hyrum; D&C 12 to Joseph Knight
  • 52. 52 About May 10, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery ran out of supplies during the translation of the Book of Mormon and went to Colesville, New York, to obtain provisions from Joseph Knight Sr. ♦ Jessee, BYU Studies 17.1:36; Welch, Opening the Heavens, 93 About May 14, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith translated the account of the appearance of the resurrected Savior in 3 Nephi 11 in the Book of Mormon. ♦ Welch, Opening the Heavens, 93 May 15, 1829 (Friday) Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery received the Aaronic Priesthood from John the Baptist. Joseph proceeded to baptize Oliver, after which Oliver baptized Joseph. Joseph was then instructed to ordain Oliver to the Aaronic Priesthood, after which Oliver ordained Joseph. ♦ History of the Church, 1:39-44; D&C 13; Cannon, Opening the Heavens, 216-18 May 17, 1829 John Jay, first U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice, died. About May 24, 1829 Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—After Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery received the Aaronic Priesthood, the Melchizedek Priesthood was also conferred upon them by the ancient Apostles, Peter, James and John along the banks of the Susquehanna River between Colesville, New York, and Harmony, Pennsylvania. It should be noted that some historians place the Melchizedek Priesthood restoration at a later date. ♦ History of the Church, 1:39-46; Cannon, Opening the Heavens, 218-25, History of the Church, Vol 1:41 May 25, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith baptized his brother Samuel H. Smith just ten days after Joseph and Oliver Cowdery had received the Aaronic Priesthood and were baptized. ♦ History of the Church, 1:44
  • 53. 53 About May 28, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 12, a revelation to Joseph Knight Sr. about laborers wishing to assist in the vineyard. ♦ History of the Church, 1:47-48; D&C 12 May or June 1829 Lyons, New York Legal Events—Martin Harris’s wife, Lucy, filed a complaint against Joseph Smith, attempting to prove that he never had gold plates. ♦ Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 28 June-July 1829 Travels—Joseph returned home to be with Emma. About June 1, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Personal Life—David Whitmer arrived, met Joseph Smith for the first time, and satisfied himself of the Prophet’s divine inspiration. ♦ Welch, Opening the Heavens, 94 About June 1, 1829 Fayette, New York Writings—Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery moved into the home of Peter Whitmer Sr., where Joseph resumed translation of the Book of Mormon. ♦ History of the Church, 1:49-51 June 1, 1829 Travels—Joseph, Oliver and Emma move to Fayette to complete the translation. Miracle of the sowing of Plaster at the Whitmers; Moroni appeared along the way and later to sister Whitmer. ♦ History of Joseph Smith, 151 About June 2, 1829 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 14, 15, and 16, revelations for David, John, and Peter Whitmer Jr., respectively, concerning their calls to missionary labor. The three are to choose the Twelve; the first Apostles in 1800 years. ♦ History of the Church, 1:49-51; D&C 14, 15, 16 About June 10, 1829 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 17, a revelation to Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer and Martin Harris that prepared them to become witnesses of the gold plates and other sacred objects. ♦ History of the Church, 1:52-53; D&C 17
  • 54. 54 June 11, 1829 Utica, New York Legal Events—Richard R. Lansing, clerk of the Northern District Court, entered Joseph Smith’s copyright application for the Book of Mormon. ♦ History of the Church, 1:58-59; Wadsworth, BYU Studies 45.3:77-99 June 16, 1829 Geronimo, Apache leader, was born. About June 20, 1829 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith was present as the Three Witnesses were shown the plates by the angel Moroni. About this same time, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 18, a revelation to himself, Oliver Cowdery, and David Whitmer. The mission and calling of the Twelve Apostles were revealed, and Oliver and David were directed to “search out” the Twelve. ♦ History of the Church, 1:56, 62-64; D&C 18 June 1829 Three witnesses view the plates, see the angel Moroni, hear the Voice of God in the Chamber of Old father Whitmer ♦ DC 128:19-21; Testimony of the three Witnesses; History of Joseph Smith, 151-3 June The eight witnesses view the plates (Testimony of the Eight Witnesses) About June 24, 1829 Palmyra, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith showed the Eight Witnesses the gold plates near the Joseph Smith Sr. log home. ♦ History of the Church, 1:57; Testimony of the Eight Witnesses, Book of Mormon June 26, 1829 Palmyra, New York Writings—Egbert B. Grandin published the title page of the Book of Mormon as a “curiosity” in the Wayne Sentinel. History of the Church, 1:71; Wayne Sentinel (Palmyra, New York), June 26, 1829 June 27, 1829
  • 55. 55 British mineralogist James Smithson died, leaving money to the U.S. that was used later to fund the Smithsonian Institution. About July 1, 1829 Fayette, New York Writings—On or before this date, Joseph Smith completed the translation of the Book of Mormon. ♦ Welch, Opening the Heavens, 148 August 25, 1829 Fayette, New York Legal Events—Martin Harris mortgaged his farm in order to assure payment to Egbert B. Grandin of $3,000 to print 5,000 copies of the Book of Mormon. ♦ Welch, Opening the Heavens, 98 October 22, 1829 Harmony, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Oliver Cowdery about his safe arrival in Harmony on October 4 and progress made toward the publication of the Book of Mormon. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith¸ 251-52 November 6, 1829 Manchester, New York Writings—In a letter to Joseph Smith at Harmony, Pennsylvania, Oliver Cowdery wrote, “The printing goes rather Slow yet as the type founder has been sick but we expect that the type will be in and Mr. Granden still think he will finish printing by the first of February.” ♦ Welch, Opening the Heavens, 98 November 28, 1829 Anton Rubinstein, Russian pianist and composer, was born. 1830 In the beginning of this year the Book of Mormon was printed and published in the English language. This first edition of the book, consisting of 5,000 copies, was printed by Egbert Grandin, at Palmyra, New York. Soon afterwards the Church was organized—the first conferences were held, the first missionaries sent out to preach the fulness of the gospel, and several revelations given for the government of the Church; a large branch was
  • 56. 56 established at Kirtland, Ohio, etc. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology: A Record of Important Events Pertaining to the History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1914] Early 1830 The Reflector (Palmyra) prints extracts from the unpublished Book of Mormon in January. The prophet travels to Palmyra from Harmony to stop the unauthorized publishing. Squire Cole. January 1830 Palmyra, New York Legal Events—Joseph Smith v. Abner Cole. Joseph won an arbitration against Cole, who had copied passages from the Book of Mormon he had found at Grandin’s print shop and included them in his newspaper, The Reflector. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series About March 14, 1830 Palmyra, New York Writings—Joseph Smith wrote what became the preface to the first edition of the Book of Mormon. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 253–54 1830 Temperance activist Sylvester Graham advocated a diet based on vegetables and whole wheat. About March 21, 1830 Palmyra, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 19, a revelation to Martin Harris concerning repentance and the Atonement of Jesus Christ. Martin was commanded to pay the debt that he had contracted with the printer for the publication of the Book of Mormon. ♦ History of the Church, 1:72–74; D&C 19 1830 Camorra, a secret Italian criminal association in Naples, came to light. March 26, 1830 Palmyra, New York Writings—The Book of Mormon was advertised for sale at Egbert B. Grandin’s bookstore. ♦ History of the Church, 1:75–76; Wayne Sentinel, March 26, 1830 April 6, 1830 (Tuesday) Fayette, New York
  • 57. 57 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph officially organized the Church of Christ in Peter Whitmer Sr.’s home and recorded Doctrine and Covenants 20 concerning Church organization and government. Joseph also received Doctrine and Covenants 21. ♦ History of the Church, 1:62– 80; D&C 20, 21; Peterson, BYU Studies 35.4: 222; Carmack, Ensign (Feb. 1989): 14–19 1830 Bohemian peasants developed the polka. April 11, 1830 Fayette, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended the first public sermon given after the organization of the Church, preached by Oliver Cowdery in the Peter Whitmer Sr. home. ♦ History of the Church, 1:81 April 13, 1830 Palmyra, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 22, a revelation directing converts who had been previously baptized in other churches to be rebaptized as members of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:79–80; D&C 22 April 14, 1830 Palmyra, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 23, a revelation to Oliver Cowdery, Hyrum Smith, Samuel H. Smith, Joseph Smith Sr., and Joseph Knight Sr., calling them to preach the gospel and strengthen the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:80; D&C 23 April, June 1830 Manchester area Samuel Smith labored as a missionary April 18, 1830 (Sunday) Colesville, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—First miracle –Joseph Smith casts a devil out of Newel Knight ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 69-70 May 28, 1830 President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, forcibly removing tens of thousands of Native Americans to the West. June 1830 Colesville, New York
  • 58. 58 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received by revelation what is now the first chapter of the book of Moses in the Pearl of Great Price. The translation of the Bible (JST) is an ongoing project. ♦ History of the Church, 1:98–101; Matthews, “A Plainer Translation,” 26–27; RofP, 4 June 9, 1830 Fayette, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith conducted the first conference of the Church since its organization, with about thirty members assembled. Newell Knight saw the Savior seated on the right hand of the Father. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 70-71; History of the Church, 1:84–86 June 26-28, 1830 Colesville, New York Baptisms and persecution ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 71 June 28, 1830 Colesville, New York Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s wife, Emma, and twelve others were baptized by Oliver Cowdery at the Joseph Knight farm. ♦ History of the Church, 1:87–88 1830 The cancan became popular in Paris. Between June 28 and July 2, 1830 Colesville and South Bainbridge, New York Legal Events—Joseph Smith was arrested in Colesville on a charge of being a “disorderly person.” This arrest took place in the evening of June 28 before those who had been baptized that day could be confirmed, and he was taken to South Bainbridge, Chenango County, for trial. Joseph was acquitted by Justice of the Peace Joseph Chamberlain, but as soon as he was acquitted, he was arrested on a second warrant and was taken to Colesville, where he was tried and again acquitted. ♦ History of the Church, 1:85–96; Walters, Westminster Theological Journal 36.2: 124–25; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 30, 1830 Fayette, New York Travels—Joseph Smith’s Brother Samuel departed on one of the first missions for the Church, traveling into Ontario, Monroe, and Livingston counties in New York. ♦ Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch. 33
  • 59. 59 30 June-1830-Mar. 1831 Writings--Moses 2-8 ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 72 July 1830 Manchester area Joseph Smith, Sr., and Don Carlos Smith left to do missionary work. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 67, 75 About July 4, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 24, a revelation relating to his and Oliver Cowdery’s callings. ♦ History of the Church, 1:101–3; D&C 24 About July 5, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 25, a revelation directing Emma, the “elect lady,” to assemble the first hymnbook for the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:103–4; D&C 25; Poulter, BYU Studies 37.2 About July 6, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 26, a revelation regarding scripture study and common consent. ♦ History of the Church, 1:104; D&C 26 July 20, 1830 Jews received citizenship in Greece. About August 5, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 27, a revelation concerning the sacrament. ♦ History of the Church, 1:106–8; D&C 27 Aug. 9, 1830 Louis-Philippe, the “Citizen King,” accepted the crown in France in the wake of the July Revolution. August 25, 1830 Montrose, Pennsylvania Legal Events—George H. Noble v. Joseph Smith. Joseph Smith executed a promissory note payable to George H. Noble for $190.95 to enable Joseph to purchase from his father-in-law, Isaac Hale, thirteen acres and the home where Joseph and Emma had been living and where he had translated much of the Book of Mormon. See entry for April 6, 1829. ♦ Porter, Origins of the Church, 134, citing Deed Book 8, 59–60, Susquehanna County Courthouse, Pennsylvania; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series August 26, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • 60. 60 Legal Events—George H. Noble v. Joseph Smith. An amicable judgment was entered in favor of George H. Noble to secure his creditor rights for the $190.95 owed to him by Joseph Smith. Jesse Lane was judge as well as notary on the deed, filed with Court of Common Pleas in Montrose, Pennsylvania. Satisfied in full June 3, 1831. ♦ Porter, Origins of the Church, 134, citing Deed Book 8, 59–60, Susquehanna County Courthouse, Pennsylvania; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series August 29, 1830 Between Colesville, New York, and Harmony, Pennsylvania Travels—While traveling to Colesville, New York, from Harmony, Pennsylvania, Joseph Smith and his company were miraculously delivered from their enemies, who were blinded and unable to identify them. ♦ History of the Church, 1:108–9; Newel Knight, Autobiography, 63 August 31, 1830 The lawnmower was patented by Edwin Beard Budding. Late August, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania Travels—With Emma, Joseph Smith left Harmony for Fayette for the last time September 1, 1830 Manchester area Parley P. Pratt Conversion and baptized ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 67, 75 About September 20, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 28, a revelation to Oliver Cowdery, in response to Hiram Page’s professed revelations, directing that no one was to receive revelation for the Church save the Prophet. ♦ History of the Church, 1:109–11; D&C 28 About September 21, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—In the presence of six elders, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 29, a revelation concerning the Millennium. ♦ History of the Church, 1:111–15; D&C 29 About September 24, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 30, a revelation for David Whitmer, Peter Whitmer Jr., and John Whitmer concerning their callings and duties in the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:115–16; D&C 30 September 26, 1830 Fayette, New York
  • 61. 61 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith conducted the second conference of the Church at the Peter Whitmer Sr. home. ♦ History of the Church, 1:110, 115 1830 Alexander Duff, Scottish missionary to India, opened a mission college in Calcutta. About September 27, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 31, a revelation calling Thomas B. Marsh to “declare glad tidings of great joy unto this generation.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:116–17; D&C 31 October 1830 Manchester area Oliver Cowdery and others leave on Mission to the Indians October 4, 1830 The Provisional Government in Brussels declared the independent state of Belgium, in revolt against the Netherlands. About October 8, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 32, a revelation regarding the mission of Parley P. Pratt and Ziba Peterson to teach the Lamanites. ♦ History of the Church, 1:118–20; D&C 32 October 21, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 33, a revelation calling Ezra Thayre and Northrop Sweet to serve proselyting missions. ♦ History of the Church, 1:126–27; D&C 33 October 31, 1830 Manchester area Personal Life—Joseph’s grandpa, Asael Smith, dies at the age of 86. ♦ History of Joseph Smith, 348 November 4, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 34, a revelation calling Orson Pratt to the ministry. ♦ History of the Church, 1:128; D&C 34 November 30, 1830 Fayette, New York
  • 62. 62 Visions and Revelations—The Lord revealed to Joseph Smith what is now Moses 5:62–6:18 in his inspired translation of the Bible. ♦ Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 57; Moses 5–6 December 1, 1830 Harmony, Pennsylvania Visions and Revelations—The Lord revealed to Joseph Smith what is now Moses 6:19–52 in his inspired translation of the Bible. ♦ Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 57; Moses 6 About December 8, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—While working on his inspired translation of the Bible, Joseph Smith received by revelation the latter portion of chapter 6 in the Book of Moses. ♦ Faulring, Jackson,Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 57; Moses 6 Dec. 10, 1830 Emily Dickinson, American poet, was born. About December 10, 1830 Fayette, New York Personal Life—Joseph Smith welcomed Sidney Rigdon and Edward Partridge from Mentor and Painesville, Ohio, respectively. ♦ History of the Church, 1:12 December 11, 1830 Seneca River, Seneca County, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith baptized Edward Partridge, who later became the first bishop of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:129 About December 12, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received by revelation extracts from the prophecy of Enoch, which later became Moses 7 in the Pearl of Great Price. ♦ History of the Church, 1:133– 39; Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 57; Moses 7 About December 15, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 35, a revelation calling Sidney Rigdon to be the Prophet’s scribe for the translation of the Bible. ♦ History of the Church, 1:129–31; D&C 35 1830 Frédéric Chopin composed his Piano Concerto in E Minor. About December 19, 1830 Fayette, New York
  • 63. 63 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 36, a revelation containing a blessing and calling for Edward Partridge. ♦ History of the Church, 1:131; D&C 36 About December 21, 1830 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon received Doctrine and Covenants 37, a revelation calling the Saints to gather in Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 1:139; D&C 37 1831 The first Elders arrived in Jackson County, Missouri, and the Saints from the State of New York and other places commenced to build up Kirtland, Ohio, where the Prophet Joseph also located with his family. Jackson County, Missouri, was named by the Lord a land of Zion where the New Jerusalem should be built, and where the Saints were to gather. The land was dedicated for that purpose, a Temple site selected and dedicated, and the building of a settlement commenced. The Elders also began to preach the gospel with great zeal. January 1, 1831 William Lloyd Garrison published the first issue of The Liberator, an abolitionist newspaper January 2, 1831 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—During the third conference of the Church, which was held at the Peter Whitmer Sr. home, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 38 (after Moses 8), a revelation calling the Saints to gather in Ohio; the Lord promises his Law and His endowment ♦ History of the Church, 1:40-43; D&C 38 January 5, 1831 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 39, a revelation calling James Covill to be baptized and labor in Zion. ♦ History of the Church, 1:143-44; D&C 39 About January 6, 1831 Fayette, New York Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 40, an additional revelation concerning James Covill, who had broken his covenant with the Lord. ♦ History of the Church, 1:145; D&C 40 About January 15 1831 Fayette, New York
  • 64. 64 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith reportedly saw in vision the face of Newel K. Whitney, who would later receive Joseph and his wife, Emma, In Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 311; History of the Church, 1:146 n. 1831 The electromagnetic current generator was developed by Michael Faraday. Early February, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Ohio by sleigh with Emma. “Thou art the Man.” ♦ Church History and the Fulness of Times, 90 About February 1, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith and his wife, Emma, arrived in Kirtland, Ohio (from New York) and were kindly received into the house of Newel K. Whitney. ♦ History of the Church, 1:145- 46; Staker, BYU Studies 42.1: 100 February 4, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 21, a revelation calling Edward Partridge to be the first bishop of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:146- 47; D&C 41 1831 The reaper was invented by Cyrus McCormick. February 9, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 42, a revelation containing the law of the Lord to his Church, including the law of consecration and stewardship of property. ♦ History of the Church, 1:148-54; D&C 42 About February 14, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—In response to a visit by a woman who claimed to receive commandments, laws, and other curious matters, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 43, a revelation about the Lord’s pattern of revelation. Conference set for June ♦ History of the Church, 1:154; D&C 43, D&C Institute Manual, 87
  • 65. 65 About February 25, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 44, a revelation about the duties of elders. ♦ History of the Church, 1:154-56; D&C 44 March 3, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his brother Hyrum, living in Colesville, New York, asking that he come to Kirtland and bring Joseph Smith Sr. from Fayette, New York. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 255-62 March 7, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 45, a lengthy revelation concerning the salvation of mankind and the calamities of the last days. DC 45-- Promise of Peace, Safety, and Refuge during the judgments. He also completed his translation work on the book of Genesis through chapter 24. ♦ History of the Church, 1:158- 63; D&C 45; Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 57 About March 8, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith began his translation work on the Gospel of Matthew. ♦ D&C 45:60-61; Matthews, BYU Studies 11.4: 408 March 8, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 46, a revelation concerning the gifts of the Spirit, and Doctrine and Covenants 47, a revelation calling John Whitmer to be the Church historian and recorder. ♦ History of the Church, 1:163-66; D&C 46, 47 March 10, 1831 French Foreign Legion, and elite unit of the French Army was founded. March 12, 1831 Clement Studebaker, American automobile pioneer, was born. About March 16, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 66. 66 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 48, a revelation for the Saints gathering in Kirtland about purchasing land. ♦ History of the Church, 1:166-67; D&C 48 About March 19, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 49, a revelation concerning the teachings of Ann Lee and the Shakers. ♦ History of the Church, 1:167-69-; D&C 49; Flake, BYU Studies 20.1: 94-99 Spring 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Earthquake in Peking China predicted by young Mormon girl. This convinced Symonds Ryder to join the church ♦ Church History and the Fulness of Times, 93 April 7, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith Translated Matthew 9:1-11 in his work on the New Testament. ♦ Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 65 April 26, 1831 Jackson County, Missouri Writings –D&C 82 Much Given Ecclesiastical Duties-- Joseph Sustained as President of High Priesthood April 30, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s wife Emma gave birth to twins, a son and daughter, who lived only three hours. They were later identified in family records as Thadeus and Louisa. ♦ History of the Church, 1:260 About May 1, 1831 Thompson, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 51, a revelation concerning the responsibilities of Bishop Edward Partridge. ♦ History of the Church, 1:173-74; D&C 51; Partridge, BYU Studies 42.1 1831 Xavier University was founded as “The Athenaeum” in Cincinnati, Ohio. About May 9, 1831 Hiram, Ohio
  • 67. 67 Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith adopted the twin children of John Murdock, whose wife, Julia, had died during childbirth. ♦ History of the Church, 1:260 May 10, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith baptized Luke S. Johnson. ♦ History of the Church, 1:260; “History of Luke Johnson by Himself,” Millennial Star 26:835 About May 30, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 50, a revelation in response to Elder Parley P. Pratt’s descriptions of strange spiritual manifestations that were sweeping through the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 1:170; D&C 50; Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, 48 May 1831 Thompson, Ohio Visions and Revelations—D&C 51 to Edward Partridge May-June 1831 Thompson, Ohio New York immigrants arrived in Ohio, Lucy Mack’s Miracle of opening the ice. ♦ Lucy Mack Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 199-205 1831 Victor Hugo published The Hunchback of Notre Dame. June 3, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith saw God and Jesus Christ at a conference of elders where the first high priests were ordained. ♦ History of the Church, 1:175-77; Diary of Levi W. Hancock, 1883 June 3, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Fourth general conference of the Church was held in Kirtland, Ohio; At the Isaac Morley Farm, in the little school house, the Man of Sin is revealed and the First High Priests ordained. June 7, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 68. 68 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 52, a revelation organizing pairs of elders to proselyte en route to the next Church conference to be held in Missouri. D&C 52 Commandment was given to go to Missouri ♦ History of the Church, 1:177- 79; D&C 52 About June 8, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 53, a revelation to Algernon Sidney Gilbert, telling him of his calling to be an agent of the Church and to travel with the Prophet and Sidney Rigdon. ♦ History of the Church, 1:179-80; D&C 53 About June 12, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 54, a revelation directed to Newel Knight concerning difficulties in the branch at Thompson, Ohio. D&C 54 - be patient in tribulation ♦ History of the Church, 1:180-81; D&C 54 About June 16, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 55, a revelation calling William W. Phelps to preach the gospel and to assist in making books of instruction for the children of the Church. D&C 55 to a non-member, W. W. Phelps; he is chosen to write children’s books and go to Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:185-86; D&C 55 About June 18, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 56, a revelation concerning Thomas B. Marsh and Ezra Thayre ♦ History of the Church, 1:186-88; D&C 56 June 19, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—After receiving the commandment by heavenly vision to travel to western Missouri, Joseph Smith started on his first journey to Independence, Missouri, with Sidney Rigdon and others, arriving on July 14. ♦ History of the Church, 1:188; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 311 Travels-- Joseph Starts for Missouri to designate the land of Zion July 4, 1831 Former U.S. President James Monroe died.
  • 69. 69 About July 14, 1831 Independence, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and his party arrived in Independence from Kirtland, Ohio, after being shown in vision where the temple at Independence and the city of Zion would be located. ♦ History of the Church, 1:188-89; 2:254 July 20, 1831 Independence, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 57, a revelation concerning the building up of Zion in Independence, Missouri. ♦ D&C 57 August 1, 1831 Jackson County, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 58, a revelation concerning the Saints in their new place of gathering. ♦ History of the Church, 1:191-95; D&C 58 1831 Robert Brown, Scottish botanist, identified and named the cell nucleus. August 2, 1831 Kaw Township, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith assisted the Colesville Branch in laying the first log of the first house in the establishment of Zion in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:196 August 3, 1831 Independence, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties---Joseph Smith dedicated the first temple site in this dispensation just west of Independence. ♦ History of the Church, 1:199 1831 The first horse-drawn buses appeared in New York. August 4, 1831 Kaw Township, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—At the home of Joshua Lewis, Joseph Smith attended and conducted the first conference of the Church in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:199 August 7, 1831 Kaw Township, Missouri
  • 70. 70 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith attended the funeral of Sister Polly Knight, the first Church member to pass away in Missouri, and received Doctrine and Covenants 59, a revelation about Sabbath observance. ♦ History of the Church, 1:199-200; D&C 59 August 8, 1831 Independence, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 60, a revelation concerning the elders called to serve missions to the East. ♦ History of the Church, 1:201-2; D&C 60 August 9, 1831 Independence, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and ten other elders left in canoes on the Missouri River for Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 1:202 August 12, 1831 McIlwaine’s Bend, Missouri River Visions and Revelations—After Brother William W. Phelps saw the destroyer riding on the face of the river in an open vision by daylight, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 61, a revelation concerning Satan’s power over the waters. ♦ History of the Church, 1:203-5; D&C 61 August 13, 1831 Chariton, Missouri Visions and Revelations—On the banks of the Missouri River, Joseph Smith had a chance meeting with several elders who were on their way to the land of Zion, and he received Doctrine and Covenants 62, a revelation concerning their journey. ♦ History of the Church, 1:205-6; D&C 62 August 21, 1831 Nat Turner began a slave rebellion in Virginia. August 27, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith and his company arrived in Kirtland from Independence, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:206 About August 30, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 71. 71 Visions and Revelations—In response to the anxiety of the Saints, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 63, a revelation concerning the gathering of the Saints and the purchase of land. ♦ History of the Church, 1:206-11; D&C 63 September 11, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 64, a revelation containing the Lord’s law of forgiveness and the promise “he that is tithed shall not be burned.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:211-14; D&C 64 September 12, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith moved with his family to Hiram, Ohio, to live with John and Alice Johnson. ♦ History of the Church, 1:215 1831 William Goodell, American missionary, traveled to Constantinople and there established a mission for the local Armenians. He later translated the Bible into Armeno-Turkish. September, 26, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith completed Matthew 26:1-23 in his work on the inspired translation of the Bible. ♦ Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 305-6 October 2, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Sidney Rigdon baptized Orson Hyde. Joseph Smith confirmed Orson and ordained him an elder in the Church that same day. ♦ History of the Church, 1:219-20; Times and Seasons 5:481 About October 4, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 65, a revelation on the Lord’s Prayer, in which the Lord confirmed that the keys of the kingdom of God were established upon the earth so that the kingdom of heaven may come. ♦ History of the Church, 1:2184; D&C 65; Welch and Packer, BYU Studies 33.2: 330-36 October 11, 1831 Hiram, Ohio
  • 72. 72 Ecclesiastical Duties—At a conference at John Johnson’s farm, Joseph Smith taught the brethren about the “ancient manner of instruction meetings.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:219 October 25, 1831 Visions and Revelations—D&C 66 (Orange, Ohio) Ecclesiastical Duties—First day of an important conference October 26, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—En route from Orange to Hiram, Ohio, Joseph Smith healed William McLellin’s ankle. ♦ History of the Church, 1:220-22; Shipps and Welch, eds., Journals of William E. McLellin, 1831-1836, 45 October 29, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith attended a follow-up to the conference held on October 11 and received Doctrine and Covenants 66, a revelation giving conditional blessings to William E. McLellin and calling Samuel H. Smith to preach the gospel. ♦ History of the Church, 1:219-21; D&C 66; Shipps and Welch, eds., Journals of William E. McLellin, 1831-1836, 45-46 October–December 1831 Ezra Booth attacked the Church in the press ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 113-114 November 1, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—At a special conference of the Church, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 1, a revelation that later became the Lord’s preface to the Doctrine and Covenants. ♦ History of the Church, 1:221-24; D&C 1 About November 2, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 67, a revelation containing the Lord’s testimony of the truth of the Book of Commandments. This later became known as the Doctrine and Covenants. William E. McLellin tried to write a revelation but was unable to do so. ♦ History of the Church, 1:224-26; D&C 67 1831 Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, was founded.
  • 73. 73 November 3, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 133, a revelation concerning the Lord’s preparations for the Second Coming, which is sometimes called the appendix of the Doctrine and Covenants. ♦ History of the Church, 1:229-34; D&C 133 About November 3, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations -- Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 68, a revelation concerning the true nature of revelation, the powers of the Aaronic Priesthood, and the responsibilities of parents to their children, speak as moved by the spirit and Presiding Bishopric ♦ History of the Church, 1:226-29; D&C 68 1831 The new London Bridge opened. November 7, 1831 Brazil forbade the slave trade. November 9, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith spent much of his time reviewing and arranging the commandments and revelations in preparation for Oliver Cowdery to take them to the printing press in Independence, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:229, 235 About November 10 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 69, a revelation appointing John Whitmer to accompany Oliver Cowdery to Missouri for the printing of the compiled commandments and revelations; John Witmer is to record the History as they travel. ♦ History of the Church, 1:234-35; D&C 69 November 11, 1831 Slave rebel Nat Turner died. November 12, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 70, a revelation in which the Lord appointed stewards to have the revelations published as the Book of
  • 74. 74 Commandments. Conferences were held to consider the Revelations in the Book of Commandments; “the foundation of the Church in these latter- days...showing that the keys of the mysteries of the kingdom of our Savior are again entrusted to man”. ♦ History of the Church, 1:235-37; D&C 70 November 14, 1831 Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, German philosopher died. November 16, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Writings—After Oliver Cowdery and John Whitmer left for Missouri with the compiled revelations and commandments, Joseph Smith resumed his inspired translation of the scriptures with Sidney Rigdon as his scribe. ♦ History of the Church, 1:238 December 1, 1831 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 71, a revelation in which the Lord promised to confound the enemies of Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon as they proclaimed the gospel.” Joseph and Sidney are to stop translating and reach to allay the bad feelings caused by the Newspaper articles by Ezra Booth who apostatized.♦ History of the Church, 1:238-39; D&C 71 December 3, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon traveled from Hiram to Kirtland, Ohio, in order to follow the instructions in Doctrine and Covenants 71, a revelation about their duty to proclaim the gospel. ♦ History of the Church, 1:239 December 4, 1831 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 72, a revelation for Church members in Kirtland who desired to know their duty. Newell K. Whitney called as Bishop, his duties ♦ History of the Church, 1:239-41; D&C 72 About December 9, 1831 Northern, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon preached in various towns as they traveled through northern Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 1:241
  • 75. 75 1832 January 10, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 73, a revelation concerning preaching and the translation of the Bible. Joseph and Sidney are to return to the Translation of the Bible. ♦ History of the Church, 1:241-42; D&C 73 January 13, 1832 Horatio Alger Jr., Unitarian minister and author was born. January 13, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith talked considerably with a Mr. Bennett, a Campbellite priest. ♦ Shipps and Welch, eds. Journals of William E. McLellin, 69. About January 24, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 74, a revelation answering some of his questions about Paul’s teachings in I Corinthians 7:14 ♦ History of the Church 1:242; D&C 74 January 25, 1832 Amherst, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—At a conference of high priests, elders and other members, Joseph Smith was sustained and ordained as President of the High Priesthood and the Elders wanted to know their duties. ♦ History of the Church, 1:242-43; D&C 107:91-92 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 75, a revelation concerning the office of an elder. ♦ History of the Church, 1:243-45; D&C 75 January 27, 1832 Lewis Carroll, English author was born. February 16, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith worked through John 5:20-40 in his inspired translation of the Bible. ♦ Faulring, Jackson, Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 58; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 313 Visions and Revelations—While at the John Johnson home, Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon received a vision recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 76, in which they saw the Son of Man on the right hand of God as well as events in the premortal life and postmortal glories. ♦ History of the Church, 1:245-52; D&C 76
  • 76. 76 About March 1, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations--While laboring on his inspired translation of the Bible, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 77, a revelation answering questions about the book of Revelation, chapters 4-11. ♦ History of the Church, 1:253-55; D&C 77 March 8, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith ordained Sidney Rigdon and Jesse Gause as counselors in the presidency of the High Priesthood ♦ Kirtland Revelation Book, 10 Before March 20, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 78, a revelation on caring for the poor, and Doctrine and Covenants 79 (Jared Carter) and 80 (Stephen Burnett and Eden Smith), revelations extending callings to individuals ♦ History of the Church, 1:255- 58; D&C 78-80 March 1832 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 81, Frederick G. Williams is to replace Jesse Gause in the First Presidency. March 24, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Personal Life—A mob violently tarred and feathered Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon. His adopted son of John Murdock dies on 29 March 1832 in consequence of exposure at the time. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 115; JS-R, p.140-141; HC 1:265; History of the Church, 1:261-63 March 25, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Emma faints at the sight of Joseph; they spent the night scraping off the tar. The next day Joseph preaches a sermon on brotherly love and kindness; mobbers are in the congregation. The Prophet baptized three people that day. ♦ DHC 1:261 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached at a Sabbath meeting the day after he had been tarred and feathered. He also baptized three people that afternoon ♦ History of the Church, 1:264 March 29, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith Murdock, adopted son of Joseph and Emma Smith died ♦ History of the Church, 1:260-65 March 1832 Hiram, Ohio
  • 77. 77 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 79. April 1, 1832 Warren, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith and several brethren went from Hiram to Warren, Ohio, on their way to Jackson County, Missouri ♦ History of the Church, 1:265-66, Church History in the Fulness of Times, 115 1832 George Catlin, American artist, began living among the Sioux. April 2, 1832 Wellsville, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith traveled from Warren to Wellsville, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 1:266. April 3, 1832 Steubenville, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith traveled from Wellsville to Steubenville, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 1:266. April 4, 1832 En route to Wheeling, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith took passage aboard a steamboat while traveling from Steubenville, Ohio, to Wheeling, Virginia (now West Virginia). ♦ History of the Church, 1:266 April 14, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball baptized. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 75 April 24, 1832 Independence, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Independence after traveling first by steamboat and then an additional 300 miles by stagecoach. ♦ History of the Church, 1:266 April 26, 1832 Independence, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith called a general council of the Church, where he received Doctrine and Covenants 82, a revelation about the responsibilities of Church members, and was acknowledged as President of the High Priesthood. ♦ History of the Church, 1:266-69; D&C 82 1832 The first school for blind children in the U.S., the Perkins School for the Blind, opened in Watertown, Massachusetts. April 28-29, 1832 Kaw Township, Missouri
  • 78. 78 Travels—Joseph Smith visited the Church members living above the Big Blue River. ♦ History of the Church, 1:269 April 30, 1832 Independence, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith sat in council with the brethren and received Doctrine and Covenants 83, a revelation regarding the care of women and children without husbands or fathers. ♦ History of the Church, 1:269-70; D&C 83 May 6, 1832 (Sunday) En route to Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Newel K. Whitney departed Independence by stagecoach. On their return to Kirtland, Ohio, near Greenville, Indiana, the horses became frightened. Joseph jumped safely from the coach, but Newel’s foot caught in the wheel as he jumped. His leg and foot were broken in several places. Joseph tended him at Mr. Porter’s public house in Greenville for four weeks. Sidney continued to Kirtland alone. Joseph Smith, Jun., Sidney Rigdon and Newel K. Whitney left Independence, Mo., for Ohio. On the journey Bro. Whitney broke his leg and was miraculously healed. Joseph was poisoned by his enemies, but was restored in an instant. He vomited so profusely that he dislocated his jaw. He replaced it himself and then made his way to the bedside of Newel K. Whitney where Newel administered to him and he was healed instantly. The Prophet Joseph Smith indicated that the effect of the poison was so powerful it caused much of the hair of his head to be loosened. He was grateful to be alive, however, and said, “thanks be to my Heavenly Father for his interference.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:271; Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914; DHC 1:271-2 for the instance of writing An Impressive Letter from the Pen of Joseph Smith by Lamar C. Berrett Fn, BYU Studies, vol. 11 (1970-1971), Number 4 - Summer 1971 June 1832 Jackson County, Missouri First edition of the Evening and Morning Star ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 109 June 6, 1832 Greenville, Indiana Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife, Emma, while at the Porter tavern, telling her of his meditation and prayers in a nearby grove. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 263-68 July 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith completed his work on the inspired translation of the New Testament. ♦ Jackson and Jasinski, BYU Studies 42. 2:35 July 1832 Independence, Missouri
  • 79. 79 July 20, 1832 Independence, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 57 - Zion July 31, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to William W. Phelps concerning the brethren in the settlement of Zion in Jackson County, Missouri. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 269- 76 August 1, 1832 Independence, Jackson County, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 58 - to Colesville Branch. August 2, 1832 Independence, Jackson County, Missouri Sidney Rigdon dedicated the land for a place of gathering ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 102, 107 August 3, 1832 Independence, Jackson County, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith dedicated the temple site in Independence ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 107 August 7, 1832 Independence, Jackson County, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 59 – Sabbath; return to the garden of Eden, reinstating the Commandments August 8, 1832 Visions and Revelations—Doctrine and Covenants 60 –travel routes About August 19, 1832 Hiram, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 99, a revelation calling John Murdock to proclaim the gospel in the eastern countries. ♦ D&C 99 September 22-23, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 84, a revelation containing instructions about the priesthood as well as scripture in poetic form called “the new song of Zion.” Oath and Covenant of the Priesthood (unlocks Malachi 2) ♦ History of the Church, 1:286-95; D&C 84 October-November 1832 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 80. 80 Joseph serves a mission to Albany, New York City, and Boston with Newel K. Whitney ♦ D&C 84:114) October 13, 1832 Manhattan Island, New York Writings—On a trip with Newel K. Whitney, Joseph Smith wrote to his wife, Emma, describing his fascination with Manhattan Island. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 277-83 1832 Congress passed the protectionist Tariff of 1832 November 6, 1832 (Tuesday) Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith’s fourth natural child, Joseph Smith III, was born on the day the Prophet returned to Kirtland from a hurried journey to Albany, New York and Boston, Massachusetts. ♦ History of the Church, 1:295, Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 November 8, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph meets Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball for the first time. Joseph prophecies that Brigham will one day lead the church after hearing Brigham pray in the Adamic language ♦ History of the Church, 1:295-97; Comprehensive History of the Church, 1:289, JS-R, p.144; JSC p. 36 About November 27, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to William W. Phelps in Independence, Missouri, about consecration, an extract of which appears in Doctrine and Covenants 85. Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 284-91; D&C 85 December 3, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith recorded that his counselor Jesse Gause had been excommunicated from the Church. ♦ Quinn, BYU Studies 23.4:492 December 6, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 86, a revelation explaining the parable of the wheat and tares. ♦ History of the Church, 1:300; D&C86 December 18, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph gives Oliver Cowdery a patriarchal blessing. The first one given in the Church. ♦ K of GR, 180 December 25, 1832 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 81. 81 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 87, a revelation containing prophecies about wars, most notably the forthcoming American Civil War. Civil War Prophecy was given as the brethren were pondering slavery of the children of men on Christmas Day ♦ History of the Church, 1:301-2; D&C 87 December 27-28, 1832 and Kirtland, Ohio January 3, 1833 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 88, a revelation often known as the “Olive Leaf” and which he called “the Lord’s message of peace to us. ♦ History 1833 During this year the First Presidency of the Church was organized and the translation of the Bible finished by the Prophet Joseph; the cornerstones of the Kirtland Temple were laid, and the Saints driven by a mob from their homes in Jackson County, Missouri. The Church printing office having been destroyed by the mob in Missouri, a new press and type were secured, and the publication of the Evening and Morning Star was recommenced at Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 January 4, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—In a letter to N. C. Saxton, editor of the American Revivalist and Rochester Observer, Joseph Smith taught about the gathering of Israel and prophesied of pestilence and civil war. ♦ History of the Church, 1:312-16; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 294-98 January 5, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received a revelation that was never published, naming Frederick G. Williams a counselor in the Presidency to replace Jesse Gause. ♦ Quinn, BYU Studies 23, 4:492 1833 Congress passed the Compromise Tariff of 1833 to resolve the Nullification Crisis. January 11, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—In a letter to William W. Phelps containing the text of the revelation in Doctrine and Covenants 88, Joseph Smith talked of the great blessings awaiting the Saints but also prophesied that if they persisted in iniquity they would “feel [the Lord’s] wrath.” ♦ History of the Church 1:316; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 292-93
  • 82. 82 January 22, 1833 (Tuesday) Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith was at a conference of high priests where the brethren experienced the gift of tongues. ♦ History of the Church 1:322-23 Joseph Smith, Jun., Sidney Rigdon, Frederick G. Williams, Newel K. Whitney, Hyrum Smith, Zebedee Coltrin, Joseph Smith, Sen., Samuel H. Smith, John Murdock, Lyman E. Johnson, Orson Hyde, Ezra Thayer, Levi W. Hancock and William Smith assembled in conference at Kirtland, Ohio. On this occasion the Prophet Joseph, Zebedee Coltrin and Wm. Smith spoke in tongues, “after which the Lord poured out his spirit in a miraculous manner, until all the Elders and several members, both male and female, spoke in tongues.” ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, Deseret News, 1914 January 22-23 Kirtland, Ohio School of the prophets is organized. ♦ Doctrine and Covenants 88:70-80, 117-141 January 23, 1833 (Wednesday) Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—The conference was continued at Kirtland. “After much speaking, singing, praying and praising God, all in tongues,” the brethren “proceeded to the washing of feet, as commanded of the Lord,” according to the practice recorded in John 13:4-15. ♦ History of Joseph Smith January 1833 Kirtland, Ohio J.S. writes to Bishop Partridge that he feels more like weeping over Zion than rejoicing over her. ♦ K of GR, 172 1833 Oberlin College, the first American institution to admit women and blacks, was founded in Ohio. About January 24, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—At the beginning session of the School of the Prophets, Joseph Smith washed the feet of the brethren and administered the sacrament. ♦ History of the Church, 1: 323-24. February 2, 1833 (Saturday) Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith finished reviewing his inspired translation of the New Testament. ♦ History of the Church, 1:324
  • 83. 83 February 6, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter from the First Presidency to the Church members in Thompson, Ohio, encouraging them to “continue in brotherly love, walk in meekness, watching unto prayer, that you be not overcome.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:324-25 February 12, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a strongly worded letter to N.C. Saxton, editor of the American Revivalist and Rochester Observer, who had printed only part of the letter Joseph had sent for publication on January 4. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 299-300 February 17, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—During a conference, Joseph Smith ordained John Johnson an elder. ♦ History of the Church, 1:327 February 27, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 89, a revelation containing the dietary code known as the Word of Wisdom ♦ History of the Church, 1:327; D&C 89 March 4, 1933 U. S. President Andrew Jackson was sworn in for a second term. March 8, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 90, a revelation stating that his counselors in the presidency, Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams, were to have increased authority and be “accounted as equal with thee in holding the keys of this last kingdom.” They were ordained to their new responsibilities on March 18. ♦ History of the Church, 1:329-32; D&C 90 March 9, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 91, a revelation concerning the Apocrypha, books which at that time were included in many editions of the Bible. ♦ History of the Church, 1:331-32; D&C 91 March 15, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 92, a revelation concerning Frederick G. Williams, recently called member of the First Presidency. ♦ History of the Church, 1:333; D&C 92
  • 84. 84 1833 President Jackson began placing federal deposits in pet banks around the country, laying the foundation for the Panic of 1837. March 18, 1833 (Monday) Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—At a meeting of high priests, Joseph Smith ordained Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams as c0unselors in the presidency of the Church, to which they had previously been called, as recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 81. Many of those present saw visions. Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams were appointed and set apart by President Joseph Smith to be his Counselors in the Presidency of the Church, according to the revelation given March 8th . On the same occasion “many of the brethren saw a heavenly vision of the Savior and concourses of angels.” ♦ John Murdock and Zebedee Coltrin, see The Father and the Son; History of Joseph Smith; Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, Deseret News, 1914; History of the Church, 1:334-35; D&C 81; Williams, BYU Studies 12.3:312; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 312 March 23, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with a council of high priests and elders to discuss purchasing land in Kirtland. ♦ History of the Church 1:335. April 1833 Jackson County, Missouri Three hundred meet at Independence Courthouse to expel Mormons; get drunk—fight instead ♦ KofGR, 173 About April 13, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith responded by letter to Jared Carter’s brother, who had inquired about the duties of Church officers and preparations for going to Zion. ♦ History of the Church. 1:338-39 April 21, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith responded to an epistle the brethren in Missouri had sent in February. ♦ History of the Church, 1:340-42 May 6, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 93, a sublime revelation about mankind’s eternal existence and relationship to God, Those who are begotten through Christ are the Church of the Firstborn, and Doctrine and Covenants 94, a revelation about the construction of a house for the presidency and also a printing house. Church Building Committee appointed ♦ History of the Church, 1:343-47; D&C 93, 94
  • 85. 85 May 7, 1833 Johannes Brahms, German composer, was born. Summer 1833 Kirtland, Ohio School of the Elders was held. June 1, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 95, a revelation giving a continuation of instructions for building the temple in Kirtland. Saints chastised for not building the temple. ♦ History of the Church, 1:350-52; D&C 95 June 3, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—A conference of high priests convened in the translating room, where Joseph Smith received a revelation on the size of the house to be built for worship and for the School of the Prophets. ♦ History of the Church, 1:352 June 4, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 96 - Disposition of the French Farm 1833 The Whig Party was established in the U.S. June 4, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—At a conference assembled in the translating room, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 96, a revelation concerning the Lord’s order for dividing certain properties. ♦ History of the Church, 1:352-53; D&C 96 June 6, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and an assembly of high priests voted to instruct the building committee to proceed immediately to obtain materials for the construction of the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 1:353-54 June 21, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a council to hear the appeal of Doctor Philastus Hurlbut, who was excommunicated two days later. ♦ History of the Church 1:354-55 July 1833 Jackson County, Missouri “Secret constitution” distributed by Jackson County citizens. ♦ Church History in the Fulness
  • 86. 86 of Times, 130-134 July 2, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Although the major portion of the inspired translation of the Bible was completed by this date, Joseph Smith continued until his death in 1844 to make modifications while preparing a manuscript for the press. ♦ History of the Church, 1:369 July 5, 1833 Joseph Niépce, French photography pioneer died. About July 10, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith clarified to the Saints that the “hot drinks” spoken of in the Word of Wisdom included tea and coffee. ♦ McConkie, Remembering Joseph, 253-54; Joel Johnson reminiscence 1881 July 20, 1833 Jackson County, Missouri First edition of Book of Commandments printed. Mob of 500 demands Mormon evacuation of Jackson County. They destroy the press, burn most Books of Commandments, tar and feather Bishop Partridge and Charles Allen. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 133; KofGR, p. 175 July 23, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith participated in laying the cornerstones of the Kirtland Temple. Six elders offered their lives for the safety of the Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 1:400 August 2, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 97, a revelation about the Saints in Jackson County, Missouri, who were suffering great persecutions. ♦ History of the Church, 1:400-402; D&C 97 August 6, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 98, a revelation regarding the persecution of the Church in Missouri and including instructions on how the Saints should react to their enemies - the Law of War and Retaliation. ♦ History of the Church, 1:403-6; D&C 98 August 10, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 87. 87 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to William W. Phelps, John Whitmer, Edward Partridge, Isaac Morley, John Corrill, Sidney Gilbert, and others. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 304-6 August 18, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to the brethren in Missouri concerning the violence there. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 307-16 August 20, 1833 Future U.S. President Benjamin Harrison was born. September 4, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Vienna Jacques, thanking her for her monetary offerings. ♦ History of the Church, 1:407-9; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 317-20 September 11, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and other council members consented to establish a press in Kirtland to publish the Latter-day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate and The Evening and the Morning Star until they could be published in Missouri again. ♦ History of the Church, 1:409 1833 William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan founded the American Anti-Slavery Society September 26, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Silas Smith a Stockholm, St Lawrence County, New York. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 321-24 September 28, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and the Kirtland High Council decided by unanimous vote “that it was the will of the Lord for all who were able and willing, to build up and strengthen the stake in Kirtland.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:410 1833 Lucretia Coffin Mott, American feminist and reformer, organized the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society October 3-November 4 Travels—Joseph’s mission to Canada
  • 88. 88 October 5, 1833 Ashtabula, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith started on a journey to the eastern United States and Canada. ♦ History of the Church, 1:416-17 October 12, 1833 Perrysburg, New York Visions and Revelations—While at Freeman Nickerson’s, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 100, a revelation concerning his and Sidney Rigdon’s missionary labors. “Your families are well.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:419-21; D&C 100 October 15, 1833 Lodi, New York Travels—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon were refused entrance to preach in a Presbyterian meetinghouse. ♦ History of the Church, 1:421 October 18, 1833 Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada (now Ontario) Travels—Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Freeman Nickerson arrived at the house of Eleazer Freeman Nickerson. ♦ History of the Church, 1:421 October 20, 1833 Brantford, Upper Canada (now Ontario) Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon preached in the morning and evening to attentive congregations. ♦ History of the Church, 1:421 October 21, 1833 Alfred Nobel, creator of the Nobel Prize and inventor of dynamite, was born. October 23, 1833 Colburn, Upper Canada (now Ontario) Ecclesiastical Duties—At a candlelight meeting, Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon were challenged by a Wesleyan Methodist who “exhibited a great lack of reason, knowledge, and wisdom and gave [them] no opportunity to reply.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:421-22 October 24, 1833 Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada (now Ontario) Travels—When Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon returned from preaching in Waterford, Eleazer Freeman Nickerson and his wife “declared their belief in the work, and offered themselves for baptism.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:422 October 26, 1833 (Saturday) Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada (now Ontario) Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith, Jr., preached and baptized twelve persons. October 27, 1833 Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada (now Ontario)
  • 89. 89 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith had great success while preaching in Mount Pleasant; twelve people requested baptism and others desired another meeting for the next day. ♦ History of the Church, 1:422 October 28, 1833 Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada (now Ontario) Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held another meeting and confirmed fourteen people who had been baptized in the previous two days. ♦ History of the Church, 1:422 October 29, 1833 En route to Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon departed for their return trip to Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 1:422 October 31, 1833 (Thursday) Jackson County, Missouri A mob attacked a branch of the Church, west of the Big Blue, in Jackson County, Missouri, destroyed ten houses, and beat several of the brethren in a most brutal manner. Parley P. Pratt said: “It was evening. I was out in the act of posting guards a short distance from the dwellings, when two men [Robert Johnson and one Harris] assailed us, armed with guns and pistols; and supposing it against our principles to make any defence, they attacked the guards. I was without arms, but stepped forward to interfere between them, when one of them drew his gun backwards, and, with both hands, struck the barrel of it across the top of my head. I staggared back, but did not fall; the blood came streaming down my face, and I was for an instant stunned by the blow; But, recovering myself, I called help from the house and disarmed them, and put them under guard till morning. Their arms were then restored, and they let go in peace.” ♦ Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, p.97 Sister Whitmer: “I do not now reecollect on the 31st day of October... of the Mob Came to the house of David Whitmer and drew his wife out of the house by the hair of the head and proceeded to throw down the house they then went to other houses throwing them down untill they had demolished ten dwelling houses amidst the shrieks and screams of women and children.” ♦ Clark V. Johnson, ed., The Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833- 1838 Missouri Conflict, p.525 – 527 A few days later the Rockwells were told that unless they renounced their "doctrine and religious faith as Mormons," they would share the same fate as Partridge and Allen. Rockwell, too, related how the wife of David Whitmer was dragged from her home by the hair of her head and watched helplessly as her domicile was demolished. ♦ Arnold K. Garr and Clark V. Johnson, eds., Regional Studies in Latter-day Saint History: Missouri , p.211 November 1-14 Boggs orders weapons taken away from Mormons 1200 Mormons driven out. 203 homes burned. Trail of blood left by 190 exiled across 30 miles of frosted ground; meteor storm in
  • 90. 90 the sky. ♦ Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, p.____; KofGR p. 177 November-December 1833 Jackson County, Missouri Saints expelled from Jackson County. November 1, 1833 (Friday) En route to Kirtland, Ohio Travels—While Joseph was en route to Kirtland, mobs attacked the Gilbert and Whitney Store in Independence, Missouri, partially destroying it, as well as the homes of many Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 1:426-29 November 1, 1833 (Friday) Independence, Missouri The Saints at Independence were attacked by a mob, and Gilbert & Whitney’s store was partly destroyed, besides many private dwellings. November 2, 1833 (Saturday) Big Blue, Jackson County, Missouri The mob attacked the Saints on the Big Blue, Jackson County, and beat David Bennett severely. November 4, 1833 (Monday) Jackson County, Missouri Became known as “bloody day” of conflict. A skirmish took place between a company of Saints and a mob, several miles west of the Big Blue, in Jackson County. Andrew Barber, one of the Saints, was mortally wounded, two of the mob were killed, and several others wounded on both sides. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 136 November 4, 1833 (Monday) Kirtland, Ohio Travels-- Joseph Smith, Jr., returned from his mission to Canada. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology, Deseret News, 1914 November 13, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith arose at 4:00 A.M. and beheld a meteor shower, which he interpreted as a sign from God that the coming of Christ was close at hand. ♦ History of the Church, 1:439 November 12-13, 1833 The Leonid meteor shower was observed. November 19, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Moses Nickerson in Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada, relating some of his travel experiences and his testimony of the gospel. ♦ History of the Church, 1:441-43; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 325-27
  • 91. 91 November 22, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s brother Don Carlos came to live with him and learn the printing trade. Joseph learns of the Saints’ expulsion from Jackson County. ♦ History of the Church, 1:446 November 25, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Orson Hyde and John Gould arrived from Missouri and told Joseph Smith and the other brethren about the expulsion of the Saints from Jackson County, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:446 1833 British Parliament forbade child labor for children under nine in the textile industry. December 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Doctor Philastus Hurlbut returned to Kirtland from a fact-finding mission (an attempt to prove that the Book of Mormon was a work of fiction and that Joseph Smith was not an honest man), began to lecture on his findings, and threatened the life of Joseph Smith. ♦ History of the Church, 1:448-51 December 1833 Joseph and Emma receive patriarchal blessings from Joseph Smith, Sr.
  • 92. 92 December 5, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Bishop Edward Partridge in Liberty, Missouri, concerning the persecution of the Saints there. ♦ History of the Church, 1:448-51 December 6, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and others prayed that the newly arrived printing press would be a means to bring “about the restoration of the house of Israel.” ♦ History of the Church, 1:451 December 10, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Writings— Joseph first learns about the Missouri persecutions. Joseph Smith dictated a consoling letter to the Saints in Missouri who had been exiled from their homes in Jackson County. ♦ History of the Church, 1:453-56; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 328-32; KofGR, 179 December 12, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Word was received that the Saints who had already fled from northwestern Jackson County, Missouri were about to be expelled from a southern area of that county. ♦ History of the Church, 1:456-57 1833 The first enzyme, diastase, was discovered by Anselme Payen. December 16, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 101, a revelation concerning the Saints’ afflictions in Jackson County, Missouri. The Lord promised that he will own the righteous saints who are persecuted for his name. Saints have been driven from Jackson County to Clay County and some to Van Buren. Threats and Destruction of personal property were prevalent. ♦ History of the Church, 1:458-64; D&C 101 December 18, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith saw in vision Jehovah appearing to Adam at Adam- ondi-Ahman in ancient times. Office of evangelist or patriarch announced, first patriarchal blessings given. Joseph Smith, Sr., was ordained Patriarch to the whole Church. ♦ Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 312; Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 Ecclesiastical Duties—The elders assembled, and Joseph Smith dedicated the printing press. Later he pronounced blessings on his parents and siblings. ♦ History of the Church, 1:465-67 December 21, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 93. 93 Legal Events—Ohio v. Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. Joseph Smith filed a complaint against Hurlbut, stating that he had reason to fear that Hurlbut would “wound, beat, or kill him.” ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series December 26, 1833 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith rebuked Elder Ezekiel Rider and Bishop Newel Whitney, who had been saying hard things to each other. ♦ History of the Church, 1:469-70 December 31, 1833 (Tuesday) Richland, New York Wilford Woodruff was baptized at Richland, New York, by Zera Pulsipher. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 1834 The first High Council of the Church was organized at Kirtland, Ohio. Zion’s Camp made its famous march to Missouri, and a High Council was organized in Clay County, Mo., where most of the Saints, who had been expelled from Jackson County, had located. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 January 13-15, 1834 Painesville, Ohio Legal Events—Ohio v. Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. Sixteen witnesses gave testimony concerning the alleged threat against Joseph Smith. Joseph testified on at least two of the three days. The court ordered Hurlbut to enter recognizance to keep the peace. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series January 16, 1834 Chardon, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith visited his sister Katherine’s husband, Wilkins Jenkins Salisbury, and spent the night. History of the Church, 2:4 January 28, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, and Frederick G. Williams prayed that Doctor Philastus Hurlbut would not prevail against them in a pending lawsuit. ♦ History of the Church, 2:24 January 31, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 94. 94 Writings—Before departing on a mission to recruit and raise funds for the Zion’s Camp march, Joseph Smith prayed for more subscribers to the church newspaper, The Evening and the Morning Star ♦ History of the Church, 2:24 February 8, 1834 Dmitri Mendeleev, Russian chemist and creator of the first version of the periodic table was born. February 9, 1834 New Portage, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a conference of high priests, elders, priests, teachers, and deacons at the house of Brother Kirlins. ♦ History of the Church, 2:24-25 February 12, 1834 Friedrich Schleiermacher, German theologian and father of modern Protestant theology, died. February 12, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—At a meeting of high priests and elders at his home, Joseph Smith spoke of the dignity of his office, and he taught the brethren, according to a vision he had of the pattern and organization of the Church, how a council of the Church should be organized. ♦ History of the Church, 2:25-36; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 312 February 17, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith recorded D&C 102, which contained minutes from a high priests’ meeting held at his home where he organized the first high council of the Church; sanctioned plan to organize army to help Missouri Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 2:28-31; D&C 102 February 19, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—During a meeting with the high council, Joseph Smith blessed other members of the council and received a blessing from his father. ♦ History of the Church, 2:31- 34. February 20, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—At a high council meeting, the brethren discussed whether a transgression of the Word of Wisdom should “deprive an official member from holding
  • 95. 95 office in the Church.” Joseph Smith rendered a decision in the affirmative.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:34-35 February 24, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations— After Parley P. Pratt and Lyman ______ arrived in Kirtland, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 103, a revelation about the persecution and redemption of Zion in Missouri, with instructions to organize companies, called Zion’s Camp, to go to the relief of the Saints in Jackson County. ♦ History of the Church, 2:36-40; D&C 103 February 26, 1834 En route to New York and Pennsylvania Travels—Joseph Smith started from Kirtland to New York and Pennsylvania to gather volunteers for Zion’s Camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:40 February 28, 1834 Wesleyville, Pennsylvania Travels—Joseph Smith stayed with kind strangers on his journey to New York to gather volunteers for Zion’s Camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:41 March-May 1834 Members recruited for Zion’s Camp. March 2, 1834 José Cecilio del Valle, first president of the United Provinces of Central Amerca and author of the Central American Declaration of Independence, died. March 2, 1834 Westfield, New York Travels—While traveling with Parley P. Pratt to enlist men to help the Saints return to their land in Jackson County, Missouri, Joseph Smith preached in the evening to a small congregation that “seemed strong in the faith.” History of the Church, 2:41 March 5, 1834 Perrysburg, Cattaraugus County, New York Travels—Joseph Smith and Parley P. Pratt held another meeting at Freeman Nickerson’s home but gained no volunteers to help the Missouri Saints return to their homes in Jackson, County, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:420; 2:41-42 March 6, 1834 Perrysburg, Cattaraugus County, New York
  • 96. 96 Travels—Joseph Smith and Parley P. Pratt held another meeting at Freeman Nickerson’s home but gained no volunteers to help the Missouri Saints return to their homes in Jackson County, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 1:420; 2:42 1834 The combine harvester was patented by Hiram Moore. March 7, 1834 Ellicottville, New York Travels—While traveling in the eastern states, Joseph Smith, Parley P. Pratt, and Freeman Nickerson experienced difficulties finding lodging. ♦ History of the Church, 2:42 March 8, 1834 Farmersville, New York Travels—Joseph Smith, Parley P. Pratt, and Freeman Nickerson travelled to Farmersville, New York, where they spent the evening in the home of an Esquire Walker. ♦ History of the Church, 2:42-43; Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, 117; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 38 March 9, 1834 Farmersville, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and his traveling companions held a meeting in a schoolhouse and afterward had difficulty leaving because many who believed in their message were eager to speak with them. ♦ History of the Church, 2:42 March 10, 1834 Freedom, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached to two large congregations with much success. ♦ History of the Church, 2:42-43 March 11, 1834 Freedom, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a meeting at which he baptized Heman T. Hyde, a young man whose entire family later joined the Church and formed part of the Freedom Branch. ♦ History of the Church, 2:43 March 12, 1834 Livonia, New York Travels—Joseph Smith rode thirty-six miles to Edmund Bosley’s home in Livonia, New York. ♦ History of the Church, 2:43 March 17, 1834 Avon, New York Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a conference of elders at which he recruited men to assist the Saints who had been driven from Jackson County, Missouri. He also
  • 97. 97 appealed for funds to buy land in Missouri and to pay debts owed by the Church’s leaders in Kirtland. ♦ History of the Church, 2:44 March 19, 1834 Bennington Township, Wyoming County, New York Travels—Joseph Smith traveled to Bennington Township, Wyoming County, New York, where he stayed the night at Isaac McWithy’s tavern. ♦ History of the Church, 2:44-45 March 22, 1834 Perrysburg, New York Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Perrysburg and stayed at Vinson Knight’s home. ♦ History of the Church, 2:45 March 24, 1834 John Wesley Powell, explorer of the American West, was born. March 25, 1834 Westfield, New York Travels—Joseph Smith traveled to Job Lewis’s home in Westfield, New York. ♦ History of the Church, 2:45 March 27, 1834 Near Painesville, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith traveled to Springfield, Pennsylvania, where he found Sidney Rigdon, then continued his homeward journey, stopping sixteen miles east of Painesville, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:45 March 28, 1834 The Senate censured President Jackson for withdrawing federal funds from the Bank of the United States the previous year. ♦ History of the Church, 2:45 March 28, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith praised the Lord that he found his family well when he returned from his journey to western New York. Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Edward Partridge, William W. Phelps, and other members of the United Firm, a business Joseph established to oversee the Church’s properties and commercial interests in Ohio and Missouri. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 333-39; Parkin, BYU Studies 46.3:4-66 March 30, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 98. 98 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Edward Partridge, William W. Phelps, and other members of the United Firm, a business Joseph established to oversee the Church’s properties and commercial interests in Ohio and Missouri. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 333-39; Parkin, BYU Studies 46.3:4-66 March 31, 1834 Chardin, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith went to Chardon, Ohio, to attend court as a witness for the prosecution in the case of Ohio v. Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. ♦ History of the Church, 2:46 1834 Twenty-eight million acres of public lands were offered for sale in a land boom driven by immigration and also by speculative interests. April 1, 1834 Chardon, Ohio Legal Events—While preparing subpoenas for witnesses at Ezekial Rider’s house, Joseph Smith prophesied that the Lord would not allow Doctor Philastus Hurlbut to prevail in court against Joseph. ♦ History of the Church, 2:46 April 2-3, 1834 Chardon, Ohio Legal Events—Ohio v. Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. Joseph Smith attended court in the matter of his complaint against Hurlbut. ♦ History of the Church, 2:47; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series April 5, 1834 Chardon, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith served as a witness for John Johnson. ♦ History of the Church, 2:47 April 7, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with Newel K. Whitney, Oliver Cowdery, Frederick G. Williams, and Heber C. Kimball in the council room and prayed for means to reconcile debts and to prevail against Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. ♦ History of the Church, 2:45 April 7-9, 1834 Charlton, Ohio Legal Events—Ohio v Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. The trial continued with seventeen prosecution witnesses and four defense witnesses testifying. Judge Birchard ruled that Joseph Smith had sufficient cause to file a complaint. Hurlbut was ordered to pay the court
  • 99. 99 costs and enter into a $200 recognizance to keep the peace for six months. ♦ History of the Church, 2:47; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series April 10, 1834 (Thursday) Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a council of the United Firm in Ohio in which he dissolved the economic order among the members who were involved in the firm. ♦ Parkin, ♦ BYU Studies 46.3:4-66; History of the Church, 2:49 1834 The first practical refrigerator was invented by Jacob Perkins. April 11, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a meeting where Andrews Tyler was restored to the fellowship of the church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:50 April 12, 1834 Near Lake Erie, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith went from Kirtland to a place near Lake Erie to go fishing and visit some brethren. ♦ History of the Church, 2:50 April 15, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith plowed fields and planted oats on Brother Frederick G. Williams’s farm. ♦ History of the Church, 2:50 April 17, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a meeting where Elder Sidney Rigdon discussed the “deliverance of Zion” and the building of a temple in Kirtland. ♦ History of the Church, 2:50 April 18, 1834 New Portage, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith left for New Portage with Sidney Rigdon, Oliver Cowdery, and Zebedee Coltrin to attend a conference. ♦ History of the Church, 2:50 April 19, 1834 Norton, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Oliver Cowdery, and Zebedee Coltrin gave one another priesthood blessings to gain strength and wisdom for their upcoming labors. According to Coltrin’s account, they saw Adam and Eve in vision. ♦ History of the Church, 2:50-51; Zebedee Coltrin in Andrus and Andrus, They Knew the Prophet, 28
  • 100. 100 April 20, 1834 Norton, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Elder Sidney Rigdon entertained a large congregation of Saints, including Joseph Smith, with an interesting discourse on the fullness of times. ♦ History of the Church, 2:52 April 21, 1834 Norton, Ohio Legal Events—Ohio v. Joseph Smith. The state of Ohio brought an action against Joseph for assaulting Calvin Stoddard, his brother-in-law (married to his sister Sophronia). ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1834 Charles Babbage, English mathematician, invented the principle of the “analytical engine” (modern computer). April 22, 1834 Norton, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith returned home, traveling from New Portage to Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:54 April 23, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—While assembled in council with the brethren, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 104, a revelation concerning the United Firm and the care of the poor; United Order to be temporarily dissolved. ♦ Parkin, BYU Studies 46.3:4-66; History of the Church, 2:54-60; D&C 104: Pykles, BYU Studies 41.1:179 April 27, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—As Wilford Woodruff remembered, Joseph Smith prophesied in a testimony meeting before the departure of Zion’s Camp that the Church would fill the Rocky Mountains, North and South America, and the whole earth. ♦ Conference Report, April 1898; Discourses of Wilford Woodruff, 39; Cowley, Wilford Woodruff, 38-39 May 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Zion’s Camp began march. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 143-151 May 3, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith presided over a conference of elders that discussed the name by which the Church was to be known. The name was changed to The Church of the
  • 101. 101 Latter-Day Saints (from Church of Christ) to distinguish it from other churches. The name was changed again by revelation on April 26, 1838, to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- day Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 2:62-63; Evening and Morning Star 2.20:160; D&C 115:4 May 4, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached to the Saints in the shade of the new school- house. ♦ Millennial Star 27:406-8; 423-35, 438-41 May 5, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith started from Kirtland as the leader of Zion’s Camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:63-69; Crawley, BYU Studies 14.4:413 May 6, 1834 New Portage, Ohio Travels—Continuing his trek with Zion’s Camp, Joseph Smith went from Streetsborough to New Portage, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:64 May 7, 1834 New Portage, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp brethren prepared for their journey to Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:64 1834 Historian George Bancroft published History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent. May 8, 1834 Chippewa, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith continued on the Zion’s Camp march to Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:65; Radke, BYU Studies, 39.1:150 May 9, 1834 Wooster, Ohio Travels—Continuing with Zion’s Camp, Joseph Smith went from Chippewa to Wooster, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:65 May 10, 1834 Richfield, Ohio Travels—continuing with Zion’s Camp, Joseph Smith passed through Mansfield on the way from Wooster to Richfield, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:65 May 11, 1834 Richfield, Ohio
  • 102. 102 Travels—On the Zion’s Camp march led by Joseph Smith, Elder Sylvester Smith preached to the brethren, after which they received the sacrament and were joined by eight more men. ♦ History of the Church, 2:65 May 12, 1834 Sandusky Plains, Ohio Travels—Zion’s Camp, led by Joseph Smith, continued traveling through Indian settlements on the Sandusky Plains. ♦ History of the Church, 2:65 May 13-16, 1834 Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith continued on the Zion’s Camp march, traveling from Sandusky Plains, Ohio, to a location between Springfield and Dayton, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:65-68 May 17, 1834 Wayne Country, Indiana Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith warned discontented Zion’s Camp members that mis- fortune would befall them if they did not change their disobedient behavior. ♦ History of the Church, 2:68 May 18, 1834 Richmond, Indiana Travels—Joseph Smith’s warning to the brethren in Zion’s Camp concerning their disobedience was evidenced when their horses foundered. History of the Church, 2:68-69 May 19, 1834 Franklin, Indiana Travels—Zion’s Camp, led by Joseph Smith, traveled thirty-one miles, going from Richmond to Franklin, Indiana. ♦ History of the Church, 2:69 May 20, 1834 Greenfield, Indiana Travels—Joseph Smith led the Zion’s Camp march from Franklin to Greenfield, Indiana. ♦ History of the Church, 2:69-70 May 20, 1834 Marquis de Lafayette, French nobleman and volunteer soldier in the American Revolution, died. May 21, 1834 Indianapolis, Indiana
  • 103. 103 Travels—By temporarily dispersing, Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp brethren passed through Indianapolis without attracting the attention of their enemies. ♦ History of the Church, 2:70 May 22, 1834 Belleville, Indiana Travels—The Zion’s Camp march, led by Joseph Smith, went from Indianapolis to Belleville, Indiana, and encamped near “a small stream of water in a grove.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:70 May 23, 1834 Near Greencastle, Indiana Travels—Joseph led the Zion’s Camp march from Belleville to Greencastle, Indiana, and after a hard drive, the group encamped about four miles from Greencastle. ♦ History of the Church, 2:70 May 23, 1834 Carl Heinrich Bloch, Danish artist, was born. May 24, 1834 Edgar County, Illinois Travels—The ongoing Zion’s Camp march, led by Joseph Smith, left Greencastle, crossed the Wabash River in ferry boats, and pushed on to the Illinois state line at Edgar County. ♦ History of the Church, 2:70 May 25, 1834 Edgar County, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith and the other brethren on the Zion’s Camp march spent Sunday in camp, not on the road. ♦ History of the Church, 2:70 May 26, 1834 Near the Embarras River, Illinois Travels-–Joseph Smith demonstrated great care for the wild animals the brethren encountered on the Zion’s Camp march and then tested the readiness of the brethren by sounding a false alarm. ♦ History of the Church, 2:71-72 May 27, 1834 Okaw branch of the Kaskaskia River, Illinois Travels—As Joseph Smith’s history records, he and the brethren of Zion’s Camp experienced the protection of angels on their journey. ♦ History of the Church¸ 2:73 May 28, 1834 Decatur, Illinois
  • 104. 104 Travels—Joseph Smith continued to lead the brethren on the Zion’s Camp march, even though they suffered from want of food and water. ♦ History of the Church, 2:74 1834 Spanish inquisition, which began in the thirteenth century, was suppressed. May 29, 1834 Decatur, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith organized a sham battle for Zion’s Camp marchers in order to alleviate growing tension and unrest due to low provisions in the camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:74-75 May 30, 1834 Springfield, Illinois Travels—Zion’s Camp passed through Springfield, and Ezra Thayre administered his own concocted medicine to the sick horses. ♦ History of the Church, 2:76-77 May 31, 1834 Jacksonville, Illinois Travels—Zion’s Camp moved on to Jacksonville after a man from Springfield, Illinois, gave Joseph Smith $100 for their march. ♦ History of the Church, 2:77 June 1, 1834 Jacksonville, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and some of the brethren in Zion’s Camp preached all day to a crowd just outside of Jacksonville. ♦ History of the Church, 2:78 June 2, 1834 Illinois River, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp marchers went from Jacksonville to the banks of the Illinois River and ferried over without difficulty, despite threats from enemies that the company would not cross the river. ♦ History of the Church, 2:79 June 3, 1834 Illinois River, Illinois Travels—While the Zion’s Camp marchers were encamped on the banks of the Illinois River, Joseph Smith visited a burial mound and examined a skeleton. He identified the man as a righteous Lamanite warrior who had been called Zelph. ♦ History of the Church, 2:79-80; Godfrey, BYU Studies 29.2:31-56 June 4, 1834 Mississippi River, Missouri
  • 105. 105 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to his wife, Emma, giving news of Zion’s Camp and recounting how their enemies had perceived their band of 170 men to be from five to seven hundred. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 344-46 Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp marchers went from Atlas, Illinois, to the banks of the Mississippi River, where it took two days to cross into Missouri because they had only one ferry. ♦ History of the Church, 2:82-83 June 7, 1834 Salt River, Missouri Travels—The Zion’s Camp march, led by Joseph Smith, encamped in the woods near a spring of water at Salt River. ♦ History of the Church, 2:87 June 8, 1834 Salt River, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp brethren enjoyed preaching on the Sabbath and were joined later that day by the Prophet’s brother Hyrum and Lyman Wight with a company of volunteers they had gathered from Michigan. Zion’s Camp obtained maximum numerical strength of 207 people. ♦ History of the Church, 2:87-88; Manscill, BYU Studies 39.1:171, 174 1834 British East India Company’s monopoly on trade with China ended. June 9, 1834 Salt River, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp marchers remained at the Salt River for three days, resting themselves and reorganizing the camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:88 June 9-15 Governor Dunklin refused to cooperate with Zion’s Camp. June 13, 1834 Near the Salt River, Missouri Travels—On the Zion’s Camp march led by Joseph Smith, Heber C. Kimball’s horses got loose through the negligence of the guards, and he had to pursue the horses for ten miles. ♦ History of the Church, 2:90 June 14, 1834 Near the Salt River, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp marchers encamped in an unsafe and unpleasant situation in a ravine because it was the only place to get water for several miles. ♦ History of the Church, 2:91
  • 106. 106 June 15, 1834 Charlton River, Missouri Political Events—While on the Zion’s Camp march, Joseph Smith received word that Daniel Dunklin, governor of Missouri, would not fulfill the expectation to reinstate the Saints to their lands in Jackson County, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:94 June 16, 1834 (Monday) Clay County, Missouri A large meeting of the citizens of Clay County, Mo., held at the Liberty court house, failed to adjust the difficulties between the Saints and the Jackson County people. From the meeting Samuel C. Owens, James Campbell and about thirteen other mob-leaders started for Jackson County to raise a mob, in which, however, they failed, as Mr. Campbell and six others were drowned in attempting to cross the Missouri River. ♦ Andrew Jensen, Chronology 1834 Abraham Lincoln entered politics at age twenty-five as an assemblyman in the Illinois legislature. June 16, 1834 Grand River, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and the Zion’s Camp marchers suffered from thirst and fatigue as they went from the Chariton to the Grand River. ♦ History of the Church, 2:95 June 17, 1834 Near Wakenda River, Carroll County, Missouri Travels—The Zion’s Camp marchers, led by Joseph Smith, experienced some divisions while trying to decide where to camp after crossing the Wakenda River. ♦ History of the Church, 2:101 June 18, 1834 Outside of Richmond, Missouri Travels—On the Zion’s Camp march, Joseph Smith was in poor health and had no provisions, but he managed to travel seventeen miles before eating. ♦ History of the Church, 2:101 June 19, 1834 Between Little and Big Fishing Rivers, Missouri Travels—A violent hailstorm came upon a large mob of about 300 who had just commenced their attack on Joseph Smith and the brethren of Zion’s Camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:102-5
  • 107. 107 June 19, 1834 C. H. Spurgeon, an influential British Reformed Baptist preacher who founded the Spurgeon’s charity, was born. June 20, 1834 Fishing River, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith counseled the brethren of Zion’s Camp to discharge all their firearms because of possible moisture; they then marched five miles onto the prairie where they could procure food and defend themselves from their enemies. Cholera attacked Zion’s Camp. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 149; History of the Church, 2:105 June 21, 1834 Fishing River, Missouri Travels—While encamped on the Fishing river, Joseph Smith and the brethren of Zion’s Camp were visited by three men from Ray County who became their allies after hearing about the Mormons’ afflictions firsthand. ♦ History of the Church, 2:105-6 June 21-29, 1834 Fishing River, Missouri Travels—Cholera attacked Zion’s Camp ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 149 June 22, 1834 Fishing River, Missouri Visions and Revelations—While on the Zion’s Camp march, Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 105, a revelation concerning the delay in the redemption of Zion in Jackson County. ♦ History of the Church, 2:107-11; D&C 105 June 24, 1834 Rush Creek, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and many of the Zion’s Camp marchers were taken sick as cholera swept through the camp. ♦ History of the Church¸ 2:114 June 26, 1834 Rush Creek, Missouri Travels—Zion’s Camp was dispersed to homes of Saints in the area, and Joseph Smith left with David Whitmer and two other brethren for the western part of Clay County. The first deaths from the cholera outbreak occurred. ♦ History of the Church, 2:114-15 July 1834 Fishing River, Missouri
  • 108. 108 Ecclesiastical Duties—David Whitmer named as successor: While the conference was in session, Joseph Smith presiding, he arose and said that the time had come when he must appoint his successor in office. Some have supposed that it would be Oliver Cowdery; but, said he, Oliver has lost that privilege in consequence of transgression. The Lord has made it known to me that David Whitmer is the man. David was then called forward, and Joseph and his counsellors laid hands upon him, and ordained him to his station, to succeed him. Joseph then gave David a charge, in the hearing of the whole assembly. Joseph then seemed to rejoice that that work was done, and said, now brethren, if anything should befall me, the work of God will roll on with more power than it has hitherto done. Then brethren, you will have a man who can lead you as well as I can. He will be Prophet, Seer, Revelator, and Translator before God. ♦ Ensign of Liberty 1, no. 3 [December 1847]: 43-44; see also History of the Church, 3:32; Hoyt W. Brewster, Jr., Prophets, Priesthood Keys, and Succession, p.36. Evidently Joseph had not discussed this with his newly designated successor, for David was later to say, "I did not know what he was going to do until he laid his hands upon me and ordained me." An Address to All Believers in Christ [Richmond, Virginia: David Whitmer, 1887], p. 55.) July 2, 1834 Liberty, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith told the brethren of Zion’s Camp that they could avoid a second plague of cholera by humbling themselves and covenanting to obey the Lord’s commandments. ♦ History of the Church, 2:114-20 July 3, 1834 Liberty, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith organized a high council from members of the assembled high priests; he also organized the first Missouri stake with presidents David Whitmer, William W. Phelps, and John Whitmer. Zion’s Camp was disbanded. ♦ History of the Church, 2:122-23 July 7, 1834 Liberty, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith assembled with the high council in the home of Lyman Wight and gave them instructions pertaining to their callings. ♦ History of the Church, 2:124 July 10, 1834 James McNeill Whistler, American painter and etcher, was born. August 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Travels--Zion’s Camp returned ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 151
  • 109. 109 About August 1, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Kirtland from Missouri after a tedious journey from the midst of enemies, mobs, cholera, and excessively hot weather.´ ♦ History of the Church, 2:139 August 1, 1834 Slavery was abolished in the British Empire. August 2, 1834 Frédéric Bartholdi, French sculptor of the Statue of Liberty, was born. August 11, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Elder Sylvester Smith accused Joseph Smith of criminal conduct during his journey to and from Missouri but later confessed that his accusation was false and asked Joseph Smith for forgiveness. ♦ History of the Church, 2:142 August 11-12, 1834 A Protestant mob burned down a convent of Roman Catholic Ursuline nuns near Boston, Massachusetts. August 16, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith dictated instructions for the high council of the Church in Missouri and urged them to sign a petition to Missouri Governor Daniel Dunklin requesting his protection. ♦ History of the Church¸2:144-46; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 347-50 August 21, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith sent Dr. Frederick G. Williams to Cleveland, Ohio, to administer to those who were sick with cholera. ♦ History of the Church, 2:146 August 23, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—The Kirtland High Council read and adopted resolutions concerning Joseph Smith’s conduct toward Sylvester Smith, saying that Joseph Smith was “worthy of [their] esteem and fellowship.” ♦ History of the Church, 2, 147-49 August 28, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 110. 110 Ecclesiastical Duties—During a special council assembled for the trial of Sylvester Smith, Joseph Smith was cleared of Sylvester Smith’s false accusations from the Zion’s Camp march. ♦ History of the Church, 2:150-60 About September 1, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith labored with other Church members to build the Kirtland Temple, acting as the foreman in the stone quarry. ♦ History of the Church, 2:161; Crary, Pioneer and Personal Reminiscences, 32-33 September 5, 1834 New Portage, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith traveled with Oliver Cowdery to New Portage, Ohio, to attend a conference of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:161; Times and Seasons 2:201 September 8, 1834 New Portage, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—At a conference of elders, Joseph Smith answered questions regarding the gift of tongues and told the brethren “that it was particularly instituted for the preaching of the Gospel to other nations,” and not for governing the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:162 September 9, 1834 James Weddell, who explored Antarctica in the 1820s, died. September 24, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Oliver Cowdery about Alexander Campbell’s “Millennial Harbinger” and its misrepresentations of “Joe Smith! false prophet!” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 351-53 About October 8, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Despite limited funds and means, Joseph Smith spent the first half of the month furthering the work on the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:167 October 16, 1834 En route to Pontiac, Michigan Travels—Joseph Smith left Kirtland with his brother Hyrum and others to visit some Saints in Pontiac, Michigan, arriving there four days later. ♦ History of the Church, 2:168 October 16, 1834
  • 111. 111 Palace of Westminster in London was destroyed by fire. October 17, 1834 En route to Michigan Travels—While on board the steamer Monroe, a man called Ellmer claimed to know about “Joe Smith” and insisted, even in the Prophet’s presence, that Joseph Smith was a liar and that he was dead. ♦ History of the Church, 2:168-69 October 31, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—After returning to Kirtland from Michigan, Joseph Smith prepared a meeting place for the School of the Prophets. ♦ History of the Church, 2:169-70 1834 Congress officially created the Indian Territory, which was to be a settlement for Native Americans from the East. It included parts of present-day Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska. November 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties--School of the Elders opened in Kirtland. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 153 November 22, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—D&C 106 The Second Coming shall not overtake the Children of Light as a thief in the night (to Warren Cowdery) November 24, 1834 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Dennis Lake v. Joseph Smith. A summons, issued by Dennis Lake as plaintiff, was served on Joseph Smith by Constable J. Ames. Lake alleged that Joseph had promised him a lot in Missouri if he would march with Zion’s Camp, which he had done. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series November 25, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 106, a revelation calling Warren Cowdery as a high priest in the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:170-71; D&C 106 November 29, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith said that he had never been more “busily engaged” than he was during the month of November. ♦ History of the Church, 2:170
  • 112. 112 About November 30, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith and the brethren received a prophecy by revelation that the Lord would deliver them from their current financial troubles and debt. ♦ History of the Church, 2:175 About December 1, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—The School of the Prophets was established and well attended, and Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon gave regular lectures on theology that later became know as the Lectures on Faith. ♦ History of the Church, 2:175-76 December 4, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Dennis Lake v. Joseph Smith. Judgment was rendered in favor of Lake for $63. 67 in addition to $8.04 for the costs of the suit. Joseph Smith appealed the case to the Geauga . ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series December 5, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith ordained Oliver Cowdery to be an Assistant President of the Church, a position that no longer exists. ♦ History of the Church, 2:176; Arrington, BYU Studies 12.4:412 December 16, 1834 Leon Wairas, French economist who created the general equilibrium theory, was born. December 23, 1834 Thomas Malthus, English economist and political philosopher, died. About December 27, 1834 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Oliver Cowdery, providing details about his birth and early life for a History of the Church Oliver intented to publish in the Messenger and Advocate. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 354-56; Messenger and Advocate 1.3:40 1835
  • 113. 113 1835 Kirtland, Ohio The Council of Twelve Apostles and the First Quorum of Seventy were organized at Kirtland, Ohio. The Book of Doctrine and Covenants was accepted by the Church, and Joseph Smith, Jr., obtained some Egyptian rolls of papyrus containing the writings of Abraham, etc. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 January 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—During the month of January, Joseph Smith was engaged in work at the School of the Prophets and in preparing a set of lectures on theology for publication in the Doctrine and Covenants. ♦ History of the Church, 2:180 January 30, 1835 The first assassination attempt against a U.S. President, which ended unsuccessfully, was against Andrew Jackson. February 8, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—The Spirit of the Lord was poured out when Brigham Young and his brother Joseph Young came to Joseph Smith’s home and sang for him. ♦ History of the Church, 2:180-81 About February 8, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith saw in vision the order of the priesthood and the postmortal condition of those who died in Zion’s Camp. ♦ History of the Church, 2:181 n. 1; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 313 February 14, 1835 (Saturday) Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith presided at a meeting where the Quorum of the Twelve was organized and the Twelve Apostles were chosen. Twelve Apostles were chosen by the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mormon according to revelation (Doctrine and Covenants, Sec. 18:37), namely: Thos. B. Marsh, David W. Patten Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, Wm. E. McLellin, Parley P. Pratt, Luke S. Johnson, Wm. Smith, Orson Pratt, John F. Boynton and Lyman E.Johnson. Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball were ordained and blessed the same day. First apostles called in 1800 years. ♦ History of the Church, 2:180- 89 February 17, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 114. 114 Writings—Joseph Smith and his counselors approved the publication of the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants. ♦ History of the Church, 2:250-51 February 21, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith ordained Parley P. Pratt as one of the Twelve Apostles and blessed him with great promises of health and capability in his calling. ♦ History of the Church, 2:191-92 February 27, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with nine of the Twelve Apostles at home and gave them counsel on the authority of the apostleship and the importance of keeping records. ♦ History of the Church, 2:198-200 February 28, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith organized the First Quorum of the Seventy. ♦ History of the Church, 2:201-4 March 1, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with the high council and ordained many of the newly called members of the First Quorum of the Seventy, including George A. Smith, who later became a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. ♦ History of the Church, 2:203-4 March 7, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith participated in a meeting held for the purpose of giving blessings to 119 men who had helped build the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:205-6 March 12, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and proposed that they take their “first mission through the Eastern States, to the Atlantic Ocean.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:209 March 15, 1835 Eduard Strauss, Austrian composer, was born.
  • 115. 115 March 28, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received the final portions of Doctrine and Covenants 107, a revelation concerning the order and offices of the priesthood. ♦ History of the Church, 2:210-17; D&C 107 March 29, 1835 Huntsburg, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached for about three hours on the divinity of the Book of Mormon. ♦ History of the Church, 2:218 April 21, 1835 Samuel Slater, English textile engineer and founder of the American Industrial Revolution, died. April 26, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties--Joseph Smith assembled in the Kirtland Temple with the Apostles and Seventies to give them a charge and instructions relating to their missions and other duties. ♦ History of the Church, 2:218 April 28, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles met together to finalize preparations for their mission to the eastern states in May. ♦ History of the Church, 2:219 May 2, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith presided at a conference with the First Presidency, the Twelve, part of the Seventy, and other elders of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:219-22 May 5, 1835 The first railway in continental Europe opened between Brussels and Mechelen in Belgium. May 7, 1835 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Dennis Lake v. Joseph Smith. Lake’s declaration was filed, stating that Joseph Smith was indebted to Lake for $800 as of November 21, 1834, consisting of $200 for labor performed, $200 for the use of property, and two $200 loans made to Joseph Smith. Joseph responded the same day that no such promise occurred. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series
  • 116. 116 May 31, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke for three and a half hours on the subject “This Is My Beloved Son: Hear Ye Him.” ♦ Van Orden, BYU Studies 33.3: 547, 553 June 2, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Almira Mack Scobey, daughter of his maternal uncle, Stephen Mack. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 357-59 June 15, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to the brethren in Independence, Missouri, informing them of plans to print the “New Translation” of the Bible and requesting donations and loans to enable them to accomplish the work “as a great means towards the salvation of men.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 363 June 15, 1835 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Dennis Lake v. Joseph Smith. Both parties appeared before the Court of Common Pleas. Before the jury deliberated, the court ruled that Lake failed to provide evidence in support of his claim, requiring the court to order a nonsuit of the case. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 16, 1835 Chardon, Ohio Legal Events—State of Ohio v. Joseph Smith. Assault and battery charges were brought against Joseph Smith in the Court of Common Pleas by Calvin W. Stoddard, Joseph’s brother-in-law (married to Sophronia). Joseph was acquitted. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 25, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a meeting to raise money for the Kirtland Temple and pledged $500. ♦ History of the Church, 2:234 July 3, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith viewed four Egyptian mummies and two or more rolls of papyrus exhibited in Kirtland by Michael H. Chandler. ♦ History of the Church, 2:235
  • 117. 117 About July 5, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Some saints at Kirtland purchased from Michael H. Chandler the Egyptian mummies and papyri, which contained the Writings of Abraham and J0seph of Egypt. ♦ History of the Church, 2:235-6; Nibley, BYU Studies 11.4: 350-99, Church History in the Fulness of Times, 159 July 6, 1835 John Marshall, influential American chief justice, died. July 6, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith received a certificate from Michael H. Chandler affirming that Joseph’s translation of the Egyptian hieroglyphics corresponded with information Chandler received from learned men in “eminent cities.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:235 July 6, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith “was continually engaged in translating an alphabet to the Book of Abraham, and arranging a grammar of the Egyptian language as practiced by the ancients.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:238 July 20, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Sally Phelps and offered reassurance that her husband, William, would return safely from his mission. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 360-62 August 1835 Michigan Travels—Joseph Smith visited Michigan; he returned to Kirtland on August 23, 1835. ♦ History of the Church, 2:253 August 17, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—A general assembly of the priesthood and of the Church approved the Doctrine and Covenants as scripture. Joseph Smith was in Michigan and was therefore not in attendance. ♦ History of the Church, 2:243; 1835 Doctrine and Covenants, 255-57 1835
  • 118. 118 Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America was published. Writings—The assembled body of the Church voted unanimously to accept the declaration of belief regarding governments and laws in general now contained in Doctrine and Covenants ♦ History of the Church, 2:247-49; D&C 134 August 28, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached to the Saints on the duty of wives. ♦ History of the Church, 2:253 August 31, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to brethren in Missouri with a postscript to Hezekiah Peck. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 364-67 September 1, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith wrote an extensive letter to the elders in Missouri, explaining his actions and motives in settling the Saints there. ♦ History of the Church, 2:253-72; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 368-74 September 2, 1835 New Portage, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith traveled from Kirtland to New Portage, Ohio, to attend a Church conference and remained there until September 8. ♦ History of the Church, 2:273 September 14, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Under Joseph Smith’s direction and in accordance with instructions in Doctrine and Covenants 25, the high council instructed Emma Smith, the Prophet’s wife, to prepare a new selection of sacred hymns to be printed by William W. Phelps. ♦ History of the Church, 2:273 September 22, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Oliver Cowdery recorded the words to multiple blessings that Joseph Smith had given. ♦ History of the Church, 2:281 September 23, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith continued to give blessings but was continually interrupted by throngs of visitors. ♦ History of the Church, 2:281
  • 119. 119 September 24, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith met with the high council and, through the voice of the Spirit, decided to petition Missouri Governor Daniel Dunklin to restore lands to the Saints who had been driven off. ♦ History of the Church, 2:281-82 1835 Fort Cass, which became the largest internment camp during the 1838 Trail of Tears, was established. September 29, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with the high council and acted in defense of and pleaded for mercy for those who had been accused of offenses against the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:286 October 1, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith studied the Egyptian alphabet with Oliver Cowdery and William W. Phelps, and the principles of astronomy that Abraham understood were revealed to them. ♦ History of the Church, 2:286 October 3, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith exhibited and explained some ancient Egyptian records to the high council. ♦ History of the Church, 2:287 October 4, 1835 Perry, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith saw two deer in the forest on the way to a meeting with John Corrill and rejoiced in God’s creations. ♦ History of the Church, 2:287 1835 William Fox Talbot, English mathematician, invented the negative/positive photographic process. October 5, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—At a meeting with the Twelve Apostles, Joseph Smith told them it was the Lord’s will that they move with their families to Missouri in the coming season. ♦ History of the Church, 2:287
  • 120. 120 October 7, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith recommenced translating the ancient Egyptian records. ♦ History of the Church, 2:289 October 11, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—The Lord revealed to Joseph Smith that his sick father would live, and the Prophet and David Whitmer administered a blessing of healing to Joseph Smith, Sr. ♦ History of the Church, 2:289 About October 17, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Because of growing problems due to nonpaying boarders, Joseph Smith dismissed all of his boarders. ♦ History of the Church, 2:290 October 19, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith exhibited to a number of visitors the ancient Egyptian records he had been translating. ♦ History of the Church, 2:290 October 23, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith united with a group of the brethren to pray to the Lord for special blessings on the Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 2:291 October 27, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith prayed concerning his brother Samuel’s sick wife and received a promise from the Lord that she would “be delivered of a living child, and be spared” from death. ♦ History of the Church, 2:292-93 October 31, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s brother, William, commenced a period of rebellion after a disagreement he and Joseph had on October 29. ♦ History of the Church, 2:296-98 November 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Plastering on the Temple began. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 164 About November 3, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith assisted in organizing the School of the Prophets and then dedicated the school in the name of Jesus Christ. ♦ History of the Church, 2:301
  • 121. 121 1835 The incandescent light bulb was patented by James Bowman Lindsay. November 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Emma Smith’s hymnal was published ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 74, 153, 161 November 5, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith healed Thomas Burdick through the laying on of hands. ♦ History of the Church, 2:301-2 November 6, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith met a man from the eastern United States who was disappointed that Joseph Smith the Prophet “was nothing but a normal man.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:302 November 8, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—After Sunday meetings, Joseph Smith convinced his uncle John Smith and Sidney Rigdon of the error of some accusatory remarks they had made at the afternoon meeting regarding a confession by Isaac Hill. ♦ History of the Church, 2:303 About November 9, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith received a visit from a man called “Joshua, the Jewish Minister,” who remained the entire day discussing religion. Later that day Joseph’s thoughts were confirmed that “Joshua” was really “Robert Mattias,” who had been on trial for multiple crimes in New York. However, even this was an alias for his real name, Robert Matthews. ♦ History of the Church, 2:304-6 About November 10, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith continued in conversation with “Robert Mattias” (Robert Matthews) and told him his doctrines were of the devil. ♦ History of the Church, 2:307 November 11, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith believed “Robert Mattias” (Robert Matthews) to be a murderer and directed him to leave immediately after breakfast. ♦ History of the Church, 2:307
  • 122. 122 November 12, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke to nine of the Apostles about the ordinance of washing of feet and of the forthcoming endowment for which they must prepare. ♦ History of the Church, 2:307-10; Jessee, Papers of Joseph Smith, 2:75-77 November 13, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent the evening at Sidney Rigdon’s conversing with George Messinger Jr., a Universalist minister from Bainbridge, New York, who tried to object to Joseph’s teachings but was unable to say anything for “the force of truth bore him down.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:311 November 14, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received a revelation calling Warren Parrish as his scribe. ♦ History of the Church, 2:311-12 November 16, 1835 Halley’s Comet made its closest approach to the sun. November 16, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings – Joseph Smith received and responded to a letter from Harvey Whitlock, in which Brother Whitlock asked for forgiveness of his past sins. ♦ History of the Church, 2:312-16 November 18, 1835 Mentor, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached about the resurrection at the funeral of Martin and Preserved Harris’s father, Nathan Harris. ♦ History of the Church, 2:316-17 November 19, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith visited the Kirtland Temple and saw that the stonemasons were putting on the finishing coat of plaster. ♦ History of the Church, 2:318 November 20, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—At home, Joseph Smith made rapid progress translating the Egyptian records, and he received a Hebrew Bible, Greek and Hebrew lexicons, and a Webster’s dictionary from Oliver Cowdery, who had recently returned from New York. ♦ History of the Church, 2:318
  • 123. 123 November 21, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and the other members of his Hebrew class decided to request a Jewish teacher from New York. ♦ History of the Church, 2:318-19 November 24, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph performed the marriage ceremony of Newel Knight and Lydia Goldthwaite, and Emma was also in attendance. ♦ History of the Church, 2:320; Hartley, BYU Studies 39.4: 16 November 25, 1835 Andrew Carnegie, American industrialist and philanthropist, was born. November 27, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and his scribe Warren Parrish healed each other, through the laying on of hands, of severe colds. ♦ History of the Church, 2:321 November 30, 1835 Mark Twain, American author, was born. December 1, 1835 Hans Christian Anderson published his first book of fairy tales. December 2, 1835 Painesville, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith had a fine sleigh ride with his family to visit Sister Harriet Howe in Painesville, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:323-24 December 3, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and his wife, Emma, visited at Thomas Carrico’s where Joseph talked on matrimony and married Warren Parrish to Martha H. Raymond. ♦ History of the Church, 2:324 December 4, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent the evening talking with a visitor, Mr. John Hollister, who acknowledged the next morning that “he knew but little” about religion. ♦ History of the Church, 2:325
  • 124. 124 December 9, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith rejoiced in gratitude for the brethren who had donated money to help him (the total was $64.50). ♦ History of the Church, 2:326-27 December 10, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith labored with the brethren to put out a fire in the Kirtland board kiln. ♦ History of the Church, 2:328 Ecclesiastical Duties—Healing--Joseph said: “This afternoon I was called, in company with President David Whitmer, to visit Angeline Works. We found her very sick, and so much deranged that she did not recognize her friends and intimate acquaintances. We prayed for her and laid hands on her in the name of Jesus Christ, and commanded her in His name to receive her senses, which were immediately restored. We also prayed that she might be restored to health; and she said she was better. ♦ Joseph Smith, History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 7 vols. 2:328 December 12, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith attended a debate at his brother William’s house on the following question: “Was it necessary for God to reveal Himself to mankind in order for their happiness?” ♦ History of the Church, 2:330 December 13, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties---Joseph Smith officiated in the marriages of Ebenezer Robinson to Angeline Works and Edwin Webb to Eliza Ann McWhithy. ♦ History of the Church, 2:330-31 December 16, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith attended the debating activity begun on the 12th . Joseph’s brother William became angry when the group decided not to continue such debates. ♦ History of the Church, 2:334 December 16-17, 1835 The Great Fire of New York destroyed over five hundred buildings, including the New York Stock Exchange. December 17, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—After Orson Hyde read aloud to Joseph Smith his letter of complaint, the Prophet addressed “the objections he had set forth in it, and satisfied his mind upon every point, perfectly.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:337
  • 125. 125 December 18, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith received and promptly replied to a letter from his brother William in which William asked forgiveness for his abuse at a debate on December 16. ♦ History of the Church, 2:338-43 December 16, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations-- D&C 108 to Lyman Sherman - strengthen your brethren. 1835 Felix Dujardin, French zoologist, first described protoplasm in unicellular animals. December 26, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith resumed his Hebrew studies with Warren Parrish and Fredrick G. Williams. ♦ History of the Church, 2:345 Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 108, a revelation forgiving Lyman Sherman for his sins and calling him to serve in the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:345; D&C 108 December 29, 1835 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached for three hours to a large crowd at the Kirtland school, some of whom were Presbyterians. ♦ History of the Church, 2:347 1836 1836 The Kirtland Temple was dedicated, and the Savior, Moses, Elias and Elijah the Prophet appeared to the Elders in that building and committed the keys of their respective dispensations to the Prophet Joseph Smith. The Saints who had resided temporarily in Clay County, Mo., removed to another location on Shoal Creek, which was organized into Caldwell County. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 1836—Boers in South Africa began the Great Trek across the Orange River 1836—The British Parliament began making census data available to the public
  • 126. 126 1836—James Pollard Espy, American meteorologist, presented his convection theory of storms to the American Philosophical Society. 1836—William Holmes McGuffey, American educator, published the first and second McGuffey Eclectic Readers. 1836—Ralph Waldo Emerson published his essay Nature, making him the central figure of the Transcendentalists. 1836—Charles Darwin returned to England with biological data which he later used to develop his theory of evolution. January 1, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith reconciled differences with his brother William and healed George A. Smith of inflammatory rheumatism. ♦ History of the Church, 2:338-43, 346-47, 353- 54 January 4, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—In the translating room of the Kirtland Temple, Joseph Smith met with and organized a school for the study of the Hebrew language. ♦ History of the Church, 2:355- 56 January 7, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith attended a feast at Bishop Newel K. Whitney’s to which the poor were invited. ♦ History of the Church, 2:362-63; Luke 14:12-14 January 8, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith made rapid progress at the Hebrew school. The plastering and hard-finishing of the outside of the Kirtland Temple was finished. ♦ History of the Church, 2:363 January 9, 1936 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith accepted an invitation from Bishop Newel K. Whitney to attend a dinner party similar to the one on January 7 “for the poor and the lame” ♦ History of the Church, 2:363 January 12, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 127. 127 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith called on the First Presidency in the morning and met with Russell Weaver, a Unitarian preacher, in the afternoon. ♦ History of the Church, 2:364 January 13, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith presided over a meeting with Church leaders from Kirtland and Clay County, Missouri. The brethren sang William W. Phelps’s hymn “Adam- ondi-Ahman,” and new members of various councils were called and ordained in preparation for the coming solemn assembly. ♦ History of the Church, 2:364-68 January 14, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with a council to draft the rules and regulations for the Kirtland Temple in preparation for its completion. He then performed two marriages in the evening. ♦ History of the Church, 2:368-69 January 17, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith performed three marriages; William F. Cahoon to Maranda Gibbs, Harvey Stanley to Larona Cahoon, and Tunis Rapley to Louisa Cutler. ♦ History of the Church, 2:276 January 18, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—The School of the Prophets, instructed by Joseph Smith, moved into a third-floor room of the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:375 January 20, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith performed the marriage of John F. Boynton and Susan Lowell. ♦ History of the Church, 2:377-78 January 21, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—While in the Kirtland Temple with the First Presidency, Joseph Smith saw a vision of the celestial kingdom and the Father and the Son, which is recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 137. ♦ History of the Church, 2:379-82; D&C 137; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 313 January 22, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Visions and Revelations were poured out when Joseph Smith and other brethren performed anointing ordinances for the Quorum of the Twelve and the Presidency of the Seventy. ♦ History of the Church, 2:382-83
  • 128. 128 January 23, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Visions of God attended Joseph Smith from the night of the 22nd until the early morning of the 23rd . ♦ History of the Church, 2:383-84; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 313 January 26, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joshua Seixas, the new teacher Joseph Smith hired for the Hebrew school, arrived in Kirtland. ♦ History of the Church, 2:385-86 January 28, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith, his counselors, the Twelve Apostles, and the seven Presidents of the Seventy saw glorious visions in the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:386-87 January 29, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—In the evening, Joseph Smith made a feast for his father’s family. ♦ History of the Church, 2:387-88 January 30, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith received several visitors and showed them the Abraham papyri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:388 January 30, 1836—Betsy Ross, creator of the American flag, died. January 31, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith organized quorums of the Church in preparation for the solemn assembly at the dedication of the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:389 February 2, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—In the evening Joseph Smith attended a meeting at a schoolhouse where Sidney Rigdon preached about the gathering of Israel. ♦ History of the Church, 2:390 February 3, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith received many visitors and showed them the Abraham papyri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:390-91 February 6, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith labored to teach each priesthood quorum the revealed order by which they should conduct their meetings and be able to receive spiritual blessings. ♦ History of the Church, 2:391-92 February 10, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 129. 129 Personal Life—Joseph Smith tended to his brother Hyrum, who had wounded his arm with an axe. ♦ History of the Church, 2:393-94 February 11, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent the afternoon reading and showing the Egyptian record to those who came to call. ♦ History of the Church. 2:394 February 14, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith performed a baptism and confirmed others who had already been baptized. ♦ History of the Church, 2:395-96 February 16, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph enjoys the day sleighing. ♦ JSC, p. 87 February 21, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent the day at home in meditation and prayer. ♦ History of the Church, 2:398 February 22, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith baptized John O. Waterman and filled out records on eleven marriages he had performed in the last three months. ♦ History of the Church, 2:398 February 23, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith blessed the sisters who were sewing the veil for the Kirtland Temple “for their liberality in giving their services so cheerfully.” ♦ History of the Church, 2:400 February 25, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith visited and blessed Sidney Rigdon’s wife, Phebe, who was ill. She began to recover within the hour that the blessing was given. ♦ History of the Church, 2:400 February 25, 1836—Samuel Colt patented the Colt revolver, the first revolving barrel multishot firearm. March 3, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Joseph gives a black man the priesthood. March 13, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with the First Presidency and some of the Quorum of the Twelve to discuss moving to Jackson County in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:406-7
  • 130. 130 March 18, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith attended the funeral of a faithful Church member, Susan Johnson, the daughter of Ezekiel Johnson. ♦ History of the Church, 2:407 March 21, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith prepared elders’ licenses to send to Medina County for the Saints to obtain licenses to perform marriages, since the court in Geauga County had refused permission. ♦ History of the Church, 2:408: Bradshaw, BYU Studies 39.4:24 March 23, 1836—The coin press was invented by Franklin Beale. March 26, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Oliver Cowdery, Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Warren A. Cowdery, and Warren Parrish met to receive by revelation the prayer for the dedication of the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:420-26 March 27, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith dedicated the Kirtland Temple, and the prayer was later published as Doctrine and Covenants 109. Spiritual outpourings received. ♦ History of the Church, 2:410-28; D&C 109 March 29, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith ministered in the Kirtland Temple overnight with the Church presidents and bishops, who washed each others’ feet in preparation for the solemn assembly. ♦ History of the Church, 2:429-30 March 30, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith continued the meetings in the Kirtland Temple, where he and other Church leaders washed the feet of those in attendance and experienced an outpouring of spiritual gifts and revelation. Joseph presides in the Kirtland Temple as an endowment of power falls upon a large group of priesthood leaders. ♦ History of the Church, 2:430-33; CHURCH HISTORY IN THE FULNESS OF TIMES, p 164-165 March 31, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a second dedicatory session of the Kirtland Temple for those who were unable to attend the first session. ♦ History of the Church, 2:433 April 1, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Leman Copley confessed to Joseph Smith that he had testified falsely against him in the Hurlbut case. ♦ History of the Church, 2:433
  • 131. 131 April 3, 1836 (Easter Sunday) Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Jesus Christ, Moses, Elias, and Elijah appeared to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery in the Kirtland Temple to accept the temple and restore priesthood keys. This vision is recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 110. ♦ History of the Church, 2:434-36; D&C 110; Ricks, BYU Studies 23.4:483; History of the Church 2:435-436 April 6, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith, with his brother Hyrum and Sidney Rigdon, participated in bestowing patriarchal blessings upon Amasa M. Lyman, Nathan Tanner, and Tanner’s father. ♦ Nathan Tanner, Biographical History, 1831-1846, 18 April 6, 1836 Salem, Massachusetts Visions and Revelations—Doctrine and Covenants 111 received—treasure in the city--- Nathaniel Felt. April 20, 1836—The Territory of Wisconsin was created. May-June 1836 Kirtland, Ohio John Taylor and Lorenzo Snow, two future presidents, baptized due to Parley P. Pratt’s mission to Canada ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 153 May 17, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life –Mary Duty Smith, Joseph Smith’s ninety-three-year-old grandmother, arrived in Kirtland. ♦ History of the Church, 2:442-43 May 27, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s grandmother Mary Duty Smith died. ♦ History of the Church, 2:443; History of Joseph Smith, p 34 Summer 1836 Far West, Missouri Saints began settling Far West ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 181-187 June 15, 1836—Arkansas became the twenty-fifth state in the U.S. June 16, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio First Missionary tract published by Orson Hyde ♦ JSC, p.91 June 20, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph’s son, Frederick Granger Williams Smith is born. June 22, 1836 Painesville, Ohio
  • 132. 132 Travels—Joseph Smith took his mother and aunt Clarissa Smith in a carriage to Painesville, Ohio, where they partook of the sacrament together before his father and uncle John Smith started on a mission to the branches in the eastern United States. ♦ History of the Church, 2:446-47 June 28, 1836—James Madison, fourth U.S. President, died. July 25, 1836-September 1836 Travels—Joseph’s mission to Salem, Massachusetts. July 25, 1836 Fairport Harbor, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith left Kirtland and boarded the steamboat Charles Townsend at Fairport Harbor, Ohio, beginning the first leg of his proselyting journey to Massachusetts. ♦ History of the Church, 2:463 July 29, 1836 En route to Massachusetts Travels—On his way to Massachusetts, Joseph Smith took the line boat on the Erie Canal to Utica, the railroad car to Schenectady, and the luggage car to Albany, New York. ♦ History of the Church, 2:463-64 About August 3, 1836 Salem, Massachusetts Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Salem with Sidney Rigdon, his brother Hyrum, and Oliver Cowdery. ♦ History of the Church, 2:463-64 August 6, 1836 Salem, Massachusetts Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 111, a revelation concerning his journey to Salem with Sidney Rigdon, his brother Hyrum, and Oliver Cowdery. ♦ History of the Church, 2:465-66; D&C111 August 19, 1836 Salem, Massachusetts Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife, Emma, letting her know of his concern for her well-being in his absence. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 389-90 September 14, 1836—Aaron Burr, U.S. Vice President famous for dueling with Alexander Hamilton, died. September 22, 1836 (Thursday) Missouri Peter Whitmer, Jun., one of the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, died near Liberty, Clay County, Mo. ♦ Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology Deseret News, 1914 October 2, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 133. 133 Travels—Joseph Smith’s father and his uncle John Smith returned from their successful mission to the eastern United States. ♦ History of the Church, 2:467 About November 2, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith and other brethren drew up the articles of agreement for the Kirtland Safety Society Bank, a financial institution of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:467; Adams, BYU Studies 23.4:469 December 22, 1836 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a conference of the Church in the Kirtland Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 2:468-69 December 26, 1836 Missouri Caldwell County was created. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 187-192 December 31, 1836 (Saturday) Kirtland, Ohio Dr. Willard Richards was baptized at Kirtland, by Brigham Young. 1837 Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri was surveyed, and the first foreign mission of the Church called and sent to England, where a successful opening was made. A great apostasy took place in the Church, both in Kirtland, Ohio, and in Missouri. January 2, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Bank of Geauga v. Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon. Joseph Smith, Newel K. Whitney, and Sidney Rigdon obtained a loan for $3,000 from the Bank of Geauga and gave the bank a promissory note stating that they would return (“pay jointly and severally”) the money “forty five days after date” at the Bank House in Painesville, Ohio. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series DATE 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Kirtland Safety Society opened for business. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 169-180 January 6, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith gave instructions concerning the Kirtland Safety Society that were later published in the Church periodical Messenger and Advocate. ♦ History of the Church, 2:470–73; Messenger and Advocate 3.4: 441 Jan. 26, 1837 Michigan became the twenty-sixth state in the U.S.
  • 134. 134 February 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Leaders meet in the temple to usurp Joseph; Brigham valiantly defends him. Brigham Young was invited by some of these men who were trying to depose the Prophet Joseph from his position as President of the Church; but they made a mistake by inviting President Brigham Young into their circle. Brigham Young said, “You cannot destroy the appointment of a prophet of God, but you can cut the thread that binds you to the prophet of God, and sink yourselves to hell” (in Conference Report, May 1963, p. 81). Elder John A. Widtsoe said: “The most important prophet in any age is the living prophet. … To follow the living prophet, the interpreter of the past, is the essence of wisdom. The very strength of the Church lies in the doctrine of continuous revelation through a living prophet.” ♦ Evidences and Reconciliations, 3 vols. in 1, arr. G. Homer Durham, Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1960, 352 Feb. 7, 1837 Florence Nightingale claimed that God spoke to her and called her to his service. February 16, 1837 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Martindale v. Smith. A writ of capias was filed against Joseph Smith and others for damages totaling $7,500. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series February 19, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith addressed the Saints in the Kirtland Temple by the power of God. ♦ Wilford Woodruff Journal, 1:124–25 February 22, 1837 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Martindale v. Smith. Joseph Smith and others were arrested and released on $10,000 bond each. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series March 2, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Bank of Geauga v. Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon. Defendants owed the bank $4,000 and promised to pay the money on request. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series March 4, 1837 City of Chicago, Illinois, was incorporated. March 21, 1837 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Martindale v. Smith. Joseph Smith appeared before the court to enter special bail. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series March 22, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio
  • 135. 135 Legal Events—Bank of Geauga v. Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon. The bank sued for a writ of capias to have Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon brought before the Geauga Court of Common Pleas to pay damages of $4,000. The court clerk signed the writ, which was returned to the sheriff. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1837 Louis Agassiz proposed that the Earth had been subject to a past ice age March 24, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Bank of Geauga v. Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon. Vinson Knight and Ira Bond entered into a recognizance of special bail on behalf of Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon, promising $8,000 to the bank. The court ordered that the cause be continued until the next term of the court. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series April 6, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Solemn assembly in the Kirtland Temple May 10, 1837 Panic of 1837 began in New York City. Panic of 1837 hit Ohio and banks fail; mass apostacy ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 169 About June 1, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith set apart Elder Heber C. Kimball to preside over a mission to England, the first mission of the Church outside continental North America. ♦ History of the Church, 2:489–90 June 5, 1837 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Martindale v. Smith. All parties appeared before the court and settled by mutual agreement. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1837 Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist appeared in serialized form. June 5, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Bank of Geauga v. Smith, Whitney, and Rigdon. The parties appeared before the court. The case was settled and discontinued. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 11, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith gave special instructions to Elders Heber C. Kimball and Orson Hyde and to Joseph Fielding concerning their mission to England. ♦ History of the Church, 2:491–92
  • 136. 136 June 13, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Due to sickness, Joseph Smith was unable to raise his head from his pillow to bid farewell to a group of missionaries. ♦ History of the Church, 2:492 June 14, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—After Joseph Smith had been extremely sick and weak for a few days, Dr. Levi Richards attended to him, and the Prophet regained his strength immediately. ♦ History of the Church, 2:493 June 20, 1837 Queen Victoria, monarch of the United Kingdom, ascended to the throne. July 7, 1837 Joseph Smith drops Fredrick G. Williams from the First Presidency, he was excommunicated shortly thereafter. July 19, 1837 First missionaries arrived to preach the gospel in Great Britain. July 23, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 112, a revelation to Thomas B. Marsh about his duties as the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. ♦ History of the Church, 2:499–501; D&C 112 July 23, 1837 D&C 112 to Thomas B. Marsh on the day the Twelve began preaching in England July 27, 1837 Painesville, Ohio Legal Events—On their journey to visit the Saints in Canada, Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Thomas B. Marsh were detained all day in Painesville, Ohio, because of malicious lawsuits. ♦ History of the Church, 2:502 July 29, 1837 Ashtabula, Ohio Travels—On his journey to Canada, Joseph Smith walked on the beach and bathed in the beautiful, clear water of Lake Erie at Ashtabula before boarding the steamer for Buffalo, New York, in the afternoon. ♦ History of the Church, 2:502–3 July 30, 1837 England
  • 137. 137 Elders have incident with Satan. Joseph Smith said, “If you would have held on for another half hour, you would have seen Christ.” Convert members of John Feilding’s brother’s church; John Watt wins foot race to be first person baptized in England. Heber C. Kimball feels tingling in streets of England. Joseph Smith: “Some of the old Prophets travelled and dedicate that land, and their blessing fell upon you.” ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times; 175; K of GR, 211 1837 American John Deere developed and manufactured the first commercially successful cast- steel plow. August 1837 “Old Standard” apostates broke up a meeting in the Kirtland Temple August 8, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Allen v. Granger (originally Allen v. Smith, Cowdery, Knight, Orton, Cahoon). Justice of the Peace Frederick G. Williams rendered judgment against Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, Vinson Knight, Roger Orton, and Reynolds Cahoon (being the Kirtland Steam Company) for $23 plus court costs. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series August 1837 Canada Travels—Joseph Smith spent most of August in Canada, where he preached, baptized, blessed the Saints, and strengthened the branches. ♦ History of the Church, 2:502–8 August 24, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Moses Usher v. Joseph Smith. A judgment was issued against Joseph Smith when he did not appear before the justice of the peace. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1837 Thomas Davenport patented the first electric motor, which he used to drive a rotary printing press. September 3, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a conference for the whole Church to reorganize its leadership. ♦ History of the Church, 2:509–10 September 4, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to John Corrill and the Church in Missouri. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 391–92
  • 138. 138 September 10, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended an assembly of Saints in the Kirtland Temple, where the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper was administered. ♦ History of the Church, 2:512 September 17, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith presided at a conference of elders in the Kirtland Temple to discuss the gathering of the Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 2:513–14; Elders’ Journal, November 1837, 17 1837 Louis Daguerre developed the daguerreotype. September 27, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Legal Events—Oliver Granger became the agent of Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon and held power of attorney on their behalf to settle their business affairs in Kirtland after their departure. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series September 27,1837 En route to Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon left Kirtland to travel to Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 2:518 October 13, 1837 En route to Missouri Personal Life—While Joseph Smith was traveling to Far West, Missouri, his brother Hyrum’s wife, Jerusha Barden Smith, died in Kirtland. ♦ History of the Church, 2:519 November 7, 1837 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a conference to reorganize Church leadership, and his brother Hyrum was sustained as the Second Counselor in the First Presidency, replacing Frederick G. Williams who was rejected by a vote of the members. ♦ History of the Church, 2:522–25 About November 10, 1837 En route to Kirtland, Ohio Travels—Joseph Smith left Far West to return to Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 2:525 Dec 1837 Martin Harris, John Boynton excommunicated; nearly 50 leaders excommunicated. Brigham Young flees Kirtland to save his life for defending Joseph. ♦ RofP, 9 About December 10, 1837 Kirtland, Ohio Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith returned to Kirtland from Missouri and found that Warren Parrish, John F. Boynton, Luke S. Johnson, Joseph Coe, and others had apostatized and were trying to overthrow the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 2:528
  • 139. 139 December 15, 1837 George B. Post, architect who designed the first building to use elevators and made substantial contributions to building skyscrapers, was born. December 22, 1837 Brigham Young flees to Missouri ♦ K of GR, 215) 1838 Joseph Smith, Jun., and most of the faithful Saints left Kirtland, Ohio, because of apostasy and persecution, and removed to Missouri. Adam-ondi-Ahman, in Daviess County, Missouri, was surveyed, and organized into a Stake of Zion; the revelation on tithing was given; persecutions were renewed against the Saints in Missouri, and DeWitt, Adam-ondi-Ahman and Far West were taken and sacked by the mob; nearly a score of Saints were massacred at Haun’s Mill, Joseph the Prophet and other Elders imprisoned, and all the Saints ordered out of Missouri, under pain of death by the exterminating order of Gov. Lilburn W. Boggs. January 1838 Kirtland, Ohio Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith prophesied to a council of brethren that he would live at least another five years. ♦ Lucy Smith, History of Joseph Smith, ch 46. January 4, 1838 General Tom Thumb, American circus performer and entertainer, was born. January 12, 1838 Kirtland, Ohio Personal Life—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon fled Kirtland to escape mob violence. Joseph Smith fled from his enemies hiding in a box in an oxcart. Joseph, family and Sidney Rigdon flee to Missouri. Emma is four months pregnant. Mob follows for 200 miles. ♦ History of the Church, 3:1; Church History in the Fulness of Times, 169 About January 16, 1838 Dublin, Indiana Travels—Fleeing mob violence in Ohio, Joseph Smith traveled to Dublin, Indiana, where he tarried nine days. he was then given $300 from the sale of Brother Nathan Tomlinson’s farm, which allowed him to continue his journey. ♦ History of the Church, 3:2-3 February 10, 1838 W.W.Phelps and John Whitmer excommunicated by leaders in Missouri. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 185
  • 140. 140 About March 1838 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Lory Holmes & Charles Holmes v. Joseph Smith Jr. & Reynolds Cahoon. Court of Common Pleas, Geauga County. The plaintiffs sued on two promissory notes of $5,000 each. A default judgment rendered was for $10,071; satisfied in full. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series March 10, 1838 John Whitmer excomunnicated, possibly W.W. Phelps also ♦ History of the Church 3:8,248 March 13, 1838 Eight miles from Far West, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a journal entry that was included with his “Scriptory Book,” which described his various activities. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 393-94 March 14, 1838 Far West, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Far West at the conclusion of a difficult journey from Kirtland, Ohio, and was “immediately received under the hospitable roof of Brother George W. Harris, who treated us with all possible kindness.” Joseph hailed as he enters Far West ♦ History of the Church, 3:8-9; Church History in the Fulness of Times, 181-192 March 16, 1838 Far West, Missouri Writings—At about this time, Joseph Smith composed what later became known as “The Political Motto of the Church of Latter-day Saints,” proclaiming a love of “peace and good order in society.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:9 March 1838 Far West, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 113, a revelation identifying the “stem of Jesse” and the “rod” and “root of Jesse” in Isaiah 11; lineage of Joseph Smith. ♦ History of the Church, 3:9-11; D&C 113 March 29, 1838 Far West, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to the Presidency of the Church in Kirtland, giving them news about the Church in Far West. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 395-97 April 8, 1838 Regular Atlantic steamship service began with the SS Great Western. Apr 12, 1838 Oliver Cowdery excommunicated at his own request. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 186
  • 141. 141 April 13, 1838 David Whitmer, Hyram Page, Lyman and Luke Johnson excommunicated. ♦ K of GR, 224 April 14, 1838 Personal Life—Joseph arrives with his family in Far West. Emma moves to a new home again; she is five months pregnant April 17, 1838 Far West, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 114, a revelation instructing David W. Patten to prepare for a mission the coming spring. DC 114 - Unfaithful shall be replaced ♦ History of the Church, 3:23; D&C 114 April 21, 1838 John Muir, American ecologist who founded the Sierra Club, was born. April 26, 1838 Far West, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 115, a revelation commanding the Church to build a house unto the Lord in Far West. This revelation also established the name of the Church as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 3:23-25; D&C 115 April 27, 1938 Far West, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith spent the day working on a History of the Church from its beginnings, which would eventually be published as History of the Church. ♦ History of the Church 3:25; Jessee, BYU Studies 11.4:462, Church History in the Fulness of Times, 187 April 28, 1938 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon attended the high council by invitation and filled in as councilors in an appeals case. ♦ History of the Church, 3:25-26 April 30, 1938 Nicaragua declared independence from the Central American Federation. May 1838 The People’s Charter, drawn up in the United Kingdom, demanded universal suffrage for women. May 1838 Adam-ondi-Ahman was founded.
  • 142. 142 May 5, 1838 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith learned from Brother Bailey that 200 families and wagons would arrive in three weeks from Canada. ♦ History of the Church, 3:27 May 9, 1838 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached at the funeral of James G. Marsh, son of Thomas B. Marsh. ♦ History of the Church, 3:30 May 10, 1838 John Wilkes Booth, American actor and assassin, was born. May 11, 1838 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended the trial of William E. McLellin and Dr. McCord before the bishop’s court. Both were excommunicated. ♦ History of the Church, 3:31 May 12, 1838 Far West, Missouri Personal Life—Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon were suffering financially and did not have enough money to provide for their families. ♦ History of the Church, 3:31-32 May 14, 1838 Far West, Missouri Personal Life—Joseph Smith plowed his garden. ♦ History of the Church, 3:33 May 19, 1838 Spring Hill, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 116, a revelation that identified Spring Hill as the site of Adam-ondi-Ahman and the place where Adam would again come to meet with his people. ♦ History of the Church, 3:35; D&C 116 May 26, 1838 The Trail of Tears forced the Cherokee tribe to relocate, killing at least eight thousand. June 1838 Town of DeWitt was settled. Apostate Mormons threatened and leave Far West. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 181, 191 June 2, 1838 Far West, Missouri Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith’s son Alexander Hale Smith was born. ♦ History of the Church, 3:37 19 June Sidney Rigdon gave his “Salt Sermon.”
  • 143. 143 June 28, 1838 Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a conference where he organized the high council and a stake of Zion, with his uncle John Smith as president. ♦ History of the Church, 3:41-42 July 1838 Fredrick G. Williams is re-baptized. July-Oct. Kirtland Camp 500 journeyed to Missouri. Apostacy is rampant. Fifty leading members excommunicated: Three Witnesses, Frederick G. Williams, four apostles, several Seventies; 200-300 members left the Church. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 177, 179 July 4, 1838 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith participated in laying the cornerstones for the Far West Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 3:41-42 July 4, 1838 Sidney Rigdon gave his Independence Day speech. Sidney Rigdon threatens the mobbers. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 192 July 8, 1838 Far West, Missouri Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received four revelations: Doctrine and Covenants 119 and 120 on tithing; Doctrine and Covenants 117 concerning the duties of William Marks, Newel K. Whitney, and Oliver Granger; and Doctrine and Covenants 118 on the will of the Lord concerning the Twelve Apostles. D&C 117 - forsake littleness of soul ♦ History of the Church. 3:44-46; D&C 117-20 July 8, 1838 Four new Apostles were called, and the law of tithing was revealed in a period of poverty. 1838 Friedrich Bessel made the first accurate measurement of the distance to a star. About July 10, 1838 Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith visited Adam-ondi-Ahman with other members of the First Presidency, which consisted of Sidney Rigdon, Joseph’s brother Hyrum, and clerk George W. Robinson. ♦ History of the Church, 3:34 July 26, 1838 Far West, Missouri
  • 144. 144 Ecclesiastical Duties—The First Presidency, high council, and bishop’s court were assembled to determine what to do with surplus property and how the First Presidency was to be supported. ♦ History of the Church, 3:47-48 July 28, 1838 En route to Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith left Far West for Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri, to transact business and to help some of the Canadian brethren who were settling there. ♦ History of the Church, 3:48 July 31, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith attended court and received a visit from Judge Austin A. King. ♦ History of the Church, 3:48-49 August 1, 1838 Slavery was officially abolished in Trinidad and Tobago. August 6, 1838 Far West, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith met with the citizens of Far West in the schoolhouse, where his suggestion that they start a weekly newspaper was welcomed. ♦ History of the Church, 3:56 August 6, 1838 Gallatin, Missouri Election day battle at Gallatin August 7, 1838 Gallatin, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith went with a group of about fifteen brethren to Colonel Lyman Wight’s house in Gallatin, Missouri, and met with the Saints who had been beaten while trying to vote. ♦ History of the Church, 3:58-59 August 8, 1838 Daviess County, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith met with Justice of the Peace Adam Black, who gave a written agreement to the Saints to uphold the law. Joseph Smith and others ask Missouri leaders to sign proclamation of peace ♦ History of the Church, 3:59-60; Church History in the Fulness of Times, 194 August 9, 1838 Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith and other Saints met in Adam-ondi-Ahman with a citizens committee from Millport and entered into a covenant of peace with them. Joseph then rode to Far West. ♦ History of the Church, 3:60 August 10, 1838 Gallatin, Missouri
  • 145. 145 Missouri leaders swear an affidavit that Joseph Smith and an army of 500 threatened them. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 195 August 11, 1838 En route to Grand River, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith traveled with members of the high council to visit the Canadian brethren who had settled on the Grand River at Three Forks, Gentry County, Missouri, contrary to the Church’s counsel. ♦ History of the Church, 3:62 August 13, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith was chased by “evil designing men” on his journey back to Far West from the Grand River and upon arrival was informed of a writ for his arrest. ♦ History of the Church, 3:63 August 16, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith told Sheriff William Morgan of Daviess County that he wished to be tried in Caldwell County according to the law. ♦ History of the Church, 3:63 August 20, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith met with various inhabitants of Caldwell County who formed themselves into “Agricultural Companies.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:63-64 August 30, 1838 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spent the day in an interview with Brother John Corrill, whose “conduct for some time had been very unbecoming.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:65-66 September 1, 1838 William Clark, American explorer of the West, died. September 1, 1838 Far West, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith traveled with the First Presidency to the half-way house of Waldo Littlefield in the Daviess County, Marrowbone Settlement, for the purpose of appointing another city of Zion as a place of refuge for the Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 3:67 September 2, 1938 Liliuokalani, the last Queen of Hawaii, was born. September 2, 1938 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith visited with a man from Livingston County, who gave him reports of a growing mob in Daviess County. ♦ History of the Church, 3:68-69 September 4, 1938 Far West, Missouri
  • 146. 146 Legal Events—Joseph Smith engaged Generals David R. Atchison and Alexander W. Doniphan as his lawyers. ♦ History of the Church, 3:69; Anderson, BYU Studies 26. 3:3-47 September 6, 1938 Daviess County, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith’s hearing at the home of Waldo Littlefield before Judge Austin A. King could not proceed because of the absence of the plaintiff. ♦ History of the Church, 3:72 September 7, 1838 Daviess County, Missouri Legal Events—In a hearing at John Raglin’s home, Adam Black claimed his life had been threatened by Church members, and Joseph Smith was required to post a $500 security bond despite the lack of evidence against him. Joseph Smith and Lyman Wight were tried before Judge Austin King. ♦ History of the Church, 3:72-73 September 8, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith received news that a mob planned to attack Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 3:74 September 9, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—A mob was frustrated in its attempts to attack Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri, but the mobbers continued to send taunting reports of tortured prisoners to Joseph Smith and the Saints, trying to provoke them to commit the first act of violence. ♦ History of the Church, 3:74-75 September 12, 1838 Far West, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith received a report that citizens from Daviess County, Missouri, sent a letter to the governor, Lilburn W. Boggs, filled with lies and falsehoods about the Saints in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 3:76 September 18, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith was at home with an illness when Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs issued orders to General David R. Atchison of the state militia to march into Daviess and Caldwell Counties in Missouri and assist in the apprehension of certain Church leaders. ♦ History of the Church, 3:81 September 26, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—A committee of the Church related to Joseph Smith that it had entered into an agreement with a mob to purchase the lands of all non-Mormon citizens wishing to leave Daviess County. ♦ History of the Church, 3:84-85 October 1838 Kirtland Camp arrives in Far West. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 179
  • 147. 147 October 1, 1838 Charles Tennant, Scottish chemist and industrialist who discovered bleaching powder, died. October 5, 1838 Caldwell County, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith was interrupted on his journey to lower Caldwell County, Missouri, when some brethren from De Witt, Missouri, told him that the Saints in De Witt were in danger. ♦ History of the Church, 3:152-53 October 6, 1838 De Witt, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith arrived in De Witt and found the Saints surrounded by an armed mob. ♦ History of the Church, 3:153 1838 Proteins were discovered by Jons Jakob Berzelius. October 9, 1838 De Witt, Missouri Legal Events—An armed mob held the Saints in De Witt under siege for a period of days, during which time Joseph Smith saw several brethren die from starvation. ♦ History of the Church, 3:157-60 October 11, 1838 Seventy wagons of saints abandon DeWitt. Some Mormons are dying of deprivation. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 197 October 12, 1838 Caldwell County, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Caldwell County after having buried some of the Saints who died of fatigue and privation during the evacuation from De Witt, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 3:160 October 14, 1838 Caldwell County, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached about the scripture “Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his brethren,” and requested the support of all who would stand by him to meet on the public square the next day. ♦ History of the Church, 3:162 October 15, 1838 Adam-0ndi-Ahman, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith traveled to Adam-ondi-Ahman with a militia company of about 100 men under the command of Colonel George M. Hinckle to protect the Saints from the Daviess County mob. ♦ History of the Church, 3:162 Oct 17-18 1838
  • 148. 148 Saints are being driven and whipped in Davies County. Bad snow storm; three petitions for help sent and ignored by Boggs. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 198 October 25, 1838 Log Creek near Far West, Missouri Legal Events—At the Battle of Crooked River, David W. Patten received a fatal gunshot wound. Joseph Smith attended to him as he was dying. ♦ History of the Church, 3:171-72 1838 Duke University was established in North Carolina. October 1-7, 1838 Battle of DeWitt October 9, 1838 The prophet records that in answer to Latter-Day Saint pleas for protection from increasing mob violence. Missouri Governor Lilburn Boggs replied “the quarrel was between the Mormons and the mob and that we might fight it out.” October 11, 1838 Joseph Leads saints from Dewitt, Carroll County to Far West October 18, 1838 Thomas Marsh and Orson Hyde apostatize and swear out affidavits against Joseph Smith saying that he plans to tread down his enemies. No church action is taken against them until 17 March 1839. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 199 October 18-19, 1838 Guerrilla warfare in Daviess County October 25, 1838 Battle of Crooked River- David W. Patten About October 27, 1838 Jefferson City, Missouri Legal Events—Ignoring the truths of what was happening to the Mormons, Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs issued an extermination order concerning the Saints: “The Mormons must be treated as enemies and must be exterminated or driven from the state.”
  • 149. 149 300-400 Mormons murdered in all. ♦ History of the Church, 3:175; Anderson, BYU Studies 26.3:3-47; Church History in the Fulness of Times, 201; History of Joseph Smith, 287 October 30, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—About 3,500 mob members and Missouri militia approached Far West, acting on orders from Governor Lilburn W. Boggs. ♦ History of the Church, 3:182; Stevenson, Reminiscences of Joseph the Prophet, 36-37 October 30, 1838 About 240 mobbers attack HAUN’S MILL; 17 people killed, 13 wounded. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 203 October 30-November 6, 1838 Siege of Far West October 31, 1838 The Prophet and other Church leaders are taken prisoners at what they are told will be a peace talk with leaders of the Missouri state militia besieging Far West. Over 2,000 mobbers surround Far West. Mormons are outnumbered 5-1. ♦ Church History in the Fulness of Times, 201 1838 Britain opened the first consulate in Jerusalem. About October 31, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Colonel George M. Hinkle, on the pretense that the hostile militia surrounding Far West desired a truce, escorted Joseph Smith and other Church leaders to a supposed parley with militia officers. Instead, they were taken prisoner and marched to the enemy camp on Goose Creek. ♦ History of the Church, 3:188-90 November 1, 1838 Goose Creek Camp, Caldwell County, Missouri Legal Events—Officers of the Missouri militia held a court martial and sentenced Joseph Smith, his brother Hyrum, and others to be shot at 9:00 A.M. General Alexander W. Doniphan refused to carry out the sentence. ♦ History of the Church, 3:190-92 November 2, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith’s wife and children wept as the guards thrust them away with their swords and took the Prophet under heavy guard toward Independence, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 3:192-95
  • 150. 150 November 3, 1838 Crooked River, Ray County, Missouri Visions and Revelations—While traveling under heavy guard toward Independence, Missouri, Joseph Smith prophesied to his fellow prisoners that none of their lives would be taken. ♦ History of the Church, 3:200; Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, 210 November 4, 1838 Ray to Clay County, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—While en route to Independence with other prisoners, Joseph Smith preached the gospel of Jesus Christ to a woman who inquired whether he “professed to be the Lord and Savior.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:200-201 November 4, 1838 Independence, Missouri Writings—From a house in Independence where the prisoners stayed before being moved to Richmond, Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife Emma at Far West. “I have great anxiety about you, and my lovely children, my heart mourns <and> bleeds for the brotheren, and sisters, and for the slain <of the> people of God.” he wrote. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 398-404 November 5, 1838 The Central American Civil War began. November 5, 1938 Independence, Missouri Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and other prisoners were able to explain their doctrines to many people thus removing “mountains of prejudice, and enlist[ing] the populace in our favor.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:202 November 6, 1938 Geauga County, Ohio Legal Events—Joseph Smith, Jr. for the Use of Julius Granger v. John Coltrin & Cyrus Smalling. In the Court of Common Pleas, Geauga County, Joseph Smith filed an action on a promissory note for $500. The defendants counterclaimed against Joseph Smith for $2,000 allegedly owed for “various goods and merchandise” as well as $1,500 for Kirtland Safety Society notes, an “unauthorized bank paper.” A jury trial was held. The defendants recovered their cost of $23.24. The plaintiffs gave notice of intent to appeal. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1838 Yucatan declared independence from Mexico. November 9, 1938 Richmond, Missouri Legal Events—Colonel Sterling Price chained Joseph Smith and the other prisoners together in an old vacant house. ♦ History of the Church, 3:205-6
  • 151. 151 November 11, 1838 Richmond, Missouri Personal Life—After listening most of the night to the guards elaborate and boast about the atrocities they had committed against the Saints, Joseph Smith stood and rebuked them, in the name of Jesus Christ, to be still or die. ♦ History of the Church, 3:208; Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, 210-11 November 12, 1838 Richmond, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife, Emma. “Oh God grant that I may have the privaliege of seeing once more my lovely Family . . .tell the children that I am alive and trust I shall come and see them before long,” he assured. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 405-9 Legal Events—On the first day of Joseph Smith’s hearing before Judge Austin A. King, a group of armed men was sent out, without any civil proceedings, to obtain witnesses. ♦ History of the Church, 3:209; Madsen, BYU Studies 43. 4:92-137 1838 Religious philosopher Christian Hermann Weisse proposed the two-source hypothesis, stating there were two sources to the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Luke, which is still widely accepted today. November 13, 1838 Richmond, Missouri Legal Events—Over forty witnesses appeared at court and bore false witness against the Prophet. ♦ History of the Church, 3:209-10 November 18, 1838 Richmond, Missouri Legal Events—All of the witnesses Joseph Smith and his brethren requested for their trial (between forty and fifty persons) were arrested, thrown in prison, and prohibited from testifying. ♦ History of the Church, 3:210-11 November 29, 1838 Richmond, Missouri Legal Events—After being abused and enduring an unjust preliminary hearing, Joseph Smith and five of the other brethren were committed to Liberty Jail in Liberty, Missouri, by Judge Austin A. King. ♦ History of the Church, 3:212-15 About November 30, 1838 Liberty, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and five other brethren were en route as prisoners to Liberty Jail. ♦ History of the Church, 3:215 About December 1, 1838 Far West, Missouri Legal Events—Heber C. Kimball and Alanson Ripley were appointed by the brethren in Far West, Missouri, to visit Joseph Smith and the others in Liberty Jail “as often as circumstances would permit.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:244
  • 152. 152 December 1, 1838 Liberty, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Emma announcing that he and his fellow prisoners were admitted to Liberty Jail. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 410-14; Arrington, BYU Studies 13.1:20-35 1838 Ralph Cudworth, English theologian and philosopher, published A Treatise on Freewill. December 16, 1838 Liberty, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter of comfort to the Saints from Liberty Jail. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 415-22 December 20, 1838 Liberty, Missouri Personal Life—Emma Smith visited Joseph in Liberty Jail. ♦ Newell and Avery, Mormon Enigma, 77 1839 January 1, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s history proclaimed the irony that he was imprisoned in a land of liberty due to his worship of God. ♦ History of the Church, 3:244-45 January 16, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Writings—From Liberty Jail Joseph Smith dictated a letter signed by himself, Sidney Rigdon, and Hyrum Smith to Heber C. Kimball and Brigham Young. The letter counseled them that even if they took their families out of the state of Missouri, they must return “and leave as before designed on the 26 of Apriel” on a mission to England. In the letter, Joseph, Sidney, and Hyrum also nominated George A. Smith and Lyman Sherman to replace Orson Hyde and Thomas B. Marsh in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Hyde and Marsh had left the Church during the Missouri difficulties. George A. Smith was ordained an Apostle in April 1839, but Lyman Sherman died eleven days after this letter was written. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 3:244-45 January 19, 1839 Paul Cezanne, French painter, was born. January 31, 1839 Liberty, Missouri
  • 153. 153 Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s history records: “I sent the poor brethren [in Far West, Missouri] a hundred dollar bill from jail, to assist them in their distressed situation.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:254 About February, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Legal Events—All six inmates in Liberty Jail petitioned Judge Joel Turnham for a writ of habeas corpus. Only Sidney Rigdon’s was granted. They were all returned to jail; Rigdon was released that night and was pursued but succeeded in arriving in Illinois. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series February 7, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Legal Events—After much rude treatment in jail and lack of due respect from the law, Joseph Smith considered escaping from Liberty Jail and received a confirmation that he and the brethren could go that night if they all assented. Lyman Wight objected, however, so they delayed the attempt. ♦ History of the Church, 3:257 February 8, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Legal Events—After Joseph Smith’s failed escape attempt, local citizens gathered outside of Liberty Jail and threatened to kill him and his fellow inmates. Joseph prophesied that they would be kept safe. ♦ History of the Church, 3:257-58 February 11, 1839 Josiah Willard Gibbs, American engineer, mathematician, and scientist, was born. He laid the basis for a large part of modern-day science and invented vector analysis. February 24, 1839 William Otis received a patent for the steam shovel. March 9, 1839 Phoebe Knapp, American hymn writer who composed melodies for over five hundred Protestant hymns, was born. March 15, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Visions and Revelations—While in prison, Joseph Smith predicted his own release in a letter and sent a petition to the judges of the Missouri supreme court. ♦ History of the Church, 3:277-81, 285-86
  • 154. 154 Writings—From Liberty Jail, Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Presendia Huntington Buell, who had tried to visit the prisoners but was refused entrance. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 426-28 March 20, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Visions and Revelations—From jail, Joseph Smith dictated a letter to the Saints who had found refuge in Quincy, Illinois, and elsewhere, after they had been driven from Missouri. The letter included what is now known as Doctrine and Covenants 121, 122, and 123. ♦ History of the Church, 3:289-303; D&C 121-23; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 429-47; Jessee and Welch, BYU Studies 39.3; 125-45 March 21, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife, Emma, living in Quincy, Illinois. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 448-53 March 22, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith sent a letter to landowner Isaac Galland informing him of the Church’s desire to purchase land in the Commerce, Illinois, vicinity, thus saving the Church from fragmentation. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 454-62; Cook, BYU Studies 19.3: 261- 84 March 23, 1839 The first recorded use of OK (“o.k. – all correct”) was published in the Boston Morning Post. April 4, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter from Liberty Jail to his wife. “My dear Emma,” he wrote, “I think of you and the children continually, if I could tell you my tale, I think you would say it was altogether enough for once, to gratify the malice of hell that I have suffered.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 463-69 April 6, 1839 Liberty, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith traveled with other prisoners by a dangerous route from Liberty to Gallatin, Daviess County. ♦ History of the Church, 3:308-9 1839 The world’s first commercial electric telegraph line came into operation alongside the Great Western Railway line from Paddington station to West Drayton.
  • 155. 155 April 8, 1839 Daviess County, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith arrived in Daviess County on Monday after being transferred from Liberty Jail and was turned over to Sheriff William Morgan and his guard. ♦ History of the Church, 3:309 April 9, 1839 Gallatin, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith’s trial commenced before a drunken grand jury and judge. ♦ History of the Church, 3:309-10 April 10, 1839 Gallatin, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith spent the day in court as witnesses were examined. ♦ History of the Church, 3:310 April 11, 1839 Gallatin, Missouri Visions and Revelations—During the night, Joseph Smith saw in a vision a means of escape from his own unjust imprisonment and that Brother Stephen Markam, a witness for the defense, must flee for his life. ♦ History of the Church, 3:316 April 12, 1839 Millport, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith and other prisoners left the home of Judge Josiah Morin en route to Boone County with an escort of five guards. ♦ History of the Church, 3:319; Baugh, Mormon Historical Studies 2.1: 59-82 About April 16, 1839 Gallatin, Missouri Travels—While traveling to Boone County under the guard of Sheriff William Morgan and four other men, Joseph Smith and his company were encouraged to escape from the guards, who then all became drunk. ♦ History of the Church, 3:320-21 April 22, 1839 Quincy, Missouri Travels—Joseph Smith arrived at Quincy after escaping from his unjust imprisonment in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 3:327-32 April 25, 1839 Iowa Travels—Joseph Smith went to Iowa with a committee of the Church to select a place for the relocation of the Saints from Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 3:336
  • 156. 156 1839 Mississippi became the first state to allow women to own property. May 10, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith moved his family into a small log house purchased from Hugh White. ♦ History of the Church, 3:349, 375 May 21, 1839 Montrose, Iowa Travels—With the First Presidency and several others, Joseph Smith rode out on a land excursion to view the territory for many miles in the regions about Montrose. ♦ Wilford Woodruff Journal, 1:333 June 1, 1839 Quincy, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties –Joseph Smith held a conference and taught that bishops are the authorities God appointed to take care of the poor. ♦ Watson, Manuscript History of Brigham Young, 42 June 11, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith began dictating his personal history to James Mulholland. ♦ History of the Church, 3:375 June 22, 1839 Louis Daguerre received a patent for his camera, which became commercially available by September. June 23, 1839 McDonough County, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—While visiting his brother Don Carlos, Joseph Smith preached to a congregation so eager to hear “that a part of them stood out in the rain during the sermon.” ♦ History of the Church, 3:378 July 2, 1839 Montrose, Iowa Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith counseled with and blessed the Twelve Apostles and certain of the Seventies before their missions to Great Britain. ♦ Wilford Woodruff, Leaves from My Journal, 106 July 6, 1839 Daviess County, Missouri
  • 157. 157 Legal Events—State of Missouri v. Joseph Smith et al. William Morgan, Sheriff of Daviess County, Missouri, filed a statement that on July 6, Joseph Smith and the others escaped without the “connivance, consent of negligence” of Morgan and the other officers. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series July 7, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a farewell meeting for members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles who were about to leave on missions to Great Britain. ♦ History of the Church, 4:1-3 July 8, 1839 John D. Rockefeller, American industrialist and philanthropist, was born. About July 9, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Over the course of a few days, Joseph Smith spent time with the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles selecting hymns for a new hymnbook. ♦ History of the Church, 4:3 July 21, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith and the Saints did not hold their Sunday meetings because of rain and sickness. However, elders of the Church healed many of the sick through the power of God. ♦ History of the Church, 4:3 July 22, 1839 Commerce, Illinois, to Montrose, Iowa Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith, Wilford Woodruff, and others miraculously healed the Saints of illnesses that had taken hold on both sides of the Mississippi River; this day is known as a great day of healing in Church history. ♦ McConkie, Remembering Joseph, 123-24; Wilford Woodruff Journal, 1:147-48; Esplin, BYU Studies 15.4: 425-34; Ament, Joseph Smith’s Prophetic Gifts, 78 1839 The New York Philharmonic was established. July 28, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Despite the great number of Saints still sick, the Sunday meeting was held as usual. Joseph Smith admonished the Saints to set their houses in order, so that by obedience the sick might be healed. ♦ History of the Church, 4:4-5
  • 158. 158 August 4, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith instructed the entire congregation of Saints in Commerce “concerning the necessity of being righteous, and clean at heart before the Lord.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:5 August 28, 1839 William Smith, English geologist and cartographer who created the first nationwide geological map, died. About September 9, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith spent much of his time attending to the settlement of the Saints in the Hotchkiss purchase in the northwest part of the city. ♦ History of the Church, 4:7 October 27, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Writings—The high council voted that Joseph Smith’s wife, Emma, select and publish an updated hymnbook for the Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 4:17-18 October 29, 1839 Commerce, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith left for Washington, D.C., seeking redress from the U.S. Congress for the grievances and losses of the Saints in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 4:19 November 1839 Commerce, Illinois Writings—While Joseph Smith traveled, the first issue of the Church newspaper Times and Seasons was published; it included one of Joseph’s journal entries. ♦ Writings of Joseph Smith, 470-82; Times and Seasons 1:2-9 November 4, 1839 Springfield, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith and his company arrived in Springfield on their journey to Washington, D.C., and met up with William Law and a number of Saints coming from Canada. Robert D. Foster, a physician, joined the company in Springfield and cared for Sidney Rigdon, who had fallen ill. ♦ History of the Church, 4:20 1839 The first pedal-driven bicycle was invented by Scottish blacksmith Kirkpatrick MacMillan.
  • 159. 159 November 9, 1839 Springfield, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife, Emma, telling her of Sidney Rigdon’s illness. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 485-88 November 18, 1839 Columbus, Ohio Travels—Because of illness among the group traveling to petition the government, Joseph Smith and Judge Elias Higbee went on ahead in order to make better time by stagecoach to Washington, D.C. ♦ History of the Church, 4:21 November 27, 1839 The American Statistical Association was founded in Boston, Massachusetts. November 27, 1839 En route to Washington, D.C. Travels—Just before arriving in Washington, D.C., the horses on the stagecoach ran off at full speed while the coachman was getting a drink, Joseph Smith climbed outside the door of the coach and regained control of the horses after a two to three mile run, saving the passengers from injury. ♦ History of the Church, 4:23-24 November 28, 1839 Washington, D.C. Legal Events—Joseph Smith arrived in the capital to present the Saints’ petition to the United States government seeking redress for losses in Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 4:24-38; Johnson, BYU Studies 26.2: 31-44 December, 1839 Washington, D.C. Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith gave a public sermon on Latter-day Saint beliefs to an audience that included several members of Congress. ♦ History of the Church, 4:78-79 December 5, 1839 George A. Custer, American cavalry officer, was born. December 5, 1839 Washington, D.C. Writings—Joseph Smith sent a letter to his brother Hyrum in Nauvoo, Illinois, reporting his visit with U.S. President Martin Van Buren. ♦ History of the Church, 4:39-42 December 7, 1839 Washington, D.C.
  • 160. 160 Legal Events—Joseph Smith consulted with the Illinois delegation about how to get the Church’s petition for redress brought before Congress. ♦ History of the Church, 4:43-44 December 21, 1839 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Travels— Joseph Smith arrived in Philadelphia by railway and “spent several days preaching and visiting from house to house, among the brethren and others.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:47 1839 Abd al-Kader, Algerian military and religious leader, proclaimed a Muslim holy war against the French. December 23, 1839 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Ecclesiastical Duties – Although a small branch had been organized already in Philadelphia, Joseph Smith established a more extensive organization there. ♦ Historical Atlas of Mormonism, 16 December 30, 1839 Monmouth, New Jersey Travels—Joseph Smith left Philadelphia and spent a few days visiting a branch of the Church in New Jersey. ♦ History of the Church, 4:49 1840 1840—Christian Friedrich Schönbein, German chemist, discovered ozone. 1840—The afternoon tea ritual was introduced in Britain by the Duchess of Bedford. 1840—Elizabeth Cady Stanton omitted the word obey from her marriage vows. January 20, 1840 Chester County, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to his wife, Emma, expressing his anxiety to see his family again and his hope of their petition going before Congress in a few days. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 489-92 January 22, 1840 Brandywine, Pennsylvania
  • 161. 161 Writings—In response to false rumors, Joseph Smith wrote a letter to the editor of the Chester County Register and Examiner relating the Church’s beliefs concerning civil government. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 493-96 About February 22, 1840 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Writings—Joseph Smith wrote his autograph in the family album of the Wilkinsons, nonmembers in Philadelphia who later joined the Church. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 497-98 February 29, 1840—John Philip Holland, Irish engineer who developed the first submarine formally commissioned by the U.S. Navy, was born. Early March 1840 Between Washington, D.C., and Nauvoo, Illinois Travels—On his way home from a fruitless visit to Washington, D.C., to seek redress for injustices the Saints suffered in Missouri, Joseph Smith proclaimed the iniquity and insolence of Martin Van Buren, the president of the United States, with whom he had visited. ♦ History of the Church, 4:89 March 6, 1840 Montrose, Iowa Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a meeting of the high council in Iowa and addressed the issue of the law of consecration. ♦ History of the Church, 4:93-94 March 11, 1840 Commerce, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Robert D. Foster, who had spent four months with the Prophet on his journey to the nation’s capital. Foster and Joseph Smith had returned to Illinois together, after having left Sidney Rigdon in Philadelphia, Elias Higbee in Washington, D.C., and Orrin Porter Rockwell in Dayton, Ohio. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 499-500 About April 7, 1840 Commerce, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Talitha Garlik Avery Cheney recorded that the Prophet baptized her in the Mississippi River the evening after Tuesday session of the Church’s conference. ♦ McConkie, Remembering Joseph, supplemental CD-ROM About April 8, 1840 Commerce, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith and his clerk Robert B. Thompson prepared credentials for Orson Hyde, recommending him as a worthy representative of the Church to the Jews in foreign lands. Hyde’s ultimate destination was Jerusalem, Palestine. ♦ History of the Church, 4:112-13
  • 162. 162 April 21, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Pursuant to Joseph Smith’s direction, the postmaster general officially changed the name of Commerce to Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 4:121 May 1, 1940—Britain issued the Penny Black, the world’s first adhesive postage stamp. May 7, 1840—Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, Russian composer, was born. June 2, 1840—Thomas Hardy, English writer, was born. June 18, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to the Nauvoo high council, petitioning for a release from attending to temporal concerns. ♦ History of the Church, 4:137; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 501-3 June 29, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith received a letter written to William W. Phelps on this date, wherein Phelps admitted the wrongs he had committed against Joseph and asked for his forgiveness. ♦ History of the Church, 4:141-42 July 14, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote to the Saints at the Crooked Creek Branch in Illinois (later Ramus, Hancock County), approving the organization of a stake there. The stake was later discontinued by Hyrum Smith at a conference on December 4-5, 1841. ♦ Times and Seasons 2:222 About July 19, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—While giving a discourse, Joseph Smith prophesied that the “time would come when the nations of the whole earth, even this nation [the United States], will be on the very verge of crumbling to pieces,” and the United States Constitution would hang by a thread. ♦ Ehat and Cook, eds., Words of Joseph Smith, 415-16; Jessee, BYU Studies, 19.3: 390-94 July 22, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings –After William W. Phelps requested forgiveness, Joseph Smith dictated a letter granting that forgiveness and inviting him to return to the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 4:162-64; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 508-10
  • 163. 163 About July 26, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Oliver Granger, the agent assigned to settle Church debts at Kirtland, Ohio. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 511-14 August 9, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to a friend of the Church, John C. Bennett, of Wayne County, Illinois, inviting him to come visit Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 4:177-79 August 15, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—While preaching a funeral sermon for Colonel Seymour Brunson, Joseph Smith first announced the doctrine of baptism of the dead. ♦ Ehat and Cook, eds., Words of Joseph Smith, 49; History of the Church, 4:179 September 1, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The successor to Lilburn W. Boggs, Missouri Governor Thomas Reynolds, initiated extradition proceedings against Joseph Smith and others by sending a requisition to Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series September 11, 1840—Jean-Gabriel Perboyre, a French Catholic missionary, was martyred in China. September 14, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s father, Joseph Smith Sr., died. ♦ History of the Church, 4:189 About September 15, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The funeral for Joseph Smith Sr. was held. An editorial printed in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons on this date reported that Lilburn W. Boggs, former governor of Missouri, had demanded the extradition of Joseph Smith Jr. as a fugitive from justice. ♦ History of the Church, 4:191, 198-99; Times and Seasons 1:170 October 3-5, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith presided at a three-day general conference of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 4:204-14 October 19, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum wrote a letter to the Saints in Kirtland reproving them for neglect in their brethren and sisters during the Missouri persecutions. ♦
  • 164. 164 Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 504-5 November 12, 1940—Auguste Rodin, French sculptor, was born. November 14, 1840—Claude Monet, French painter, was born. December 12, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Newel K. Whitney requesting some dry wood to burn in his stove. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 504-5 December 15, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to the Twelve Apostles on missions in Great Britain. Joseph expressed his pleasure at the spread of truth throughout England and agreed with their request to return in the spring. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 515-22 December 16, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The city of Nauvoo was granted its charter from the state of Illinois, making it an official city with various government rights and protections. ♦ History of the Church, 4:239-49 December 30, 1840 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith’s history included an extensive list of books, pamphlets, and letters published for and against the Latter-day Saints during the past year. ♦ History of the Church, 4:253-56, 487-89 1841 January 19, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 124, a revelation giving extensive instructions regarding specific callings as well as the building of the Nauvoo Temple and the Nauvoo House (a hotel). ♦ History of the Church, 4:274–86; D&C 124 January 26, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Oliver Granger, the Church’s agent at Kirtland. Under the impression that Granger was planning to return to Nauvoo in fall 1840, Almon Babbitt had been called to preside over the stake at Kirtland. If Granger’s letters making his intentions known had been delivered to the Prophet promptly, Granger would likely have been called to preside over the Kirtland stake. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 523–25
  • 165. 165 January 30, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—At a special conference, Joseph Smith was unanimously elected sole Trustee-in-Trust for the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 4:286 February 3, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—The first general elections of the newly chartered city of Nauvoo were held on this date. At a meeting organizing the city council, Joseph Smith gave the opening prayer, presented bills concerning the University of Nauvoo and the Nauvoo Legion, and was sworn in as a member of the city council. ♦ History of the Church, 4:288–95 February 4, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith attended a court martial organizing the Nauvoo Legion and was elected lieutenant general. ♦ History of the Church, 4:295–96 Feb. 10, 1841 The Act of Union merged Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. February 11, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith performed the marriage of Philo Dibble and Hannah Ann Dubois Smith at his home. Joseph’s wife, Emma, prepared a wedding supper for a large party of friends assembled. ♦ Lambert, Early Scenes in Church History, 92–93; Life History of Philo Dibble, 6 Feb. 18, 1841 The first ongoing filibuster in the U.S. Senate began and lasted until March 11. About February 21, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith prophesied to John Taylor’s worried mother that her son John would safely return from jail within a week after having been imprisoned in Missouri for six months; he returned six days later. ♦ John Taylor, Juvenile Instructor 27:202 Feb. 25, 1841 Pierre-Auguste Renoir, French painter, was born. March 1, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—At the Nauvoo City Council meeting, Joseph Smith presented a bill for an ordinance allowing “free toleration and equal privileges” to all religious sects and denominations. ♦ History of the Church, 4:306 Mar. 4, 1841 William Henry Harrison succeeded Martin Van Buren as U.S. President.
  • 166. 166 Mar. 8, 1841 Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., U.S. Supreme Court Justice, was born March 16, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Amos Keeler, a New York City dry-goods merchant. After his Missouri imprisonment, Joseph once again turned his attention to his unpaid Kirtland debts. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 526 About March 26, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 125, a revelation concerning the Saints gathering in Iowa Territory. ♦ History of the Church, 4:311; D&C 125 Apr. 4, 1841 President Harrison died and was succeeded by Vice President John Tyler. April 5, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith married Louisa Beaman. This is the first of Joseph’s plural marriages for which there is documentable evidence. Joseph B. Noble, Louisa’s brother-in- law, performed the ceremony as it was dictated to him by Joseph. ♦ Roberts, Rise and Fall of Nauvoo, 116; Newell and Avery, Mormon Enigma, 95 April 6, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith supervised the laying of the four Nauvoo Temple cornerstones and attended a military parade celebrating the eleventh anniversary of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 4:326–27; Times and Seasons 2:375–83 Apr. 28, 1841 Pierre Chanel, Catholic priest and missionary, was martyred on Futuna Island. May 4, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Oliver Granger, his agent in Kirtland, Ohio, expressing his eagerness to have “matters which concern the First Presidency settled as soon as possible.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 527–28 June 4, 1841 Quincy, Illinois Legal Events—After Joseph Smith had an agreeable meeting with Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin, the governor sent Sheriff Thomas King of Adams County to arrest Joseph. ♦ History of the Church, 4:364 June 5, 1841 Quincy, Illinois
  • 167. 167 Legal Events—Joseph Smith was arrested in Bear Creek, Illinois, on a warrant from Thomas Carlin, Governor of Illinois, and was charged as a fugitive from justice. Joseph returned to Quincy and obtained a writ of habeas corpus. ♦ History of the Church, 4:365 June 7, 1841 En route to Monmouth, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith started very early for his court hearing in Monmouth, Illinois, a seventy-five-mile journey, accompanied by Sheriff Thomas King, the arresting officer from Adams County. ♦ History of the Church, 4:365–66; Times and Seasons 2:447–49 June 8, 1841 Monmouth, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith arrived at Monmouth for his hearing before Judge Stephen A. Douglas and “found great excitement prevailing in the public mind, and great curiosity was manifested by the citizens who were extremely anxious to obtain a sight of the Prophet, expecting to see me in chains.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:366 June 9, 1841 Monmouth, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith was represented at his hearing by Orville H. Browning, who eloquently defended him. ♦ History of the Church, 4:369 June 10, 1841 Monmouth, Illinois Legal Events—On a technicality, Judge Stephen A. Douglas ruled that that Joseph Smith’s writ was illegal and discharged him from the arrest warrant. Joseph returned to Nauvoo the next day. ♦ History of the Church, 4:370–71 July 3, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith made a patriotic speech to the Nauvoo Legion troops in which he declared his willingness to lay down his life in defense of the United States. ♦ History of the Church, 4:382 1841 The Preemption Act of 1841 allowed settlers to claim up to 160 acres and then purchase them after fourteen months for $1.25 an acre. July 9, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 126, a revelation stating that Brigham Young would no longer be required to leave his family. ♦ History of the Church, 4:382; D&C 126 July 12, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith appointed John Patten to be the recorder of baptisms for the dead in Iowa. ♦ History of the Church, 4:382
  • 168. 168 July 18, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and the Nauvoo Saints spent the day in fasting and prayer to mourn the death of Senator Sidney H. Little. ♦ History of the Church, 4:389; Times and Seasons 2:481 1841 New England intellectuals founded Brook Farm, a Transcendentalist commune and school. July 25, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a meeting in a grove where he preached a sermon on the Resurrection. ♦ History of the Church, 4:389 August 1, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and the Saints heard reports from all the members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles who had recently returned from missions. ♦ History of the Church, 4:390–91; Times and Seasons 2:487 August 5, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith received a letter from his brother William Smith regarding the Hotchkiss land purchase on which Nauvoo was built. ♦ History of the Church, 4:391–92 August 7, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s Brother Don Carlos died. He was twenty-five years old. ♦ History of the Church, 4:393–99 August 8, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—A large group of friends and relatives attended the funeral of Joseph Smith’s brother Don Carlos, who was buried with military honors. ♦ History of the Church, 4:399 August 10, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a council with some of the Apostles to plan the next phase of missionary work. ♦ History of the Church, 4:400 August 12, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with about a hundred chiefs, braves, and their families, of the Keokuk, Kis-ku-kosh, and Appanoose tribes. Joseph instructed them about their fathers and the promises made concerning them in the Book of Mormon. ♦ History of the Church, 4:401–2 August 15, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith’s son Don Carlos died at fourteen months and two days old. ♦ History of the Church, 4:402
  • 169. 169 Aug. 16, 1841 President John Tyler vetoed a bill to establish a federal bank and Whigs rioted, causing a violent demonstration on the White House grounds. August 16, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—On account of the death of his son Don Carlos, Joseph Smith was absent from the morning session of a special conference of the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 4:402–4 August 25, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith responded to a letter from Horace R. Hotchkiss regarding the purchase of the land that Joseph called “a deathly sickly hole.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:406–8 August 27, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s clerk Robert B. Thompson died. ♦ History of the Church, 4:411; Van Orden, BYU Studies 32.1–2: 86–91 September 5, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke to a large congregation concerning the science and practice of medicine. ♦ History of the Church, 4:414 Sept. 8, 1841 Antonin Dvoˇrák, Czech composer, was born September 13, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith received an invitation from the militia of Lee County, Iowa, to attend a military parade on September 14 in Montrose, Illinois. ♦ History of the Church, 4:416 September 14, 1841 Montrose, Iowa Political Events—Joseph Smith went from Nauvoo to Montrose, Illinois, with a few of the brethren and was courteously received by General Ezekiel Swazey, along with other officers and militia. ♦ History of the Church, 4:416 September 25, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s nephew Hyrum Smith, son of Hyrum and Jerusha, died at the age of seven. ♦ History of the Church, 4:418 September 30, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 170. 170 Legal Events—Joseph Smith sent the deputy sheriff of Adams County a statement detailing the total costs ($685) from his arrest and trial while in the sheriff’s custody. ♦ History of the Church, 4:419–20 1841 John Augustus developed the concept of probation. October 2, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—During a general conference of the Church, Joseph Smith laid the southeast cornerstone of the Nauvoo House (a hotel) and placed the original manuscript of the Book of Mormon and other important documents inside a square-cut chest hewn in the center of the cornerstone and covered with a stone lid. ♦ History of the Church, 1:75; 4:423– 29 1841 Dorothea Dix encountered the cruel treatment of the mentally ill and began working for reforms. October 9, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Smith Tuttle of New Haven, Connecticut. Tuttle was a land speculator who, along with Horace R. Hotchkiss and John Gilbert, had owned the largest section of land upon which Nauvoo was being built. The Church had obtained 500 acres from these men in August 1839. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 529–32 November 7, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke to the Saints about the danger of accusing and pointing out the sins of others. ♦ History of the Church, 4:445–46 November 8, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended the dedication of the baptismal font built in the cellar of the Nauvoo Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 4:446–47 Nov. 13, 1841 James Braid first saw a demonstration of animal magnetism, which led to his study of hypnosis. November 14, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Under Joseph Smith’s direction, the members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles met in council to prepare an epistle to the Saints in Europe. ♦ History of the Church, 4:448–53 November 16, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 171. 171 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to John M. Bernhisel in New York City. Bernhisel had sent Joseph a copy of Stephens’s Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan, which Joseph read with “greatest interest & pleasure.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 533–34 November 21, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—The first baptisms for the dead in the Nauvoo Temple were performed in the temple font in compliance with Joseph Smith’s instructions regarding the ordinance. ♦ History of the Church, 4:454 November 26, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith presented and passed a bill at the Nauvoo City Council meeting for “an Ordinance in relation to Hawkers, Pedlars, Public Shows, and Exhibitions, in order to prevent any immoral or obscene exhibition.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:461 November 28, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—At a meeting with the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Joseph Smith told the brethren “that the Book of Mormon was the most correct of any book on earth, and the keystone of our religion, and a man would get nearer to God by abiding by its precepts, than by any other book.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:461 December 5, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith began to proof a new edition of the Book of Mormon prior to its being stereotyped. ♦ History of the Church, 4:468 1841 The University of Missouri opened. December 7, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Nehemiah Browning and Orville H. Bushnell, law partners who were attempting to collect debts for some of Joseph’s Kirtland creditors. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 535–36 December 13, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith appointed Willard Richards as the recorder for the Nauvoo Temple and as his personal scribe. This date marks the first journal entry in Joseph’s journal that would continue virtually unbroken until the week of his death. ♦ History of the Church, 4:470; Searle, BYU Studies 31.2: 41–62 December 14, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith began unpacking and sorting the dry goods for his Red Brick Store on the corner of Granger and Water Streets ♦ History of the Church, 4:476
  • 172. 172 December 18, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith sent a statement to James Gordon Bennett of the New York Weekly Herald, expressing gratitude for an unbiased publication concerning the Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 4:477–78 December 19, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke about the parable of the vine and its branches at a meeting with the Twelve Apostles in his home. ♦ History of the Church, 4:478–79 December 22, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith received the first supply of groceries for his store in thirteen wagonloads that had been detained in St. Louis, Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 4:483 December 24, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—In the evening, Joseph Smith consulted “with President [Brigham] Young and Bishop [Newel] Whitney about establishing an agency in England for the cheap and expeditious conveyance of the Saints to Nauvoo.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:484 1841 A Philadelphia store began using a life-size model of Santa Claus. December 26, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—At a public meeting of the Saints in his home, Joseph Smith explained that the gift of tongues is the ability to hear and preach the gospel in a different language. ♦ History of the Church, 4:485–86 December 27, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—In a meeting with the Twelve Apostles, Joseph Smith discussed seer stones and showed his seer stone to the brethren. ♦ McConkie, Remembering Joseph Smith, 232 December 28, 1841 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith baptized Sidney Rigdon for and in behalf of Elder Rigdon’s parents. The Prophet also baptized Reynolds Cahoon and others. ♦ History of the Church, 4:486 1842 January 5, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 173. 173 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Edward Hunter at West Nantmeal, Pennsylvania, describing the opening of his new store. “The store has been filled to overflowing…& I have stood behind the counter <all day myself> dealing out goods as steady as any clerk you ever saw.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 541-44; History of the Church, 4:491-92 January 8, 1842 Caldwell County, Missouri Legal Events--George Boosinger v. Joseph Smith & Hyrum Smith. George Boosinger sued Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith for nonpayment of loan evidenced by a promissory note signed in Tallmage, Ohio, on May 26, 1836. Court proceedings were signed by Austin King on February 28, 1842. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series January 9, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life--Joseph Smith attended the marriage of William Moore and Orissa Angelia Bates in the house of Elder Orson Pratt. ♦ A Short Biographical History and Diary of William Moore Allred, 3 January 11, 1842 William James, American psychologist and philosopher who studied educational and religious psychology, was born. January 13, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life--Joseph Smith’s clerk Willard Richards commenced boarding with him. ♦ History of the Church, 4:494 January 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith commenced reading the first American stereotype edition of the Book of Mormon to make a few corrections for the second stereotype edition. ♦ History of the Church, 4:494 1842 Sir Richard Owen invented the term dinosauria. January 21, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life--Joseph Smith’s history records: “I read the Book of Mormon, transacted a variety of business in the store and city, and spent the evening in the office with Elders John Taylor and Willard Richards interpreting dreams.” ♦ History of the Church, 4:501
  • 174. 174 January 22, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith revised the rules of the Nauvoo City Council and, due to John C. Bennett’s absence, was elected mayor pro tem of Nauvoo at the council meeting. ♦ History of the Church, 4:501 January 27, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith attended to business, put carpet on the floor of his office, and spent the evening in council. ♦ History of the Church, 4:502-3 January 28, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—At his office, Joseph Smith received a revelation directed to the Twelve Apostles concerning the Church newspaper Times and Seasons. ♦ History of the Church, 4:503 1842 The Sons of Temperance fraternity was founded in New York City. February 4, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The Church closed a contract to purchase the printing office of Ebenezer Robinson. ♦ History of the Church, 4:513 February 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—The newspaper Times and Seasons published its first issue with Joseph Smith listed as the editor, although he later claimed no responsibility for the content of this issue. ♦ Times and Seasons, 3:696, 702, 719; Leonard, Nauvoo, 219 February 17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The Nauvoo City Council passed an ordinance that allowed marriages to occur without marriage licenses or public notice. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series February 18, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith v. Thomas J. Shearer. Joseph Smith filed a complaint against Shearer for “Forcible entry & detainer.” Shearer had entered and taken up abode on lands belonging to Smith. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series
  • 175. 175 Political Events—In a city council meeting, Joseph Smith expressed his confidence in the privileges afforded by the Nauvoo charter. ♦ History of the Church, 4:516 February 23, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith visited the printing office and gave instructions regarding the book of Abraham to be printed in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons. ♦ History of the Church, 4:518 February 24, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a note authorizing Ebenezer Robinson to use the stereotype plates to make another impression of the Book of Mormon and print 1,500 copies. Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 545-46 1842 Alfred Tennyson published Poems. March 1, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith’s letter to Chicago newspaper reporter John Wentworth was published in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons, telling of the rise of the Church, giving an account of the First Vision, and including statements of belief that would become the Articles of Faith. ♦ History of the Church, 4:535-41 March 4, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—In preparation for the publication of the book of Abraham in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons, Joseph Smith showed the book of Abraham papyri to Reuben Hedlock and gave him instructions about preparing facsimiles for printing. ♦ History of the Church, 4:543 March 5, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith wrote a resolution for the Nauvoo City Council, moving that city inhabitants “shall keep their children home <except on lawful business> on Sundays and from skayting on the ice and from marauding upon their neghbours property and any persons refuseing to do the same shall pay five dollars fine for every offence for the same &c.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 547-48 March 6, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 176. 176 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached at Orson Spencer’s house on the hill near the Nauvoo Temple. ♦ History of the Church, 4:543 March 9, 1842 Giuseppe Verdi’s third opera, Nabucco, premiered in Milan. March 9 and 11, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Edward Hunter at West Nantmeal, Pennsylvania, who had sold one of his farms and intended to donate $400 toward the construction of the Nauvoo Temple and $400 for stock in the Nauvoo House. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 549-50 March 11, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith commanded the Nauvoo Legion on parade through the streets of Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 4:549-50 March 13, 1842 Henry Shrapnel, English soldier and inventor of the shrapnel shell, which was referred to in “The Star-Spangled Banner,” died. March 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—An installment of Joseph Smith’s translation of the book of Abraham, including facsimile 2, was published in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons. ♦ History of the Church, 4:519-34; Book of Abraham March 17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith organized the Relief Society of Nauvoo with his wife Emma as the president. ♦ History of the Church, 4:552-53, 567 March 20, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached a sermon on death and resurrection, baptized a large number of individuals in the river, confirmed many of them in the grove near the temple, and then performed additional baptisms in the font of the temple. ♦ History of the Church, 4:553-58 March 24, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 177. 177 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended the Relief Society meeting to complete its organization. ♦ History of the Church, 4:567-68 March 27, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties--Joseph Smith witnessed the landing of Latter-day Saint immigrants from England on the steamboat Ariel and performed ordinances for 107 individuals after speaking on baptism for the dead. ♦ History of the Church, 4:543 March 30, 1842 Anesthesia (ether) was used for the first time in an operation by Dr. Crawford Long. April 1, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith published a lengthy editorial in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons titled “Try the Spirits,” about the gift of discernment. ♦ History of the Church, 4:571- 81 April 9, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached at the funeral of Brother Ephraim Marks in the morning. ♦ History of the Church, 4:586-87 April 10, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—While preaching in a grove near the Nauvoo Temple site, Joseph Smith “reproved and rebuked” the Saints for wickedness and all forms of iniquity. ♦ History of the Church, 4:587-88 April 14, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith and others met with attorney Calvin A. Warren to consider declaring bankruptcy under the new federal law made effective February 1, 1842. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series April 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith published an editorial in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons concerning baptism for the dead. ♦ History of the Church, 4:595-99; Times and Seasons 3:759- 61 April 24, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 178. 178 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached on the hill near the Nauvoo Temple concerning the building of the temple. ♦ History of the Church, 4:601 April 28, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with the members of the Relief Society and lectured on the privileges and blessings of the priesthood. ♦ History of the Church, 4:602-7 May 4, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with Hyrum Smith, Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, Judge James Adams, Bishops Newel K. Whitney and George Miller, and Elder William Law in the upper room of the Red Brick Store, where he gave them instructions and the endowment. ♦ History of the Church, 5: 1-2, 9; Brown, BYU Studies 19.3: 364 May 6, 1842 Independence, Missouri Legal Events—Joseph Smith later learned that on this date, former Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs was shot and seriously wounded at his home. For several days he was not expected to live. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1842 Henry Wace, American clergyman instrumental in the founding of Unitarianism, published An Inquiry into the Foundation, Evidences, and Truths of Religion. May 7, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith commanded drills for the Nauvoo Legion throughout the day. ♦ History of the Church, 5:3-5 May 12, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended an overflowing meeting of the Relief Society. ♦ History of the Church, 5:6 May 14, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Orrin Porter Rockwell arrived in Nauvoo, having traveled from Independence, Missouri, where he had been staying with his wife and her family at the time of the Lilburn W. Boggs shooting. Joseph Smith received word on this day that Boggs had been killed at Independence. These early reports proved untrue, as Boggs eventually recovered from his wounds. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series; History of the Church, 5:8
  • 179. 179 May 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith spoke at a meeting and told the assembly that Boggs had been murdered. Soon thereafter rumors began circulating, fanned by John C. Bennett, that Rockwell had been the shooter and that he had been ordered or encouraged to do so by Joseph Smith. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series; History of the Church, 5:9 1842 John C. Fremont mapped the Oregon Trail. May 16, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith published facsimile 2 and the remaining verses from the book of Abraham in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons. ♦ History of the Church, 5:11; 4:525 May 17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—A city ordinance banned brothels and punished adultery and fornication by imprisonment up to six months and fines from $500 to $50,000. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series May 19, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith was elected by the Nauvoo City Council to replace John C. Bennett as mayor. ♦ History of the Church, 5:12 May 27, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith stayed at home and took medicine for a bilious attack. ♦ History of the Church, 5:21 June 1, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Truman Gillette would later swear (on June 18, 1844) that on this date he heard that William Law and a Missouri band were plotting to kidnap Joseph Smith. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 9, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended the Relief Society meeting and taught about avoiding strife and building unity. ♦ History of the Church, 5:23-25
  • 180. 180 June 23, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Jennetta Richards, wife of Willard Richards, informing her that he was sending her husband to Richmond, Massachusetts, to bring his family to Nauvoo. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 551-52 June 29, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties – Joseph Smith appointed William Clayton as his new scribe to replace Willard Richards, who was leaving to bring his family to Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 5:49 June 29, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith married Eliza Roxcy Snow, sister of Lorenzo Snow, as a plural wife. ♦ Derr, BYU Studies, 36.1: 87; www.familysearch.org July 11, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith bought a horse, which he named Jo Duncan after Joseph Duncan, Whig candidate for Illinois governor, who had attacked Mormon charters. Joseph Smith supported Duncan’s opponent, Democrat Thomas Ford. ♦ History of the Church, 5:60; Widstoe, Joseph Smith--Seeker after Truth, Prophet of God, 366 1842 P. T. Barnum began exhibiting Tom Thumb. July 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—After finding a despairing letter by Orson Pratt and fearing that he intended to take his own life, Joseph organized a search for him. Elder Pratt returned that evening. ♦ History of the Church, 5:60-61; Jessee, Papers of Joseph Smith, 2:398 July 16, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith rode out to the prairie with his clerk William Clayton, hoed some potatoes, and dined with Cornelius P. Lott, who maintained Joseph Smith’s farm. ♦ History of the Church, 5:66 July 17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith attended a meeting at a grove near the Nauvoo Temple but became sick and stayed at home the rest of the day. ♦ History of the Church, 5:67 July 22, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 181. 181 Legal Events—Missouri Governor Thomas Reynolds issued a requisition to Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin for the extradition of Joseph Smith and Orrin Porter Rockwell in connection with the Boggs shooting. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series July 25, 1842 Dominique Jean Larrey, a French surgeon who established battlefield hospitals and ambulance corps for Napoleon’s army, died. July 27, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith took Sarah Ann Whitney, daughter of Newel K. and Elizabeth Ann Whitney, as a plural wife. The ceremony was performed by Sarah Ann’s father. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 566; Newell and Avery, Mormon Enigma, 125 August 4, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith and fifteen other brethren practiced fencing with Colonel Brewer. ♦ History of the Church, 5:84 About August 6, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith prophesied that the Saints would be driven to the Rocky Mountains, endure many afflictions, and become a mighty people. ♦ History of the Church, 5:8 August 8, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith was arrested on a charge of being “an accessory to an assault with intent to kill” ex-Governor Lilburn Boggs of Missouri and was placed under custody of the city marshal after the court issued a writ of habeas corpus. Joseph went into hiding on this date and would remain in hiding intermittently for the next few months to avoid further arrest attempts-ultimately resulting in his going to Springfield in late December and early January for a habeas corpus hearing. ♦ History of the Church, 5:86-88 August 9, 1842 The Webster Ashburton Treaty, which settled the disputed border between the U.S. and Canada, was signed. August 11, 1842 Mississippi River between Nauvoo, Illinois and Montrose, Iowa Personal Life—Joseph Smith held a private council after dark with his wife Emma, his brother Hyrum, and a few others at the lower end of an island in the river. His legal position
  • 182. 182 was discussed and lawyers were retained to represent him in Iowa and Illinois. ♦ History of the Church, 5:89-90, 106-9 August 13, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s wife Emma eluded detection by the sheriff while taking a carriage to visit her husband, who was in hiding. ♦ History of the Church, 5:91-92 1842 The British Empire annexed Hong Kong. August 14, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent an enjoyable afternoon talking a reading his history with his wife Emma. ♦ History of the Church, 5:84 August 16, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—In a letter to his wife Emma, Joseph Smith considered the possibility of escaping with her and “20 or 30 of the best men we can find” to the Wisconsin pine country. Joseph discouraged Emma from visiting Governor Carlin, whom he considered to be “a fool.” Joseph also dictated some personal reflections, which his clerk William Clayton recorded in Joseph’s journal. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 553-56, 559-65 August 16-17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith exchanged several letters with Wilson Law, who first advised him to retire away from Nauvoo until the next governor took office, then changed his counsel and advised Joseph to return to Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 5:110-12; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 557-58 August 17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith continued to receive letters from his wife and various others at his secret retreat at Brother Edward Sayer’s. ♦ History of the Church, 5:114-17 August 18, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith’s wife Emma encourage him to change his hiding spot immediately, and they accordingly traveled together to Carlos Granger’s place. ♦ History of the Church, 5:117-18 Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to the Newel K. Whitney family from his hiding place at Carlos Granger’s on the outskirts of Nauvoo. Joseph requested Newel, his wife, and their
  • 183. 183 daughter, Sarah Ann, to come and comfort him in his loneliness. Sarah Ann had been sealed to Joseph on July 27, 1842. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 566-69 August 20, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith had a meeting with his brother Hyrum and four others; they discussed the illegal proceedings of their prosecutors. ♦ History of the Church, 5:119-29 August 24, 1842 Quincy, Illinois Legal Events—Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin sent a letter to the Prophet’s wife Emma Smith, assuring her that all of his actions concerning Joseph had “been prompted by a strict sense of duty.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:130-31 August 26, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith had a meeting with the Twelve in which he stressed the importance of continued missionary work, despite the persecutions against the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 5:131-32 August 29, 1842 The Treaty of Nanking was signed, ending the First Opium War. August 29, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith gave a talk in which he promised the Saints there would be no lives lost if they would listen to his counsel. ♦ History of the Church, 5:136-39 August 31, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith rode to a grove near the Nauvoo Temple with his wife Emma to attend a meeting of the Relief Society. ♦ History of the Church, 5:139-41 September 1, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—While in seclusion, Joseph Smith dictated a general epistle to the Church concerning the work of baptisms for the dead, which was later canonized as Doctrine and Covenants 127. ♦ History of the Church, 5:142-44; D&C 127; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 570-73 September 2, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith received a report that the sheriff was on his way to Nauvoo with a posse. ♦ History of the Church, 5:142-44
  • 184. 184 September 3, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith escaped out the back door of his home from Deputy Sheriff Pitman and others who had come to arrest him. ♦ History of the Church, 5:145 September 7, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to the Church containing further instruction concerning baptisms for the dead, which was later canonized as Doctrine and Covenants 128. ♦ History of the Church, 5:148-53; D&C 128; Joseph Smith journal entry for September 7, 1842 September 8, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—In a letter to James Arlington Bennet, Joseph Smith bore his testimony and described his persecutions. ♦ History of the Church, 5:156-59; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 574-79; Cook, BYU Studies 19.2: 247-49 September 10, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life--Joseph Smith remained in hiding the entire day and returned home at night. ♦ History of the Church, 5:161 September 15, 1842 Francisco Morazan, President of the Federal Republic of Central America and one of the most important military leaders of the region, died. September 16, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith was at home sitting for his portrait painted by David Rogers. ♦ History of the Church, 5:164 September 19, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith continued to sit for his portrait being painted by David Rogers. ♦ History of the Church, 5:165 September 20, 1842 Quincy, Illinois Legal Events—Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin, embarrassed by the inability of his state law enforcement officers to capture Joseph Smith, issued a “proclamation” setting forth the legal basis for issuing the arrest warrants for Smith and Rockwell, reciting hat they had “resisted the laws by refusing to go with the officers who had them in custody.” and
  • 185. 185 offering a reward of $200 for their apprehension. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series September 25, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke at a grove in Nauvoo for two hours concerning persecutions. ♦ History of the Church, 5:165 September 29, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith stayed at home all day nursing his wife Emma, who was sick. ♦ History of the Church, 5:166 About November 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—City of Nauvoo v. Thomas J. Hunter and City of Nauvoo v. Amos Davis. Charges, respectively, were for slandering Joseph Smith and for using ridiculous and abusive language against Joseph Smith. Hunter was found guilty, but Joseph forgave the judgment. Davis was convicted, but the County Circuit Court reversed the conviction on May 24, 1843. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1842 Christian Doppler, Austrian physicist, published “On the Colored Light of Binary Stars” (about the Doppler effect). November 1, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith, three of his children, and William Clayton were miraculously preserved after being thrown from their carriage, which overturned on their way to Joseph’s farm. ♦ History of the Church, 5:182-83 November 5, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith received a visit from some Native Americans, who “expressed great friendship for the Mormon people, and said they were their friends.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:183 November 8, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith issued writs and affidavits I order to clear up problems with fraud and irregularity at the Nauvoo Post Office. ♦ History of the Church, 5:184 November 10, 1842
  • 186. 186 The Fleet Prison for debtors in London was abolished. November 15, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith resigned as editor of the Church newspaper Times and Seasons and appointed John Taylor in his place. ♦ History of the Church, 5:193; Times and Seasons 4:8 November 26, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—For six hours, Joseph Smith attended to Brigham Young, who was sick with a severe fever. ♦ History of the Church, 5:196; Watson, Manuscript History of Brigham Young, 124; McConkie, Remembering Joseph Smith, 171 November 28, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a daylong trial at his house concerning the unequal distribution of provisions among the temple workers. ♦ History of the Church, 5:196-97 December 2, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—City of Nauvoo v. Amos Davis. The city court under Joseph Smith convicted Amos Davis for illegally “selling spirits by the small quantity” and of assaulting Joseph’s employee William H. Walker and insulting another employee, Ira Miles. Rulings were confirmed by the Circuit Court on May 24, 1843. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series Legal Events—Joseph Smith dispatched a delegation to visit Springfield to sound out new Illinois Governor Thomas Ford on the possibility of dismissing the outstanding warrant for Joseph’s arrest. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1842 Commonwealth v. Hunt made strikes and unions legal in the U.S. December 9, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent the day chopping wood. ♦ History of the Church, 5:200 December 14, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith’s delegation at Springfield, Illinois, made an affidavit that was in Illinois on May 6, the day of the assassination attempt of former Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs. ♦ History of the Church, 5:204-5 December 15, 1842 Springfield, Illinois
  • 187. 187 Legal Events—Hyrum Smith was discharged in bankruptcy by Judge Nathaniel Pope, and U.S. Attorney Justin Butterfield attempted to settle Joseph Smith’s bankruptcy application. This matter was still unresolved when Joseph was murdered. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series December 17, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Illinois Governor Thomas Ford wrote Joseph Smith a letter refusing to interfere with the acts of his predecessor, Governor Thomas Carlin, but encouraged Joseph to come to Springfield to have his extradition case heard. He offered Joseph protection while traveling to and from his court trial. U.S. Attorney Justin Butterfield also encouraged him to come to Springfield and assured Joseph he would represent him. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series; History of the Church, 5:205-7 December 20, 1842 The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, was established. December 26, 1842 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith was arrested for being an accessory to attempted murder in the Lilburn W. Boggs case, for the second time, on an extradition order. This time, however, he was arrested by Wilson Law, a friend, for the purpose of conveying him safely to Springfield. Henry Sherwood and William Clayton went to Carthage to obtain a writ of habeas corpus. ♦ History of the Church, 5:209 December 29, 1842 En route to Springfield, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith and his company traveled thirty-two miles in the cold. ♦ History of the Church, 5:210-11 December 31, 1842 Springfield, Illinois Legal Events---Joseph Smith appeared before Judge Pope of the U.S. District Court and posted bail in connection with Missouri’s extradition demand relating to the Boggs assault. ♦ History of the Church, 5:212-13 1843
  • 188. 188 1843—Andrew Jackson Davis, American spiritualist, became a clairvoyant known as the “Poughkeepsie Seer.” He was popular among abolitionists, feminists, and those in the temperance movement. 1843---Congress granted Samuel F. B. Morse $30,000 to build the first telegraph line (Washington, D.C.—Baltimore). 1843—Sir George Everest, British surveyor, worked on the trigonometrical survey of India from 1806 to 1843. Mt. Everest was named for him. 1843—James Joule quantified the conversion of work into heat. 1843—The Economist, a magazine partly inspired by the American financial crisis of the 1830’s was first published. 1843—Sojourner Truth, American abolitionist and freed slave, claimed to hear heavenly voices. She then traveled in the North, where she advocated emancipation and women’s rights. 1843—Seren Kierkegaard wrote Either/Or, which contained philosophies that became the basis for existentialism. 1843—Edgar Allen Poe published “The Tell-Tale Heart.” 1843—The first commercial Christmas cards were printed by Sir Henry Cole in London. January 2, 1843 Springfield, Illinois Legal Events—Regarding the outcome of the ongoing trial against him, Joseph Smith prophesied that he would not go to Missouri, dead or alive. ♦ History of the Church, 5:216-20 January 3, 1843 Springfield, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—While in Springfield awaiting trial, Joseph Smith called upon Sister Crane and blessed her baby, Joseph Smith Crane. ♦ History of the Church, 5:219 January 4, 1843 Springfield, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith appeared in a packed federal court and afterward had dinner and visited with U.S. Marshall William Prentice before retiring to Judge James Adam’s. ♦ History of the Church, 5:220-23 January 5, 1843 Springfield, Illinois Legal Events—After Judge Nathaniel Pope discharged him from this arrest, Joseph Smith prophesied to him that Nauvoo, Illinois would become a great city. ♦ History of the Church, 5:223-32 January 6, 1843 Springfield, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith went to see Judge Nathaniel Pope in the morning and blessed his son. The judge wished him well and hoped he would not longer be persecuted. Joseph then visited Illinois Governor Thomas Ford, who signed an executive order rescinding
  • 189. 189 Governor Carlin’s earlier order for Joseph’s arrest. ♦ History of the Church, 5:232-33; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series January 11, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith had a mishap with his sleigh while on an outing with his wife Emma. ♦ History of the Church, 5:248 January 11, 1843—Francis Scott Key, American lawyer who wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner,” died. January 17, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—At an overflowing public meeting at his home, Joseph Smith spoke at length on the kingdom of God and the manner of baptism performed by John the Baptist. ♦ Wilford Woodruff Journal, 2:212; History of the Church, 5:252 January 20, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a meeting with the Twelve, where he told them that from April 6, 1844 he would prepare for a mission with them throughout the United States, England, and other countries. The council also considered the case of Orson Pratt and his reinstatement in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. ♦ History of the Church, 5:255-56 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith rebaptized Orson Pratt and his wife, Sarah, confirmed them in the Church, and ordained Brother Pratt to his former office in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. ♦ History of the Church, 5:256 January 28, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith played ball with the brethren and rode around the city with Mr. Taylor, a land agent visiting from New York. ♦ History of the Church, 5:260 February 3, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith read German and a proof copy of the second edition of the Doctrine and Covenants (published in 1844). ♦ History of the Church, 5:264 February 6, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—After spending the forenoon at the city election held at his brother Hyrum’s, Joseph Smith was re-elected mayor of Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 5:264 February 8, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—After visiting with a man and woman from Michigan, Joseph Smith recorded, “I went out with my little Frederick, to exercise myself by sliding on the ice.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:265
  • 190. 190 February 9, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 129, a revelation about the nature of heavenly beings, stating “there are two kinds of beings in heaven,” resurrected angels who have bodies of flesh and bones and “the spirits of just men made perfect.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:267; D&C 129 February 11, 1943 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—At a city council meeting, Joseph Smith reproved the judges for closing the polls at six o’clock at an election the week before, “when there were many wishing to vote.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:270 February 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—In the course of an evening at Elder Orson Hyde’s home, Joseph Smith remarked that “those brethren who came here having money, and purchased without the Church and without counsel, must be cut off.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:272-73 February 15, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith published a letter in the Times and Seasons containing a parable about the libel and persecutions he had received from the press. ♦ History of the Church, 5:273-77 February 18, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith taught that the earth would eventually be a Urim and Thummim. ♦ History of the Church, 5:279; D&C 130 February 20, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith stopped two boys from fighting in the street and instructed them about their inappropriate behavior, after which he lectured bystanders for not interfering. ♦ History of the Church, 5:282-83 February 26, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith stayed at home all day nursing his mother, who was “sick with inflammation of the lungs.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:290 February 28, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith saw a notice in the Chicago Express about the signs of the Son of Man and wrote to the editor of the Church newspaper Times and Seasons on this topic. ♦ History of the Church, 5:290-91 March 2-3, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Charles A. Dana v. William B. Brink. Brink had been charged with malpractice delivering the Danas’ baby. Joseph Smith spent most of these two days examining “many
  • 191. 191 witnesses,” hearing “many lawyers’ pleas,” and reading “much law.” This lawsuit “excited much feeling among the people.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:293-94 March 4, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—In the evening, Joseph Smith said, “For a man to be great, he must not dwell on small things, though he may enjoy them.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:298 March 10, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Charles A. Dana v. William B. Brink. Joseph Smith opened court at 10:00 A.M. and rendered a decision against Brink for malpractice. That night Joseph and others observed rays of light in the sky in the shape of a sword. The following day he prophesied that the sword was a sign of a “speedy and bloody war” to come. ♦ History of the Church, 5:300-301 March 11, 1843 Ramus, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith traveled with Brigham Young from Nauvoo to Ramus, where with one hand Joseph pulled up the strongest man in town in a stick-pulling contest. ♦ History of the Church, 5:302 March 13, 1843 Ramus, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith wrestled with and threw “the most expert wrestler in Ramus” and later, with “great fervency,” blessed nineteen children. ♦ History of the Church, 5:302-3 March 14, 1943 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—After Joseph Smith returned from Ramus, Illinois, he explained to Jedediah M. Grant why he (Joseph) had turned pale and lost strength the previous day while blessing nineteen children. ♦ History of the Church,5:303 March 15, 1843—Victoria, British Columbia, was founded by the Hudson’s Bay Company as a trading post and fort. March 18, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent most of the morning in the office in “cheerful conversation” with Willard Richards and others. About noon he lay down on the writing table and with his head on a pile of law books and said, “Write and tell the world I acknowledge myself a very great lawyer; I am going to study law, and this is the way I study it.” He then fell asleep. Later that day he played ball with some boys. ♦ History of the Church, 5:307 March 27, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 192. 192 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Sidney Rigdon expressing suspicions of Elder Rigdon’s involvement with those working against the Church. ♦ History of the Church, 5:312- 14; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 580-82 March 28, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith moved his office from the smokehouse to the small upper room of his Red Brick Store. Josiah Butterfield (stepfather of the Lawrence sisters who were later sealed to Joseph) came to Joseph’s house and insulted him so outrageously that Joseph kicked Butterfield “our of the house, across the yard, and into the street.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:316 April 2, 1843 Ramus, Illinois Visions and Revelations—After hearing Orson Hyde preach on the Second Coming, Joseph Smith kindly corrected him in private and at a public meeting. Some of his instructions to Elder Hyde became Doctrine and Covenants 130. ♦ History of the Church, 5:323-26; D&C 130; Paulsen, BYU Studies 35.4:7 April 4, 1843—William Henry Jackson, American painter, photographer, and explorer who became famous for his images of the West, was born. April 5, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith sat with several brethren in the municipal court on a writ of habeas corpus. ♦ History of the Church, 5:326 April 6, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—At the afternoon session of the annual conference of the Church, Joseph Smith taught about the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. ♦ History of the Church, 5:336 April 8, 843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith asked the congregation to pray to calm the winds while he spoke to them at the morning session of conference. ♦ History of the Church, 5:339-45 April 12, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith was the first on board the steamer Maid of Iowa to welcome 240 members from England, as well as Parley P. Pratt and his family. ♦ History of the Church, 5:354-57; Enders, BYU Studies 19.3:326 April 17, 1843—Samuel Morey, inventor of the internal combustion engine and pioneer in steamships, died. April 18, 1843 Near Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 193. 193 Personal Life—On the prairie, Joseph Smith talked with three Pottawattamie tribal chiefs concerning stolen houses and cattle. ♦ History of the Church, 5:365 April 19, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith located a site in Nauvoo for a music hall. ♦ History of the Church, 5:368 April 24, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith took his children on a pleasure ride in a carriage. ♦ History of the Church, 5:368 May 1, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith paid Lucien Woodworth, general contractor, monies toward the building of the Nauvoo House. ♦ History of the Church, 5:366,372 May 17, 1843 Ramus, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants 131, a revelation containing requirements for obtaining the celestial degree of glory. ♦ History of the Church, 5:392-93; D&C 1331 May 18, 1843 Carthage, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith dined with Judge Stephen A. Douglas and prophesied that the judge would aspire to the presidency of the United States but that if he ever turned against the Saints, he would feel the hand of the Almighty. ♦ History of the Church, 5:393-94 May 20, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith sent an explanation of the word “Mormon” to the Church newspaper Times and Seasons in response to erroneous views held by “men that profess to be learned.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:399-400 May 22, 1843 The first major wagon train traveling northwest set out with a thousand pioneers from Elm Grove, Missouri. May 23, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—With Emma’s approval and in her presence, Joseph Smith was married to sisters Emily and Eliza Partridge by Judge James Adams, a high priest in the Church. About this time, Emma also approved Joseph’s marriage to two other sisters, Maria and Sarah Lawrence. ♦ Newell and Avery, Mormon Enigma, 143-44; Young, Woman’s Exponent 14.5:38 May 24, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 194. 194 Writings—To Joseph Smith’s pleasant surprise, the Boston Bee published a favorable letter about him. ♦ History of the Church, 5:406-8 May 28, 1843—Noah Webster, American lexicographer and textbook author, died. May 28, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith were sealed as husband and wife for time and all eternity in the Red Brick Store after Emma had given approval for Joseph to take the Partridge sisters and Lawrence sisters as additional plural wives. ♦ Newell and Avery, Mormon Enigma, 143 June 2, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith paid Dan Jones $1,375 to become half-owner of the steamboat Maid of Iowa. ♦ History of the Church, 5:417-18 June 3, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith took his family and a large group on a pleasure voyage on the steamboat Maid of Iowa to Quincy, Illinois, with a live band on board. ♦ History of the Church, 5:418 June 10, 1843 Independence, Missouri Legal Events—A letter was sent from Missouri to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford, informing him that Joseph Smith had been indicted for treason. A special agent, Joseph Reynolds, was sent to apprehend Joseph. ♦ History of the Church, 5:422 June 11, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith gave a discourse on the gathering of Israel and also interpreted Bible passages about post-mortal life and the Godhead. ♦ History of the Church, 5:423-27 June 13, 1843 En route to Dixon, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith departed Nauvoo with his wife Emma and their children to visit Emma’s sister, Elizabeth Wasson, who lived near Dixon, Illinois. ♦ History of the Church, 5:431 June 17, 1843 Springfield, Illinois Legal Events—Illinois Governor Thomas Ford issued an arrest warrant for Joseph Smith in connection with the Missouri treason charge of June 10. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 21, 1843 Near Dixon, Illinois Legal Events—Stephen Markham and William Clayton, having sent by Hyrum Smith to warn Joseph about the arrest warrant, arrived at the Wassons’ home at about 4 p.m. Joseph
  • 195. 195 decided not to set out for Nauvoo, fearing that if he were arrested where he had no friends, he would be kidnapped into Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 5:435-39 June 23, 1843 Near Dixon, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith sent William to Dixon to try to find out what was going on there. Clayton met Joseph H. Reynolds, sheriff of Jackson County, Missouri, and Constable Harmon T. Wilson of Carthage, Illinois, both of whom were masquerading as Mormon missionaries. They found Joseph at the Wassons’ and arrested him. ♦ History of the Church, 5:439-43 June 24, 1843 Dixon, Illinois Legal Events—Although Reynolds and Wilson sought to prevent Joseph Smith from obtaining legal counsel, they were unsuccessful, and Joseph obtained a writ of habeas corpus, returnable before Judge John D. Caton at Ottawa, Illinois. Cyrus Walker, candidate for U.S. representative, agreed to serve as Joseph’s lawyer only after securing Joseph’s promise to vote for him. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 26, 1843 Dixon, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith and his entourage returned to Dixon and obtained a second writ of habeas corpus, this one returnable before the nearest tribunal in the Fifth Judicial District. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 27, 1843 Fox River near Geneseo, Illinois Legal Events—Still in custody of Reynolds and Wilson, Joseph Smith was joined by members of the Nauvoo Legion and , shedding tears of joy, said, “I am not going to Missouri this time. These are my boys.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:449-52 June 29, 1843 Honey Creek, Daviess County, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith consulted with his lawyers and told them that Nauvoo was the nearest place where writs of habeas corpus could be heard. They agreed, and the party turned toward Nauvoo. Joseph and his company of roughly 100 men made it to Michael Crane’s on Honey Creek, where a flock of turkeys and chickens were killed for a feast for the company. ♦ History of the Church, 5:454-56 June 30, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith rode into Nauvoo for his hearing, where he wept tears of joy together with his family and friends and was greeted with a band and processional. ♦ History of the Church, 5:458-60 July 1, 1843—Ulysses S. Grant graduated from West Point. July 2, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 196. 196 Legal Events—After a hearing on the return of habeas corpus pertaining to Joseph Smith’s arrest, the Nauvoo Municipal Court ordered Joseph to be discharged “for want of substance in the warrant…as well as upon the merits of the case,” ♦ History of the Church, 5:474 July 12, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith dictated Doctrine and Covenants 132, a revelation about the eternal marriage covenant, in the presence of his brother Hyrum and William Clayton, his recorder. This revelation may have been received as early as 1831. ♦ History of the Church, 5:500-507; D&C 132 July 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent most of the day in conversation with his wife Emma. ♦ History of the Church, 5:509 July 15, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith went with his family and 100 others on a pleasure excursion on the steamship Maid of Iowa. ♦ History of the Church, 5:510 July 16, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached in a grove near the Nauvoo Temple concerning traitorous thoughts harbored by some in Nauvoo who professed to be Saints. ♦ History of the Church, 5:510 July 17, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent much of the day at home with his brother Hyrum conversing about the priesthood. ♦ History of the Church, 5:510 July 18, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith spent the day preparing hay on his farm. ♦ History of the Church, 5:511 July 24, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith conversed with Mr. Joseph P. Hoge, the Democratic candidate for U.S. Congress. ♦ History of the Church, 5:518 July 30, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith felt very ill, so he called for his brother Hyrum, William Law, and Willard Richards to give him a priesthood blessing. ♦ History of the Church, 5:522 August 6, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached to the Saints about politics and current elections. ♦ History of the Church, 5:525-26
  • 197. 197 August 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke at the funeral of Judge Elias Higbee. ♦ History of the Church, 5:529-31 August 14, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended the funeral of Lydia Walker, who had died at his house the previous day. ♦ History of the Church, 5:532 August 15, 1843—Tivoli Gardens, one of the oldest extant amusement parks in the world, opened in Copenhagen, Denmark. August 21, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith received a letter written by Mr. J. Hall of independence, Missouri, “breathing hard things against us as a people,” which he forwarded along with some additional remarks to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford. ♦ History of the Church, 538-40 August 22, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith continued hearing rumors that people in Carthage, Illinois, were determined to raise a mob “to drive the Mormons out of the state.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:541 August 27, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached about the Aaronic and Melchizedek priesthoods and their respective powers. ♦ History of the Church, 5:553-56 August 31, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith began to move into the new Mansion House. ♦ History of the Church, 5:556 September 9 ,1843—The hand-cranked ice cream freezer was patented by New England housewife Nancy Johnson. September 10, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—George W. Taggart, later a musician in the Mormon Battalion, described the Prophet Joseph Smith as “ one of the warmest patriots and friends to his country and laws.” McConkie, Remembering Joseph Smith, 37 September 11, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith appointed William W. Phelps, Henry Miller, and Hosea Stout to try to persuade Illinois Governor Thomas Ford to provide firearms for the Nauvoo Legion. ♦ History of the Church, 6:31
  • 198. 198 September 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith spoke a few words in reply to a lecture at a grove near the temple by Mr. John finch, a socialist from England. ♦ History of the Church, 6:33 September 15, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith put up a sign outside his home, explaining his decision to use the “Nauvoo Mansion” as a hotel. ♦ History of the Church, 6:33 September 16, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith went in company with his staff to view the parade of the Nauvoo Legion, who saluted Joseph as their commanding officer. ♦ History of the Church, 6:34 September 17, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith made some remarks following a sermon of Mr. Blodgett, a Unitarian minister, and disagreed with some of his ideas concerning persecution. ♦ History of the Church, 6:34 September 19, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith had William W. Phelps reply to a recent letter from Illinois Governor Thomas Ford and send him “a copy of the resolutions passed at the meeting of the mobocracy at Carthage.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:35 About September 20, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—After hearing a boarder at the Smith home insult one of the hired servants, Joseph Smith demanded that he leave. ♦ McConkie, Remembering Joseph Smith, 99-100 September 28, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith was chosen president over a special council of elders that met above the Red Brick Store. ♦ History of the Church, 6:39 October 1, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith published in the Church newspaper Times and Seasons an invitation to donate money for Elder George J. Adam’s mission to Russia. ♦ History of the Church, 6:41 October 2, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Lucien Adams, son of James Adams, co-owner with Joseph of the steamboat Maid of Iowa. James Adams had died of cholera in August 1843, and his son Lucien was handling his affairs, at least concerning the steamboat. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 583-84
  • 199. 199 October 3, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph and Emma Smith hosted a dinner at their new Mansion House for about 100 brethren and their wives. ♦ History of the Church, 6:42-43 October 13, 1843 The Independent Order of B’nai B’rith, the oldest continually operated Jewish service organization, was founded in New York City. October 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith allowed Dr. Turner, a phrenologist, to examine his head for about an hour. ♦ History of the Church, 6:56 October 15, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—From the speaker’s stand east of the Nauvoo Temple, Joseph Smith preached about the Constitution of the United States, the Bible, and Nauvoo’s economy. ♦ History of the Church, 6:56-59; Melville, BYU Studies 28.2:65-74 October 19, 1843 Macedonia, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith and William Clayton started for Macedonia (now Webster), Illinois, to visit Benjamin F. Johnson, and arrived at sundown. They returned two days later. ♦ History of the Church, 6:59-60 October 23, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—After receiving more means from those of the Twelve who had returned from the eastern United States, Joseph Smith immediately gave directions to send for groceries and supplies for the Nauvoo Temple and the workman. ♦ History of the Church, 6:60-61 November 2, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith and some of the brethren agreed to write to five leading candidates for the presidency of the United States, to inquire “what their course of action would be in relation to the cruelty and oppression that we have suffered from the State of Missouri, if they were elected.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:63 November 4, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Elders Willard Richards and John Taylor spent the day helping Joseph Smith write letters to presidential candidates. These letters were sent to John C. Colhoun, General Lewis Cass, Hon. Richard M. Johnson, Hon. Henry Clay, and U.S. President Martin Van Buren. Calhoun, Clay and Cass responded to Joseph’s queries, but their answers were considered unsatisfactory. ♦ History of the Church, 6:64-65 November 7, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 200. 200 Writings—Joseph Smith instructed Joseph C. Cole to move the tables for his school from the hall above the Red Brick Store, so Elders Willard Richards and William W. Phelps could continue working on the Prophet’s history undisturbed. ♦ History of the Church, 6:65-66 November 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a reply letter to James Arlington Bennet in which he addressed a mathematical approach to religion brought up in Bennet’s letter. ♦ History of the Church, 6:73-78 November 15, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—At a mayor’s court, Joseph Smith told the brethren of his intention to write a proclamation to the kings of the earth. Joseph had been commanded in a revelation (now D&C 124) almost three years earlier on January 19, 1841, to write this proclamation. ♦ History of the Church, 6:79; D&C 124:2-3, 7, 107 November 23, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith suggested “petitioning Congress for a grant to make a canal over the falls (around the Des Moines rapids), or a dam to turn the water to the city, so that we might erect mills and other machinery.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:8 November 28, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith and the brethren prepared a “memorial” for Congress that included an account of their history and grievances with the state of Missouri. ♦ History of the Church, 6:84-97 November 28, 1843 The Kingdom of Hawaii was officially recognized as an independent nation by the United Kingdom and France. December 3, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—In the assembly room above the Red Brick Store, Joseph Smith and the others present prayed for his brother Hyrum, who had injured his leg. ♦ History of the Church, 6:98-99 December 8, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—At a city council meeting, Joseph Smith suggested petitioning Congress to have Nauvoo placed under the protection of the United States government. ♦ History of the Church, 6:105-7 December 9, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 201. 201 Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to William Clayton, asking him to pay $60 from city funds to the commandants of the Nauvoo Legion for the protection of Nauvoo. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 585-86 December 11, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith sent an affidavit to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford reporting conditions surrounding the recent kidnapping of Daniel Avery. ♦ History of the Church, 6:109- 10 December 14, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith received a letter from Illinois Governor Thomas Ford in which he claimed no place to interfere in individual crimes committed against the Saints in this matter and that punishment belonged to the judicial power and no to the executive. ♦ History of the Church, 6:113-15 December 15 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—After becoming ill in the morning, Joseph Smith was administered herbs and mild drinks by Levi Richards and was considerably revived by evening. ♦ History of the Church, 6:155-16 December 16, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith signed a “Memorial to Congress for redress of losses and grievances in Missouri” and prophesied that if Congress would not hear their petition the administration in power would be broken up. ♦ History of the Church, 6:116 December 19, 1843 Charles Dickens published “A Christmas Carol.” December 25, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith was serenaded in the morning by Sister Lettice Rushton’s family. Later that evening Joseph and his wife Emma hosted a dinner for fifty couples. ♦ History of the Church, 6:134 December 29, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith pronounced a blessing on the Nauvoo Police and offered to pay twice the amount of any bribe offered to them for information about the briber. ♦ History of the Church, 6:149-53 December 31, 1843 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—About fifty musicians and singers performed William W. Phelps’s New Year’s hymn under Joseph Smith’s window. ♦ History of the Church, 6:153
  • 202. 202 1844 January 1, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a letter to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford relative to the kidnapping of certain Saints who were falsely imprisoned in Missouri. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 587–89 January 5, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith dreamed the night before that two serpents were swallowing each other by the tail, but he gave no explanation for this dream in his history. ♦ History of the Church, 6:166 1844 James K. Polk used the phrase “Fifty-four forty or fight,” referring to the longitude and latitude of the Oregon country, as a campaign slogan in the presidential election. January 8, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith interviewed William Law in the street and dropped him from the First Presidency. Later, on June 8, Hyrum Smith testified that Law had confessed to Hyrum that he had committed adultery. ♦ History of the Church, 5:458–60 January 10, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith received a letter from Francis M. Higbee, who falsely accused him of slandering his character. ♦ History of the Church, 6:174, 178 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith ordained his uncle John Smith as a patriarch; he became the fourth presiding patriarch of the Church on January 1, 1849. ♦ History of the Church, 6:173 Jan. 15, 1844 The University of Notre Dame received its charter from Indiana. January 16, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith attended a city council meeting and forgave Francis M. Higbee for writing a slanderous letter on January 10. ♦ History of the Church, 6:178 January 18, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated letters to Reuben McBride and Joseph Coe. McBride had become the Church’s agent to regulate business affairs in Kirtland after Oliver Granger’s untimely death. Coe had written Joseph claiming an interest in the Egyptian mummies.
  • 203. 203 Joseph found Coe’s “pretended claim” astonishing. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 590–94 January 19, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith gave a lecture on the U.S. Constitution and on the candidates for the presidency of the United States. ♦ History of the Church, 6:180 January 21, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith preached to several thousand people on sealing the hearts of the fathers to the children and the hearts of the children to the fathers. ♦ History of the Church, 6:183–85 January 23, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith sold the printing establishment to John Taylor for $2,832. ♦ History of the Church, 6:185 January 29, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith was nominated as a candidate for president of the United States. ♦ History of the Church, 6:187–88 February 3, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—In the assembly room above the Red Brick Store, Joseph Smith related a dream about his efforts to save friends on a steamboat and walking on the water with his brother Samuel. ♦ History of the Church, 6:194–95; Wilford Woodruff Journal, 2:346– 48 February 5, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith reported to architect William Weeks that he had seen in vision the pattern for the Nauvoo Temple, which had been under construction since April 1841. ♦ History of the Church, 6:196–97; Arrington, BYU Studies 19.3: 337–59; Baugh, Opening the Heavens, 316 Legal Events—At the Nauvoo Municipal Court, where Joseph Smith presided as chief justice, he spent the whole day listening to different city wards present their tax lists; then he remitted the taxes of the widows and poor who were unable to pay. ♦ History of the Church, 6:196 Feb. 1844 Karl Marx described religion as the opium of the people and the sigh of the oppressed. February 7, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 204. 204 Political Events—Joseph Smith met with his brother Hyrum and the Twelve Apostles “to devise means to promote the interests of the General Government.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:197–209 About February 7, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith prayed that the Saints would be delivered from the harassment of Thomas Reynolds, governor of Missouri. Within two days, Joseph learned that Reynolds had committed suicide. ♦ Journal of Discourses, 24:55 February 8, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—At a political meeting in the assembly room above the Red Brick Store, Joseph Smith gave his reasons for running for the office of president of the United States. ♦ History of the Church, 6:210–11 February 10, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a prayer meeting in the assembly room above the Red Brick Store where he prayed for Sister Jennetta Richards and others who were sick. ♦ History of the Church, 6:211 February 12, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—At a city council meeting, Joseph Smith signed the memorial to Congress, a document outlining the afflictions of the Saints in Missouri, and he blessed Orson Pratt to prosper in presenting the memorial before government officials in Washington, D.C. ♦ History of the Church, 6:212 February 13, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Joseph L. Heywood, an LDS merchant in Quincy, Illinois. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 595–96 February 17, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote an article called “Pacific Innuendo,” which explained the Church’s desire for peace with all peoples. ♦ History of the Church, 6:218–20 Feb. 17, 1844 Aaron Montgomery Ward, American mail-order merchandiser, was born. February 21, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended a lecture in the assembly room above the Red Brick Store given by an Episcopalian reverend, Mr. De Wolfe, and spoke afterward on the importance of obeying all commandments to receive salvation. ♦ History of the Church, 6:223 February 23, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 205. 205 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith met with the Twelve Apostles in the assembly room above the Red Brick Store and gave them specific instructions regarding supplies for the Oregon and California Exploring Expedition. ♦ History of the Church, 6:224 February 25, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith prophesied at a temple block prayer meeting that within five years the Saints would be out of the power of old enemies. ♦ History of the Church, 6:225 1844 Ralph Waldo Emerson published his second series of essays February 26, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The first meeting to organize a conspiracy to destroy the Smiths was held at William Law’s home. This meeting was reported later by Dennison Harris and Robert Scott, who lived at the Law home. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series February 29, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith directed Brother William W. Phelps to write a reply to an article printed on January 31 in the Zanesville Gazette on a speech by Cassius M. Clay (a Kentucky abolitionist) about annexing Texas to the United States. ♦ History of the Church, 6:227 March 4, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith held a council with the First Presidency, the Twelve Apostles, the temple committee, and others, emphasizing the importance of finishing the Nauvoo Temple and having it paid for. ♦ History of the Church, 6:230–31 Political Events—Joseph Smith proposed James Arlington Bennet as his vice-presidential running mate. ♦ History of the Church, 6:230–31 March 11, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith attended an organizational meeting of the Council of Fifty, a group assigned to assist with strategic planning for the Church. ♦ Wilford Woodruff Journal, 2:366 March 12, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith told Brother Joseph C. Cole that the upstairs room in the Prophet’s Red Brick Store was needed for more important purposes than the school, which could be moved to Henry Miller’s house. ♦ History of the Church, 6:262 March 22, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 206. 206 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith advised the Seventies to rebuild the Seventies’ Hall by demolishing the existing walls and building a more permanent two-story edifice on the foundation. ♦ History of the Church, 6:271 March 23, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith and William Clayton requested donations of supplies for Latter- day Saint lumbermen laboring in Wisconsin. Robert D. Foster’s wife denied to Joseph Smith, Alexander Neibaur, and William Clayton that Joseph had ever tried to seduce her or commit any immoral act or preach the plurality of wives. She later recanted after being threatened by her husband. ♦ History of the Church, 6:271 Mar. 25, 1844 Adolf Engler, German botanist and inventor of the Engler system of plant classification, was born. March 30, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith prepared a written message for U.S. President John Tyler, requesting permission to enlist 100,000 men to help protect Americans seeking to settle in Oregon and other areas within U.S. territory and to help provide security for the independent republic of Texas. ♦ History of the Church, 6:281–82 Legal Events—Joseph Smith investigated a robbery of the Keystone Store. ♦ History of the Church, 6:281 March 31, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith signed two petitions to the United States Congress and one to U.S. President John Tyler that he had written the previous day. ♦ History of the Church, 6:282 April 4, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith had an interview with eleven visiting Indians “who wanted counsel.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:286 April 7, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith delivered the King Follett Discourse about the nature of God and man, memorializing a friend who had died on March 9, 1844. ♦ History of the Church, 6:302–17; Cannon, BYU Studies 18.2: 179–92 About April 14, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith again preached on board the recently landed steamer Maid of Iowa. ♦ History of the Church, 6:333 April 18, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 207. 207 Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and other Church leaders excommunicated William, Jane, and Wilson Law and Robert D. Foster for “unchristianlike conduct.” ♦ History of the Church, 5:341 April 25, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith told a reporter from the St. Louis Gazette that he had gained his power by the principles of truth and virtue. ♦ History of the Church, 6:343 April 26–27, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith issued a warrant against Robert D. Foster for slandering Willard Richards. The next day, Foster accused Joseph “with many crimes and said that Daniteism was in Nauvoo.” Joseph tried to settle, but when Foster refused, Joseph “shook his garments” against Foster. ♦ History of the Church, 6:344–45 April 28, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The Reformed Church was organized at Wilson Law’s home, with William Law as president and Wilson Law as a counselor, Robert D. Foster and Francis M. Higbee as apostles, and Keokuk hotelier Charles Ivins as bishop. This church’s purpose was to destroy the Smiths and take control of Nauvoo. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1844 Alexander Dumas published The Three Musketeers. May 1, 1844 Carthage, Illinois Legal Events—Francis Higbee sued Joseph Smith in Carthage for being slandered on January 5, 1844, as a thief, fornicator, whoremaster, murderer, adulterer, and perjurer, with a “rotten stinking [venereal] disease” that kept Joseph from coming near him; he also claimed that Joseph urged other young people in Nauvoo to stay away from him. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series May 2, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith could not collect his July 2, 1843 debt from Wilson Law, as Law tried to offset claims Joseph had already paid, leaving Joseph “no remedy but the glorious uncertainty of the law.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:350. 1844 The first international cricket match was played in New York City between the U.S. and Canada. About May 3, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 208. 208 Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a rhyming verse in Barbara Matilda Neff’s autograph book. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 597–98 May 5, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith addressed a large company of friends at his home on the Saints’ course of dealings with the national government. ♦ History of the Church, 6:356 May 6, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—An arrest warrant was served to Joseph Smith on complaint of Francis M. Higbee, but Joseph petitioned for and obtained a writ of habeas corpus answerable before the Nauvoo Municipal Court. ♦ History of the Church, 6:356 1844 Hugh Bourne, English founder of the Primitive Methodists, visited the U.S. and organized several congregations May 8, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith went before the municipal court in the case of Francis M. Higbee v. Joseph Smith. ♦ History of the Church, 6:357–61 May 9, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith blessed Elders Wilford Woodruff and George A. Smith before their journeys to the eastern United States. ♦ History of the Church, 6:362 May 15, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith was visited at home by Josiah Quincy, former mayor of Boston, and Charles Francis Adams, son of former U.S. President John Quincy Adams. ♦ History of the Church, 6:377; Woodworth, BYU Studies 39.4: 71–87 May 17, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith was nominated as a U.S. presidential candidate for the National Reform Party at the Illinois state convention. ♦ History of the Church, 6:386–97 May 17, 1844 Julius Wellhausen, German biblical scholar who hypothesized the Pentateuch originated from four independent texts dating several centuries after the time of Moses, was born. May 18, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith and other Church leaders excommunicated Francis M. Higbee, Charles Ivins, and two others for apostasy. ♦ History of the Church, 6:398
  • 209. 209 May 21, 1844 Henri Rousseau, French artist, was born. May 23, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Visions and Revelations—Joseph Smith prophesied to his brother Hyrum that their enemies would lie about Hyrum the same as they had about Joseph. ♦ History of the Church, 6:403 Personal Life—Joseph Smith spoke with the Sac and Fox Indians who had arrived the previous day. ♦ History of the Church, 6:402 May 24, 1844 Samuel F. B. Morse sent the first electrical telegram, from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Maryland, saying, “What hath God wrought.” May 25, 1844 Carthage, Illinois Legal Events—A grand jury indicted Joseph Smith for adultery with Maria Lawrence “and other diverse women,” based on William Law’s testimony. Joseph considered suing him for perjury and slander on behalf of Maria Lawrence. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series May 25, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Sidney Rigdon resigned as postmaster and recommended Joseph Smith as his successor. ♦ History of the Church, 6:407 May 27, 1844 Carthage, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith, accompanied by friends, went to Carthage, Illinois, to attend the circuit court in answer to perjury and adultery indictments against him. ♦ History of the Church, 6:412–13 May 31, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith administered to Sister Richards, who was sick. Joseph also issued a warrant for Thomas B. Johnson’s arrest for threatening the peace of the city. ♦ History of the Church, 6:423–24 June 1, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Joel Hamilton Walker of Boston, Massachusetts. Walker had learned that Joseph had petitioned Congress for authority to raise 100,000 volunteers to protect the southern and western borders of the United States. He wrote to offer his services, but Joseph had not received authority from Congress. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 599 June 4, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois
  • 210. 210 Writings—Joseph Smith sent a letter to Abijah Tewksbury of Boston, Massachusetts, who had been cut off from the Church. Joseph invited him to be rebaptized. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 600–601 June 6, 1844 George Williams founded the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) in London. June 7, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—The first issue of the Nauvoo Expositor appeared, attacking the political powers in Nauvoo and specifically Joseph and Hyrum Smith. ♦ History of the Church, 6:430; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series June 10, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—The Nauvoo City Council passed an ordinance declaring the Nauvoo Expositor a public nuisance, and Joseph Smith, as mayor, agreed to have that newspaper destroyed. ♦ History of the Church, 6:432; Barnett, BYU Studies 19.2: 244–46 June 11, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith wrote a proclamation that was published in the Nauvoo Neighbor regarding the promulgation of false statements injurious to the people of Nauvoo. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 602–3 June 12, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith was arrested by officers from Carthage and charged with riot for the destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor, and he went before Justice Aaron Johnson in Nauvoo on a writ of habeas corpus. He was “honorably discharged from the accusations and of the writ.” ♦ History of the Church, 6:453–58 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Washington Tucker of Eldorado, Arkansas, who had written Joseph expressing interest in the Church. Joseph promised to send an elder to him as soon as the Twelve could make the necessary arrangements. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 606 June 13, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith presided over the Nauvoo Municipal Court and discharged all of the other sixteen defendants in the Nauvoo Expositor matter. ♦ History of the Church, 6:460– 61; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series Personal Life—Joseph Smith received the report that a mob of about 300 was assembled at Carthage, Illinois, and was ready to attack Nauvoo. ♦ History of the Church, 6:462 June 13, 1844
  • 211. 211 Thomas Charles Hope, Scottish chemist who discovered the chemical element Strontium, died June 14, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford explaining the destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor printing press. ♦ History of the Church, 6:466–67; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 604–5 June 15, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph Smith was at home examining Benjamin West’s painting Death on the Pale Horse, which had been in his reading room for three days. ♦ History of the Church, 6:471 June 15, 1844 Charles Goodyear received a patent for vulcanization, a process to strengthen rubber. June 16, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Ecclesiastical Duties—Joseph Smith gave a sermon in the grove east of the Nauvoo Temple about the Godhead. ♦ History of the Church, 6:473–79 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated letters to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford and Isaac Morley. Joseph informed Ford of a published account of an organized effort to exterminate the Saints from Illinois by force of arms. Joseph asked the governor for “immediate council and protection.” Morley was an officer in the Nauvoo Legion. Joseph advised him to “cause all the troops of said Legion in your vicinity, to be in readiness to act at a moments warning” to defend the Saints against the mob. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 607–9 June 17, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—Joseph Smith was arrested again (see June 12) along with sixteen others for the destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor and taken before Daniel H. Wells, justice of the peace, who discharged the prisoners. The Warsaw Signal called for the extermination of the Latter-day Saints from Illinois. ♦ History of the Church, 6:487–91; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to John Smith, his uncle, at Macedonia, Illinois, informing him “that we feel determined in this place not to be dismayed if hell boils over all at once. We feel to hope for the best, and determined to prepare for the worst.” Joseph counseled his uncle to retreat to Nauvoo if the mob fell upon them “with a superior force.” ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 610–11 June 18, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith stood in full military uniform on the frame of a building and gave his final address to the Nauvoo Legion. ♦ History of the Church, 6:496–503
  • 212. 212 June 19, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith met the Nauvoo Legion at the front of his home and gave orders to have a picket guard posted on all the roads leading out of the city, to have all the powder and lead in the city secured, and to have all the arms put into use. ♦ History of the Church, 6:504–5 June 20, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith prepared for the defense of Nauvoo against the growing mob, wrote letters telling those on missions to come home immediately, and advised his brother Hyrum to take his family on the next steamboat to Cincinnati, Ohio. ♦ History of the Church, 6:507–20 1844 Alexander Fichet invented the first safe. June 21, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith exchanged letters regarding the growing crisis in Nauvoo with Illinois Governor Thomas Ford and prepared affidavits for him. ♦ History of the Church, 6:520– 27 June 22, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Political Events—Joseph Smith was visited by John C. Calhoun Jr. and his brother Patrick, sons of John C. Calhoun, a senator from South Carolina whom Joseph had met in Washington, D.C., in February 1840 and who was now a candidate for United States president. ♦ Cannon, BYU Studies 33.4: 772–80 Writings—Joseph Smith sent a letter to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford explaining the difficulties in Nauvoo and asking Ford to visit. Governor Ford addressed his reply to the mayor (Joseph Smith) and the Nauvoo City Council and concluded that the destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor was a violation of the laws protecting freedom of the press in the United States. ♦ History of the Church, 6:532–41; Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 612–14 June 23, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Legal Events—With the promise of full protection pledged by Illinois Governor Thomas Ford, Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum decided to turn themselves in at Carthage, Illinois, for a hearing.♦ History of the Church, 6:548–52 June 24, 1844 Four miles west of Carthage, Illinois Travels—Joseph Smith rode from Nauvoo to Carthage, Illinois, turning back, however, to deliver up to Captain James A. Dunn the state arms of the Nauvoo Legion before his final arrival in Carthage. ♦ History of the Church, 6:553–55 1844
  • 213. 213 The anonymously written Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation was published, which was a forerunner for Charles Darwin’s book The Origin of Species. June 24, 1844 Outside Carthage, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford explaining that his arrival in Carthage would be delayed as he was assisting Captain James A. Dunn with the retrieval of state arms from the Nauvoo Legion. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 619 June 25, 1844 Carthage, Illinois Legal Events—After Joseph and Hyrum Smith surrendered to the authorities in the morning, Illinois Governor Thomas Ford paraded the brothers through the ranks of the troops assembled by his orders from the surrounding counties. The Smiths and the other defendants were arraigned before Justice of the Peace Robert F. Smith, also Captain of the Carthage Greys. The case was postponed until October because Francis Higbee, a key witness, failed to appear. All the defendants posted bail, even in excessive amounts. Joseph and Hyrum were served writs charging them with treason, a nonbailable offense. Despite having no hearing on that new charge, the defendants were taken to Carthage Jail that evening under protective custody. ♦ History of the Church, 6:561–74; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter to his wife Emma from Carthage Jail, informing her of the new treason charge and of his interactions with Governor Ford. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 620–23 June 26, 1844 Carthage, Illinois Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter from Carthage Jail to Illinois Governor Thomas Ford, requesting an interview. He also dictated a letter to Judge Jesse B. Thomas, associate justice of the Illinois Supreme Court, stating that he and Hyrum were being held illegally and requesting Thomas to go to Nauvoo, obtain a writ of habeas corpus, and bring their case before an impartial judge. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 624–28 Legal Events—In court, Joseph Smith moved for a change of venue on the charge of treason brought against him. The motion was denied, and the case was continued until noon the next day, allowing time to bring witnesses to Carthage. Joseph and Hyrum were then taken back to jail, where they had an extensive interview with Illinois Governor Thomas Ford, who promised protection to him and the other prisoners. The hearing was changed to June 29, apparently without consulting the defendants. ♦ History of the Church, 6:575–601; LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series 1844 Wood pulp paper was invented by Friedrich Gottlob Keller. June 27, 1844 Carthage, Illinois
  • 214. 214 Writings—Joseph Smith dictated a letter from Carthage Jail to his wife Emma. In his own hand he penned a postscript that included the following: “I am very much resigned to my lot knowing I am Justified and have done the best that could be done give my love to the children and all my Friends.” Joseph then dictated a letter to lawyer Orville H. Browning, requesting his professional services. ♦ Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, 629–35 Personal Life—While in protective custody at Carthage Jail, Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith were shot and killed by an armed mob just after 5 p.m. ♦ History of the Church, 6:602–26; D&C 135; Shipps, BYU Studies 14.3: 389–92; Jessee, Journal of Mormon History 8:3– 19 June 28, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—Joseph and Hyrum Smith’s bodies were brought on two wagons through Nauvoo to the Mansion House (the Prophet’s home), where thousands of Saints were gathered to lament their death. ♦ History of the Church, 6:627–28; Van Wagoner and Walker, BYU Studies 23.1: 3–18 June 29, 1844 Nauvoo, Illinois Personal Life—The bodies of Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were buried. ♦ History of the Church, 6:627–28 Aug. 8, 1844 Brigham Young was chosen to lead the Church. October 1844 Carthage, Illinois Legal Events—State of Illinois v. Levi Williams, Jacob C. Davis, Thomas C. Sharp, Mark Aldrich and Thomas Grover. This suit was filed for the murder of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series Oct. 22, 1844 Samuel S. Snow, a Millerite, predicted that Christ’s Second Coming would occur on this date, which led to the “Great Disappointment” on Oct. 23, 1844. 1845 June 1845 Carthage, Illinois Legal Events—State of Illinois v. Levi Williams, Jacob C. Davis, Thomas C. Sharp, Mark Aldrich and Thomas Grover. All defendants were acquitted for the murders of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. ♦ LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series
  • 215. 215